Condarrell
IMO 5083605

Leaving the Canadian lock at the Soo, July 1978.
(Roger LeLievre)


Shipbreakers at the International Marine Salvage scrapyard near the Lake Erie entrance to the Welland Canal wasted little time in 2012 in cutting apart the former freighter D. C. EVEREST (C. 194457). Work on dismantling the hull got underway in early 2014, after the last of the self-unloading bulk carrier MAUMEE was broken up. It had been 33 years since the D. C. EVEREST last operated under its own power, but the vessel survived by performing limited duty as a barge and by having owners who held out hope for a better future. But eventually they decided that there was no alternative but to scrap the hull and recycle the steel.

D. C. EVEREST was built for the pulpwood trade as Hull 45 from the Kingston Shipbuilding Company of Kingston, Ontario. It was launched on October 15, 1952, and christened by Mrs. Norman Weaver, daughter of Mr. D. C. Everest. The ship was completed in 1953 for the Marathon Corp. and named for that company’s recently retired chairman of the board. The reported price tag for the new ship was $1 million.

The 259-foot-long vessel was registered at 2,196 gross and 1,231 net tons and was able to carry 2,860 tons of ore or 163,000 bushels of grain. These dimensions were well-suited to the locks of the old St. Lawrence canals but the ship was not built for those trades. Instead, it headed north to Lake Superior to carry pulpwood from Marathon, Ontario, primarily to company customers at Green Bay, Wisconsin, and Menominee, Michigan.

D. C. EVEREST arrived at Marathon for the first time on April 6, 1953, under the command of Captain George Matheson. James Fowler was the chief engineer. An open house allowed local citizens to see the ship. After loading 220 tons of pulpwood, D. C. EVEREST sailed for Menominee on April 7. The vessel had two cargo holds and four hatches. A pair of revolving cranes were mounted on deck for handling this cargo and, over the years, the ship beat a path from Marathon to Lake Michigan ports and back with a variety of wood products. The vessel would use its cranes to load and unload the 500-pound bales of bleached sulphite pulp. As needed, the D. C. EVEREST would return to Marathon with up to 3,500 tons of limestone.

The vessel even came to the aid of boaters in distress. An alert first mate, John Playford, spotted a light bobbing in the waves of Lake Erie on September 10, 1959. The ship was returning to Marathon in ballast after delivering pulpwood to Oswego, New York, and the crewman’s binoculars picked up a small boat adrift 27 miles out into the lake from Conneaut, Ohio. Two people, Paul and Edith Laughlin, were on board. D. C. EVEREST came alongside in the early morning, and the husband and wife were helped aboard via the ship’s ladder. They explained that their pleasure craft had broken down and they had been adrift out on the lake for three days and three nights. After being fed and given a place to sleep the couple, from Youngstown, Ohio, stayed with the ship until Detroit. There they were delivered to the U.S. Coast Guard near the Ambassador Bridge and a joyful reunion with their son. The crew of D. C. EVEREST was even able to bring the small boat aboard and return it, via the Coast Guard, when the couple departed at Detroit.

There were a few incidents. D. C. EVEREST went aground in the St. Marys River in May 1965 due to heavy fog. The blanket had persisted for four days and when the fog lifted on May 10, 68 ships were able to resume their voyages. Two other lakers, BETHLEHEM and ASHCROFT, had also gone aground due to the poor visibility, but D. C. EVEREST was the most seriously damaged. It had to return to the Canadian Soo for hull repairs.

The Marathon Corp. was acquired by American Can of Canada in 1969, but her work did not change much. There were some unusual cargoes when the vessel was not required on its regular route. D. C. EVEREST took a load of grain to Manitowoc, Wisconsin, in 1975 and more of the same to Goderich, Ontario, in 1978 and 1979. It also ventured as far east as Cornwall, Ontario, with pulpwood in 1978. Late in 1980, D. C. EVEREST was sold to Johnstone Shipping and the vessel laid up at Toronto with a winter storage load of grain. It resumed service in 1981 as CONDARRELL, fitted with a larger crane to load and unload steel. The ship departed Toronto on May 13, 1981, to begin this new service but it would not find much success. On July 7, CONDARRELL lost power entering Lock 2 upbound in the Welland Canal and hit the wall. The bow was damaged and the ship went back to Toronto for repairs.

CONDARRELL completed the 1981 season and tied up at Toronto on November 17. It was sold to Marine Salvage of Port Colborne in 1982 but the ship remained idle at Toronto. It was maintained by a shipkeeper and used for a time by Sea Cadets, who did some training as well as living on board. The ship was resold to McKeil Work Boats in 1987 for use as a barge, and in 1992 participated in a dredging project at Toronto. There, contaminated soil was removed from the lake bed at the foot of Parliament Street and transported to an experimental treatment facility. By now, the name had reverted back to D. C. EVEREST. Later, the ship was towed to Valleyfield, Quebec, for use as a lighter. The name Remorqueurs et Barges Montreal was painted, billboard-style, along the hull and the ship did see some service helping stranded carriers. On one occasion, D. C. EVEREST came to the aid of the saltwater ship UTVIKEN, which lost steering while upbound in the St. Lawrence on November 26, 1996. UTVIKEN went aground near the International Bridge at Cornwall, and some of the cargo of titanium ore was lightered to the D. C. EVEREST. On December 4, the latter was towed up the Welland Canal by the tugs ROBERT B. No. 1 and GLENSIDE to Ashtabula to unload the lightered cargo. D. C. EVEREST was back downbound in the canal on December 8. On June 18, 1997, CANADIAN MARINER had a steering failure and grounded on a shoal in the St. Lawrence River near Blind Bay. The McKeil tugs WYATT McKEIL, GLENBROOK and CAROLYN JO brought D. C. EVEREST to the scene and 2,400 tons of wheat were removed on June 20. The laker was released June 21 and, after unloading the rest of the cargo at Quebec City, proceeded to Port Weller Dry Docks to repair damage to the starboard ballast tanks. On December 12, 1998, FEDERAL BERGEN strayed out of the channel, struck Light 68, and then got stuck on Weaver Shoals. The vessel sustained damage to the forepeak and to the port double bottom. The tugs LAC VANCOUVER and GLENBROOK brought D. C. EVEREST to the scene to unload 3,800 tons of grain, allowing the damaged ship to head to Montreal for repairs. But, for the most part, D. C. EVEREST remained idle.

The vessel was sold for scrap once again in 2006, and passed upbound in the Welland Canal between the tugs EVANS McKEIL and PROGRESS. They arrived at the International Marine Salvage facility in Port Colborne on June 28, 2006. It got a reprieve in 2008, and was towed to Toronto on June 24 by the tugs RADIUM YELLOWKNIFE, M.R. KANE and CHARLIE E. The vessel was anchored off Humber Bay as a floating platform for the Canada Day fireworks display. The name K. R. ELLIOTT was painted on the bow and stern, but this name change was not officially registered as far as can be determined.

The ship was returned to Port Colborne after the July 1 program and spent most of the last few years in the outer harbor, save for a sojourn in Port Maitland when the IMS yard got congested. There had been some thought of preserving the ship as a museum, possibly where it was built at Kingston, but these ideas were unfunded and the ship languished until work on breaking up the hull got underway early in 2014. Soon there was nothing left of the sturdy little vessel.


Written by Skip Gillham. Courtesy The Detroit Marine Historian.



Ship Particulars
Length 259' 02" (78.9m)
Beam 43' 07" (13.28m)
Depth 21' 00" (6.4m)
Midsummer Draft 16' 09" (5.11m)
Unloading Crane Length 80' (24.38m)
Capacity 3,017 tons
Engine Power 1,200 bhp diesel
Previous Names
K. R. Elliott 2006 - 2014
Condarrell 2002 - 2006
D. C. Everest 1989 - 2002
Condarrell 1981 - 1989
D. C. Everest 1953 - 1981

 


Unknown person, Captain George Matheson, Chief Engineer James Fowler.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Crowd gathered for the launch.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Wider view of the crowd.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Ready to be launched, Oct. 15, 1952
(Dave Benedet collection)

Another view.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Dedication before launch.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Into the water.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Ready to be launched.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Everyone gathering.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Into the water.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Floating on her own.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Another angle.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Captain George Matheson.
(Dave Benedet collection)

View of the bridge.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Another angle.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Captain's room.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Galley crew cooking up dinner.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Officer's dinning.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Chief Engineer James Fowler.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Engineroom.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Original crew.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Duluth 1960.
(Wes Harkins)

Passing throught the Canadian Canal in Sault Ste. Marie.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Possibly arriving in Marathon.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Upbound at Mission Pt.
(Peter Worden collection)

Loading grain in Milwaukee, Aug. 1970.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Loading grain in Thunder Bay, Aug. 1970.
(Dave Benedet collection)

At the dock in Marathon, 1970.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Coming into the dock in Green Bay, 1970.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Lowering a fork truck into the hold to help unload.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Looking into the hold.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Tied up in Thunder Bay for the winter, April 1971.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Tied up along side the Algorail in Marathon, 1972.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Loading grain in Thunder Bay, 1972.
(Dave Benedet collection)

At Pascol Shipyard for the winter, April 1973.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Unloading grain in Manitowoc, 1973.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Tied up to the Soviet ship Zapolyarnyy in Marathon, June 1973.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Close up of the funnel logo, 1973.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Downbound St. Marys River, 1973.
(Jim Hoffman)

Loading grain in Goderich, 1973.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Loading stone in Calcite, 1977.
(Dave Benedet collection)

View from the deck.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Another view.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Unloading stone in Marathon, 1977.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Upbound under the Blue Water Bridge, 1977.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Plowing through heavy seas on Lake Superior, 1977.
(Dave Benedet collection)

One over the pilothouse.
(Dave Benedet collection)

The deck getting the same treatment.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Thanksgiving dinner for the crew, Oct. 10, 1977.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Officer's Thanksgiving, Oct. 10, 1977.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Unloading in a cold Green Bay, Nov. 1977.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Another winter at Pascol Shipyard, Thunder Bay, Feb. 1978.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Loading in Marathon, April 1978.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Leaving the Canadian lock at the Soo, July 1978.
(Roger LeLievre)

Loaded at the dock in Cornwall, July 1978.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Appling a fresh coat of blue paint to the hull, 1978.
(Dave Benedet collection)

New paint on the stern.
(Dave Benedet collection)

View from the dock.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Painting continues in Menominee, 1978.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Laid up in Thunder Bay, Aug. 1978.
(Dave Benedet collection)

In the Pascol drydock, Thunder Bay, for hull work, Nov. 1978.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Stern view.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Showing off the fresh paint in the sunlight.
(Dave Benedet collection)

View from in the drydock.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Work being done on the propeller.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Tied up at the Pascol Shipyard in Thunder Bay, 1980
(Dave Benedet collection)

Tied up for the winter in Toronto, Jan. 1981.
(Dave Benedet collection)

     

The newly applied name Condarrell is finished while in Toronto, May 1981.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Upbound in the Welland Canal between Locks 1 & 2, July 1981.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Close up of the stern.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Stern view heading for Lock 2.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Loaded on the St. Marys River, 1981.
(Jim Kidd)

Upbound above Lock 1 in the Welland Canal.
(Peter Worden collection)

In Toronto for the winter, Jan. 1986.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Tied up in Toronto, 1987.
(Keith Robinson)

Stern view.
(Keith Robinson)

Receiving some paint.
(Keith Robinson)

Close up of the logo on the funnel, 1987.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Laid up in Hamilton, Jan. 1988.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Another view in Hamilton, June 1988.
(Dave Benedet collection)

   

Fresh coat of paint applied in Hamilton, Sept. 1988.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Sandwich between the Canadian Century and a Misener boat, March 1989.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Laid up in Toronto, 1992.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Stern view.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Evans McKeil moving her out of Toronto, 1996.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Tied up in Valleyfield, 1996.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Beached on the outside of Valleyfield harbor, 1996.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Looking aft on the deck.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Close up of the crane.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Engineroom.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Engineroom pumps.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Lightering the grounded Canadian Mariner near Crossover Island, NY, June 1997.
(Dave Benedet collection)

Close up, Feb. 2002.
(Kent Malo)

Crane on deck.
(Kent Malo)

Stern view.
(Kent Malo)

In Montreal, March 1, 2003.
(Kent Malo)

Wheelhouse, 2004.
(Y. Desloges - copyright Parks Canada)

Another view, 2004.
(Y. Desloges - copyright Parks Canada)

Engine room, 2004.
(Y. Desloges - copyright Parks Canada)

Accommodations, 2004.
(Y. Desloges - copyright Parks Canada)

Galley, 2004.
(Y. Desloges - copyright Parks Canada)

       

Passing Massena, June 26, 2006.
(Leo Ames)

Between Morrisburg and the Iroquois Lock, June 26, 2006.
(Ron Walsh)

Another view.
(Ron Walsh)

Passing under Welland Canal's Bridge 3, June 28, 2006.
(Michel Gosselin)

Stern view.
(Michel Gosselin)

Approaching Lock 3.
(Michel Gosselin)

Tied up at the scrapyard, Sept. 20, 2008.
(Matt Miner)

Stern view.
(Matt Miner)

Black & white view, Sept. 19, 2009.
(Matt Miner)

Close up of the bow.
(Matt Miner)

Stern view.
(Matt Miner)

Tied up along side the Canadian Leader, Sept. 17, 2011.
(Matt Miner)

Closer view.
(Matt Miner)

Tied up to the remains of the Maumee shortly after being towed from Port Maitland, Nov. 1, 2013.
(Barry Anderen)

 

 

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