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BoatNerd 2019 Fundraiser

12/16 -   We are continuing our second annual fall fundraising drive. We are accepting donations through PayPal or by mail. https://paypal.me/Boatnerd (updated link) or to e-mail donate@boatnerd.net

We had hoped to have a new website online by now generating revenue through advertising. That project has been much slower than anticipated, so we are hosting this fundraising drive to help keep the web site and Gatherings operational for another year. Any amount is appreciated and will go a long way towards keeping the site active.

2019 was a good year and we made progress on the new web site and added new AIS stations. We also returned the Port Huron Webcam. Thank you for your continuing support. We hope to continue the same in 2020.

Great Lakes & Seaway Shipping Online, Inc.
Box 244
Troy, MI 48099

 

Tecumseh has engine room fire off Windsor

12/16 - On Sunday afternoon, the Tecumseh experienced an engine room fire while downbound on the Detroit River. The vessel was bound for the ADM dock in Windsor. Photos on social media showed dense black smoke coming from the after end of the vessel. The fire was doused by using the CO2 supression system and the vessel dropped both anchors about a half mile upriver from the ADM dock. There were no reported injuries among the 19 crewmembers. By early evening, the crew was waiting for the C02 to disperse before reentering the engine room. At 10 p.m. the tug Stormont was alongside, according to AIS. The Detroit fire boat Curtis Randolph had laid up for the winter a short time before the fire. This is a developing story; please check back for updates.

 

Port Reports -  December 16

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day's news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known). Reporters needed for Lake Michigan ports, Marquette, St. Marys River, Saginaw River and ports such as Johnstown and Prescott, ON. If you would like to see your port represented, please consider becoming a news page volunteer and send us your information.

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
There was no traffic through either the Duluth or Superior entries on Sunday. On the Duluth side, Erie Trader/tug Clyde S. VanEnkevort was loading iron ore pellets at CN, while Burns Harbor was tied up at Burlington Northern in Superior loading ore. Neither vessel had a posted departure time. Philip R. Clarke was due in Duluth around midnight to unload limestone at Hallett #5, and Stewart J. Cort was anchored outside of Superior waiting to load after Burns Harbor.

Two Harbors-Silver Bay, MN – Gary A. Putney
American Century departed Two Harbors on Dec. 14th at 23:35 from South of #2 for Conneaut. The Edwin H. Gott arrived Two Harbors on Dec. 14th at 23:54 from lake anchorage for South of #2. As of 19:30 on Dec. 15th she was still at the loading dock. Tentatively due Two Harbors on Dec. 16th is the Philip R. Clarke after unloading stone at Hallett #5. She has been delayed by weather. Due Northshore Mining in Silver Bay on Dec. 16th is the American Integrity.

Thunder Bay, ON
Sunday; 0:37 The self-unloader Thunder Bay departed for Montreal. 0:43 Algoma Harvester arrived and went to anchor. 0:47 CSL Niagara arrived at Viterra A to load grain. 15:17 The saltie Fearless shifted back to Keefer Terminal. 16:45 Whitefish Bay departed for Baie Comeau. 19:31 Alina departed the Midcontinent Terminal and is shifting to the G3 elevator to load grain. 20:47 Algoma Guardian departed and is down bound on Lake Superior.

Northern Lake Huron ports
Alpena: Saturday; Undaunted arrived to unload at the Lafarge plant and departed on Sunday at 9:44 for Sault Ste Marie. 14:01 The cement carrier Alpena departed for Essexville.

Stoneport: Sunday; 4:48 Manitowoc arrived and went to anchor. 10:52 Dorothy Ann departed for Marine City. 11:02 Olive L Moore arrived to load.

Calcite: Saturday; 19:37 John J Boland departed for Buffington. Sunday 11:42 Arthur M Anderson departed for Detroit.

Owen Sound, ON – Paul Martin
The ferry Chi-Cheemaun has moored for the winter at her usual lay-up berth on the inner west harbor wall.

Detroit-Rouge River – Raymond H
Sunday Arrivals: Algoma Enterprise arrived at Zug Island to unload coal. Presque Isle arrived at Zug Island to unload ore. Saginaw arrived at Zug Island to load coke. Kaye E Barker arrived at AK Steel to unload ore.

Welland Canal and vicinity – Sunday December 15, Barry Andersen
Nanticoke - arrival - Dec 15 - John D Leitch at 1105 - docked - Dec 14 - Algosea at 0743 and James R Barker at 2334 - departed - Dec 14 - James R Barker at 2334

Long Point anchorage - anchored - Dec 15 - John D Leitch at 0406 - departed - Dec 15 at 1019 into the dock

Buffalo - arrival - Dec 15 - Manitoulin at 1340

Welland Canal upbound - Dec 14 - CSL Tadoussac at 1508, tug Wilf Seymour & Alouette Spirit at 1755 (stoppping wharf 1 and tug Michigan & Great Lakes (see anchorage off Hamilton) - Dec 15 - tug Wilf Seymour & Alouette Spirit at 1705 from wharf 1, NACC Argonaut at 1844, Federal Seto (Mhl) at 2003, Algoma Conveyor eta 2200 and tug Michigan & Great Lakes eta 2220

Welland Canal downbound - Dec 14 - Federal Weser (Mhl) at 0643, Algoma Conveyor at 0916, Drawsko (Bhs) at 1108, Belasitza (Mlt) at 1326, Algoma Transport at 1420, G3 and Marquis at 1620 and Algoma Equinox at 2100 - Dec 15 - Shoveler (Cyp) at 0351 for Mexico, Federal Cedar (Mhl) at 0824 for Belgium, and Iver Bright (Nld) at 1949

Port Weller anchorage - anchored - Dec 14 - Federal Weser (Mhl) at 1828, Erria Swan (Den) (ex Erria Helen-12, Alaattin Bey-07) at 1950, Drawsko (Bhs) at 2043 and NACC Argonaut at 2134 - Dec 15 Belasitza (MLt) at 0220, Shoveler (Cyp) at 1424, Federal Cedar (Mhl) at 1911 - departed - Drawsko (Bhs) at 2043 eastbound, Erria Swan (Den) (ex Erria Helen-12, Alaattin Bey-07) at 1605 back to Mississauga dock and NACC Argonaut at 1803 for the canal and Federal Weser (Mhl at 2045 eastbound

Welland Canal docks - arrival - Dec 14 - Lake Erie (Atg) (ex Hanse Gate-19, CL Hanse Gate-15, Federal Matane-11) at 0150 approx. to unload

Hamilton - arrivals - Dec 14 - Algoma Conveyor at 2255 - Dec 15 - Algoma Transport at 1229 - docked - Nov 17 - Rt Hon Paul J Martin at 1337 - Stelco dock 16-2 "lay-over" - Dec 8 - Federal Churchill at 2023 and Federal Mackinac (Mhl) at 1330 - Dec 10 - Hinch Spirit at 1520 - Dec 13 - Algoma Niagara at 1243 - Dec 14 - Wicky Spirit at 1038 - departed - Dec 15 - Federal Seto (Mhl) at 1704 for Duluth and Algoma Conveyor at 2016 for the canal

Anchorage off Hamilton - Dec 14 - tug Michigan & Great Lakes at 0030 and Robert S Pierson at 2035 from Clarkson - departed - Dec 15 - Robert S Pierson at 1612 eastbound

Clarkson - arrival - departed - Dec 14 - Robert S Pierson at 1650 to the anchorage off Burlington

Mississauga - departed - Dec 14 - Erria Swan (Den) (ex Erria Helen-12, Alaattin Bey-07) at 1729 for Port Weller anchorage - arrival - Dec 15 - Erria Swan (Den) (ex Erria Helen-12, Alaattin Bey-07) at 1826 - back to dock from Port Weller anchorage

Toronto - arrivals - Dec 15 - none - docked - Dec 13 - tug Petite Forte & St Marys Cement at 1523 - Dec 14 - tug Sea Eagle II & St Marys Cement II at 1335 -

 

’Tis the season to post your Christmas cards

12/16 - The annual Christmas Card Gallery is now open on this site’s Information Search page. Click here to view or upload your own.

 

BoatNerd seeks used equipment donations

12/16 - Have an old IPad, or touch screen laptop? BoatNerd is looking for donations of used equipment that can be repurposed as kiosk displays. Touch screen laptops , monitors or iPads are good candidates. The equipment will be wiped and reset with our own software.

Depending on your location we can send you a pre-paid shipper to drop it in the mail.

Please contact help@boatnerd.com with the type of equipment you would like to donate. As a 501 (c) 3 non-profit, we will send a thank you letter acknowledging your donation.

 

Lay-up reports needed

12/16 - As the end of the shipping season approaches, please send reports of vessel lay-ups to news@boatnerd.net. This will help us compile our annual lay-up list. Include vessel name, date, port and lay-up dock name.
Click here to view the Lay-Up List

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  December 16

In 1949, the tow line between the tug JOHN ROEN III and the barge RESOLUTE parted in high seas and a quartering wind. The barge sank almost immediately when it struck the concrete piers at Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin. Eleven crewmembers, including Captain Marc Roen, were safely taken off the barge without difficulty.

On 16 December 1922, the JOSHUA W. RHODES (steel propeller bulk freighter, 420 foot, 4,871 gross tons, built in 1906, at Lorain, Ohio) struck bottom in the middle of the St. Clair River abreast of Port Huron, Michigan. Damages cost $6,179.32 to repair.

In 1983, HILDA MARJANNE's forward section, which included a bow thruster, was moved to the building berth at Port Weller Dry Docks where it was joined to CHIMO's stern. The joined sections would later emerge from the dry dock as the b.) CANADIAN RANGER.

IMPERIAL BEDFORD (Hull#666) was launched December 16,1968, at Lauzon, Quebec, by Davie Shipbuilding Co.

Canada Steamship Lines’ J.W. MC GIFFIN (Hull#197) was launched December 16, 1971, at Collingwood, Ontario, by Collingwood Shipyards.

Litton Industries tug/barge PRESQUE ISLE departed light from Erie, Pennsylvania, on December 16, 1973, on its maiden voyage bound for Two Harbors, Minnesota. This was the latest maiden voyage date at that time. There, the PRESQUE ISLE loaded 51,038 long tons of taconite pellets for delivery to Gary, Indiana. After this ice-covered trip, the vessel returned to Erie for winter lay-up. PRESQUE ISLE was the second thousand-foot vessel on the Great Lakes (the Erie-built STEWART J. CORT which came out in 1972, was the first).

While in tandem tow on the way to scrapping with the former Ford Motor Co. steamer ROBERT S. McNAMARA, BUCKEYE MONITOR developed a crack in her deck amidships. The crack extended down her sides to below the waterline and she sank at 0145 hours on December 16, 1973, at position 43¡30'N x 30¡15'W in the North Atlantic.

BENSON FORD, a) RICHARD M. MARSHALL made her last trip to the Detroit’s Rouge River where she was laid up on December 16, 1984.

The PIC RIVER was the last vessel to use the old Welland City Canal on December 16, 1972, as the new Welland by-pass opened the following spring.

WOLFE ISLANDER III arrived in Kingston, Ontario on December 16, 1975. Built in Thunder Bay, she would replace the older car ferries WOLFE ISLANDER and UPPER CANADA on the Kingston - Wolfe Island run.

WILLIAM A. IRVIN sustained bottom damage in Lake Erie and laid up December 16, 1978, at Duluth, Minnesota.

The Maritimer THOMAS WILSON operated until December 16, 1979, when she tied up at Toledo. During that final year, the vessel carried only 30 cargoes and all were ore.

On 16 December 1906, ADVENTURER (wooden propeller steam tug, 52 foot, built in 1895, at Two Harbors, Minnesota) broke her moorings and went adrift in a gale. She was driven ashore near Ontonagon, Michigan on Lake Superior and was pounded to pieces.

On 16 December 1954, the 259-foot bulk carrier BELVOIR was launched at the E. B. McGee Ltd. yard in Port Colborne, Ontario. She was built for the Beaconsfield Steamship Co. and sailed in the last years before the Seaway opened. During the winter of 1958-59, she was lengthened 90 feet at Montreal. She left the lakes in 1968, and later sank in the Gulf of Honduras with the loss of 21 lives.

1939: GLITREFJELL was torpedoed and sunk in the North Sea by U-59 while sailing southwest of Norway. The vessel was newly built when it first came to the Great Lakes in 1934.

1941: The Norwegian freighter NIDARDAL, best remembered as LAKE GORIN, a World War One-class laker, foundered in the Atlantic P: 56.07 N / 21.00 W enroute from Freeport, Bahamas, to Manchester, England, with sulphur.

1962: ARISTOTELES of 1943 sank in the Atlantic 250 miles off Cape Vincent, Portugal, after developing leaks. The vessel, enroute from Detroit to Calcutta with steel, had first come inland in 1961. All on board were rescued by the Liberty ship HYDROUSSA, which had also been a Seaway trader in 1962.

1964: DONNACONA (ii) was disabled by a fire while downbound in Lake Huron and the forward cabin was burned out before a distress call could be sent. The ship was found, brought to safety and repaired.

1966: CABOT was loading at Montreal when the ship rolled on her side at Montreal and sank in 30 feet of water. Two lives were lost. It was righted on the bottom and refloated in January 1967 for a return to service. The stern of this vessel was cut off to help form CANADIAN EXPLORER in 1983 and has been part of ALGOMA TRANSFER since 1998.

1975: THORNHILL (i) went aground in the St. Marys River, was lightered and released.

1979: ARCHANGELOS ran aground in the St. Lawrence while outbound from the Great Lakes with a cargo of scrap. The ship was lightered and released December 21. It had to spend the winter in the harbor at Port Weller as it was too late to depart the Seaway that year.

1980: D.G. KERR (ii), enroute overseas to Spain for scrapping, was lost in the Atlantic, after it began leaking in bad weather.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Brian Johnson, Dave Swayze, Jody Aho, Russ Plumb, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series and the Marine Historical Society of Detroit.

 

Council to get updated Norgoma report in new year

12/15 - Sault Ste. Marie, ON – The vessel Norgoma, which was returned to the City of Sault Ste. Marie’s ownership earlier this year after the municipality filed a motion to do so, continues to cost the city $40 per day in docking fees.

A request for proposals, which closed in October, seeking a new owner for the MS Norgoma, has netted the city “some interest,” said Tom Vair, deputy CAO of community development and enterprise services. “We are talking to a couple of parties that are interested in the vessel,” he said.

Vair wouldn’t provide specifics on who is interested in the MS Norgoma, where they are from or what they want to do with it. “We’re hoping to have some things ironed out in the new year. There are some ongoing discussions and negotiations taking place and I don’t think it’s fair to share that information and get anyone’s hopes up at this time,” he said.

Vair did say negotiations are taking place with more than one interested party and there is a number of logistics that need to be sorted out. “Let’s say I’m cautiously optimistic,” Vair said.

The Norgoma was conspicuously missing from city council’s budget discussion earlier this week. The city moved the ship from the Roberta Bondar Marina on June 4 and relocated it to a docking location owned by Purvis Marine, just west of Algoma Steel. Costs to move the vessel were about $50,000 – double that which the St. Mary’s River Marine Heritage Centre said they had in their coffers.

It’s unclear what exactly the volunteer organization owes the city now that the vessel has been reconveyed to the city. Technically, legal action filed by the city remains an open case and there are outstanding monetary issues that still need to be resolved between the city and the St. Mary’s River Marine Heritage Centre.

The centre has recently removed artifacts and property it wanted to retain from the vessel, he said. Vair said he expects to present a report to council early in the new year with options council can consider.

One option may include having the vessel decommissioned if an agreement can’t be reached with a potential purchaser. Council did not set aside any money in its 2020 budget for the decommissioning of the ship, estimated to cost $150,000. If forced to decommission the Norgoma, the money may come from the city’s unforeseen account.

The City of Sault Ste. Marie had acquired the Norgoma in 1975 and conveyed it to the board in 1981 to allow the heritage centre to continue to operate it as a museum ship and tourist attraction. The city argued the St. Mary’s River Marine Heritage Centre breached the contact and an agreement was reached that saw the vessel reconveyed to the city.

The 185-foot-long vessel served as a means of transportation between Owen Sound, Ont., and Sault Ste. Marie, and a car ferry between Tobermory and South Baymouth. It’s considered one of the last surviving ships from that era.

For many years now, the Norgoma, which serves as a ship museum in the city’s downtown waterfront, has struggled to survive.

Sault Star

 

Port Reports -  December 15

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day's news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known). Reporters needed for Lake Michigan ports, Marquette, St. Marys River, Saginaw River and ports such as Johnstown and Prescott, ON. If you would like to see your port represented, please consider becoming a news page volunteer and send us your information.

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
Cason J. Callaway departed Duluth at 00:14 Saturday morning with a load of iron ore pellets for Indiana Harbor. Great Lakes Trader/tug Joyce L. VanEnkevort then weighed anchor, arrived at 01:10, and tied up at Canadian National to load. H. Lee White was outbound at 14:00 with a load of wheat from General Mills. Great Lakes Trader finished loading and departed at 17:48. Her fleetmate Erie Trader, which had been moored at CN berth 6, then shifted over to the loading dock and began taking on iron ore pellets. In Superior, Joseph L. Block departed at 04:03 with a load of iron ore for Indiana Harbor, and Burns Harbor arrived at 07:11 to load at Burlington Northern. Her departure time was unknown as the cold weather was slowing the loading process.

Two Harbors-Silver Bay, MN – Gary A. Putney
As of 19:30 on Dec. 14th the American Century continued to load at South of #2. When the Edwin H. Gott arrived off Two Harbors early on Dec. 14th, she stopped out in the lake South of the breakwall. There is no scheduled traffic for Two Harbors on Dec. 15th. There's a possibility the Clarke could arrive late in the day, but it depends on what time she arrives at Hallett #5 to unload stone and how long it takes to discharge. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay saw the American Mariner depart on Dec. 14th at 15:17 for Cleveland. There is no scheduled traffic for Silver Bay on Dec. 15th.

Thunder Bay, ON
Friday; 20:03 The saltie Maccoa shifted to the main anchorage. 20:09 Whitefish Bay weighed anchor and proceeded to the Superior Elevator to load grain. 20:27 CSL Laurentian weighed anchor and proceeded to the Richardson Main Terminal to load grain. 22:58 The saltie Alina arrived at the Midcontinent Terminal to unload project material. 23:18 Frontenac departed for Port Colborne. Saturday; 0:47 Victoriaborg departed for Ceuta Spain. 6:10 Algoma Innovator departed and is down bound, following the north shore on Lake Superior. 9:32 Federal Mosel arrived and to anchor 9:54 Fearless shifted to the G3 elevator to load grain. 10:14 Algoma Guardian arrived at the Richardson Current River Terminal to load wheat.

Sturgeon Bay, WI – Daniel Lindner
Edgar B. Speer arrived in Sturgeon Bay on Saturday, becoming the first vessel to arrive at Bay Shipbuilding for winter layup. With assistance from the tug William C. Gaynor, the ship turned around off of Sherwood Point and backed into the shipyard.

Northern Lake Huron ports
Meldrum Bay: Saturday; 4:02 Mississagi departed for Lorain.

Alpena: Friday; 22:22 Mackinaw arrived and went to anchor and weighed anchor Saturday at 7:41 to complete ice operations in Alpena. 9:56 The cement carrier Alpena arrived to load.

Stoneport: Saturday; 1:47 Dorothy Ann arrived and went to anchor. 6:24 John G Munson departed for Fairport. Dorothy Ann weighed anchor and proceeded to the dock to load.

Cheboygan: Saturday; 16:33 Mackinaw arrived at the coast guard station.

Marine City, MI – Rich Larson
Saturday: 2 pm downbound USCG vessel Hollyhock; 3 pm arriving at St. Clair power plant, Paul R. Tregurtha, began unloading coal; weather 44 degrees F, wind slight, river almost a flat calm but for current, cloudy and a bit hazy.

Toledo, OH – Brendan Falkowski
Great Republic laid up for the winter at Toledo, Interlake Iron Dock, on Dec. 13.

Welland Canal and vicinity – Saturday December 14 – Barry Andersen
Nanticoke arrival - Dec 14 - Algosea at 0743, James R Barker at 1110 and John D Leitch eta 2200 - departed - Dec 14 - Algoma Hansa at 0718 westbound

Welland Canal upbound - Dec 13 - Lake Erie (Atg) (ex Hanse Gate-19, CL Hanse Gate-15, Federal Matane-11) at 1319 - stopping wharf 13 to unload, Spruceglen at 1340, Algoma Strongfield at 1512, Algoma Buffalo at 1539 and BBC Arizona (Atg) at 2353 - Dec 14 - and Algoma Sault at 1949 to the anchorage - Dec 14 - BBC Arizona (Atg) at 2353 - Dec 14 - Algoma Sault at 0042, Algoma Spirt at 0105, Sarah Desgagnes at 0342, John D Leitch at 0551, McKeil Spirit at 0714, Federal Barents (Mhl) at 1030, CSL Tadoussac at 1508, tug Wilf Seymour & Alouette Spirit eta 1755 and tug Michigan & Great Lakes eta 2110

Welland Canal downbound - Dec 13 - tug Albert (ex Craig Eric Reinauer-18, El Bronco Grande-06, Hercules-81) & Margaret at 1756 - Dec 14 - Federal Weser (Mhl) at 0643, Algoma Conveyor at 0916, Drawsko (Bhs) at 1108, Belasitza (Mlt) at 1326, Algoma Transport at 1420, G3 and Marquis eta 1600

Port Weller anchorage - anchored - Dec 13 - and Kitikmeot W at 2133 - departed - Dec 13 - BBC Arizona (Atg) at 2325 for Toledo - Dec 14 - Algoma Sault at 0005 for the canal, Kitikmeot W at 1121 eastbound

Welland Canal docks - Dec 14 - Lake Erie (Atg) (ex Hanse Gate-19, CL Hanse Gate-15, Federal Matane-11) at 0150 approx. to unload

Hamilton - arrivals - Dec 14 - Wicky Spirit at 1038 - docked - Nov 17 - Rt Hon Paul J Martin at 1337 - Stelco dock 16-2 "lay-over" - Dec 8 - Federal Churchill at 2023 and Federal Mackinac (Mhl) at 1330 - Dec 10 - Hinch Spirit at 1520 - Dec 11 - Federal Seto (Mhl) at 0802 - Dec 13 - Algoma Niagara at 1243 - departed - Dec 14 - Federal Ems (Mhl) at 0454 eastbound, tug Wilf Seymour & Alouette Spirit at 1430 for the canal

Bronte - Dec 11 - Sarah Desgagnes at 1109 - departed Dec 13 at 2312 for the canal

Clarkson - arrival - Dec 14 - Robert S Pierson at 0458

Mississauga - docked - Dec 13 - Erria Swan (Den) (ex Erria Helen-12, Alaattin Bey-07) at 2211

Toronto - arrival - Dec 14 - tug Sea Eagle II & St Marys Cement II at 1335 - docked - Dec 13 - tug Petite Forte & St Marys Cement at 1523 - departed - Dec 13 - Algoma Buffalo at 1336 westbound

Oshawa - docked - Dec 9 - Johanna G (Por) (ex Redhead-18) at 1513 - departed Dec 14 at 1208 eastbound

Seaway – Rene Beauchamp
The Vectis Pride left the port of Côte Ste-Catherine overnight for Spain. Heerengracht has been in Thunder Bay since December 3. Lake Erie arrived in Port Colborne overnight from Oshawa. Mirella S is on her way for overseas. She was in the Côte Ste-Catherine lock Saturday night.

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  December 15

On 15 December 1902, the TIONESTA (steel propeller passenger steamer, 340 foot, 4,329 gross tons) was launched at the Detroit Ship Building Company, Wyandotte, Michigan (Hull #150) for the Erie & Western Transportation Company (Anchor Line). She was christened by Miss Marie B. Wetmore. The vessel lasted until 1940, when she was scrapped at Hamilton, Ontario.

ROBERT KOCH went hard aground December 15, 1985, on Sheldon Point off Oswego, New York, loaded with 2,000 tons of cement, when her towline parted from the tug R & L NO 1. Dragging her anchors in heavy weather, she fetched up on a rocky shelf in 16 feet of water 300 yards off shore. She spent the winter on the bottom but was released in July 1986 and taken to Contrecoeur, Quebec, for scrapping. The dismantling was finally completed at Levis, Quebec, in 1990-1991.

NORTHCLIFFE HALL departed Kingston on December 15, 1974, headed for Colombia with a load of newsprint. She traded briefly in the Caribbean and then laid up at Houston, Texas, later to return to the lakes.

On December 15, 1972, GEORGIAN BAY was reported as the last ship to pass through the city of Welland as the new $8.3 million by-pass channel was to be ready for the beginning of the 1973, shipping season. (Actually two other ships, the TADOUSSAC and PIC RIVER, followed her through.)

The JOHN E. F. MISENER, a.) SCOTT MISENER, was laid up for the last time on December 15, 1982, at Port McNicoll, Ontario.

JOE S. MORROW (Hull#350) was launched December 15, 1906, at Lorain, Ohio by the American Ship Building Co.

RED WING was laid up for the last time at Toronto on December 15, 1984, due in part to the uneconomical operation of her steam turbine power plant.

The self-unloader ROGERS CITY cleared Lauzon, Quebec, on December 15, 1987, in tow of the Maltese tug PHOCEEN on the first leg of her tow to the cutter’s torch.

On December 15, 1988, Purvis Marine's ANGLIAN LADY departed Mackinaw City with the CHIEF WAWATAM under tow, arriving at the Canadian Soo the next day. During the winter of 1988-89, Purvis removed items tagged by the state of Michigan (including the pilot house) and began converting her into a barge.

On 15 December 1888, GEORGE W. ROBY (wooden propeller, 281 foot, 1,843 gross tons,) was launched at W. Bay City, Michigan. She was built by F. W. Wheeler (Hull#45).

Below is a winter lay-up list as published in the Port Huron Times on 15 December 1876. At Port Huron -- Steam barges: ABERCORN, BIRKHEAD, BAY CITY, H D COFFINBURY, WILLIAM COWIE, N K FAIRBANK, GERMANIA, GEORGE KING, V H KETCHUM, MARY MILL, MARY PRINGLE, E W POWERS, D F ROSE, SALINA, TEMPEST. Propellers: CITY OF NEW BALTIMORE. Tug: CORA B Schooners and Barges: T Y AVERY, BUCKEYE STATE, GEORGE W BISSEL, KATIE BRAINARD, D K CLINT, DAYTON, S GARDNER, A GEBHART, C G KING, T G LESTER, MARINE CITY, H R NEWCOMB, J H RUTTER, REINDEER, C SPADEMAN, SAGINAW, ST JOSEPH, TAYLOR, TROY, C L YOUNG, YANKEE. At Marysville -- D G WILLIAMS, 7 tow barges, JUPITER, and LEADER.

1915: The passenger and freight steamers MAJESTIC and SARONIC of Canada Steamship Lines caught fire and burned while laid up at Point Edward, Ontario.

1952: The three-masted barquentine CITY OF NEW YORK came to Chicago for the World's Fair in 1933 and was also on display at Cleveland while inland. The famous ship had been active in Antarctic exploration and the Arctic seal hunt. The shaft broke on this date in 1952 and the vessel stranded off Yarmouth, N.S. Released at the end of the month, the vessel caught fire and stranded again off Chebogue Point as a total loss.

1973: RICHARD REISS (ii) broke loose in a gale at Stoneport, Michigan, and went aground with heavy bottom damage. The ship was refloated, repaired at South Chicago, and returned to service in 1974. It has been sailing as d) MANISTEE since 2005.

1983: CARIBBEAN TRAILER spent much of the summer of 1983 operating between Windsor and Thunder Bay. It was outbound from the Great Lakes when it was caught pumping oil in the St. Lawrence. The vessel remained active on saltwater routes until arriving at Aliaga, Turkey, for scrapping on August 29, 2009.

1987: The French bulk carrier PENMARCH began regular Seaway service when new in 1974. It was also back as b) PHILIPPI in 1985 and became c) MIMI M. in 1987. The ship was attacked by Iraqi aircraft December 15 and again on December 16, 1987. It reached Bushire, Iran, December 22 with heavy damage and was ultimately sold to shipbreakers in Pakistan.

2008: ALIKRATOR began Great Lakes trading in August 1983. It was moored in the estuary at Vilagarcia, Spain, as b) DOXA when a fire broke out in the accommodations area. One life was lost and another 8 sailors injured. The ship was sold for scrap and arrived at Aliaga, Turkey, for dismantling as c) ADO on June 29, 2009.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Contractors work to raise seawall near Lightship Huron

12/14 - Port Huron, MI – Work is well underway to stabilize and raise the seawall near the Huron Lightship in Port Huron. The floating light house is all too familiar with the high water levels that have plagued much of the Great Lakes this year. City council last month provided $11,000 in funding for the project, with about $20,000 additional dollars coming from the Acheson foundation.

Andrew Kercher from the Port Huron Museum said they had to act fast. “We really tried to move as quickly as we could,” said Kercher. “That ship is really a part of our shared community heritage.” The seawall near the light ship will be raised approximately two feet for a total cost of approximately $31,000. Work is being performed by Thumb Welding. The Huron Light Ship will be 100 years old next year.

WPHM

 

Former Quebec ferry headed to Port Colborne for scrapping

12/14 - The former St.Lawrence River carferry Lucien-L is being towed to Port Colborne with Molly M 1 the lead tug. The 1967-built ferry's name has been shortened to Cien-L for the tow. She ran between Sorel-Tracy and Saint-Ignace-de-Loyola, QC.

 

Port Reports -  December 14

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day's news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known). Reporters needed for Lake Michigan ports, Marquette, St. Marys River, Saginaw River and ports such as Johnstown and Prescott, ON. If you would like to see your port represented, please consider becoming a news page volunteer and send us your information.

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
H. Lee White arrived Duluth at 07:03 Friday morning to load wheat at General Mills, and her fleetmate Walter J. McCarthy Jr. was inbound at 07:29 to pick up coal at SMET. Alina left port at 08:17, bound for Thunder Bay after unloading general cargo at Port Terminal. Mesabi Miner departed at 10:11 after loading ore at Canadian National. Cason J. Callaway arrived at 10:46 and took the Miner's place at CN. Erie Trader/tug Clyde S. VanEnkevort came in at 11:09 and moored at CN's berth 6 to wait her turn to load after the Callaway. Both the White and the McCarthy were expected to depart at some point Friday night. Roger Blough was still tied up at Port Terminal undergoing work. Great Lakes Trader was anchored outside the harbor and is likely waiting to load at Canadian National. In Superior, Joseph L. Block arrived at 07:16 Friday to load at Burlington Northern. She was due to depart at 23:00.

Two Harbors-Silver Bay, MN – Gary A. Putney
Presque Isle departed Two Harbors from South of #2 on Dec. 12th at 22:34 for Ecorse. The American Century arrived Two Harbors on Dec. 13th at 03:30 for South of #2. Due Two Harbors on Dec. 14th is the Edwin H. Gott. As of 17:40 on Dec. 13th the Gott is running checked down NE of the Apostle Islands. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay saw the Herbert C. Jackson depart on Dec. 13th at 05:45 for Toledo. Arriving Silver Bay on Dec. 13th at approx. 14:30 was the American Mariner. The Clyde S. VanEnkevort/Erie Trader went to Duluth to load at CN. Her AIS had been showing Silver Bay. Silver Bay has no inbound traffic scheduled for Dec. 14th.

Thunder Bay, ON
Thursday; 22:28 Maccoa weighed anchor and proceeded to the Richardson Main Terminal to load grain. 23:26 Frontenac arrived at the G3 elevator to load grain. Friday; 2:01 Algoma Enterprise departed for Detroit. 2:52 Federal Satsuski departed for Montreal. 2:30 Algoma Innovator arrived at Thunder Bay Terminals to load. 6:26 Victoriaborg weighed anchor and proceeded to the Richardson Current River Terminal to load. 10::27 Federal Yukina arrived at the MobilEx Terminal to load potash. 11:35 Tecumseh departed for Windsor. 11:50 the self unloader Thunder Bay weighed anchor and proceeded to Viterra A to finish loading. 14:13 CSL Laurentien arrived and went to anchor. 15:50 After completing ice operations USCG Katmai Bay departed for Duluth Superior.17:45 Acadia Desgagnes departed for Windsor. 18:57 CSL Niagara arrived and went to anchor. 20:09 Whitefish Bay arrived and went to anchor.

Northern Lake Huron ports
Bruce Mines: Friday; 7:16 Mississagi arrived to take on a partial load of trap rock and departed at 12:30 for Meldrum Bay.

Little Current: Friday; 9:45 Sharon MI and her barge departed for Sault Ste Marie On.

Meldrum Bay: Friday; 15:49 Mississagi arrived to finish loading.

Calcite: Friday; 10:08 John J Boland arrived and went to anchor. 13:20 Olive L Moore departed for Saginaw. 13:43 Arthur M Anderson arrived to load. 19:08 Philip R Clarke departed for Duluth Superior. 19:28 John J Boland weighed anchor and proceeded to the loading dock.

Stoneport: Friday; 13:17 John G Munson arrived to load limestone.

Goderich, ON – Bruce Douglas
Algoma Compass arrived 11am Friday ( turned in basin ) and loaded salt for Chicago.

Marine City, MI – Rich Larson
Friday: 2:30 pm downbound, Hon. James L. Oberstar; 2:45 pm downbound, Saginaw; 3:30 pm upbound, CSL Assiniboine. Weather partly sunny 40 degrees F, light breeze from the east-southeast creating light chop on surface, no caps. Work continues at the Harsens Island ferry mainland dock.

Detroit-Rouge River – Raymond H
Friday Arrivals: Sam Laud arrived at Zug Island to unload coal. Calusa Coast and Delaware arrived at the Marathon Asphalt Terminal to load. Hon. James L Oberstar arrived at AK Steel to unload ore.

Cleveland, OH – Bill Kloss
G.L. Ostrander/Integrity arrived at 10:39 for LaFarge. Solina is at the Port. Sam Laud arrived at 17:00.

Welland Canal and vicinity – Friday December 13, 2019 - Barry Andersen
Nanticoke docked - Dec 12 - Algoterra at 0410 and Algoma Hansa at 0436 - departed - Dec 13 - Algoterra at 1709 eastbound

Welland Canal upbound - Dec 12 - Algoma Harvester at 0701, and light tugs Jarrett M at 2025 *(omit - Sharon M I from Dec 12 report) - Dec 13 - Algoma Mariner at 0154, tug Molly M I with ferry Lucien L (renamed Cien-L for the tow) at 0432 and Jarrett M assisting to wharf 1, Helena G (Por) (ex Redhead-18) at 0537, Ojibway at 0817, Lake Erie (Atg) (ex Hanse Gate-19, CL Hanse Gate-15, Federal Matane-11) at 1319 - delayed in Lk.1, Spruceglen at 1340, Algoma Strongfield at 1512, Algoma Buffalo at 1539, light tug Jarrett M from wharf 17 at 1855 approx eastbound and Algoma Sault at 1949 to the anchorage

Welland Canal downbound - Dec 12 - tug Spartan & Spartan II at 1436, Kitikmeot W at 2056, Tim S Dool 2236 and Algoma Niagara at 2257 - Dec 13 - tug Petite Forte & St Marys Cement at 0116, and tug Albert (ex Craig Eric Reinauer-18, El Bronco Grande-06, Hercules-81) & Margaret at 1756 and light tug Molly M I at 1900 from wharf 17 westbound

Port Weller anchorage - anchored - Dec 13 - BBC Arizona (Atg) at 0419, Algoma Sault at 2019 and Kitikmeot W eta 2115

Welland Canal docks - Dec 12 - light tug Jarrett M at 2025 stopped at wharf 1 awaiting tug Molly M I - Dec 13 - tug Jarrett M and Molly M I with ferry Lucien L at 0432 - Molly M I & Jarrett M with LUCIEN L (name shortened to UCIEN L) arrived wharf 1 at 0505 - departed for lock 1 at 0713 approx. bound for scrapyard Port Colborne

Hamilton - arrival - Dec 12 - tug Wilf Seymour & Alouette Spirit at 2257 - Dec 13 - Algoma Niagara at 1243 - docked - Nov 17 - Rt Hon Paul J Martin at 1337 - Stelco dock 16-2 "lay-over" - Nov 29 - Federal Ems (Mhl) at 0540 - Dec 8 - Federal Churchill at 2023 and Federal Mackinac (Mhl) at 1330 - Dec 10 - Dec 11 - Federal Seto (Mhl) at 0802 - departed - Dec 13 - Mirella S (Mlt) (ex SCT Matterhorn-17, MCT Matterhorn-15, launched as HHL Arctic) at 0004, Helena G (Por) (ex Redhead-18) at 0326, Federal Nakagawa (Mhl) at 0703 and Algoma Strongfield at 1315 -

Bronte - Dec 11 - Sarah Desgagnes at 1109

Clarkson - arrival - Dec 12 - Robert S Pierson at 1948 - departed - Dec 13 - Robert S Pierson at 2359 eastbound

Mississauga - Dec 13 - Erria Swan (Den) (ex Erria Helen-12, Alaattin Bey-07) (Den) eta 2200

Toronto - arrival - Dec 13 - Algoma Buffalo at 0054 - docked - Dec 12 - NACC Argonaut at 0523 - departed - Dec 13 -NACC Argonaut at 0823 and tug Sea Eagle II & St Marys Cement II at 1313 - both

Oshawa - docked - Dec 9 - Johanna G (Por) (ex Redhead-18) at 1513 - departed - Dec 13 - Lake Erie (Atg) (ex Hanse Gate-19, CL Hanse Gate-15, Federal Matane-11) at 1019 for the canal

 

Harsens Island Ferry dock will not open until middle of next week, owner says

12/14 - Harsens Island, MI - The Harsens Island Ferry dock will be closed at least throughout the weekend, the owner says. The dock collapsed Wednesday and vehicle traffic was shut down. The owner said the repair is taking longer than expected. It was supposed to be open Friday, but he now says it will most likely reopen in the middle of next week.

Just last month, the owners of the ferry submitted a dock repair plan to Michigan State Police, saying the dock had to limit the types and weights of vehicles "due to the damage inflicted on our docks this past summer by the high water."

According to the plan, they already removed the downstream mainland dock from service to begin interim repairs, which include installing a new hinge foundation in the ground and re-drive new pipes to for stabilization. The plan also said that once interim repairs are made, they will resume construction on the two new docks on the mainland.

According to Champion's Auto Ferry, they estimated that the repairs would be complete by April 30, 2020, but that date is expected to change after the collapse.

With the ferry being out of service, people who live there are without access to travel to and from the island in a car. "It is a major inconvenience for everybody," Westmiller said. Ryan Morse, who has been a full-time resident on the island since 2008, said that many who live on the island are frustrated. "At a time like this, it's kind of aggravating," he said. "You know, we can't get over and do the stuff we need to do and get food in the house."

The Champions Ferry System is operating a boat that is taking residents from the island to the mainland. For people who are stuck on the island, emergency personnel are ready to respond if an emergency happens. Residents can contact emergency officials directly or call 911.

WXYZ, The Detroit News

 

Lee Murdock's Christmas Ship concert at Chicago Maritime Museum

12/14 - The Chicago Maritime Museum invites everyone to attend their Holiday Party featuring Lee Murdock performing his compete Christmas Ship Concert this Sunday, Dec. 15, 3-7pm. 1200 W. 35th St. Chicago. Tickets are $20 and must be purchased in advance at https://www.chicagomaritimemuseum.org/events.html

Chicago Maritime Museum

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  December 14

On 14 December 1902, JOHN E. HALL (wooden propeller freighter, 139 foot, 343 gross tons, built in 1889, at Manitowoc, Wisconsin) was towing the barge JOHN R. NOYES (wooden schooner, 137 foot, 333 gross tons, built in 1872, at Algonac, Michigan) on Lake Ontario when they were caught in a blizzard-gale. After a day of struggling, the NOYES broke loose and drifted for two days before she went ashore and broke up near Lakeside, New York without loss of life. The HALL tried to run for shelter but swamped and sank off Main Duck Island with the loss of the entire crew of nine.

On December 14, 1984, WILLIAM CLAY FORD laid up for the final time at the Rouge Steel plant in Dearborn, Michigan.

The JIIMAAN was towed out of dry dock at Port Weller Drydocks Ltd. on December 14, 1992, by the tugs JAMES E. McGRATH and LAC VANCOUVER to the fit out dock for completion.

CHICAGO TRIBUNE was sold for scrap in 1988, and was towed up the Welland Canal on December 14, 1988, by the tugs THUNDER CAPE and MICHAEL D. MISNER to Port Colborne, Ontario.

On December 14, 1926, W.E. FITZGERALD was caught in heavy seas and suffered damaged frames and hull plating. Repairs consisted of replacing nearly 25,000 rivets and numerous hull plates.

The package freighter GEORGE N. ORR, a recent war acquisition from the Canada Atlantic Transit Company, was wrecked off Savage Point, Prince Edward Island, on December 14, 1917. She was enroute to New York City with a load of hay.

On 14 December 1883, MARY ANN HULBERT (wooden schooner-barge, 62 gross tons, built in 1873, at Bayfield, Wisconsin) was carrying railroad workers and supplies in tow of the steamer KINCADINE in a storm on Lake Superior. She was sailing from Port Arthur for Michipicoten Island. The HULBERT was overwhelmed by the gale and foundered, The crew of five plus all 15 of the railroad workers were lost.

December 14, 1903 - The PERE MARQUETTE 20 left the shipyard in Cleveland, Ohio on her maiden voyage.

1977: SILVER FIR, outbound from Great Lakes on her only trip inland, went aground at Squaw Island, near Cornwall and was released two days later.

1991: The small tug HAMP THOMAS sank off Cleveland while towing a barge. They were mauled by 12-foot waves but the barge and a second tug, PADDY MILES, survived as did all of the crew.

1997: CANADIAN EXPLORER of Upper Lakes Shipping and the ISLAND SKIPPER collided in the St. Lawrence at Beauharnois with minor damage. The former reached Hamilton and was retired. The latter was repaired and resumed service. It revisited the Great Lakes as late as 2010.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Father Dowling Collection, Jody Aho, Chris Dunn, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Tips for viewing arrival of Sturgeon Bay’s winter fleet

12/13 - Sturgeon Bay, WI – Every year a group of ships ranging from 500 to 1,000 feet in length travel through the Canal of Sturgeon Bay to dock for annual repairs at Fincantieri Bay Shipbuilding. Repairs can range from new coats of paint and inspections to vessel repowering. The Winter Fleet runs on a tight schedule and is dependent upon the weather, so repairs are crucial to their voyages.

Each captain and crew is trying to get in the last run of the season, so depending on weather conditions, the actual schedule of arrival can be quite fluid. Regardless of the weather, locals and visitors will get out their cameras to get pictures and videos of this awe-inspiring experience.

These massive vessels are one-of-a-kind and absolutely stunning pieces of machinery that make their way through the canal and under all three Sturgeon Bay bridges. All of the freighters are guided by tugboat to ensure a safe journey to dry dock.

Fun fact: The distance between the Oregon Street Bridge and the Michigan Street Bridge is less than 1000 feet, so when one of the “big boys” comes through, they’re actually navigating the bow through one bridge opening while the stern is still going through the other.

Local fact: The arrival of ships can also cause some pretty significant traffic backups and bridges can be up for up to 30 minutes. Local radio and social media outlets monitor the ship’s arrival so that no one is late getting to where they need to be.

Graham Park, trails along the canal station, and Sawyer Park offer some of the best and closest sights to view the Winter Fleet arrival. If freighters are coming from the north, Sunset Park, Potawatomi State Park, and the old train spur bridge in front of Sonny’s Pizzeria provide great viewing options, too.

 

Port Reports -  December 13

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day's news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known). Reporters needed for Lake Michigan ports, Marquette, St. Marys River, Saginaw River and ports such as Johnstown and Prescott, ON. If you would like to see your port represented, please consider becoming a news page volunteer and send us your information.

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
The only traffic through Duluth on Thursday was the Paul R. Tregurtha, which departed from Midwest Energy at 06:08 carrying coal for St. Clair. Her fleetmate Mesabi Miner spent the day loading iron ore pellets at Canadian National, and had originally been expected to depart during the afternoon but was still at the dock Thursday night. Roger Blough was also in port, undergoing some sort of repairs at Port Terminal. Moored on the opposite side of the slip from her was Alina, unloading project equipment. In Superior, American Spirit departed at 17:24 Thursday night with a load of iron ore from Burlington Northern.

Two Harbors-Silver Bay, MN – Gary A. Putney
As of 19:30 on Dec. 12th the Presque Isle continues to load at South of #2 in Two Harbors. Due Two Harbors on Dec. 13th is the American Century, that as of 19:30 on Dec. 12th, is North of Ontonagon, MI. The Joyce L VanEnkevort/Great Lakes Trader had been showing a Two Harbors AIS, but late afternoon on the 12th it is showing Duluth. There's a chance the Edwin H. Gott could arrive Two Harbors on Dec. 13th, but if it does it will be late. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay saw the Herbert C. Jackson arrive at 07:30 on Dec. 12th from Hallett #5 in Duluth. As of 19:30 on Dec. 12th she is still at the dock. The Jackson is probably loading for Cleveland. Due Silver Bay on Dec. 13th are the American Mariner and the Clyde S. VanEnkevort/Erie Trader.

Thunder Bay, ON
Wednesday; Destination update: G3 Marquis departed for Port Cartier. 20:10 Manitoulin weighed anchor and proceeded to the Richardson Main Terminal to load grain. 22:24 Saginaw departed for Toledo. Thursday; 7:29 Algoma Enterprise arrived at Thunder Bay Terminals to load coal. 9:07 USCG Katman Bay arrived and began ice operations. 15:47 Federal Cedar departed for Montreal. Tecumseh shifted to Viterra A to finish loading. 16:36 Acadia Desgagnes finished unloading at Keefer Terminal and shifted to the Superior Elevator to load grain. 18:24 CSL Welland weighed anchor and proceeded to Viterra B to load grain. 20:12 Manitoulin departed for Buffalo.

Whitefish Bay
Thursday; 3:21 America Mariner departed for Silver Bay, 3:37 Clyde S Van Enkevort departed for Silver Bay.3:42 American Century departed for Two Harbors, 4:14 Joseph L Block departed for Duluth Superior, 5:43 H Lee White departed for Duluth Superior, 6:16 Frontenac departed for Thunder Bay, 7:11 Algoma Innovator departed for Thunder Bay, 7:51 Joyce L Van Enkevort departed for Two Harbors, 8:42 Kaye E Barker departed for Marquette, 8:13 Cason J Callaway departed for Duluth Superior.

Northern Lake Huron ports
Bois Blanc Island: Wednesday; 23:41 With a change in orders Laura L Van Enkevort weighed anchor and departed for Marquette.

Little Current: 8:55 Sharon MI and her barge arrived to unload windmill parts.

Calcite: Thursday; 4:19 Philip R Clarke arrived to load. 13:16 Dorothy Ann departed for Bay City. 13:20 Olive L Moore weighed anchor and proceeded to the loading dock.

Alpena: Wednesday; 14:24 GL Ostrander departed for Detroit. 23:47 Philip R Clarke weighed anchor and departed for Calcite.

Midland: Thursday; 2:02 Whitefish Bay weighed anchor and departed for Thunder Bay.

Marine City, MI – Rich Larson
Thursday 1pm ,Carolus Magnus upbound; 1:15pm Algoma Compass unloading on Canadian side stone yard south of Sombra; 2 pm crew and 2 cranes at work on Harsens Island ferry mainland dock but appears no service as of yet. 7:30 pm crew working under lights at Harsens Island ferry dock, no traffic allowed.

Detroit-Rouge River – Raymond H
Thursday Arrivals: Arthur M Anderson arrived at Zug Island to unload ore. Albert/Margaret arrived at the Waterfront Petroleum Terminal. GL Ostrander/Integrity arrived at Lafarge to unload cement.

Cleveland, OH – Bill Kloss
Petite Forte departed at 06:45 Thursday. Algoma Buffalo departed for Toronto. Polsteam's Solina arrived at 04:30 for the Port, Dock 24W.

Welland Canal and vicinity – Thursday December 12, 2019 - Barry Andersen
High winds delayed traffic on Thursday.

Nanticoke arrival - Dec 12 - Algoterra at 0410 and Algoma Hansa at 0436

Long Point Bay anchorage - departed - Dec 12 - Dec 9 - Algoterra at 0409 and Algoma Hansa at 0434 - both to the dock - Dec 12 - Kitikmeot W at 1800 eastbound

Welland Canal upbound - Dec 11 - Harbour Fountain (Por) at 2312 - Dec 12 - Rosaire A Desgagnes (Bds) at 0504, tug Everlast & Norman McLeod at 0530, Algoma Harvester at 0701, Algoma Mariner at 1129 and light tugs Jarrett M at 2025 and Sharon M I at 2055

Welland Canal downbound - Dec 11 - Algoscotia at 2311 - Dec 12 - Baie Comeau at 0431, tug Wilf Seymour & Alouette Spirit at 1115, Algoma Buffalo at 1243, tug Spartan & Spartan II at 1436, Tim S Dool eta 2215 and Algoma Niagara eta 2220 Dec 13 - tug Petite Forte & St Marys Cement eta 0030,

Port Weller anchorage - anchored - Dec 12 - Finnborg (Nld) 0930 from wharf 2 - departed - Dec 12 - Federal Leda (Mhl) at 0200 eastbound

Welland Canal docks - Dec 12 - Finnborg (Nld) at 0903 from wharf 2 eastbound, light tugs Jarrett M at 2025 and Sharon M I at 2055 (stopped at wharf 1)

Hamilton - arrival - Dec 12 - Algoma Strongfield at 1310 - docked - Nov 17 - Rt Hon Paul J Martin at 1337 - Stelco dock 16-2 "lay-over" - Nov 29 - Federal Ems (Mhl) at 0540 - Dec 8 - Federal Churchill at 2023 and Federal Mackinac (Mhl) at 1330 - Dec 9 - Helena G (Por) (ex Redhead-18) at 1257, Mirella S (Mlt) (ex SCT Matterhorn-17, MCT Matterhorn-15, launched as HHL Arctic) at 1614 and Federal Nakagawa (Mhl) at 1950 - Dec 10 - Dec 11 - Federal Seto (Mhl) at 0802 - departed - Dec 12 - tug Everlast & Norman McLeod at 0246 westbound

Anchorage off Hamilton - anchored Dec 12 - Algoma Mariner at 0453 - departed at 0938 for the canal

Bronte - Dec 11 - Sarah Desgagnes at 1109

Clarkson - arrival - Dec 12 - Robert S Pierson at 1948

Toronto - arrival - Dec 12 - NACC Argonaut at 0523 - docked - Dec 10 - McKeil Spirit at 2220

Oshawa - arrival - Dec 10 - Lake Erie (Atg) (ex Hanse Gate-19, CL Hanse Gate-15, Federal Matane-11) at 0920 - docked - Dec 9 - Johanna G (Por) (ex Redhead-18) at 1513

 

Groups sue ArcelorMittal over August fish kill, other alleged permit violations

12/13 - Two environmental groups filed a lawsuit Wednesday in federal court accusing ArcelorMittal of violating its Clean Water Act permit more than 100 times in the past five years, including during an August spill that killed more than 3,000 fish.

The steelmaker's Burns Harbor facility discharged higher-than-permitted levels of cyanide and ammonia, killing the fish, forcing the closure of nearby beaches and keeping visitors away from the newly designated Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore.

The Environmental Law and Policy Center and Hoosier Environmental Council filed the lawsuit Wednesday after putting the steelmaker on notice in early October of their intent to sue. Howard Learner, executive director of the ELPC, said ArcelorMittal's toxic spill and permit violations harm the environment, kill fish and threaten safe drinking water.

The lawsuit "calls for fines and penalties sufficiently large to change ArcelorMittal's environmental practices and modernize the company's equipment and operations to better reduce pollution damages going forward," Lerner said.

"ArcelorMittal should be held fully accountable for its pollution that harms local communities, the Lake Michigan shoreline and nearby waters, and the aquatic life and ecosystem of Northwest Indiana," he said.

A spokesman for ArcelorMittal said Wednesday the company had not yet been served with the lawsuit.

Indra Frank, environmental health and water policy director for the Hoosier Environmental Council, said the community can no longer wait for the state and federal governments to act in the face of "repeated, illegal damage to Lake Michigan."

"The damage has to stop for the sake of everyone who gets their drinking water from the lake; everyone who swims, fishes, or boats in the Lake; and the wildlife that make their home in the Lake," Frank said.

The groups said ArcelorMittal did not report the spill until after the public starting discovering thousands of dead fish.

ArcelorMittal Burns Harbor is on the Lake Michigan shoreline and adjacent to the Indiana Dunes National Park. The steel mill discharges pollution into the East Arm of the Little Calumet River, which flows directly into Lake Michigan.

 

Sights and Sounds Drone Edition: Freighters salute those on shore

12/13 - Sault Ste. Marie, MI – Many different freighters, from all across the globe, pass through the Soo Locks each year. As unique as each one looks, each one also has a unique salute. Captains will sometimes salute those on the shore. It’s their way of saying “hi!” In Sights and Sounds, Jim Lehocky takes us high above the St. Marys River in Sault Ste. Marie to catch some of those salutes.

View the video here: https://www.9and10news.com/2019/12/06/sights-and-sounds-drone-edition-freighters-salute-those-on-shore

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  December 13

CANADIAN ENTERPRISE entered service for Upper Lakes Shipping Ltd. on December 13, 1979.

On December 13, 1989, Kinsman’s HENRY STEINBRENNER, a.) WILLIAM A. MC GONAGLE was laid up at Toledo's Lakefront Dock.

G.A. TOMLINSON, a.) D.O. MILLS arrived under her own power at Triad Salvage Inc., Ashtabula, Ohio, on December 13, 1979, to be scrapped.

THOMAS WILSON ran aground in the St. Marys River on December 13, 1976. The accident required lightering before she would float free.

On 13 December 1872, the Port Huron Times added three vessels to those in winter lay-up at Port Huron: Steamer MARINE CITY, tug JOHN PRINDEVILLE, and wrecking tug RESCUE. December 13, 1906 - The ANN ARBOR NO 4 departed for Manitowoc, Wisconsin on her first trip.

In 1929, the McLouth Steamship Company filed a claim against the City of Port Huron for $687 because its sand sucker, the KALKASKA, was held up for 27-1/2 hours in the Black River because of an inability to open the north span of the Military Street Bridge.

On 13 December 1961, SWEDEN, a.) L C SMITH, steel propeller, 414 foot, 4702 gross tons, built in 1902, at W. Bay City, Michigan) arrived in tow at Savona, Italy, for scrapping.

1899: BARGE 115 broke loose of the towing steamer COLGATE HOYT in northern Lake Superior and drifted for 5 harrowing days before it stranded on Pic Island on December 18. While feared lost with all hands, the crew managed to come ashore in the lifeboat, found their way to the rail line and hiked to safety. They were found December 22.

1906: JOHN M. NICOL was loaded with barbed wire when it stranded off Big Summer Island, Lake Michigan. The crew was rescued by fishermen in a gasoline-powered launch, but the ship broke in two as a total loss.

1916: BAY PORT, a whaleback steamer built at West Superior as a) E.B. BARTLETT in 1891, struck bottom in the Cape Cod Canal enroute to Boston with coal. The ship was refloated but sank again December 14 blocking the entrance to the canal. All on board were saved. The hull had to by dynamited as a hazard.

1939: The Russian freighter INDIGIRKA went aground in a blizzard off the coast of Japan while trying to enter Laperouse Strait, near Sarafatsu, Japan. The ship rolled on its side and was abandoned by the crew. It was carrying fishermen and political prisoners. A reported 741 died in the cargo holds after being left behind. Only a few were still alive when salvagers returned after the storm had subsided. The vessel had been built at Manitowoc, WI in 1919 as a) LAKE GALVA and was renamed b) RIPON before leaving the lakes the next year.

1965: The Liberty ship PONT AUDEMER made one trip through the Seaway in 1960. It was abandoned by the crew as d) VESPER following an engineroom explosion on the Mediterranean enroute from Marseilles, France, to Abidjan, Ivory Coast. The vessel arrived at Cartagena, under tow on December 18, 1965. It was sold to Spanish shipbreakers and left for Villanueva y Geltru for dismantling on May 18, 1966.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, John R Decator Jr , Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  December 13

CANADIAN ENTERPRISE entered service for Upper Lakes Shipping Ltd. on December 13, 1979.

On December 13, 1989, Kinsman’s HENRY STEINBRENNER, a.) WILLIAM A. MC GONAGLE was laid up at Toledo's Lakefront Dock.

G.A. TOMLINSON, a.) D.O. MILLS arrived under her own power at Triad Salvage Inc., Ashtabula, Ohio, on December 13, 1979, to be scrapped.

THOMAS WILSON ran aground in the St. Marys River on December 13, 1976. The accident required lightering before she would float free.

On 13 December 1872, the Port Huron Times added three vessels to those in winter lay-up at Port Huron: Steamer MARINE CITY, tug JOHN PRINDEVILLE, and wrecking tug RESCUE. December 13, 1906 - The ANN ARBOR NO 4 departed for Manitowoc, Wisconsin on her first trip.

In 1929, the McLouth Steamship Company filed a claim against the City of Port Huron for $687 because its sand sucker, the KALKASKA, was held up for 27-1/2 hours in the Black River because of an inability to open the north span of the Military Street Bridge.

On 13 December 1961, SWEDEN, a.) L C SMITH, steel propeller, 414 foot, 4702 gross tons, built in 1902, at W. Bay City, Michigan) arrived in tow at Savona, Italy, for scrapping.

1899: BARGE 115 broke loose of the towing steamer COLGATE HOYT in northern Lake Superior and drifted for 5 harrowing days before it stranded on Pic Island on December 18. While feared lost with all hands, the crew managed to come ashore in the lifeboat, found their way to the rail line and hiked to safety. They were found December 22.

1906: JOHN M. NICOL was loaded with barbed wire when it stranded off Big Summer Island, Lake Michigan. The crew was rescued by fishermen in a gasoline-powered launch, but the ship broke in two as a total loss.

1916: BAY PORT, a whaleback steamer built at West Superior as a) E.B. BARTLETT in 1891, struck bottom in the Cape Cod Canal enroute to Boston with coal. The ship was refloated but sank again December 14 blocking the entrance to the canal. All on board were saved. The hull had to by dynamited as a hazard.

1939: The Russian freighter INDIGIRKA went aground in a blizzard off the coast of Japan while trying to enter Laperouse Strait, near Sarafatsu, Japan. The ship rolled on its side and was abandoned by the crew. It was carrying fishermen and political prisoners. A reported 741 died in the cargo holds after being left behind. Only a few were still alive when salvagers returned after the storm had subsided. The vessel had been built at Manitowoc, WI in 1919 as a) LAKE GALVA and was renamed b) RIPON before leaving the lakes the next year.

1965: The Liberty ship PONT AUDEMER made one trip through the Seaway in 1960. It was abandoned by the crew as d) VESPER following an engineroom explosion on the Mediterranean enroute from Marseilles, France, to Abidjan, Ivory Coast. The vessel arrived at Cartagena, under tow on December 18, 1965. It was sold to Spanish shipbreakers and left for Villanueva y Geltru for dismantling on May 18, 1966.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, John R Decator Jr , Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Coast Guard begins ice breaking operations in western Great Lakes

12/12 - Sault Ste. Marie, MI – U.S. Coast Guard Sector Sault Sainte Marie commenced Operation Taconite, Wednesday, in response to expanded ice growth in the commercial ports of western Lake Superior.

As one of two ice breaking operations that support the Great Lakes, Operation Taconite encompasses Lake Superior, St. Marys River, Straits of Mackinac, Georgian Bay, Green Bay, northern Lake Huron, and Lake Michigan.

Ice breaking operations are based on the following order of priorities: search and rescue and homeland security; urgent response to vessels; exigent community services, which includes ice breaking for flood control and to assist icebound communities in immediate need of food, fuel for heat or energy, and medical assistance; and facilitation of navigation.

In the coming weeks, various commercial waterways may close after due consideration is given to the protection of the marine environment and the safety of island residents who, in the course of their daily business, use naturally-formed ice bridges for transportation to and from the mainland.

The authority for Coast Guard domestic ice breaking was created in 1936, by Executive Order 7521 signed by President Franklin D. Roosevelt directing the U.S. Coast Guard to "assist in keeping open to navigation by means of ice breaking operations in so far as practicable, and as the exigencies may require, channels and harbors in accordance with the reasonable demands of commerce.”

USCG

 

Harsens Island ferry shut down to vehicle traffic after mainland dock collapses

12/12 - Harsens Island, MI – The Harsens Island ferry has been shut down to vehicle traffic for the night after the dock collapsed, 7 Action News has learned. According to a text message to a resident, the ferry will transport foot traffic only from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Wednesday night.

The emergency notification does say that they expect the ferry to resume normal operation on Thursday. It runs back and forth between Clay Township and the island transporting vehicles.

In a message on the Champion's Auto Ferry phone number, the company said they have "lost the mainland dock. Will not be transporting any vehicles to the island or mainland at all. It is our hope at 4 p.m. to start transporting foot passengers only. We will be doing that from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Hopefully, we will know more tomorrow about the situation tomorrow."

While crews were working on fixing the dock, a power line went down over a vehicle, sparking a fire.

Just last month, the owners of the ferry submitted a dock repair plan to Michigan State Police, saying the dock had to limit the types and weights of vehicles "due to the damage inflicted on our docks this past summer by the high water."

According to the plan, they already removed the downstream mainland dock from service to begin interim repairs, which include installing a new hinge foundation in the ground and re-drive new pipes to for stabilization. The plan also said that once interim repairs are made, they will resume construction on the two new docks on the mainland.

According to Champion's Auto Ferry, they estimated that the repairs would be complete by April 30, 2020, but that date is expected to change after the collapse.

WXYZ

 

Tug Anglian Lady, barge still aground in the St. Clair cutoff channel

12/12 - On Monday morning, the tug Anglian Lady / barge Ironmaster were reported aground adjacent to Lt X32 St Clair cutoff channel. As of Wednesday night they were still there. Photos on social media showed the Ironmaster’s bow in contact with Lt X32. There is no information available on a salvage plan.

 

Port Reports -  December 12

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day's news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known). Reporters needed for Lake Michigan ports, Marquette, St. Marys River, Saginaw River and ports such as Johnstown and Prescott, ON. If you would like to see your port represented, please consider becoming a news page volunteer and send us your information.

Two Harbors-Silver Bay, MN – Gary A. Putney
Roger Blough departed Two Harbors on Dec. 10th at 19:58 showing a Conneaut destination. She stopped off Two Harbors and got underway the afternoon of Dec. 11th and arrived Duluth late afternoon of Dec. 11th and went to the Port Terminal to take a delay. Algoma Equinox departed Two Harbors on Dec. 11th at 15:27 for Quebec City. Presque Isle shifted to South of #2 where on Dec. 11th at 19:30 she continued to load. Tentatively scheduled for Two Harbors on Dec. 12th are the Joyce L. VanEnkevort/Great Lakes Trader and the American Century. Both are anchored in Whitefish with no ETA for Two Harbors. Indiana Harbor departed Northshore Mining in Silver Bay on Dec. 11th at 15:35 for Cleveland. Due Silver Bay is the Herbert C. Jackson that remained at Hallett #5. As I post this report on the 11th at 19:30 pm, the "G" tug North Carolina was working in the slip. Tentatively due Silver Bay on Dec. 12th are the American Mariner and Clyde S. VanEnevort/Erie Trader. At 19:30 on Dec. 11th both were anchored in Whitefish with no Silver Bay ETAs.

Thunder Bay, ON
Tuesday; 21:53 The self-unloader Thunder Bay after taking on a partial load shifted to the main anchorage to wait for a dock to finish loading. Wednesday; 0:19 Federal Weser departed for Trois Rivieres. 1:38 Manitoulin arrived and went to anchor. 4:32 CSL Welland arrived and went to anchor. 4:51 Tecumseh arrived at Viterra B to load grain. 5:10 Saginaw arrived at the Superior Elevator to load grain. 16:47 Algoma Conveyor departed for Hamilton. 19:59 G3 Marquis departed and was downbound on Lake Superior.

Whitefish Bay
Wednesday: With gale and freezing spray warnings on Lake Superior a number of westbound boats have gone to anchor to wait for calmer weather. Joseph L Block, American Century, Joyce L Van Enkevort, America Mariner, Kaye E Barker, H Lee White and Cason J Callaway were all anchored south of Whitefish Point along the west shore Wednesday night. Algoma Innovator, Frontenac, Federal Weser and Clyde S Van Enkevort were all anchored off Bay Mills above the locks.

Northern Lake Huron ports
On Wednesday, Laura L VanEnkevort and her barge were scheduled to load in Meldrum Bay. Once past Stoneport, they made their way west along the Michigan shore to the lee of Bois Blanc Island and went to anchor. Sharon MI was scheduled for Little Current to unload her barge load of windmill parts. She made her way from Presque Isle across Lake Huron to the Mississagi Straits early in the morning and eventually went to anchor at 22:53 on the lee side of Clapperton Island in the North Channel.

Thessalon: Algoma Innovator had a change in orders and is now bound for Thunder Bay. Wednesday night she was at anchor in the Sault anchorage above the locks waiting for weather.

Calcite: Tuesday; 19:17 Dorothy Ann weighed anchor and proceeded to the dock to load. Wednesday; 16:23 John J Boland departed for Bay City.

Stoneport: Wednesday; 19:27 Algoma Compass departed and is down bound on Lake Huron.

Alpena: Wednesday; 7:03 GL Ostrander arrived to load cement products. 7:27 Philip R Clarke arrived and went to anchor to wait out the weather.

Midland: Whitefish Bay was unloading grain in Midland on Tuesday. She departed the ADM Milling dock early Wednesday morning, transited Severn Sound, and is waiting out gale in the lee of Giant’s Tomb Island.

Cleveland, OH – Bill Kloss
Algoma Buffalo arrived at 04:02 on Wednesday for Cargill to load salt for Toronto. Petite Forte was still at St. Marys Cement. Federal Elbe departed 12/10 at 23:02 for Windsor.

Welland Canal and vicinity – Wednesday December 11, Barry Andersen
High winds delayed traffic in the area Wednesday.

Nanticoke - arrival - Dec 11 - none

Long Point Bay anchorage - Dec 5 - Algoma Hansa at 1733 - Dec 8 - Kitikmeot W at 0452 from the dock - Dec 9 - Algoterra at 1733 from the dock

Welland Canal upbound - Dec 10 - Algoma Guardian at 1846 - Dec 10 - Solina (Bhs) at 0207, Carolus Magnus (Bds) (ex SCT Breithorn-17, SCT Breithorn-16, launched as HHL Celtic at 0633, Algoma Transport at 0928

Welland Canal downbound - Dec 10 - Federal Biscay (Mhl) at 0735, Tundra (Cyp) at 1040, Algoma Discovery at 1415, Finnborg (Nld) at 1608 stopping wharf 2, Federal Leda (Mhl) at 1711, Kaministiqua at 1745, Algonova at 1836 stopping wharf 2 and Sarah Desgagnes at 2050 - Dec 11 - Algoscotia eta 2245

Port Weller anchorage - anchored - Dec 11 - Federal Leda (Mhl) at 0536 and Harbour Fountain (Por) at 1623 - departed - Dec 11 - Bluewing (Cyp) at 0002, Federal Biscay (Mhl) at 1115, Tundra (Cyp) at 1200, Maria Desgagnes at 1215 approx., Onego Traveller (Lbr) (ex Jana-17) at 1400, Harbour Fountain (Por) etd 2300 for the canal - Dec 12 - Federal Leda (Mhl) etd 0200

Welland Canal docks - Dec 11 - Finnborg (Nld) stopped wharf 2 at 0336 and Algonova stopped wharf 2 at 0745 - departed - Algonova at 1910 eastbound

Hamilton - arrivals - Dec 11 - Federal Seto (Mhl) at 0802 - docked - Nov 17 - Rt Hon Paul J Martin at 1337 - Stelco dock 16-2 "lay-over" - Nov 29 - Federal Ems (Mhl) at 0540 - Dec 8 - Federal Churchill at 2023 and Federal Mackinac (Mhl) at 1330 - Dec 9 - Helena G (Por) (ex Redhead-18) at 1257 from the anchorage , Mirella S (Mlt) (ex SCT Matterhorn-17, MCT Matterhorn-15, launched as HHL Arctic) at 1614 and Federal Nakagawa (Mhl) at 1950 from the anchorage - Dec 10 - tug Everlast & Norman McLeod at 1403 and Hinch Spirit at 2015 - departed - Dec 10 - Onego Traveller (Lbr) (ex Jana-17) at 2349, Carolus Magnus (Bds) (ex SCT Breithorn-17, SCT Breithorn-16, launched as HHL Celtic at 2355 for Sarnia - Dec 11 - Amstelborg (Nld) at 1453 bound Fort Lauderdale

Bronte - Dec 11 - Sarah Desgagnes at 1109

Clarkson - departed - Dec 11 - Algoma Transport at 0507 westbound

Toronto - arrival - Dec 10 - McKeil Spirit at 2220

Oshawa - arrival - Dec 10 - Lake Erie (Atg) (ex Hanse Gate-19, CL Hanse Gate-15, Federal Matane-11) at 0920 - docked - Dec 9 - Johanna G (Por) (ex Redhead-18) at 1513

 

Storms, erosion and algae blooms part of 'new normal' for Lake Superior, report says

12/12 - Duluth, MN - Increasingly larger storms, more frequent heavy rains and higher water levels — likely spurred by global climate change — are not only roiling the waters of Lake Superior but also damaging the big lake’s water quality.

That’s the analysis of a “white paper’’ report released Tuesday by researchers at Northland College’s Mary Griggs Burke Center for Freshwater Innovation in Ashland.

The problem is especially pronounced along the South Shore, where erodible clay soils are sloughing into the lake, increasing sedimentation and contributing to the first widespread algae blooms ever noticed in Lake Superior.

Scientists began paying closer attention to so-called super storms in the Northland after the 2012 flood event in Duluth, when nearly 10 inches of rain fell in one June storm. Similar “1,000-year’’ or “500-year” storms hit parts of the region again in 2016 and 2018.

Those rainstorms resulted in widespread urban flooding, blown-out bridges and culverts, sewer system overflows, agricultural runoff and more than $150 million in damages combined, the report noted.

And in the past three years, fall and spring windstorms have combined with near-record high Lake Superior water levels to cause millions of dollars of damage to shoreline infrastructure as well as constant flooding headaches for some shoreline residents that continue today.

“We weren’t even thinking about super storms and algal blooms in Lake Superior until a few years ago,” said Matt Hudson, associate director of the Burke Center, in releasing the report. “Since 2012, we’ve been served a new reality and a new set of challenges.”

The report is the result of a daylong summit at Northland College in September to discuss water quality concerns with the International Joint Commission, a bi-national organization charged with assessing water quality goals set out in the 1972 Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement between the U.S. and Canada. The Burke Center convened a mix of experts from city and tribal governments, state and federal agencies and academia to examine water quality issues along the south shore of Lake Superior.

“This new normal of extreme weather events is something we’re just starting to understand,” said Valerie Damstra, operations manager with the Burke Center, in a statement.

And among the more noteworthy developments in this storm-driven “new normal” is the appearance of potentially toxic blue-green algal blooms. Brenda Lafrancois, an aquatic ecologist for the Midwest Region of the National Park Service, reported that until 2012, the only reports of algal blooms in western Lake Superior were few and anecdotal.

The 2012 bloom spread along parts of the south shore of Lake Superior in Wisconsin during warm July weather and just a few weeks after the 500-year-storm in Duluth. Then in 2018, following the 1,000-year-storm near Ashland, another bloom stretched roughly 80 miles from Duluth to areas near Ashland.

Duluth News Tribune

 

Lay-up reports needed

12/12 - As the end of the shipping season approaches, please send reports of vessel lay-ups to news@boatnerd.net. This will help us compile our annual lay-up list. Include vessel name, port and lay-up dock name.

Click here to view the Lay-Up List

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  December 12

On 12 December 1898, FANNY H (wooden propeller tug, 54 foot, 16 gross tons, built in 1890, at Bay City, Michigan) was sold by J. R. Hitchcock to the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers. She underwent a major rebuild in 1908, when she was lengthened to 60 feet.

The push tug PRESQUE ISLE was launched December 12, 1972, as (Hull #322) by the Halter Marine Services, Inc., New Orleans, Louisiana.

SPINDLETOP, e.) BADGER STATE was launched December 12, 1942, for the United States Maritime Commission.

WHEAT KING returned to Port Weller Dry Docks on December 12, 1975, for lengthening to the maximum Seaway size of 730 feet overall for the iron ore and grain trade, thus ending her salt water activities.

One unusual trip for the WOODLAND occurred when she arrived at Toronto, Ontario on December 12, 1987, to load a 155-foot, 135-ton self-unloading unit for delivery to the Verolme Shipyard in Brazil, where the Govan-built Panamax bulk carrier CSL INNOVATOR was being converted to a self-unloader.

On Monday December 12, 1898, the AURORA was fast in the ice at Amherstburg, Ontario, when a watchman smelled smoke. The crew tried to put out the fire, but to no avail. They were taken off the burning vessel by the tug C A LORMAN. The ship burned to the water's edge, but was salvaged and rebuilt as a barge.

On December 12, 1956, the once-proud passenger vessels EASTERN STATES and GREATER DETROIT were taken out onto Lake St. Clair where they were set afire. All the superstructure was burned off and the hulls were taken to Hamilton, Ontario, where they were scrapped in 1957.

On 12 December 1872, the Port Huron Times listed the following vessels at winter lay-up at Sarnia, Ontario: Schooners: MARY E PEREW, KINGFISHER, UNADILLA, ONEONTA, AMERICAN, J G MASTEN, PELICAN, UNION, B ALLEN, and CAMDEN; Brigs: DAVID A WELLS, WAGONER, and FRANK D BARKER; Barks: C T MAPLE, EMALINE BATES, and D A VAN VALKENBURG; Steamer: MANITOBA.

On 12 December 1877, U.S. Marshall Matthews sold the boiler and machinery of the CITY OF PORT HURON at auction in Detroit, Michigan. Darius Cole submitted the winning bid of $1,000.

1898: The wooden passenger and freight carrier SOO CITY sank at the dock in Holland, Mi after bucking ice while inbound.

1925: SIR THOMAS SHAUGHNESSY stranded on a rocky shoal inside the breakwall at Fairport, Ohio. Hull repairs were listed at over $18,000.

1966: AMBROSE SHEA, a new Canadian carferry, was hit by a flash fire while under construction by Marine Industries Ltd. at Sorel, Quebec, and sustained over $1 million in damage. Completion of the vessel was delayed by 3 months before it could enter service between North Sydney, NS and Argentia, Newfoundland. The ship arrived at Aliaga, Turkey, for scrapping as d) ERG on June 22, 2000.

1972: SIR JAMES DUNN went aground in the St. Lawrence near the Thousand Islands Bridge while enroute to Sorel with grain.

1990: CLIPPER MAJESTIC was abandoned by the crew due to an engineroom fire off the coast of Peru. The vessel had been through the Seaway as a) MILOS ISLAND in 1981, MAJESTIC in 1989 and was renamed c) CLIPPER MAJESTIC at Toronto that fall. The damaged ship was towed to Callao, Peru, on December 13, 1990, and repaired. It also traded inland as d) MILLENIUM MAJESTIC in 1999 and was scrapped at Alang, India, as e) MYRA in 2012.

2009: The Canada Steamship Lines bulk carrier SPRUCEGLEN (ii) went aground near Sault Ste. Marie and had to go to Thunder Bay for repairs.

2010: The tug ANN MARIE sank in the Saginaw River while tied up for the winter. It was salvaged a few days later.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Jody Aho, Gordon Shaw, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Woman dies after falling near ship docked at Port of Burns Harbor

12/11 - Burns Harbor, IN – A 30-year-old woman died Monday after falling near a ship docked in the Port of Burns Harbor.

Sara Murawski, of Kinde, Michigan, fell about 3:45 p.m. between the ship and ArcelorMittal Steel's J Dock while trying to grab her belongings onshore, according to the Indiana Department of Natural Resources. She wasn't wearing a life jacket and quickly slipped below the surface, preventing nearby witnesses from saving her.

Almost 45 minutes later, the 30-year-old deckhand, who just returned after several weeks of work, was rescued from 32 feet of water by a diver with the Porter Fire Department. She then was pulled onto a U.S. Coast Guard vessel.

Medics initiated CPR before transporting Murawski to Porter Regional Hospital in Valparaiso, where she later died. Her death is being investigated by the DNR's conservation officers and the Porter County coroner.

"The investigation is ongoing," DNR officials said in a release Tuesday morning. "Although an official cause of death has not been determined, the incident is believed to be an accidental drowning. Foul play is not suspected. Family has been notified."

Murawski fell near the Wilfred Sykes, an ore boat, according to a statement from ArcelorMittal. The company is working with Central Marine Logistics, which manages the Wilfred Sykes, captain and crew, to investigate the incident.

"ArcelorMittal's thoughts and prayers are with the family and friends of the deckhand during this challenging time," a spokesman said Monday evening.

NE Indiana Times

 

Lakes limestone trade up 8 percent in November

12/11 - Cleveland, OH – Shipments of limestone on the Great Lakes totaled 3 million tons in November, an increase of 8 percent compared to a year ago. Limestone cargos were also 8 percent above the month’s 5-year average.

Loadings from U.S. quarries increased 12.2 percent from 2018 to 2.6 million tons. Shipments from Canadian quarries totaled 429,649 tons, a decrease of 12.1 percent.

Year-to-date the limestone trade stands at 30.2 million tons, an increase of 11.2 percent compared to a year ago. Loadings from Michigan and Ohio quarries increased 12.2 percent to 24.8 million tons, while shipments from Ontario quarries total 5.4 million tons, an increase of nearly 330,000 tons.

Lake Carriers’ Association

 

Tug Anglian Lady, barge still aground in the St. Clair cutoff channel

12/11 - On Monday morning, the tug Anglian Lady / barge Ironmaster were reported aground adjacent to Lt X32 St Clair cutoff channel. On Tuesday night the tug Pride was docked north of Lambton, Ont., while the tug and barge were still aground. Photos on social media show the Ironmaster’s bow in contact with Lt X32.

 

Port Reports -  December 11

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day's news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known). Reporters needed for Lake Michigan ports, Marquette, St. Marys River, Saginaw River and ports such as Johnstown and Prescott, ON. If you would like to see your port represented, please consider becoming a news page volunteer and send us your information.

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
The only harbor traffic in Duluth on Tuesday was Algoma Enterprise, which arrived at 01:45 with salt to unload at Compass Minerals. She was still discharging as of 20:00. Drawsko continued taking on wheat at Riverland Ag on Tuesday and Alina was still unloading project equipment at Port Terminal. In Superior, James R. Barker spent Tuesday loading iron ore at Burlington Northern, and had no departure time listed. American Spirit was anchored off the Superior entry waiting for her turn at the dock.

Two Harbors-Silver Bay, MN – Gary A. Putney
As of 19:40 on Dec. 10th the Roger Blough was still at South of #2 in Two Harbors. The Presque Isle arrived Two Harbors on 15:30 for North of #2 lay-by. The Algoma Equinox got underway off Duluth on Dec. 10th at 12:20 and went up to Two Harbors and stopped off Flood Bay waiting for the Blough to depart. There is no scheduled inbound traffic for Two Harbors on Dec. 11th. As of 19:40 on Dec. 10th the Indiana Harbor continued to load at Northshore Mining in Silver Bay. Tentatively due Silver Bay on Dec. 11th are the Herbert C. Jackson that will be arriving after unloading stone in the Twin Ports. Also due Silver Bay is the American Mariner.

Thunder Bay, ON
Monday; 23:18 Victoriaborg shifted to the main anchorage. 23:54 Algoma Niagara departed for Hamilton. Tuesday; 0:26 Algoma Conveyor at the G3 elevator to load wheat.

Northern Lake Huron ports
Thessalon: Tuesday; 7:00 Algoma Innovator weighed anchor and proceeded to the dock to unload road salt. She departed at 16:25 for Detroit.

Calcite: Tuesday; 0:06 Dorothy Ann arrived and went to anchor. 4:59 Great Republic departed for Saginaw. 9:21 Manitowoc departed and is down bound on Lake Huron. 9:24 John J Boland arrived to load.

Stoneport: Tuesday John G Munson departed for Fairport. 12:25 Algoma Compass arrived to load.

Alpena: Monday; 23:58 Samuel De Champlain arrived to load cement products and departed on Tuesday at 6:13 for Milwaukee.

Marine City, MI – Dawn C. Roberts, Rich Larson
Calumet arrived at the Marine City aggregates dock around noon. Other traffic included downbound John G., Munson 1:30pm; Upbound Iver Bright 2pm; upbound Kaye E. Barker 2:15pm; downbound T&B Defiance/Ashtabula 2:30pm; upbound Canadian Coast Guard F&O vessel Limnos 2:45pm. Weather 31degrees F, winds light from the NNW, overcast, surface light chop.

Detroit-River Rouge – Raymond H
Tuesday Arrivals: Kaye E Barker arrived at AK Steel to unload ore. Philip R Clarke arrived at Nicholson's Detroit Terminal to unload stone. Walter J McCarthy Jr arrived at Zug Island to unload ore. Wilf Seymour and Allouette Spirit arrived at Zug Island to load coke.

Cleveland, OH – Bill Kloss
Petite Forte remained at St. Marys Cement and Federal Elbe was still at the Port on Tuesday. Algoma Buffalo was due in the evening from Port Weller. Sam Laud departed at 12:10.

Welland Canal and vicinity – Tuesday December 10, 2019 ... Barry Andersen
Nanticoke - arrivals - departed - Dec 9 - Algoterra at 1709 for the anchorage -

Long Point Bay anchorage - Dec 5 - Algoma Hansa at 1733 - Dec 8 - Kitikmeot W at 0452 from the dock - Dec 9 - Algoterra at 1733 from the dock

Port Colborne anchorage - Dec 8 - Algonova at 0438 - departed - Dec 10 at 1817 eastbound

Welland Canal upbound - Dec 9 - CSL Assiniboine at 1310 and Algoma Guardian at 2030 to the anchorage - Dec 10 - CSL Niagara at 0534, Algoma Guardian at 1846 stopping wharf 2, Solina (Bhs)

Welland Canal downbound - Dec 9 - Florence Spirit at 1457, Evans Spirit at 1914, Bluewing (Cyp) at 2049 and tug Everlast & Norman McLeod at 2251 - Dec 10 - Federal Biscay (Mhl) at 0735, Tundra (Cyp) at 1040, Algoma Discovery at 1415, Finnborg (Nld) at 1608, Federal Leda (Mhl) at 1711, Kaministiqua at 1745 and Sarah Desgagnes eta 2025

Port Weller anchorage - anchored - Dec 9 - Maria Desgagnes at 144, Hinch Spirit at 2015 and Algoma Guardian at 2115 - Dec 10 - Bluewing (Cyp) at 0914 and Federal Biscay (Mhl) at 1750 - departed - Dec 9 - Pacific Huron (Atg) at 2320 for Antwerp - Dec 10 - Adfines Sea (Mlt) (ex Osttank Norway-12) at 1305 eastbound, Hinch Spirit at 1328 to Hamilton and Algoma Guardian at 1814 for the canal stopping wharf 2

Welland Canal docks - Dec 10 Algoma Guardian stopped wharf 2 at 1915

Hamilton - arrivals - Dec 10 - tug Everlast & Norman McLeod at 1403 and Hinch Spirit at 2015 - anchored - Dec 9 - Helena G (Por) (ex Redhead-18) at 1315 - docked - Nov 17 - Rt Hon Paul J Martin at 1337 - Stelco dock 16-2 "lay-over" - Nov 29 - Federal Ems (Mhl) at 0540 - Dec 7 - Amstelborg (Nld) at 1953 - Dec 8 - Federal Churchill at 2023 and Federal Mackinac (Mhl) at 1330 - Dec 9 - Onego Traveller (Lbr) (ex Jana-17) at 0319 Carolus Magnus (Bds) (ex SCT Breithorn-17, SCT Breithorn-16, launched as HHL Celtic at 1112, Mirella S (Mlt) (ex SCT Matterhorn-17, MCT Matterhorn-15, launched as HHL Arctic) at 1614 and Federal Nakagawa at 1950 from the anchorage

Clarkson - arrivals - Dec 9 - Blair McKeil at 1057 and Algoma Transport at 1135 - departed - Dec 10 - Blair McKeil at 1310 eastbound

Mississauga - departed Dec 9 - Adfines Sea (ex Osttank Norway-12) at 0305 and Hinch Spirit at 1816 to Port Weller anchorage

Toronto - arrivals - Dec 9 - none - departed - Dec 10 - tug Sea Eagle II & St Marys Cement II at 1723 eastbound

Oshawa - arrival - Dec 9 - Johanna G (Por) (ex Redhead-18) at 1513

 

Steel imports have grabbed 19% of the market share this year

12/11 - NW Indiana, IN - – Steel imports have grabbed 19% of the U.S. market share so far this year, including just 14% in November. The United States imported 1.8 million tons of steel in November, according to the U.S. Commerce Department’s most recent Steel Import Monitoring and Analysis. That's down 28.1% from the 2.59 million permitted tons in October and a 14.4% decrease from the October preliminary import total of 2.17 million tons.

In November, imports of finished steel products that require no further processing in the United States, such as at the more than 20 steel companies at the Port of Indiana-Burns Harbor, fell to 1.2 million tons, down 18.8% from 1.47 million tons in October, according to the Washington, D.C.-based trade association The American Iron and Steel Institute. The offshore country with the largest finished steel import permit applications were South Korea, Japan, The Netherlands, Germany and Taiwan.

Last month, imports of black plate rose by 353%, cut lengths plates by 39%, line pipe by 28%, reinforcing bars by 18% and hot rolled bars by 16%.

For the first 11 months of the year, the United States imported 26.6 million tons of steel, down 16.3% from the previously year, likely as a result of the Section 232 tariffs of 25% on most foreign-made steel. Imports of finished steel products dropped by 18.6% to 19.5 million tons during the period, as compared to the same time a year earlier, according to the American Iron and Steel Institute.

So far this year, imports of black plate have risen by 90%, steel piling by 34% and tin free steel by 20%.

The largest offshore suppliers, excluding Canada and Mexico in North America, through the first 11 months of 2019 have included South Korean, Japan and Germany, according to the American Iron and Steel Institute. Imports from South Korea are down 10%, Japan 9% and Germany 21%.

NE Indiana Times

 

Toledo Christmas Tree Ship delivers the goods

12/11 - Toledo, OH – The air had a bit of a bite, but the skies were dry as the tugboat Josephine eased up late Saturday morning to the dock at the National Museum of the Great Lakes with Santa Claus waving to a waiting crowd and three dozen Christmas trees on its transom.

“It’s a great day for a boat ride,” Santa said in between ho-ho-hos as he strode from the boat to the museum to hear children’s Christmas wishes, while members of the tug’s crew set about unloading the pine-scented holiday cargo.

Among those taking a tree home were Ashley Lewandowski of Oregon and sons Shane, 10, Sam, 7, and Spencer, 3, who received one of several bought by anonymous donors and distributed by the East Toledo Family Center.

“It’s our first time getting a real tree — we just put hardwood floors in the house,” Ms. Lewandowski said after the boys had made their choice.

The event, now in its seventh year, is the local museum’s commemoration of a historical Great Lakes tradition of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, when schooners made their final runs of the season delivering Christmas trees harvested in northern Michigan to cities around Lake Michigan.

Most celebrated of those was the schooner Rouse Simmons, which over several decades delivered thousands of trees to Chicago until it sank during such a voyage in 1912. The Coast Guard Cutter Mackinaw now re-enacts that route annually, delivering donated trees to needy families with this year’s trip having arrived Friday in Chicago.

In Toledo, the George Gradel Co. donates the use of one of its tugboats and its employees’ time to shuttle trees to the museum from its East Toledo dock, far enough downriver to create an illusion for the youngest that the trees have made a much longer journey.

Along with its festive cargo, the tug this year was decorated with garlands and bows, wrapped boxes, and a faux sleigh for Santa, and Gradel family members offered celebratory ornaments to all in the welcoming crowd, not just the tree recipients.

“It’s been getting increasingly elaborate each year,” Ellen Kennedy, the museum’s director of education and visitor experience, said of the tugboat decorations. Ms. Kennedy said the Toledo tree tug has typically carried between 30 and 40 trees each year. The museum takes reservations and accepts donations up until early the week before delivery.

Beverly Fanning of Waterville, who bought a tree from the museum for a third straight year, said she hadn’t known about the donation opportunity and would look into that for next year.

“We just enjoy the experience — we like to help and support the museum,” said Ms. Fanning, whose son, 6-year-old Adonis Simmons, chose a tree that had a mixture of green and blue-green needles.

National Museum of the Great Lakes

 

Old 1927 Chevrolet coupe found intact in Lake Huron shipwreck

12/11 - There have been so many shipwrecks and sinkings in the Great Lakes, it’s just about impossible to find them all. One of them that was discovered in 2018 was the 1928 wreck of the Manasoo in Lake Huron. The ship was sitting in a little over 200 feet of water in the Georgian Bay near Owen Sound, Canada.

The cool things about this discovery are:
1) the ship looks pretty much intact and
2) an old 1927 Chevrolet AA Capitol 2-door Coupe was found stored inside

Some people were quick to speculate that the car was eliminated by Al Capone or some other gangster…not so. The car was on board being transported by its owner, Donald Wallace. Wallace was just one of five people who survived the wreck – the other four included the captain and three shipmen. Sixteen others perished in the wreck, as well as 116 head of cattle, all owned by Wallace. It's speculated that the constant shifting of all that heavy cattle played a part in the sinking.

The Manasoo wrecked while trying to make it through a storm in September 1928; it sank in only three minutes.

The Great Lakes Shipwreck Preservation Society isn’t holding out hope for the ship, but the car could be saved and put on display…but only if the ship is torn apart so they can get to it.

View images at this link: https://99wfmk.com/manasoo-wreck/

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  December 11

On 11 December 2002, after last minute dredging operations were completed, Nadro Marine’s tugs SEAHOUND and VAC took the World War II Canadian Naval Tribal-class destroyer H.M.C.S. HAIDA from her mooring place at Toronto’s Ontario Place to Port Weller Dry Docks where a $3.5M refit was started in preparation for the vessel to start her new career as a museum ship in Hamilton, Ontario.

TEXACO CHIEF (Hull#193) was launched December 11, 1968, at Collingwood, Ontario, by Collingwood Shipyards Ltd.

The H. LEE WHITE collided with the Greek salty GEORGIOS on December 11, 1974, near St. Clair, Michigan, and had to return to Nicholson's dock at Detroit, Michigan for inspection.

On December 11, 1979, while about 11 miles off Manitou Island near the Keweenaw Peninsula, the ASHLAND's engine stalled due to a faulty relay switch. Caught in heavy weather and wallowing in the wave troughs, she put out a distress call. True to Great Lakes tradition, four vessels immediately came to her assistance: two 1,000 footers, LEWIS WILSON FOY and EDWIN H. GOTT, along with WILLIS B. BOYER and U.S.C.G. cutter MESQUITE.

WILLIAM CLAY FORD loaded her last cargo at Duluth on December 11, 1984.

PERE MARQUETTE 21 passed down the Welland Canal (loaded with the remnants of Port Huron's Peerless Cement Dock) on December 11, 1974, towed by the tugs SALVAGE MONARCH and DANIEL MC ALLISTER on the way to Sorel, Quebec where she was laid up.

The fishing boat LINDA E vanished on Lake Michigan along with its three crewmen on December 11, 1998.

Upper Lakes Shipping Ltd.’s WHEAT KING was laid up for the last time December 11, 1981.

On 11 December 1872, the Port Huron Times listed the following vessels in winter lay-up in Port Huron: Sailing Craft: A H MOSS, FOREST HUNTER. MARY E PEREW, SEA BIRD, REINDEER, T S SKINNER, L W PERRY, ADAIN, LITTLE NELLIE, MAGGIE, PRINCE ALFRED, CAPE HORM, KITTIE, JOHNSON (wrecker), CHRISTIANA, HOWE, C G MEISEL, AUNT RUTH, W R HANNA, IRONSIDES, GOLDEN FLEECE, JOHN L GROSS, WARRINGTON, ANGLO SAXON, MOORE, LADY ESSEX, ANNIE, FORWARDER (sunk), GROTON, NORTHWEST, FRED H MORSE, GEM OF THE LAKES, D J AUSTIN, CZAR, JAMAICA, ANNIE (scow), AND HATTIE. Side wheel Steamers: 8TH OHIO, WYOMING (lighter). Propeller Steam Barges: W E WETMORE, SANILAC, CITY OF DETROIT. Tugs: KATE MOFFAT, TAWAS, HITTIE HOYT, FRANK MOFFAT, J H MARTIN, JOHN PRIDGEON, BROCKWAY, GLADIATOR, CORAL, GRACE DORNER (small passenger vessel), AND C M FARRAR.

On 11 December 1895, GEORGE W. ADAMS (wooden schooner-barge, 231 foot, 1444 gross tons, built in 1875, at Toledo, Ohio) was in tow of the steamer CALEDONIA with a load of coal, bound from Cleveland for Chicago. Her hull was crushed by ice and she sank near Colchester Shoals on Lake Erie. A salvage operation on her the following summer was a failure.

1911: A fire broke out in a wooden grain elevator at Owen Sound. The KEEWATIN was moored nearby for the winter but not yet locked in ice. The ship was moved to safety but the elevator was destroyed.

1963: MANCOX went aground in Lake St. Clair, near Peche Island, enroute from Sault Ste. Marie to River Rouge.

1984: The Yugoslavian freighter BEOGRAD, outbound in the Seaway with soybeans for Brazil, collided with the FEDERAL DANUBE at anchor near Montreal and had to be beached. The hull was refloated and arrived at Montreal for repairs on December 27. It was scrapped at Gadani Beach, Pakistan, as b) MURIEL in 1999. FEDERAL DANUBE (i) now operates for Canada Steamship Lines as c) OAKGLEN (iii).

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series and Boatnerd.com.

 

Michigan deckhand drowns after fall into Lake Michigan

12/10 - Burns Harbor, Ind. A Michigan woman who was a deckhand on an ore boat has died after falling into Lake Michigan at the Port of Indiana-Burns Harbor, authorities said.

Sara Murawski, 30, of Kinde, Michigan, had just completed a work trip of several weeks and was onshore retrieving her belongings Monday afternoon when she fell between a dock and the boat, Indiana conservation officers said. A witness entered the water in an attempt to rescue Murawski but she slipped below the surface before he could reach her and did not immediately resurface, officers said. She was not wearing a life jacket.

A diver reached her in 32 feet of water about 45 minutes later and brought her to the surface and a U.S. Coast Guard vessel, but she was pronounced dead at a hospital, officers said.

Murawski’s death is believed to be an accidental drowning, officers said.

Murawski fell at the site of Wilfred Sykes, an ore boat, according to a statement from ArcelorMittal, the steel company that operates the dock. The company is working with Central Marine Logistics, which manages the Wilfred Sykes captain and crew, to investigate the incident.

Burns Harbor is a few miles east of Gary.

Associated Press

 

Tug Anglian Lady aground in the St. Clair cutoff channel

12/10 - On Monday morning, the tug Anglian Lady was reported aground by Lt X32 St Clair cutoff channel. Later in the day, the Sarnia-based tug Pride appeared to be assisting the Anglian Lady. On Monday night the Pride was docked north of Lambton, Ont., while Anglian Lady was still aground, with her AIS reporting the same. AIS says she was bound for Detroit, likely with a Purvis Marine barge.

 

Lay-up reports needed

12/10 - As the end of the shipping season approaches, please send reports of vessel lay-ups to news@boatnerd.net. This will help us compile our annual lay-up list. Include vessel name, port and lay-up dock name.

Click here to view the Lay-Up List

 

Port Reports -  December 10

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day's news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known). Reporters needed for Lake Michigan ports, Marquette, St. Marys River, Saginaw River and ports such as Johnstown and Prescott, ON. If you would like to see your port represented, please consider becoming a news page volunteer and send us your information.

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
There was no vessel traffic through the Duluth entry on Monday, and the only vessels in port were Drawsko, loading wheat at Riverland Ag, and Alina, unloading project equipment at Port Terminal. Algoma Equinox still had her anchor down offshore waiting for dock space in Two Harbors. At the Superior entry, James R. Barker arrived at 13:13 Monday and moored at Burlington Northern for a load of iron ore pellets. She is expected to depart mid-morning Tuesday. American Spirit was anchored offshore and is next in line to load.

Two Harbors-Silver Bay, MN – Gary A. Putney
Edgar B. Speer departed Two Harbors on Dec. 9th at 00:15 for Gary. The Anderson then shifted from North of #2 lay-by to South of #2 and departed on Dec. 9th at approx. 10:30 for Zug Island. The Roger Blough arrived off Two Harbors the morning of Dec. 9th and entered at approx. 13:53 for South of #2. The Algoma Equinox continues to be anchored off the Twin Ports while she awaits South of #2 in Two Harbors. Due Two Harbors on Dec. 10th is the Presque Isle. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay saw the Indiana Harbor arrive on Dec. 9th at 13:27. It couldn't enter until the wind subsided. There is no traffic scheduled for Silver Bay on Dec. 10th.

Thunder Bay, ON
Sunday; 21:18 Federal Cedar arrived at Viterra A to load grain. Monday; 10:11 Federal Wesser arrived at Thunder Bay Terminals to load potash. 11:00 The saltie Maccoa arrived and went to anchor. 11:39 G3 Marquis arrived and went to anchor. 12:29 Acadia Desgagnes arrived at Keefer Terminal to unload. 17:31 Tim S Dool departed and is down bound on Lake Superior. 17:34 G3 Marquis weighed anchor and proceeded to the Richardson Main Terminal to load wheat.

Northern Lake Huron ports
Spragge: Monday; 9:22 Algoma Compass arrived to unload slag and departed at 18:06. Thessalon: Monday; 18:11 Algoma Innovator arrived from Goderich with a load of road salt and went to anchor.

Meldrum Bay: Sunday; 22:19 Herbert C Jackson departed for Duluth Superior.

Calcite: Monday; 6:24 Philip R Clarke departed for Detroit. 11:59 Great Republic arrived to load. 13:13 Manitowoc arrived to load.

Stoneport: Sunday; 23:52 John G Munson arrived to load.

Alpena: Sunday; 21:36 Undaunted arrived to unload at the Lafarge plant and departed Monday at 8:18 for Detroit.

Midland: Monday; 14:10 Whitefish Bay arrived at ADM to unload wheat.

Detroit-River Rouge – Raymond H
Monday Arrivals: Calusa Coast and Delaware and Iver Bright-arrived at the Marathon Asphalt Terminal to load.

Cleveland, OH – Bill Kloss
Federal Elbe arrived at the port, Dock 22E at 06:40 Monday. Petite Forte is at St. Marys Cement, arriving at 04:48 on 12/08. Sam Laud is on the shuttles.

Welland Canal and vicinity vessel passages – Monday December 9, 2019 ... Barry Andersen

Nanticoke - arrivals - Dec 9 - Algoterra at 0655 - docked - Dec 7 - Algoma Transport at 1908 - departed Dec 8 at 1552 for the canal

Long Point Bay anchorage - Dec 5 - Algoma Hansa at 1733 - Dec 8 - Kitikmeot W at 0452 from the dock - departed Dec 7 - Algoterra at 0650 for the dock

Buffalo - Dec 8 - NACC Argonaut at 0159 - departed Dec 9 at 0814 eastbound

Port Colborne anchorage - Dec 8 - Algonova at 0438 from Nanticoke - departed Dec 9 at 2045 for the canal

Welland Canal upbound - Dec 8 - Frontenac at 1439 and Belasitza (Mlt) at 1557 - Dec 9 - CSL Assiniboine at 1310, Algoma Buffalo at 0830, CSL Laurentien at 0927, CSL Assiniboine at 1310 and Algoma Guardian eta 2030

Welland Canal downbound - Dec 8 - Algoma Transport at 2112 - Dec 9 - Maria Desgagnes at 0605, John D Leitch at 0651, NACC Argonaut at 0948, Florence Spirit at 1457, Algonorth at 1525, Evans Spirit at 1914, Bluewing (Cyp) at 2049 and tug Everlast & Norman McLeod eta 2230,

Port Weller anchorage - anchored - Dec 8 - Pacific Huron (Atg) at 0834 - Dec 9 - Adfines Sea (Mlt) (ex Osttank Norway-12) at 0900,Maria Desgagnes at 1445, Hinch Spirit at 2045 approx. and Algoma Guardian at 2100 approx - departed - Dec 8 - Irma (Cyp) at 2300 - Dec 9 - Elbeborg (Nld) at 0100 and tug Michigan & Great Lakes at 0745 - all eastbound

Welland Canal docks - Dec 9 - Florence Spirit stopped wharf 16 at 1527 and John D Leitch stopped wharf 12 at 0858

Hamilton - arrival - Dec 9 - Onego Traveller (Lbr) (ex Jana17) at 0319 Carolus Magnus (Bds) (ex SCT Breithorn-17, SCT Breithorn-16, launched as HHL Celtic at 1112, Mirella S (Mlt) (ex SCT Matterhorn-17, MCT Matterhorn-15, launched as HHL Arctic) at 1614 - anchored - Dec 8 - Federal Nakagawa (Mhl) at 0040 - Dec 9 - Helena G (Por) (ex Redhead-18) at 1315 - Nov 17 - Rt Hon Paul J Martin at 1337 - Nov 29 - Federal Ems (Mhl) at 0540 - Dec 7 - Amstelborg (Nld) at 1953 - Dec 8 - Federal Churchill at 2023 and Federal Mackinac (Mhl) at 1330 - Dec 8 - Algoma Buffalo at 2045 - departed - Dec 9 - Algoma Buffalo at 0625 westbound, Pacific Huron (Atg) at 0633 for Port Weller anchorage then Belgium

Clarkson - arrivals - Dec 9 - Blaie McKeil at 1057 and Algoma Transport at 1135

Mississauga - docked - Dec 8 - Hinch Spirit at 1938 - departed Dec 9 - Adfines Sea (ex Osttank Norway-12) at 0305 for Port Weller anchorage

Toronto - arrivals - Dec 9 - none - docked - Dec 8 - tug Sea Eagle II & St Marys Cement II at 0939 at 1552 - departed - Dec 8 - McKeil Spirit at 2138 eastbound - Dec 9 CSL Laurentien at 0745 westbound

Oshawa - arrival - Dec 9 - Johanna G (Por) (ex Redhead-18) at 1513 - departed - Dec 9 - Helena G. (Por) (ex Garganey-17) at 0827 for Hamilton

 

Obituary: John M. Vournakis

12/10 - John M. Vournakis passed away unexpectedly at his home in Sault Ste. Marie. Mich., on December 4, 2019.

John was born on March 7, 1930, in Sault Ste. Marie to Michael and Helen Vournakis. After completing high school graduation, he worked as a guard for the Corps of Engineers before joining the Army and serving in the Korean War. In 1955, he began a 38-year career as a Great Lakes sailor. Over the years he was a watchman on many U.S. Steel vessels and was aboard for the maiden voyage of the Roger Blough, making him a “Plank Owner.” He also sailed on the Sewell Avery, Philip R. Clarke, Enders M. Voorhees, Arthur M. Anderson, Benjamin F. Fairless and Edwin H. Gott. As a watchman, John was able to develop his skills and a lifelong dedication and passion for photographing freighters and, later in his life, trains. He was a familiar sight in the Soo, and was often seen riding his bike on his way to photograph the many ships and trains passing through the area. In 2015, John was recognized by the Marine Historical Society of Detroit with the Historian of the Year award.

John is survived by his sister Efthimia (Vournakis) Mente and his niece Suzanna McArdle. He is also survived by his great niece Mavis McArdle and several cousins, including Nick Lambros of Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan. John had many friends, in particular Captain John Wellington, also of Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan.

John was predeceased by his mother Helen Vournakis and father Michael Vour-nakis. He was also predeceased by his brother-in-law Bernard Mente and his nephew Michael Mente.

Visitation will be on Saturday, December 14, 2019, from 12-1 pm at St. George Greek Church, in Sault Ste. Marie, with service to follow at 1 pm. John’s final resting place will be at Riverside Cemetery. His family asks that any memorial contributions be made to St. George Greek Church, 511 Court St., Sault Ste. Marie, MI 49783.

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  December 10

The steamer EDWARD Y. TOWNSEND loaded the last cargo of ore for the 1942 season at Marquette.

CEDARGLEN, a.) WILLIAM C. ATWATER, loaded her last cargo at Thunder Bay, Ontario on December 10, 1984, carrying grain for Goderich, Ontario.

Cleveland-Cliffs Iron Co. of Cleveland, Ohio bought NOTRE DAME VICTORY on December 10, 1950. She would later become b.) CLIFFS VICTORY.

IRVIN L. CLYMER was laid up at Superior, Wisconsin on December 10, 1985, for two seasons before returning to service April 30, 1988.

An explosion occurred in IMPERIAL LEDUC's, b.) NIPIGON BAY ) forward tanks on December 10, 1951. This happened while her crew was cleaning and butterworthing the tanks. Five crewmembers were injured with one eventually dying in the hospital. Multiple explosions caused extensive damage in excess of $500,000.

On December 10, 1905, WILLIAM E. COREY finally was pulled free and refloated after grounding on Gull Island Reef in the Apostle Islands in late November.

FRANK A. SHERMAN laid up for the last time at Toronto, Ontario on December 10, 1981.

Donated by Cleveland-Cliffs to the Great Lakes Historical Society on December 10, 1987, the WILLIAM G. MATHER was to become a museum ship at Cleveland's waterfront.

PAUL H. CARNAHAN and her former fleet mate, GEORGE M. HUMPHREY, arrived safely under tow at Kaohsiung, Taiwan on December 10, 1986, for scrapping.

On 10 December 1891, a fire started on MARY (2-mast wooden schooner, 84 foot, 87 gross tons, built in 1877, at Merriton, Ontario) when an oil stove in the kitchen exploded. The vessel was at anchor at Sarnia, Ontario and damage was estimated at $10,000.

The CORISANE (2-mast wooden schooner-barge, 137 foot, 292 gross tons, built in 1873, at Marine City, Michigan) was tied up alongside MARY and she also caught fire but the flames were quickly extinguished. She was towed away from MARY by the ferry J C CLARK.

PERE MARQUETTE 3 ran aground in 1893, north of Milwaukee.

1922: The wooden freighter JAMES DEMPSEY, built in 1883 as a) JIM SHERIFFS, was destroyed by a fire at Manistee, MI.

1963: The Canadian coastal freighter SAINTE ADRESSE went on the rocks off Escoumins, QC and was leaking in high winds while on a voyage from Montreal to Sept-Iles. Local residents helped lighter the cargo of beer and ale. The remains of the hull were visible at low water for several years.

1975: PAUL THAYER went aground in Lake Erie off Pelee Island. It was lightered to WOLVERINE and released Dec. 12 with extensive damage.

1994: The Maltese registered YIANNIS Z. entered Chaguaramas, Trinidad and Tobago, in leaking condition after apparently hitting bottom while enroute from Manzanillo, Cuba, to Peru. The ship was arrested for non-payment of the crew. The vessel had been a Seaway trader in 1970 as a) MATIJA GUBEC. The hull was sold at public auction on August 28, 1997, and apparently partially dismantled to become a barge. It was noted sinking at its moorings on October 14, 2006, under the name f) KELLYS MARK and subsequent fate is unknown.

2005: JOHN D. LEITCH hit bottom above the Eisenhower Lock and began leaking.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Russ Plumb, Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Port Reports -  December 9

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day's news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known). Reporters needed for Lake Michigan ports, Marquette, St. Marys River, Saginaw River and ports such as Johnstown and Prescott, ON. If you would like to see your port represented, please consider becoming a news page volunteer and send us your information.

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
Manitoulin arrived Duluth from anchor at 01:27 Sunday morning to load iron ore pellets at CN, and her fleetmate Michipicoten was outbound with ore at 02:30. Algoma Conveyor was inbound at 07:53 with salt to discharge at C. Reiss. Manitoulin left port at 10:24 bound for Sault Ste. Marie. Drawsko raised anchor and arrived at 17:54 to load wheat at Riverland Ag, and the saltie Alina was inbound at 20:03 to unload project equipment at Port Terminal. Algoma Conveyor was expected to depart at some point Sunday night once she finished unloading. The only traffic through the Superior entry on Sunday was Stewart J. Cort, which departed at 05:06 for Burns Harbor with iron ore pellets.

Two Harbors-Silver Bay, MN – Gary A. Putney
Walter J. McCarthy Jr. departed Two Harbors on Dec. 7th at 21:06 for Detroit. The Edgar B. Speer arrived Two Harbors on Dec. 7th at 22:42 for South of #2. As of 19:20 on Dec. 8th she was still at the dock, loading for Gary. Continuing at anchor off Duluth at 19:20 on Dec. 8th was the Algoma Equinox awaiting South of #2. Due Two Harbors on Dec. 9th is the Roger Blough that was abeam of Grand Marais, MN at 19:20 on Dec. 8th. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay had no traffic on Dec. 8th. Due Silver Bay on Dec. 9th is the Indiana Harbor that was off the tip of the Keweenaw at 19:20 on Dec. 8th.

Thunder Bay, ON
Saturday; 17:56 Kaministiqua departed. 20:59 Whitefish Bay departed for Midland. Sunday; 0:11 Algoma Discovery departed for Baie Comeau. 0:42 Algoma Niagara arrived at the Superior Elevator to load wheat. 1:13 The saltie Victoriaborg arrived at the Midcontinent Terminal. ( former CN Ore Dock ) 6:23 Tim S Dool arrived at the Richardson Main Terminal to load grain. 15:19 Federal Satsuki arrived at the Richardson Current River Terminal to load grain. 19:59 Baie Comeau departed for Montreal.

Sturgeon Bay, WI
James R Barker left Bay Ship Saturday morning with a destination of Superior after unspecified hull repairs.

Northern Lake Huron ports
On Saturday, a number of boats went to anchor to wait for calmer weather. H Lee White, Defiance and Alpena were at anchor off Grandview south west of Bois Blanc Island. Cason J Callaway went to anchor off of Evergreen Shores north west of Mackinac Island. The tug Spartan went to anchor in North Bay north west of Harborview. Sunday; 12:59 H Lee White weighed anchor and departed for Gary. 16:07 Cason J Callaway weighed anchor and departed for Indiana Harbor. 16:54 Spartan weighed anchor and departed for Trois Riviere. 17:13 Defiance weighed anchor and departed for Charlevoix. 18:05 Alpena weighed anchor and departed for Green Bay.

Meldrum Bay: Sunday;15:19 Herbert C Jackson arrived to finish loading.

Calcite: Sunday; 10:57 Olive L Moore departed for Saginaw.

Stoneport: Saturday; 20:18 Herbert C Jackson arrived to partially load and departed Sunday at 1:14 for Meldrum Bay.

Goderich, ON – Bruce Douglas
Algoma Enterprise cleared 9 pm Saturday, upbound for Duluth laden with salt. Algoma Innovator arrived in Goderich to load salt for Detroit.

Detroit-River Rouge – Raymond H
Sunday Arrivals: Lee A Tregurtha arrived at AK Steel to unload ore. John J Boland arrived at Zug Island to unload coal.

Cleveland, OH – Bill Kloss
Calumet arrived from Fairport at 10:48 Sunday. Sam Laud is on a shuttle.

Welland Canal and vicinity vessel passages – Sunday December 8, Barry Andersen

Nanticoke - arrivals - docked - Dec 7 - Algoma Transport at 1908 - departed Dec 8 - Kitikmeot W at 0355 for the anchorage and Algonova at 0055 eastbound

Long Point Bay anchorage - Dec 4 - Algoterra at 1815, Dec 5 - Algoma Hansa at 1733 - Dec 8 - Kitikmeot W at 0452 from the dock

Port Colborne anchorage - Dec 8 - Algonova at 0438 from Nanticoke

Welland Canal upbound - Dec 7 - CSL Welland at 1248, NACC Argonaut at 1353 and Tecumseh 1836 - Dec 8 - Federal Elbe (Mhl) at 0712, Iver Bright (Nld) at 0857, Wilf Seymour & Alouette Spirit at 1012 and Frontenac at 1439

Welland Canal downbound - Dec 7 - Jana Desgagnes at 0521 stopping wharf 12, Spruceglen at 1304, Ojibway at 1918, Salarium at 1935, tug Sea Eagle II & St Marys Cement II at 2145 - Dec 8 - Irma (Cyp) at 0059 Elbeborg (Nld) at 0218, Maria G (Mlt) (ex Gadwall-17) at 0300, tug Michigan & Great Lakes at 0723, Algoma Buffalo at 0852 and CSL Tadoussac at 1038

Port Weller anchorage - anchored - Dec 8 - Irma (Cyp) at 1154 and Elbeborg (Nld) at 1324 - departed - Dec 8 - Irma (Cyp) etd 2200 approx.

Welland Canal docks - Dec 6 - CSL Tadoussac stopped wharf 16 at 0608 - departed Dec 8 at 1038 eastbound

Hamilton - arrival - Dec 8 - Algoma Buffalo at 2045 - anchored - Dec 8 - Federal Nakagawa (Mhl) at 0037 from the dock - docked - Dec 5 - Pacific Huron (Atg) at 2045 - Nov 17 - Rt Hon Paul J Martin at 1337 - Nov 29 - Federal Ems (Mhl) at 0540 - Dec 7 - Amstelborg (Nld) at 1953 - Dec 8 - Federal Churchill at 2023 from the anchorage and Federal Mackinac (Mhl) at 1330 from the anchorage - departed - Dec 8 - Belasitza (Mlt) at 1340 for Toledo

Clarkson - arrival - Dec 7 - Robert S Pierson at 1206 - departed Dec 7 at 2221 eastbound

Mississauga - arrival - Dec 8 - Hinch Spirit at 1938 - docked - Dec 5 - Adfines Sea (Mlt) (ex Osttank Norway-12) at 2253

Toronto - arrivals - Dec 8 - tug Sea Eagle II & St Marys Cement II at 0939 and CSL Laurentien at 1552 - docked - Dec 5 - McKeil Spirit at 2349

Oshawa - docked - Dec 2 - Helena G. (Por) (ex Garganey-17) at 1403 - departed –

 

Updates

The Great Lakes Bookshelf has been updated.

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  December 9

While tied up at Port Colborne, Ontario, waiting to discharge her cargo of grain, a northeast gale caused the water to lower three feet and left the EDWIN H. OHL (steel propeller bulk freighter, 420 foot, 5141 gross tons, built in 1907, at Wyandotte, Michigan) on the bottom with a list of about one foot. The bottom plating was damaged and cost $3,460.19 to repair.

Cleveland Tankers’ JUPITER (Hull#227) was christened December 9, 1975, at Jennings, Louisiana, by S.B.A. Shipyards, Inc.

JEAN PARISIEN left Quebec City on her maiden voyage December 9, 1977.

CLIFFS VICTORY ran aground December 9, 1976 near Johnson’s Point in the ice -laden Munuscong Channel of the St. Marys River.

The FRANK C. BALL, b.) J.R. SENSIBAR in 1930, c.) CONALLISON in 1981) was launched at Ecorse, Michigan by Great Lakes Engineering Works as (Hull #14) on December 9, 1905.

ARTHUR B. HOMER was towed by the tugs THUNDER CAPE, ELMORE M. MISNER and ATOMIC to Port Colborne, Ontario, December 9, 1986, and was scrapped there the following year.

HILDA MARJANNE was launched December 9, 1943, as a.) GRANDE RONDE (Hull#43) at Portland, Oregon, by Kaiser Co., Inc.

The keel for Hall Corporation of Canada’s SHIERCLIFFE HALL (Hull#248) was laid on December 9, 1949, at Montreal, Quebec by Canadian Vickers Ltd.

On 9 December 1871, CHALLENGE (wooden schooner, 96 foot, 99 tons, built in 1853, at Rochester, New York) missed the piers at Sheboygan, Wisconsin, in heavy weather, stove in some of her planking and sank. She was a particularly sleek craft, actually designed as a yacht and once owned by the U.S. Light House Service as a supply vessel.

On 9 December 1874, the Port Huron Times reported that "the old railroad ferry steamer UNION at Detroit is having machinery taken out and preparing to go into permanent retirement, or perhaps to serve as a floating dining room for railroad passengers."

1910: JOHN SHARPLES of the Great Lakes & St. Lawrence Transportation Co., stranded on Galops Island in the St. Lawrence due to low visibility. The vessel was holed fore and aft and not released until April 1911 with the help of the tug HECLA.

1943: SARNIAN, the first member of what became the Upper Lakes Shipping fleet, stranded on Pointe Isabelle Reef, Lake Superior, while downbound with 162,489 bushels of barley. The vessel was not refloated until July 24, 1944, and never sailed again.

1956: FORT HENRY, a package freighter for Canada Steamship Lines, hit Canoe Rocks approaching the Canadian Lakehead, cutting open the hull. It reached the dock safely, quickly unloaded, and went to the Port Arthur shipyard for repairs.

1968: NORTH CAROLINA lost power and sank in Lake Erie five miles west of Fairport, Ohio, in rough weather. The U.S. Coast Guard rescued the three-member crew. The hull went down in about 30 feet of water and is a popular dive attraction.

1980: The salt-laden KINGDOC (ii) was released by the tugs POINT VALIANT and IRVING BIRCH after an earlier grounding at Pugwash, NS

1983: The saltwater ship d) IAPETOS was struck by Iraqi gunners in the Khor Musa Channel about 30-40 miles from Bandar Khomeini, Iran. It was abandoned and struck again by a missile and bombs on March 29, 1984. The vessel began Seaway service as a) JAROSA in 1965 and returned as b) IVORY STAR in 1973 and c) TURICUM in 1975. It was refloated about 1984 and scrapped at Sitalpur, Bangladesh.

2001: The former HAND LOONG, a Seaway trader beginning in 1977, sank as b) UNA in the Black Sea off Sinop, Turkey, enroute from Algeria to Romania with 11,000 tons of iron ore. Seventeen sailors were rescued but one was missing and presumed lost.

2003: STELLAMARE capsized on the Hudson River at Albany, N.Y., while loading turbines. The cargo shifted and three members of the crew were lost. The ship was righted, refloated and repaired as c) NANDALINA S. It was broken up for scrap at Aliaga, Turkey, as d) DOUAA A. in 2011. This heavy-lift freighter first came through the Seaway in 1989 and returned inland from time to time.

2011: VSL CENTURION lost its stern anchor while downbound in the Welland Canal at Port Colborne. Shipping was held up until it was found. The ship first visited the Seaway as a) SAGITARRIUS in 1990 and became d) PHOENIX SUN in 2012.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series, Marine Historical Society of Detroit.

 

Port Reports -  December 8

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day's news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known). Reporters needed for Lake Michigan ports, Marquette, St. Marys River, Saginaw River and ports such as Johnstown and Prescott, ON. If you would like to see your port represented, please consider becoming a news page volunteer and send us your information.

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
The only traffic through the Duluth entry during the day Saturday was Finnborg, which departed at 04:05 with a load of wheat from CHS 1. Edwin H. Gott continued loading ore at CN on Saturday and was on her way out of port as of 19:30. Also in port were Michipicoten, tied up at CN's berth 6 waiting their turn to load at CN; Innovation/tug Samuel de Champlain, unloading cement at Lafarge; and Drawsko, at anchor outside the harbor waiting to load wheat at Riverland Ag. Also at anchor were Edgar B. Speer and Algoma Equinox, both waiting to load in Two Harbors. Manitoulin was due in Duluth late Saturday night to load at Canadian National, however she was expected to anchor as she has to wait for Michipicoten to load first. In Superior on Saturday, Stewart J. Cort arrived at 07:31 to load ore at Burlington Northern, and Innovation was outbound light from Lafarge at 18:17 for Alpena. The Cort had been expected to depart around 19:30 but was still at the dock at that time.

Two Harbors-Silver Bay, MN – Gary A. Putney
American Integrity departed Two Harbors on Dec. 6th at 20:47 for Indiana Harbor. Arriving Two Harbors on Dec. 6th at 22:25 was the Walter J. McCarthy Jr. for South of #2 where, as of 19:45 on Dec. 7th, she continued to load. Continuing to sit off the Twin Ports at anchor awaiting South of #2 at 19:45 on Dec. 7th are the Edgar B. Speer and the Algoma Equinox. At lay-by in Two Harbors at North of #2 is the Arthur M. Anderson. This is as of 19:45 on Dec. 7th. Due Two Harbors on Dec. 8th is the Roger Blough. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay had no traffic on Dec. 7th and none scheduled on Dec. 8th.

Thunder Bay, ON
Friday; 20:29 Florence Spirit departed for Port Cartier. 20:57 Federal Biscay departed down bound on Lake Superior. 21:18 Whitefish Bay arrived at the G3 elevator to load grain. Saturday; 15:07 Federal Leda departed down bound on Lake Superior. Baie Comeau shifted from Viterra B to Viterra A to finish loading grain. 15:28 The self unloader Thunder Bay arrived at Viterra B to load grain.

Milwaukee, WI – Wisconsin Marine Historical Society
At Port Milwaukee Saturday (12/07): Prentiss Brown/St. Marys Conquest was at the Kinnickinnic River cement terminal. Tug Albert with light oil barge Margaret arrived from Green Bay at 09:23 and proceeded to the liquid cargo pier to load ethanol for Appleton-based U.S. Oil. Margaret has a capacity of 100,000 barrels (4,200,000 gallons). In 2017 Milwaukee refurbished the pier and U.S. Oil installed piping that connected with its storage tanks on Jones Island. When loading is complete, the pair will head to Montreal.

Northern Lake Huron ports
Meldrum Bay: Friday; 20:42 Mississagi arrived to load dolomite and departed on Saturday at 8:03 down bound on Lake Huron.

Calcite: Friday; 23:39 American Mariner departed for Buffington. Saturday; 0:18 Philip R Clarke arrived and went to anchor. 14:44 Olive L Moore arrived to load.

Alpena: Saturday; 6:05 The cement carrier Alpena arrived to load and departed at 11:37 for Green Bay.

Detroit-Rouge River, MI – Raymond H
Sarah Andrie and her tank barge were loading at the Marathon Asphalt Terminal on Saturday.

Toledo, OH – Jim Hoffman
American Courage, with the tug Ohio, arrived at the south side of the Torco Dock, a traditional layup dock, Saturday evening. Her AIS reads “The Barn.”

Cleveland, OH – Bill Kloss
Sam Laud arrived at 23:04 on the 6th. The Hon. James L. Oberstar arrived at 17:34 for the Bulk Terminal. Federal Alster arrived at 15:04 for the Port, Dock 24W. Sharon M1 was still at the Port. American Courage departed 12/6 at 23:02 for Toledo.

Welland Canal and vicinity vessel passages – Saturday December 7 – Barry Andersen

Nanticoke - arrivals - Dec 7 - Kitikmeot W at 0055 from the anchorage and Algoma Transport at 1908 - docked - Dec 6 - Algonova at 1340 - departed Dec 7 - Algocanada at 0038 westbound1741 -

Long Point Bay anchorage - Dec 4 - Algoterra at 1815, Dec 5 - Algoma Hansa at 1733 - departed - Dec 7 - Kitikmeot W at 0043 for the dock

Port Colborne anchorage - Dec 6 - Jana Desgagnes at 1531 - departed Dec 7 - at 0455 approx. eastbound

Welland Canal upbound - Dec 6 - Federal Alster (Mhl) at 1600 from Oshawa - Dec 7 - Shoveler (Cyp) at 0406, CSL Welland at 1248, NACC Argonaut at 1353 and Tecumseh 1836

Welland Canal downbound - Dec 6 - Wigeon (Lbr) at 1328 - Dec 7 - Jana Desgagnes at 0521 stopping wharf 12, Algoma Spirit at 0549, Spruceglen at 1304, Ojibway at 1918, Salarium at 1935, Sea Eagle II & St Marys Cement II at 2145 - Dec 8 - Irma (Cyp) eta 0030

Port Weller anchorage - anchored - Dec 7 - Wigeon (Lbr) at 0052 - departed Dec 7 at 0900 eastbound

Welland Canal docks - Dec 6 - CSL Tadoussac stopped wharf 16 at 0608 - Dec 7 - Jana Desgagnes at 0630 - departed - Dec 7 - tug Petite Forte & St Marys Cement departed wharf 13 at 0900 westbound

Hamilton - arrivals - Dec 7 - none - anchored - Nov 30 - Federal Churchill (Mhl) at 1950 - Dec 3 - Federal Mackinac (Mhl) at 1950 - Dec 5 - Pacific Huron (Atg) at 2045 - docked - Nov 17 - Rt Hon Paul J Martin at 1337 - Nov 29 - Federal Ems (Mhl) at 0540 - Dec 2 - Federal Nakagawa (Mhl) at 2254 and Belasitza (Mlt) at 2330 - departed - Dec 7 - Shoveler (Cyp) at 0040 for Toledo

Clarkson - arrival - Dec 7 - Robert S Pierson at 1206

Mississauga - arrival - Dec 5 - Adfines Sea (Mlt) (ex Osttank Norway-12) at 2253

Toronto - arrival - Dec 5 - McKeil Spirit at 2349

Oshawa - docked - Dec 2 - Helena G. (Por) (ex Garganey-17) at 1403 - departed –

Oswego, N.Y. – Ned Goebricher
On Saturday, tug Wilf Seymour and barge Alouette Spirit unloaded aluminum.

 

Marine shipping industry needs more women

12/8 - Today, women represent only two percent of the world’s 1.2 million seafarers. To help increase these numbers, Canadian shipowners as well as international shipping organizations have launched new initiatives to highlight career opportunities for women as well as the contributions they are already making in a wide range of maritime professions.

For Third Mate Denna Trachsel, joining the commercial marine shipping industry and the crew of the Algoma Discovery was an easy choice.

“It’s incredibly rewarding to be able to navigate a ship through different challenging waters and channels,” the 27-year-old explains. She goes on to list a number of other attractions – good pay, excellent career advancement opportunities, the unique workplace environment. “My favorite place is down in the Seaway near Brockville, the 1000 Islands. You can’t beat that view. We’re getting paid to see views that others pay to see.”

Despite Denna’s enthusiasm and the many perks marine shipping offers, however, women remain underrepresented, especially onboard ships. Today, women represent only two percent of the world’s 1.2 million seafarers. To help increase these numbers, Canadian shipowners as well as international shipping organizations have launched new initiatives to highlight career opportunities for women as well as the contributions they are already making in a wide range of maritime professions.

The United Nations’ International Maritime Organization has made the theme of its annual International Day of the Seafarer celebrated June 25th, “I am on Board with Gender Equality,” with a social media campaign designed for both men and women to show their solidarity for gender equality in seafaring.

Later this autumn, the theme of the IMO’s World Maritime Day will be Empowering Women in the Maritime Community. IMO is supporting gender equality and the empowerment of women through gender specific fellowships; by facilitating access to high-level technical training for women in the maritime sector in developing countries; and creating the environment in which women are identified and selected for career development opportunities in maritime administrations, ports and maritime training institutes.

Closer to home, Canadian ship operators are also increasing their efforts.

“CSL is currently designing a comprehensive action plan to address workplace diversity and encourage more women to choose maritime careers,” says Martine Rivard, Chief HR Officer at Montreal-headquartered CSL Group, which employs 1500 shore and onboard personnel worldwide. CSL operates 18 Canadian-crewed ships in the Great Lakes, St. Lawrence and east coast. “Over the past few years, we have been successful in reaching nearly 50-50 gender parity in our offices at all levels of the organization, including on our Executive Committee. Our focus is now on improving gender equality and diversity on our ships.”

There are many good reasons for increasing gender diversity both on board and in the office, says Nathalie Sykora, Senior Vice President, of CSL’s Global Operations. “Our goal is to have women hold 50 per cent of positions in the maritime industry because they comprise 50 per cent of the population. Diverse groups of people bring a greater variety of experience and different perspectives, which in turn lead to more thoughtful and better decision-making,” she explains. “We are currently in a market labour shortage and industry needs to attract more people. If we don’t encourage women to join this industry, we are limiting our talent pool.”

At St. Catharines-based Algoma Central Corporation, which owns the largest fleet of dry and liquid bulk carriers operating on the Great Lakes – St. Lawrence waterway, Senior Manager of Fleet Personnel Brooke Cameron says that the company has been analyzing what attracts, and then retains, women to shipboard positions. One of the biggest challenges is work-life balance.

“Our positions require our shipboard employees to be away “at sea” sometimes two or three months at a time before the employee goes home,” Cameron explains. “Many women, and in fact, many people in general do not want to be away from home for extended periods of time thus limiting our pool of candidates.” Improving work/life balance

To address this, Algoma worked closely with its labour partners to develop an improved leave system in 2018, with a consistent, predictable schedule that reduces the duration of time at work and away from home as well as increasing the frequency of scheduled time off.

“The intent of the leave system is to provide all officers with a better quality of life in an effort to retain and attract officers currently in the industry as well as open the doors to others, including more women, to join the marine industry,” says Cameron.

Read more and view images at this link: https://www.marinedelivers.com/2019/06/marine-shipping-industry-needs-more-women

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  December 8

On 07 December 1893, the hull of the burned steamer MASCOTTE (steel ferry, 103 foot, 137 gross tons, built in 1885, at Wyandotte, Michigan) was towed from New Baltimore to Detroit by the tug LORMAN for repairs. She was rebuilt and put back in service. She went through nine owners in a career that finally ended with another fire in Chicago in 1934.

In 1990, the ENERCHEM LAKER was sold to Environment Protection Services, Inc., Panama and departed Montreal on December 7, 1990, for off-lakes service with the new name d) RECOVERY VIII. Built for Hall Corp. of Canada as a.) ROCKCLIFFE HALL, converted to a tanker renamed b.) ISLAND TRANSPORT in 1985, and c.) ENERCHEM LAKER in 1986. Renamed e.) MORGAN TRADER in 1993, and currently serves as a bunkering tanker in Suez, Egypt as f.) ANNA II, renamed in 1997.

The LEADALE, a.) JOHN A. KLING sank in the Welland Canal on December 7, 1982, and was declared a constructive total loss.

The GEORGE R. FINK, under tow, arrived at Gandia, Spain prior to December 7, 1973, for scrapping.

W. W. HOLLOWAY was laid up December 7, 1981, for the last time in Toledo’s Frog Pond.

On December 7, 1932, the MARQUIS ROEN caught fire at Meacher's dock at Bay City, and before the fire was brought under control, the cabins and after end were destroyed.

Captain John Roen of the Roen Steamship Co. died on December 7, 1970.

On December 7, 1906, the R. L. IRELAND stranded on Gull Island in the Apostle Islands, Lake Superior. PERCIVAL ROBERTS JR. (Hull#398) was launched December 7, 1912, for the Pittsburgh Steamship Co at Lorain, Ohio by the American Ship Building Co.

The steel side-wheel passenger steamer EASTERN STATES (Hull#144) was launched on December 7, 1901, by the Detroit Shipbuilding Company for the Detroit and Buffalo Steamship Company.

The railcar ferry ANN ARBOR NO 2 (Hull#56), was launched on December 7, 1892 at Toledo, Ohio by Craig Ship Building Co. Sold in 1914 and cut down to a barge, renamed b.) WHALE in 1916, abandoned in 1927.

In 1906, the ANN ARBOR NO 4 arrived Frankfort on her maiden voyage.

On 7 December 1894, KEWEENAW (steel steamer, 291 foot, 2511 gross tons, built in 1891, at W. Bay City, Michigan) was seen groping toward the coast of the State of Washington in a severe gale. With distress signals flying, she put back to sea and foundered. She was built by F. W. Wheeler (Hull #73) for saltwater service. Built in two pieces, she was towed down the St. Lawrence and reassembled at Montreal.

On 7 December 1866, M. BALLARD (2-mast wooden schooner, 116 foot, 288 tons, built in 1855, at Cleveland, Ohio) was lost with all hands in a storm on Lake Ontario.

The wooden propeller bulk freighter MORLEY was launched at Marine City on 7 December 1878. She was on the stocks for two years and was built for the Morley Brothers and Hill. She was a double decker with side arches between decks with iron straps. She also had iron trusses running through the center. Her boiler was on the main deck and she had the engine from the tug WM PRINGLE. She had three spars, a centerboard, and could carry 45,000 bushels of grain.

1909: MARQUETTE & BESSEMER NO. 2 disappeared with all hands in the overnight hours of December 7-8 while crossing Lake Erie from Conneaut to Port Stanley with 30 loaded railway cars. The hull has never been located.

1912: The whaleback BARGE 134 was operating on the East Coast as b) BANGOR when it stranded and broke up near Hampton Roads, Va. The hull was salvaged by blasting and dredging in 1975.

1917: SIMCOE, of the Canadian Department of Marine & Fisheries, left the Great Lakes earlier in the fall for new work on the Bay of Fundy. It sent out an S.O.S. that it was sinking in heavy seas and the ship was never seen again. The only trace was a lifering that came ashore at Sable Island. There were 44 on board.

1927: KAMLOOPS, inbound for the Canadian Lakehead, disappeared with all hands overnight December 6-7. The hull was finally found by divers off 12 O'Clock Point, Isle Royale, in 1977.

1927: AGAWA stranded on Advance Reef, Georgian Bay along the south shore of Manitoulin Island. It spent the winter aground and was not released until Nay 16, 1928. The hull had been declared a total loss but was rebuilt at Collingwood as the ROBERT P. DURHAM and then later sailed as c) HERON BAY (i).

1927: The first MARTIAN went aground off Hare Island, Lake Superior and was not released until December 14.

1929: ULVA sank in the ice at Port Colborne but was raised, refitted and returned to service in 1930. The British built freighter operated between Maritime Canada and the Great Lakes until about 1939. It was torpedoed and sunk by U-60 northwest of Ireland on September 3, 1940.

1941: The tanker MAKAWELI was reported to be anchored at Pearl Harbor during the infamous Japanese attack and damaged. The ship was built at Ashtabula as COWEE in 1919 and returned to the Great Lakes for Lakeland Tankers in 1946.

1967: FIR HILL, a Seaway trader in 1961, went aground off Yasuoka, Japan, as d) UNIVERSAL CRUSADER. It was lightered and released but sold for scrap and broken up at Hirao, Japan, in 1968. 1969: The bulk carrier PETITE HERMINE and TEXACO CHIEF (ii) collided in fog near Prescott and both ships had slight damage. The former became c) CANADIAN HUNTER while the latter last operated on the lakes as c) ALGONOVA (i).

1976: The Liberian flag bulk carrier UNIMAR grounded leaving Thunder Bay with a cargo of grain and was not released until December 15.

1976: HARRY L. ALLEN of the Kinsman fleet went aground in Lake St. Clair, near St. Clair, Mich., and was held fast in the ice before being freed by tugs.

1982: LEADALE (ii) finished unloading salt at Thorold and backed into a concrete dolphin while departing the dock. A hole was punched in the hull and the ship sank while trying to get back to the dock. LEADALE was refloated December 19, towed to Port Colborne and scrapped by Marine Salvage in 1983. 1983: UNISOL had been docked at Chandler, Que., to load newsprint but left to ride out an approaching storm after being pounded against the dock. The ship ran aground while outbound and the crew was saved by a Canadian Forces helicopter. The vessel, noted as the first Peruvian flag freighter to transit the Seaway earlier that year, broke up in the storm.

1983: The Norwegian freighter WOODVILLE began visiting the Great Lakes in 1962. It ran aground near Palau Mungging, Malaysia, enroute from Bangkok, Thailand, to Malacca, Malaysia, as d) PETER RICH and was abandoned as a total loss.

1989: CAPITAINE TORRES, enroute from the Great Lakes, got caught in a vicious storm on the Gulf of St. Lawrence on December 7-8 after the cargo shifted. All 23 on board were lost when the ship went down.

2005: ZIEMIA LODZKA collided with and sank the VERTIGO in shallow water in the Great Belt off Denmark. All were saved. The former began Great Lake trading in 1992.

2010: The passenger ship CLELIA II, a Great Lakes visitor in 2009, was hit by a monstrous wave in the Antarctic Ocean smashing the pilothouse window and damaging electronic equipment. The vessel made Ushusia, Argentina, safely and only one member of the crew had a minor injury.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Historical Collections of the Great Lakes, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Bramble's new owner said no decisions yet on retired Coast Guard ship's fate

12/7 - Port Huron, MI – Modern American Recycling Services, the winning bidder in the auction for the retired U.S. Coast Guard Bramble calls itself the "largest barge dismantler and offshore decommissioning provider in the United States," according to its website. Asked why they purchased the ship, Phillip Mason, vice president of operations for the Modern American Recycling Services' Waggaman and Mobile facilities, said, "We just decided to buy it, I don't know."

Two parties bid on the ship in Mobile, Alabama, on Wednesday. According to the U.S. Marshals, the winning bid was $80,000. An order was issued in October to auction the 75-year-old ship as part of a federal lawsuit filed by Inchcape Shipping Services against the ship and associated companies in August for unpaid bills. Mason said a decision has not been made as to what will become of the historic ship. "I would like to preserve, I would very much like to preserve the boat for the history of it," he said.

Mason said he'd like to incorporate the Bramble into their fleet of ships. The company uses boats when they recycle oil platforms in the Gulf of Mexico, he said. "But what it boils down to is economic, economic factors will ultimately rule," he said.

Mason said he was "impressed" when he boarded the ship Wednesday. "She might not be a museum, but she'll be a working boat," Mason said.

Bramble had called Port Huron home until March of this year after being purchased by Virginia businessman Tom Clarke. Clarke said at the time he had a dream of recreating the Bramble's 1957 voyage through the Northwest Passage. The Bramble left Port Huron March 25 for Mobile, Alabama, where it was to be retrofitted for the trip.

Inchcape Shipping Services, Inc., filed the suit alleging Bramble Historical Epic Companies, LLC and Orinoco Natural Resources, LLC had not paid $178,000 for services between March and April 2019.Invoices attached to the complaint include fees for port charges such as mooring and pilotage, vessel services such as sewage removal and transit fees through the Saint Lawrence Seaway.

Port Huron Times Herald

 

Port Reports -  December 7

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day's news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known). Reporters needed for Lake Michigan ports, St. Marys River, Saginaw River and ports such as Johnstown, ON. If you would like to see your port represented, please consider becoming a news page volunteer and send us your information.

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
Bluewing departed Duluth at 01:11 Friday morning with a load of wheat from CHS 1. Michipicoten arrived at 05:12 and moored at the CN gravity dock to wait her turn to load after Edwin H. Gott. American Century was inbound at 09:14 to load coal at SMET, and Arthur M. Anderson left port at 09:46 light after unloading stone at Graymont. The cement barge Innovation and tug Samuel de Champlain made a very rare visit to the Twin Ports on Friday, arriving at 15:42 to unload cement at Lafarge. Also tied up in port were Edwin H. Gott, loading at CN; Tundra, loading wheat at Riverland Ag; Finnborg, loading wheat at CHS 1; and Drawsko, on the hook outside the harbor waiting to load at Riverland. Both the Century and Tundra were expected to depart late Friday night, while the Gott had no posted departure time. Burns Harbor spent Friday at Burlington Northern in Superior loading ore, and was also expected to depart during the evening.

Two Harbors-Silver Bay – Gary A Putney
American Integrity continues to load at South of #2, as of 19:15 on Dec. 6th. Continuing at anchor off Duluth on Dec. 6th at 19:15 are the Walter J. McCarthy Jr. and Edgar B. Speer. Added to the anchorage late on Dec. 5th was the Algoma Equinox. All are waiting for South of #2 in Two Harbors. Added to the mix at noon on Dec. 6th was the Arthur M. Anderson that went to lay-by in Two Harbors after unloading stone at Graymont in Superior. No new boats are scheduled to be added on Dec. 7th. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay saw the departure of the Joyce L. VanEnkevort/Great Lakes Trader on Dec. 6th at 08:39 for Toledo. There is no scheduled traffic for Silver Bay on Dec. 7th.

Thunder Bay, ON
Thursday; 20:15 Florence Spirit arrived at the Richardson Current River Terminal to load grain. 21:38 Algoma Discovery arrived at the Superior Elevator to load wheat. 22:42 Maria Desgagnes departed for Quebec City. Friday; 7:22 Kaministiqua arrived at the Richardson Main Terminal to load grain. 8:14 After unloading some project material in Duluth, Heerengracht returned to Keefer Terminal to finish unloading. 11:22 Whiteish Bay arrived and went to anchor south of the Welcome Islands. 15:13 Baie Comeau arrived at Viterra B to load grain.

Milwaukee, WI - Wisconsin Marine Historical Society
At Port Milwaukee Friday (12/06): Prentiss Brown/St. Marys Conquest arrived 13:04 from Charlevoix with cement for the St. Marys Kinnickinnic River terminal. After delivering steel from IJmuiden, Netherlands, Federal Satsuki departed 15:31 and headed for Thunder Bay. Tug Albert with light oil barge Margaret is expected early Saturday morning from Green Bay.

Northern Lake Huron ports
Parry Sound: Friday 0:04 Mississagi arrived to unload road salt and departed at 6:30.

Thessalon: Friday 5:27 Cuyahoga departed and is down bound on Lake Huron.

Stoneport: Friday; 5:24 John G Munson departed for Lorain.

Calcite: Friday; 4:19 American Mariner arrived to load. 8:07 Manitowoc arrived to load.

Alpena: Friday 0:21 Undaunted departed for Detroit.

Goderich, ON – Bruce Douglas
Algoma Conveyor arrived 2.23 pm Thursday, loaded salt cleared 7.14 am upbound. Algoma Enterprise arrived 5.36 am Friday.

Detroit, MI – Raymond H
Friday Arrivals: Kaye E Barker-arrived at AK Steel to unload ore. Capt. Keith-arrived at Nicholson's Ecorse Terminal to unload general cargo. Federal Yukina-arrived at Nicholson's Detroit Terminal to unload general cargo. Herbert C Jackson-arrivedat Zug Island to unload coal.

Cleveland, OH – Bill Kloss
USCG Hollyhock departed Cleveland at 12:06 on Friday. American Courage was still on the shuttles. Sharon M1 arrived at the Port at 08:04. John J. Boland arrived at 17:00.

Welland Canal and vicinity vessel passages - Friday December 6, Barry Andersen
Nanticoke arrivals - Dec 6 - Algonova at 1340 from Port Colborne- - docked - Dec 5 - Algocanada at 1741 - Nov 6 - departed - Dec 5 - Algonova at 0837 eastbound, Algoma Hansa at 1659 to the anchorage and Jana Desgagnes at 1718 westbound - Dec 6 - Algoma Innovator at 0200 westbound

Long Point Bay anchorage - Dec 4 - Algoterra at 1815, Dec 5 - Kittimeot W at 1502, Algoma Hansa at 1733 from the dock and Jana Desgagnes at 1813 from the dock - Dec 6 - Algonova at 0001 from the dock - departed - Dec 6 - Algonova at 1250 back into the dock and Jana Desgagnes at 1251 - for the canal

Port Colborne anchorage - Dec 6 - Jana Desgagnes at 1531

Welland Canal upbound - Dec 5 - tugs Leonard M & Jarrett M with Niagara Spirit at 1927 (stopped below guard gate), and tug Sarah Andrie & A-390 with Jarrett McKeil assisting to enter Port Weller piers at 2200 and Saginaw departed wharf 6 - Dec 6 - tug Petite Forte & St Marys Cement at 0015, Sarah Desgagnes at 0114, G3 Marquis at 0233, Acadia Desgagnes at 0817, Evans Spirit at 1144 and Federal Alster (Mhl) at 1600 from Oshawa

Welland Canal downbound - Dec 5 -Algonova at 1134 stopped wharf 16 and Saginaw at 1222 stopped wharf 6 - departed - Saginaw from wharf 6 Thorold - Dec 6 - CSL Tadoussac at 0523 stopping wharf 16 and Wigeon (Lbr) at 1328

Port Weller anchorage - departed - Dec 5 - Adfines Sea (Mlt) (ex Osttank Norway-12) at 2050 for Mississauga - Dec 6 - Sarah Desgagnes 0045 for the canal

Welland Canal docks - Dec 5 - Algonova stopped wharf 16 at 1154 - Dec 6 - CSL Tadoussac stopped wharf 16 at 0555 and tug Petite Forte & St Marys Cement at 1355 - departed Dec 5 - Algonova at 1945 back to Nanticoke - Dec 6 - Candace Elise & barges AM 2100 and AM 2101 at 1840 eastbound

Hamilton - arrivals - Dec 6 none - anchored - Nov 30 - Federal Churchill (Mhl) at 1950 - Dec 3 - Federal Mackinac (Mhl) at 1950 - Dec 5 - Pacific Huron (Atg) at 2045 - docked - Nov 17 - Rt Hon Paul J Martin at 1337 - Nov 29 - Federal Ems (Mhl) at 0540 - Dec 1 - Shoveler (Cyp) at 1125 - Dec 2 - Federal Nakagawa (Mhl) at 2254 and Belasitza (Mlt) at 2330 - departed - Dec 6 - Dara Desgagnes at 0644 eastbound

Bronte - docked - Dec 5 - Paul A Desgagnes at 1820 eastbound

Mississauga - arrival - Dec 5 - Adfines Sea (Mlt) (ex Osttank Norway-12) at 2253

Clarkson - arrival - Dec 5 - Robert S Pierson at 0153 - departed Dec 6 at 1103 eastbound

Toronto - arrival - Dec 5 - McKeil Spirit at 2349

Oshawa - docked - Dec 2 - Helena G. (Por) (ex Garganey-17) at 1403 - departed - Dec 6 - Federal Alster at 1248 for Cleveland

 

Great Lakes levels to top or be near record highs well into 2020, Army Corps predicts

12/7 - Despite below-average precipitation and seasonal decline, Great Lakes water levels remained near record highs in November, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers reported. After a year of some of the worst flooding ever in parts of the Midwest, concern is rising that the spring of 2020 may see more high water in areas that still are struggling after deluges.

The Army Corps projects that each lake will continue to be at record or near-record levels for the first six months of next year. The findings released this week come after the Great Lakes Basin saw its wettest 60-month period ending Aug. 31 in 120 years of record-keeping, according to corps records.

The continued high levels signal that winter storms could bring more coastal flooding and erosion. Storms also could cause ice floes and jams, which could clog channels that empty into the lakes, affecting water flow and leading to flooding, experts say.

The mean levels for lakes Superior, Michigan, Huron, Erie, St. Clair and Ontario were about a foot higher than the same month in 2018, according to the monthly bulletin from the Army Corps' Detroit office. The November mean water levels were: Superior, 603.05 feet; Michigan-Huron, 581.56; St. Clair, 576.48; Erie, 573.10; Ontario, 246.19.

At the same time, preliminary estimates indicate each lake had below-average precipitation in November. "Precipitation was closest to normal in the Lake Michigan-Huron basin, estimated at about 78% of its average," researchers said. "Totals were the lowest, as compared to average, in the Lake Ontario basin, at only 41% of average."

However, despite the drier conditions, "all basins except Lake Superior received above average water supplies," the analysis said. "This is likely due to the influence of enhanced runoff from the wet weather in October."

The lakes entered or continued their seasonal decline in November, the corps said. That trend is slated for all of the lakes expect Erie, which was expected to remain at the same level in December, then drop off in January.

High levels eroded shorelines across the state last summer. The damage has prompted state officials to streamline the permitting process to place sandbags along lakeshore property.

Flooding ravaged much of the Missouri and Mississippi River basins and their tributaries earlier this year, reaching record levels and overwhelming levees in many places. This fall, parts of the Missouri River were slightly above flood stage at a time of the year when river levels traditionally run low, the Associated Press reported.

Areas along the Missouri River in parts of Nebraska, Kansas, Iowa and Missouri were particularly ravaged in the early spring, damaging hundreds of homes and businesses.

In Michigan, state lawmakers Thursday asked Gov. Gretchen Whitmer to declare a state of emergency for the Lake Michigan shoreline after high lake levels damaged property and triggered erosion this year.

After the Great Lakes and the bays and rivers linked to them saw high water levels last summer, parts of beaches and shorelines disappeared all over Michigan.

“What we’re witnessing along the lakeshore has been truly heartbreaking,” said state Rep. Bradley Slagh, R-Zeeland, said. “Homes and businesses have been damaged or destroyed by the effects of wind and water. Even state parks and local roadways have been tremendously impacted by the brunt of rising water levels of Lake Michigan.”

The Detroit News

 

Canada might put its most dangerous nuclear wastes on shores of Lake Huron

12/7 - Canada has narrowed to two communities its list of potential hosts for a permanent national repository for its most radioactive waste — spent fuel from nuclear power generation. And one of those two finalists is on the shores of Lake Huron.

If chosen, Huron-Kinloss/South Bruce, in Bruce County, Ontario, could host a large repository, 1,650 feet or more underground, to which the entire nation's spent nuclear fuel supply would be transported and stored, essentially forever.

"This is the worst of the worst" waste, said Kevin Kamps, radioactive waste specialist with the nonprofit Beyond Nuclear, based in Tacoma Park, Maryland. "It’s highly radioactive irradiated nuclear fuel. It is dangerous forever."

For perspective, as the U.S. considered a similar underground repository for its spent nuclear fuel at Yucca Mountain, Nevada — a proposal that has since stalled amid backlash from Nevadans — a federal Court of Appeals in 2004 ordered the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to develop standards to protect people and the environment from the site's radiation for up to one million years.

Canada has an inventory of almost 2.9 million used nuclear fuel bundles currently stored above-ground in wet pools and dry containers at the nuclear plant sites where the waste is generated. That's about 128 million pounds of highly radioactive material, a number that is growing.

The site along Lake Huron is in the same county where another underground storage facility — this one for low-to-intermediate-level radioactive waste from Ontario's 19 nuclear reactors — was proposed. That plan, still under consideration, generated loud opposition throughout the Great Lakes Basin beginning about five years ago, especially in Michigan.

Michigan's Democratic U.S. senators, who were among those urging a halt to the lower-radiation waste storage on the Great Lakes, expressed alarm that Canada is now considering putting its most dangerous nuclear wastes along the Great Lakes as well.

“This makes no sense," U.S. Sen. Debbie Stabenow said. "Canada has as much at stake as we do in protecting our Great Lakes. There is no justification for a nuclear waste site so close to Lake Huron to even be under consideration."

U.S. Sen. Gary Peters noted that the Great Lakes provide drinking water to 40 million people on both the U.S. and Canadian sides. “I am extremely concerned about the possibility of hazardous nuclear waste being stored near the Great Lakes. Any accident could have catastrophic and long-term consequences to the health and well-being of Michigan and the country. I urge the Nuclear Waste Management Organization in Canada to reconsider naming a finalist location so close to the Great Lakes.”

The finalist decision was made by the Nuclear Waste Management Organization, which consists of the nation's generators of nuclear power and its wastes: Ontario Power Generation, New Brunswick Power Corp. and Hydro-Québec. Under an act of Canada's parliament in 2002, the organization is tasked with designing and implementing Canada's plan for the safe, long-term management of used nuclear fuel.

The idea for a "deep geologic repository" — an underground storage facility far below the surface and even groundwater — emerged during a process of engaging citizens throughout Canada, said Ben Belfadhel, vice-president of site selection at NWMO.

"It is the safest method we have today to ensure the safe, long-term management of used nuclear fuel," he said. "It is a method that's being pursued by all countries around the world with nuclear programs."

Canada's process also requires a willing host community. Twenty-two communities were initially identified as being willing to learn more about the proposal. Three main criteria helped guide evaluation of potential host communities, Belfadhel said: confidence the organization could operate a facility there safely; confidence high-level radioactive waste could be transported there in a way that's "safe, secure and socially acceptable," and the potential for partnership with municipalities and any indigenous communities in the proposed project area.

The sites were winnowed to five last month, and last week, the organization decided on its two finalists: Huron-Kinloss/South Bruce and Ignace, a rural community in northwest Ontario about 150 miles north of western Lake Superior.

"They are the communities that satisfied best the three criteria: safety, transportation and the potential for partnership," Belfadhel said.

Read more view maps at this link: https://www.freep.com/story/news/local/michigan/2019/12/06/lake-huron-canada-radioactive-nuclear-waste/2622110001

 

Residents along Lake Erie reckoning with worsening shoreline erosion

12/7 - Lake Erie, North Shore – Sue O'Brien gets anxious — "shaky," she said — as soon as a storm is in the forecast. "We call it PTSD, and I don't think that's a stretch," she admitted. "As soon as the winds start … you start getting really worried."

O'Brien, who is now retired, said she has spent $100,000 trying to fortify her property on the edge of Lake Erie. Her backyard is guarded by a steel barrier, many of her windows are permanently boarded up and sandbags surround the foundation of her home.

But every storm betrays the cruel futility of her efforts. As the winds pick up, so does the water, as four-metre-high (13 foot) waves slam into cottages already gutted by nature's wrath. The lake takes over O'Brien's backyard and gushes around to the front of her home.

"We used to have sand and beach," she said. "This year has been like a nightmare."

O'Brien lives on Erie Shore Drive, a stretch of road near Chatham-Kent in southwestern Ontario that was originally built as a dyke. It's prone to flooding, but O'Brien and her neighbors aren't alone in their struggle. Many communities along Lake Erie have faced a challenging combination over the past year: record-high water levels and significant erosion of the shoreline.

This double whammy has caused property sizes to shrink as the lake swallows land, and has forced some homeowners to make the painful decision to either continue to try to save their lots or abandon them.

Chris Bradley said he had no choice but to leave. He bought his cottage near Long Point, further northeast along the shore of Lake Erie, in July 2011. He said that at the time, he had about 12 metres (40 feet) of beachfront. But over the past few years, it has vanished.

The water rose and didn't recede. Waves knocked his cottage from its foundation, ripping away the facade looking out over the lake and destroying most of the building's structure, leaving many of his family's belongings strewn about the shore. Last month, Bradley watched as a demolition crew tore down what was left. He likened it to the death of a dream.

"I expected to come here and see my grandchildren hanging out with us, and instead I'm watching it disappear," he said. "On a logical level, I understand it, but on a personal level, it sucks." Like O'Brien, Bradley has lost a staggering amount of money trying to protect his property. He said he's out about $400,000.

"It's really sad," he said. "Frankly, if I were to go back [in time], I never would have bought the place."

The cost of protecting private lakefront property falls on individual owners, who are expected to get a work permit from Ontario's Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry or local conservation authorities to make repairs to eroded shorelines. While the province said it recently streamlined the process, some homeowners want the government to take action to ease the erosion itself — especially since it may get worse over the coming years.

Peter Zuzek, a geological scientist studying the impacts of climate change on the Lake Erie shoreline, said the water could rise by another half-metre (1.6 feet) by the end of the century.

"That's important, because we already have tremendous challenges with the current levels," he said. "Living on the edge of a lake is a beautiful experience, but you have to be willing and prepared to fight that battle every day versus nature." life investment," she said. "We're going to stay as long as we can."

Read more and view images at this link: https://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/shoreline-erosion-laek-erie-1.5384007

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  December 7

On 07 December 1893, the hull of the burned steamer MASCOTTE (steel ferry, 103 foot, 137 gross tons, built in 1885, at Wyandotte, Michigan) was towed from New Baltimore to Detroit by the tug LORMAN for repairs. She was rebuilt and put back in service. She went through nine owners in a career that finally ended with another fire in Chicago in 1934.

In 1990, the ENERCHEM LAKER was sold to Environment Protection Services, Inc., Panama and departed Montreal on December 7, 1990, for off-lakes service with the new name d) RECOVERY VIII. Built for Hall Corp. of Canada as a.) ROCKCLIFFE HALL, converted to a tanker renamed b.) ISLAND TRANSPORT in 1985, and c.) ENERCHEM LAKER in 1986. Renamed e.) MORGAN TRADER in 1993, and currently serves as a bunkering tanker in Suez, Egypt as f.) ANNA II, renamed in 1997.

The LEADALE, a.) JOHN A. KLING sank in the Welland Canal on December 7, 1982, and was declared a constructive total loss.

The GEORGE R. FINK, under tow, arrived at Gandia, Spain prior to December 7, 1973, for scrapping.

W. W. HOLLOWAY was laid up December 7, 1981, for the last time in Toledo’s Frog Pond.

On December 7, 1932, the MARQUIS ROEN caught fire at Meacher's dock at Bay City, and before the fire was brought under control, the cabins and after end were destroyed.

Captain John Roen of the Roen Steamship Co. died on December 7, 1970.

On December 7, 1906, the R. L. IRELAND stranded on Gull Island in the Apostle Islands, Lake Superior. PERCIVAL ROBERTS JR. (Hull#398) was launched December 7, 1912, for the Pittsburgh Steamship Co at Lorain, Ohio by the American Ship Building Co.

The steel side-wheel passenger steamer EASTERN STATES (Hull#144) was launched on December 7, 1901, by the Detroit Shipbuilding Company for the Detroit and Buffalo Steamship Company.

The railcar ferry ANN ARBOR NO 2 (Hull#56), was launched on December 7, 1892 at Toledo, Ohio by Craig Ship Building Co. Sold in 1914 and cut down to a barge, renamed b.) WHALE in 1916, abandoned in 1927.

In 1906, the ANN ARBOR NO 4 arrived Frankfort on her maiden voyage.

On 7 December 1894, KEWEENAW (steel steamer, 291 foot, 2511 gross tons, built in 1891, at W. Bay City, Michigan) was seen groping toward the coast of the State of Washington in a severe gale. With distress signals flying, she put back to sea and foundered. She was built by F. W. Wheeler (Hull #73) for saltwater service. Built in two pieces, she was towed down the St. Lawrence and reassembled at Montreal.

On 7 December 1866, M. BALLARD (2-mast wooden schooner, 116 foot, 288 tons, built in 1855, at Cleveland, Ohio) was lost with all hands in a storm on Lake Ontario.

The wooden propeller bulk freighter MORLEY was launched at Marine City on 7 December 1878. She was on the stocks for two years and was built for the Morley Brothers and Hill. She was a double decker with side arches between decks with iron straps. She also had iron trusses running through the center. Her boiler was on the main deck and she had the engine from the tug WM PRINGLE. She had three spars, a centerboard, and could carry 45,000 bushels of grain.

1909: MARQUETTE & BESSEMER NO. 2 disappeared with all hands in the overnight hours of December 7-8 while crossing Lake Erie from Conneaut to Port Stanley with 30 loaded railway cars. The hull has never been located.

1912: The whaleback BARGE 134 was operating on the East Coast as b) BANGOR when it stranded and broke up near Hampton Roads, Va. The hull was salvaged by blasting and dredging in 1975.

1917: SIMCOE, of the Canadian Department of Marine & Fisheries, left the Great Lakes earlier in the fall for new work on the Bay of Fundy. It sent out an S.O.S. that it was sinking in heavy seas and the ship was never seen again. The only trace was a lifering that came ashore at Sable Island. There were 44 on board.

1927: KAMLOOPS, inbound for the Canadian Lakehead, disappeared with all hands overnight December 6-7. The hull was finally found by divers off 12 O'Clock Point, Isle Royale, in 1977.

1927: AGAWA stranded on Advance Reef, Georgian Bay along the south shore of Manitoulin Island. It spent the winter aground and was not released until Nay 16, 1928. The hull had been declared a total loss but was rebuilt at Collingwood as the ROBERT P. DURHAM and then later sailed as c) HERON BAY (i).

1927: The first MARTIAN went aground off Hare Island, Lake Superior and was not released until December 14.

1929: ULVA sank in the ice at Port Colborne but was raised, refitted and returned to service in 1930. The British built freighter operated between Maritime Canada and the Great Lakes until about 1939. It was torpedoed and sunk by U-60 northwest of Ireland on September 3, 1940.

1941: The tanker MAKAWELI was reported to be anchored at Pearl Harbor during the infamous Japanese attack and damaged. The ship was built at Ashtabula as COWEE in 1919 and returned to the Great Lakes for Lakeland Tankers in 1946.

1967: FIR HILL, a Seaway trader in 1961, went aground off Yasuoka, Japan, as d) UNIVERSAL CRUSADER. It was lightered and released but sold for scrap and broken up at Hirao, Japan, in 1968. 1969: The bulk carrier PETITE HERMINE and TEXACO CHIEF (ii) collided in fog near Prescott and both ships had slight damage. The former became c) CANADIAN HUNTER while the latter last operated on the lakes as c) ALGONOVA (i).

1976: The Liberian flag bulk carrier UNIMAR grounded leaving Thunder Bay with a cargo of grain and was not released until December 15.

1976: HARRY L. ALLEN of the Kinsman fleet went aground in Lake St. Clair, near St. Clair, Mich., and was held fast in the ice before being freed by tugs.

1982: LEADALE (ii) finished unloading salt at Thorold and backed into a concrete dolphin while departing the dock. A hole was punched in the hull and the ship sank while trying to get back to the dock. LEADALE was refloated December 19, towed to Port Colborne and scrapped by Marine Salvage in 1983. 1983: UNISOL had been docked at Chandler, Que., to load newsprint but left to ride out an approaching storm after being pounded against the dock. The ship ran aground while outbound and the crew was saved by a Canadian Forces helicopter. The vessel, noted as the first Peruvian flag freighter to transit the Seaway earlier that year, broke up in the storm.

1983: The Norwegian freighter WOODVILLE began visiting the Great Lakes in 1962. It ran aground near Palau Mungging, Malaysia, enroute from Bangkok, Thailand, to Malacca, Malaysia, as d) PETER RICH and was abandoned as a total loss.

1989: CAPITAINE TORRES, enroute from the Great Lakes, got caught in a vicious storm on the Gulf of St. Lawrence on December 7-8 after the cargo shifted. All 23 on board were lost when the ship went down.

2005: ZIEMIA LODZKA collided with and sank the VERTIGO in shallow water in the Great Belt off Denmark. All were saved. The former began Great Lake trading in 1992.

2010: The passenger ship CLELIA II, a Great Lakes visitor in 2009, was hit by a monstrous wave in the Antarctic Ocean smashing the pilothouse window and damaging electronic equipment. The vessel made Ushusia, Argentina, safely and only one member of the crew had a minor injury.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Historical Collections of the Great Lakes, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

American Valor moved to a different dock at Toledo

12/6 - Toledo, OH – The steamer American Valor was towed from her layup dock near the shipyard on the Maumee River by two Great Lakes Towing Co. tugs on Thursday morning. She was tied up alongside the retired Manistee at the Hocking Valley dock. This is expected to be a short stay as hew new owner, Lower Lakes Towing, prepares her for a return to service.

Jim Hoffman

 

After two days stuck down because of heavy ice, Aerial Lift Bridge working again

12/6 - Duluth, MN – After being stuck in the down position for more than two days, the Aerial Lift Bridge is working again. It reopened Thursday morning. The first vessel through was the Paul R Tregurtha about 10:40 a.m., heading out. The second was the inbound Edwin H Gott at about 11 a.m.

The bridge, the door to Duluth’s port, was weighed down by ice, which crews worked to remove Tuesday and Wednesday. The closure was a costly inconvenience for shipping companies, who must take a longer way in and out of the harbor through the Superior Entry.

Lake Carriers’ Association spokesperson Eric Peace said since that channel is also shallower, ships must carry 6,500 fewer tons at a time. Peace said he was not aware of such a lengthy lift bridge outage happening before in Duluth.

Minnesota Star Tribune

 

Lake Carriers’ group voices concerns about adequate icebreaking

12/6 - Cleveland, OH – With the lake temperatures falling and significant ice formation imminent, the U.S. economy is facing potential job losses and serious financial implications with binational icebreaking assets that continue to age and seem frozen in time.

“The nation’s economy depends on reliable and predictable icebreaking on the Great Lakes. Last year, when cargoes carried on U.S. Great Lakes ships were delayed or cancelled because of inadequate icebreaking, 5,000 jobs were lost and the economy took a $1 billion hit,” said Jim Weakley, President of the U.S.-based Lake Carriers’ Association (LCA).

The reliability and number of U.S. and Canadian icebreaking assets on the Great Lakes is critical for the flow of cargoes to freshwater ports during the winter and spring commercial shipping seasons.

“Compounding the recurring severe ice conditions are record high water levels across the Great Lakes and connecting channels. Annual ice jams at places like Algonac, East China and Marine City in the St Clair River, cause flooding of properties and damage to sea walls. Icebreaking is essential to minimizing damaging impacts to shoreline communities from ice,” added Justin Westmiller, Director of Homeland Security and Emergency Management for St. Clair County, Michigan.

Unfortunately the outlook is not good for reliable icebreaking on the Great Lakes. In fact, the number of U.S. and Canadian Coast Guard icebreakers today is just 60 percent of what it was in the 1980s and 1990s for a system that has more shoreline than the entire U.S. east coast.

The U.S. Coast Guard has only 11 icebreakers in service, down from 19. During the ice season, as many as five have been sidelined with engine failures and other age-related problems. The Canadian Coast Guard has only two icebreakers, down from seven. Six of the U.S. Great Lakes icebreakers are 40 years-old and the Canadian’s two icebreakers are 50 and 35 years-old.

“We continue to voice our concerns that both the U.S. and Canadian Coast Guards need to take this seriously and put more icebreaking resources in the Great Lakes and repower the current aging assets to ensure they can continue to break ice. However, the response has been slow as molasses in winter and insufficient for the decrepit fleet of icebreakers. We are at a critical juncture, just to keep the small number of icebreaking ships operating is an ongoing challenge,” said Weakley.

Last year, three U.S. icebreakers were out of action during the ice season with significant engine problems. The Canadians also suffered engine failures that kept them from joining the effort in eastern Lake Superior and the St. Mary’s River where dozens of idled commercial ships were stranded for days. Icebreaking assets were stretched thin with boats stuck in Lake Erie, Lake Superior and the St Mary’s River.

This lack of adequate icebreaking on the Lakes continues to have far-reaching national implications. Jobs across the country are being lost as Great Lakes shipping companies struggle to move the vital building blocks of America during the ice season. “Our industry requires efficient deliveries this winter which customers depend on to keep their operations uninterrupted,” said Mark Pietrocarlo, LCA Board Chairman. Dave Groh, President of VanEnkevort Tug and Barge added, “We are hopeful that cargo will move this winter, it is critical to keeping the steel mills and power stations operating and people employed.”

Lake Carriers’ Association

 

Port Reports -  December 6

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day's news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known). Reporters needed for Lake Michigan ports, St. Marys River, Saginaw River and ports such as Johnstown, ON. If you would like to see your port represented, please consider becoming a news page volunteer and send us your information.

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
After being rendered inoperable for three days by the recent Lake Superior storm, the Duluth lift bridge was back in service at 09:00 Thursday morning. However, plenty of traffic transited the Superior entry in the early hours of the day before the bridge was reopened. Leading off the day was Great Republic, which departed Superior at 01:43 with a load of coal from Midwest Energy (she did not bring in limestone as was reported on Wednesday). Burns Harbor arrived at 05:27 to load iron ore pellets at Burlington Northern, and the saltie Heerengracht was inbound at 06:49 with project equipment to unload at Port Terminal. Cason J. Callaway arrived at 07:13 to load iron ore pellets at Canadian National. Manitoulin left port at 09:35 with a load of iron ore for Sault Ste. Marie. Following the Manitoulin's departure, all traffic shifted back to using the Duluth entry. The first vessel through the canal on Thursday was Paul R. Tregurtha, which departed at 10:33 for Toledo with iron ore pellets. Edwin H. Gott arrived at 11:01 and returned to CN to reload the iron ore cargo she had offloaded before undergoing repairs. Arthur M. Anderson arrived at 15:35 with a load of limestone for Graymont, and her sister Cason J. Callaway left at 16:48 with her ore cargo. After a relatively quick unload, Heerengracht was outbound light at 18:29. In port on Thursday night were Edwin H. Gott, loading iron ore at CN; Arthur M. Anderson, discharging stone at Graymont; Tundra, taking on wheat at Riverland Ag; Finnborg, unloading cement at CRH; Bluewing, loading wheat at CHS 1; and Burns Harbor, taking on ore at Burlington Northern. Bluewing was tentatively expected to depart late Thursday night, while Burns Harbor should be departing early Friday.

Two Harbors-Silver Bay, MN – Gary A. Putney
Algoma Buffalo departed Two Harbors on Dec. 5th at 03:56 for Hamilton. Arriving Two Harbors on Dec. 5th from lake anchorage was the Clyde S. VanEnkevort/Erie Trader at 03:28 for South of #2. She then departed on Dec. 5th at 15:39 for Conneaut. Arriving Two Harbors after being anchored off Duluth was the American Integrity that got underway at approx. 11:20 and arriving off Two Harbors around 15:00 and she was inbound Two Harbors at 15:59 on the 5th. The Edgar B. Speer arrived off Duluth on Dec. 5th at approx. 07:20 for anchorage. Continuing at anchor off Duluth on the 5th is the Walter J. McCarthy Jr. NW of Sand Island on Dec. 5th was the Algoma Equinox. Due Two Harbors, but probably going to anchor off Duluth. As of 19:00 on Dec. 5th the Joyce L. VanEnkevort/Great Lakes Trader continues to load at Northshore Mining in Silver Bay. The American Century was scheduled for Silver Bay on Dec. 6th, but when I checked her AIS at 18:30 it is now showing Duluth. When the Presque Isle departed Two Harbors her AIS was showing Gary. It is now showing Conneaut.

Thunder Bay, ON<BR> Wednesday; 15:07 Spruceglen departed for Montreal. 15:57 Federal Leda weighed anchor and proceeded to Viterra to load grain. 17:47 Heerengracht departed for Duluth Superior. Thursday; 7:51 Irma departed and is down bound on Lake Superior. 16:19 Baie Comeau arrived and went to anchor.

Northern Lake Huron ports
Thessalon: Thursday; 10:54 Cuyahoga arrived to unload road salt.

Stoneport: Thursday; 13:19 John G Munson arrived to load.

Calcite: Thursday 0:10 Sam Laud departed for Bay City.

Alpena: Thursday; 15:03 Undaunted arrived to unload at the Lafarge plant.

Cleveland, OH – Bill Kloss
American Spirit arrived at 06:00 Thursday; she had anchored in Lake Erie to wait for American Courage to load a shuttle at the Bulk Terminal. The Spirit finally made the dock at 15:28. Elbeborg arrived at the Port at 20:51.

Welland Canal and vicinity vessel passages – Thursday December 5 – Barry Andersen
Nanticoke arrival - Dec 5 - Algocanada at 1741 and Algoma Innovator at 1813 - docked - Dec 3 - Algoma Hansa at 1055 - docked - Dec 2 - tug Sharon M I & barge at 0425 - Dec 4 - Algonova at 0948 - departed - Dec 4 - Algosea at 1414 westbound - Dec 5 - Algonova at 0837, westbound, tug Sharon M I & barge at 1256 westbound, Algoma Hansa at 1659 to the anchorage and Jana Desgagnes at 1718 westbound

Long Point Bay anchorage - Dec 4 - Algoterra at 1815, Dec 5 - Algoma Innovator at 0831, Kittimeot W at 1502 - departed - Dec 4 - Jana Desgagnes at 1443 for the dock - Dec 5 - Algoma Innovator at 1711 for the dock

Buffalo - Dec 4 - Algoma Niagara at 1646 - departed Dec 5 at 0500 westbound

Welland Canal upbound - Dec 4 - Tim S Dool at 1705 and Elbeborg (Nld) at 2238 - Dec 5 - tug Everlast & Norman McLeod at 0338, tugs Leonard M & Jarrett M with Niagara Spirit at 1927 and tug Sarah Andrie & A-390 with Jarrett McKeil assisting to enter Port Weller piers eta 2100

Welland Canal downbound - Dec 3 - tug Candace Elise & barges at 0615 - stopped at wharf 1 and Paul A Desgagnes at 20007 - Dec 5 - Algoma Harvester at 1025, Algonova at 1134 and Saginaw at 1222 stopping wharf 6

Port Weller anchorage - anchored - Dec 4 - Sarah Desgagnes at 1316 - departed - Dec 5 - Adfines Sea (Mlt) (ex Osttank Norway-12) at 2050

Welland Canal docks - Dec 5 - tug Candace Elise with barges AM 2100 & AM 2101 stopped wharf 1 at 0300

Hamilton - arrival - Dec 4 - Algoma Transport at 1952 - Dec 5 - Dara Desgagnes at 0326 - anchored - Nov 30 - Federal Churchill (Mhl) at 1950 - Dec 3 - Federal Mackinac (Mhl) at 1950 - Dec 5 - Pacific Huron (Atg) at 2045 - docked - Nov 17 - Rt Hon Paul J Martin at 1337 - Nov 29 - Federal Ems (Mhl) at 0540 - Dec 1 - Shoveler (Cyp) at 1125 - Dec 2 - Federal Nakagawa (Mhl) at 2254 and Belasitza (Mlt) at 2330 - departed - Dec 5 - Algoma Transport at 2007 for the canal

Mississauga - arrival - Dec 5 - Adfines Sea (Mlt) (ex Osttank Norway-12) eta 2230 - departed - Dec 5 - Selasse (Gib) (ex Selay S-17) at 1622 eastbound

Clarkson - arrival - Dec 4 - Robert S Pierson at 1349 - departed Dec 5 at 0009 eastbound

Toronto - departed - Dec 5 - Pacific Huron (Atg) at 1750 for Hamilton

Oshawa - docked - Dec 2 - Helena G. (Por) (ex Garganey-17) at 1403 - Dec 3 - Federal Alster (Mhl) at 0822

Oswego, NY – Ned Goebricher
On Thursday McKeil Spirit unloaded aluminum.

 

Site contaminated with uranium collapses into Detroit River

12/6 - Windsor, ON – A shoreline property in Detroit listed for decades by the U.S. Department of Energy and Environmental Protection Agency as a contaminated site due to its use of uranium and other dangerous chemicals during manufacturing dating back to the 1940s has partially collapsed into the Detroit River.

The riverbank apparently collapsed under the weight of large aggregate piles stored at the site by Detroit Bulk Storage which has a long-term lease on the property for such use. The company is operated by the son of the owner of Windsor-based aggregate company Southwestern Sales.

The collapsed property is widely known as the former Revere Copper and Brass site which over many decades has been engaged in repeated controversy regarding its fate, safety and who is responsible for cleanup.

The property sits next door to the east of historical Fort Wayne in southwest Detroit and a stone’s throw from the planned location across the river of the Gordie Howe International Bridge. Across the river in Windsor is LaFarge Canada and Sterling Fuels.

There are uranium and radiation concerns on the site because Revere Copper in the 1940s was subcontracted under the Manhattan Project — the race to build the world’s first atomic bomb. The company into the 1950s continued to roll or construct uranium rods which were used in the nuclear bomb’s development.

The plant was eventually closed in 1984, was abandoned and then torn down in 1989. The site’s ownership has changed hands, but largely been left vacant until leased recently by Detroit Bulk Storage.

The property’s shoreline crumbled into the water last week at some point during the U.S. Thanksgiving holiday weekend, so the spill initially remained unknown to many responsible state and federal environmental regulatory agencies.

“Any time the Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy learns of incidents such as the one at the Revere Copper site in Detroit, staff is greatly concerned about the impact on water quality and the public,” Nick Assendelft, spokesman for the state’s environmental regulatory agency, said on Wednesday nearly a week after the incident.

“EGLE staff will evaluate what is known about the conditions onsite, look into whether there are any environmental concerns, and determine what, if any, obligations the property’s owner has, before we decide our next steps.”

The owner of Detroit Bulk Storage, Noel Frye, did not return a message Wednesday, but workers could easily be seen from Windsor’s west end pushing aggregate around with backhoes near the collapsed section of the shoreline, which partially remained sagging and submerged under water.

The city of Detroit has drinking water intake lines nearby downriver, but on the Canadian side the closest water intake lines that may be impacted by the spill are quite a distance away in Amherstburg.

The Wall Street Journal a half dozen years ago listed the Revere Copper site as one of America’s forgotten nuclear legacy “waste lands.” It referenced a 2011 evaluation study by the U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health of the property which concluded the “potential exists for significant residual radiation.”

Derek Coronado of Windsor’s Citizen’s Environment Alliance noted how along with uranium, historical records for the Revere Copper site also show concern for dangerous chemicals beryllium and thorium.

Aside from the dangers of what’s in the property’s soil that may get washed into the river, a bigger issue may involve sediment on the bottom of the Detroit River. Sediment in that area is loaded with a cocktail of chemicals that include mercury, PCBs and PAHs which all have negative health implications for humans, wildlife and the water, he said.

The sediment, like the soil of the Revere Copper site, may generally be considered safe if left undisturbed. But the fact a ton of aggregate just fell off the shore into the water will disperse the sediment in many directions, Coronado said.

“It’s a concern at what level those three chemicals were on site before this happened and what degree they have gone in the river,” he said.

“But the volume of stuff (aggregate) that went into the river would cause resettlement of the contaminated sediment which is really not good. Moving that stuff around will spread contamination and cause greater destruction to what’s in the water.”

Several officials with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency contacted Wednesday were not aware of what had occurred regarding the shoreline collapse In Detroit of the contaminated site until informed by the Star.

The agency indicated responsibility for the former Revere Copper site belongs with the U.S. Department of Energy which was tasked decades ago with oversight of dangerous properties that feature nuclear or radiation histories across the U.S. — especially those connected with war-related equipment. There are roughly 500 such properties — many connected with the Manhattan Project which the department tracks, said Padraic Benson, spokesman for U.S. energy department’s office of legacy management.

The former Revere Copper site was actually listed years ago as potential crossing point for the Howe bridge, but eventually rejected because of the environmental risk.

Windsor Star

 

Ice already forming on Great Lakes; water temps prime for heavy lake effect

12/6 - There is ice starting to form along the Great Lakes shorelines. At the same time, even though ice is forming, the surface water on the Great Lakes are prime for heavy lake effect snow next week.

Lakes Superior, Michigan, Huron and Ontario have small amounts of ice forming at spots along the shoreline. The ice amounts are very tiny, but forming. Lake Superior has eight-tenths of a percent of ice coverage. Lake Huron and Lake Ontario have 0.15 percent of ice coverage. Lake Michigan has a tiny 0.02 percent covered in ice.

Outside of the small ice areas, surface water temperatures are still well above the freezing mark. Lake Erie is the warmest with surface water somewhere between 45 degrees and 49 degrees. Lake Michigan is still between 43 degrees and 46 degrees. Lake Huron is listed as 41 degrees to 43 degrees. Finally, Lake Superior has surface waters mostly between 38 degrees and 42 degrees.

These water temperatures will play a big role in heavy lake effect snow next week. We look for heavy lake effect potential with a temperature difference of 40 degrees between the surface water and the air at 5,000 feet up. In the case of the coldest days next week, a temperature difference of 60 degrees will be likely. This temperature contrast could help fuel very heavy lake effect snow.

View graphics at this link: https://www.mlive.com/weather/2019/12/ice-already-forming-on-great-lakes-but-water-temps-prime-for-heavy-lake-effect.html

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  December 6

On 06 December 1886, C. McElroy purchased the steamer CHARLIE LIKEN for use as a ferry at St. Clair, Michigan to replace the burned CLARA.

In 1988, Canada Steamship Lines’ HON. PAUL MARTIN was renamed b.) ATLANTIC ERIE.

American Steamship Co.’s H. LEE WHITE (Hull#711) was launched December 6, 1973, at Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin by Bay Shipbuilding Co.

CONSUMERS POWER was laid up for the last time at Erie, Pennsylvania on December 6, 1985.

On December 6, 1988, an arsonist set fire to the after end of FORT CHAMBLY while she was laid up at Ojibway Slip in Windsor, Ontario.

GOLDEN HIND was launched at Collingwood, Ontario on December 6, 1951, as the tanker a.) IMPERIAL WOODBEND (Hull#147).

N.M. Paterson & Sons LAWRENDOC (Hull#174) was launched December 6, 1961, at the Collingwood Shipyards.

On 6 December 1874, the Port Huron Times reported that the Port Huron Dry Dock Co. had been declared bankrupt and Mr. John Johnston had been appointed assignee of the company by the U.S. District Court.

OCONTO grounded near Charity Island in Saginaw Bay on 6 December 1885. The passengers and crew were saved. She was built at Manitowoc in 1872, by Rand & Co. and owned by Capt. Gregory W. McGregor and Rensselaer VanSycle. She was later recovered but only lasted until July 1886, when she went down in the St. Lawrence River with a valuable cargo of merchandise. Although several attempts were made to recover her, she remains on the bottom and is a frequent charter dive target to this day.

1906: MONARCH, carrying a cargo of bagged flour, struck Blake Point, Isle Royale and broke in two. The stern sank in deep water and the survivors huddled on shore. They were spotted the next day by the passing steamer EDMONTON who had help sent out from Port Arthur. Only one life was lost.

1906: R.L. IRELAND went aground off the Apostle Islands, Lake Superior, while loaded with coal. Some of the crew rowed a lifeboat to Bayfield for help. The vessel was salvaged and last sailed as c) ONTADOC (i)in 1970.

1909: BADGER STATE caught fire at Marine City, drifted downstream and stranded off Fawn Island. The hull burned to the waterline. 1910: DUNELM went aground on Isle Royale while downbound with grain for Montreal. It was salvaged on December 21 and taken to Port Arthur for repairs.

1917: TUSCARORA, recently cut in two, towed through the Welland and St. Lawrence Canals, and rejoined at Montreal, sank with the loss of all hands off Cape Breton Island on the delivery voyage to the East Coast.

1924: MIDLAND PRINCE was swept onto a reef while under tow in the outer harbor at Port Colborne and sank the tugs JOSEPH H. and HOME RULE in the process. The laker was released the next day but the tugs were a total loss.

1961: The listing freighter MARIANGELA B. was abandoned on the Mediterranean south of Formentera, Spain, after the cargo of zinc shifted in a storm. The vessel was towed to Cartagena, Spain, on December 8 but soon sold to Italian shipbreakers for dismantling at La Spezia in 1962. The vessel had been built at Sturgeon Bay as LABAN HOWES in 1943.

1977: The passenger ship ROYAL CLIPPER caught fire in the engine room at Montreal. After five hours, the ship rolled on its side and sank. It was salvaged in 1982, towed to Port Maitland, and scrapped during 1984-1986.

1992: WILLIAM R. ROESCH was inbound at Holland, Mich., with a cargo of slag when it went aground. The ship was stuck for two hours.

2001: NANCY MELISSA visited the Great Lakes in 1980. It began taking water as e) EMRE BAY in the Ionian Sea and the crew abandoned the ship. The grain laden vessel was taken in tow to safety but was later sold for scrap and arrived at Aliaga, Turkey, for dismantling as f) RESBE on April 9, 2003.

2002: SAGINAW sustained rudder damage while backing away at Thorold and had to go to Hamilton for repairs.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Father Dowling Collection, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Retired U.S. Coast Guard cutter Bramble sold at auction

12/5 - Port Huron, MI – The highest bid Wednesday for the 75-year-old retired U.S. Coast Guard Bramble was $80,000. The auction of the historic ship took place in Mobile, Alabama at noon Wednesday. There were two registered bidders at the auction, according to the United States Marshals Service.

Edward Eversman, U.S. Marshals Service public affairs officer for the Southern District of Alabama, said in an email they are not authorized to release names of the bidders. The sale is pending "execution of all required terms," according to the U.S Marshals.

An order was issued in October to auction the Bramble, part of a federal lawsuit filed by Inchcape Shipping Services against the ship and associated companies in August for unpaid bills. Thomas Damsgaard, Inchcape Shipping Services' marine services vice president for North America, was present at the auction and said a Mobile, Alabama, ship yard owner was the winning bidder.

"Everyone is saying he's going to cut it into pieces," Damsgaard said of the winning bidder. He did not immediately have further details about the man. "It's sad, really sad."

Damsgaard said the second bidder was a group of former Coast Guard members who wanted to save the ship. I think it's tragic, it's tragic...total disregard for the history," he said.

Damsgaard said he had hoped the Bramble would "find a good safe new home, honoring her proud USCG heritage and place in American maritime history." Damsgaard said Clarke reached out to try to find a solution Monday. "He tried on Monday, but it's a little too late, it's the eleventh hour," Damsgaard said.

Inchcape Shipping Services, Inc., filed the suit alleging Bramble Historical Epic Companies, LLC and Orinoco Natural Resources, LLC had not paid $178,000 for services between March and April 2019. Invoices attached to the complaint include fees for port charges such as mooring and pilotage, vessel services such as sewage removal and transit fees through the Saint Lawrence Seaway.

The court had ordered the ship be auctioned off at noon Nov. 6 before the motion to halt and rescheduled to Wednesday.

The retired Coast Guard vessel was purchased in 2018 by Clarke, who had a dream of recreating the Bramble's 1957 voyage through the Northwest Passage. A film crew has been documenting the journey, calling it "Bramble Reborn." The Bramble left Port Huron March 25 heading to Mobile, Alabama, to be retrofitted for the trip. The Times Herald has not been able to reach Clarke for comment.

The film crew tweeted Oct. 17: "Thank you to everyone who has reached out about the status of the Bramble. The film production is independent and not affiliated with the owner of the ship. The film crew shares your passion for the ship and remain hopeful that the voyage will live on." The account has not tweeted since.

The Bramble was commissioned in 1944 at a cost of just over $925,000, according to www.uscgcbramble.com.

"Following World War II, the Bramble participated in 'Operation Crossroads,' the first test of an atomic bomb’s effect on surface ships, at Bikini Island. In 1957, (along) with the cutters Spar and Storis, it headed for the Northwest Passage, traveling through the Bering Straits and Arctic Ocean. Traveling for 64 days through 4,500 miles of partially uncharted waters, the vessels finally reached the Atlantic Ocean. These three surface vessels were the first to circumnavigate the North American Continent, an ambition mariners have had for more than 400 years," according to the website about the ship.

The Bramble was moved to Detroit in 1962 before ending up in Port Huron in 1975, where its duties included being responsible for buoys in eastern Lake Erie, southern Lake Huron and Saginaw Bay. The ship was decommissioned in 2003 to be used as a museum.

Robert and Sara Klingler of Marine City bought the Bramble in 2013 from the Port Huron Museum, which received the ship from the Coast Guard. The Klinglers operated the ship as a museum docked at the Bean Dock in Port Huron with the uscgcbramble.com website. They announced to sale of the ship to Clark in December 2018.

"We, the family of the Klinglers and the crew of the Bramble for the past six years, are extremely fortunate to have found a trustee of history, as we were, who is going to keep Bramble preserved for as long as we can imagine and especially recreate the Northwest Passage," Robert Klingler said in a press release at the time.

Port Huron Times Herald

 

Save the River seeks delay in 2020 seaway shipping season

12/5 - Clayton, NY – The environmental group Save The River is calling for a delayed start of the 2020 shipping season on the St. Lawrence Seaway. The group is asking for Governor Andrew Cuomo's support.

In a letter addressed to Governor Cuomo, Save The River advocates that this request be made now, rather than later in the winter, in order to allow the shipping industry to make necessary adjustments to their schedules.

Save The River has previously made three requests to the seaway to take action to allow an increase in outflows, including two requests for patterning that were denied and an unanswered request to close the 2019 shipping season early.

“We are proposing that the Seaway delay the opening of the 2020 shipping season until the beginning of the Ottawa River freshet. According to members of the International Lake Ontario-St. Lawrence River Board, this is the best remaining opportunity to continue to lower water levels to seasonal averages,” said John Peach, executive director of Save The River, in a news release. “As the Great Lakes remain at historical season highs going into the winter season, we believe that the losses and damages sustained by the region’s riparians and businesses are at least equal to, if not greater than, the loss that shipping may sustain by a delay in next spring’s opening.”

State and national leaders were copied on the letter including Senator Patty Ritchie, Assemblyman Mark Walcyzk, Congresswoman Elise Stefanik, Senator Charles Schumer, and Senator Kirsten Gillibrand.

WWNY

 

Port Reports -  December 5

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day's news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known). Reporters needed for Lake Michigan ports, St. Marys River, Saginaw River and ports such as Johnstown, ON. If you would like to see your port represented, please consider becoming a news page volunteer and send us your information.

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
The aerial lift bridge in Duluth was inoperable for the third consecutive day on Wednesday, once again forcing all vessels to use the Superior entry to access the port. First up for the day was Mesabi Miner, which departed from Burlington Northern at 00:23 with a load of iron ore pellets for Burns Harbor. Wilfred Sykes then arrived from anchor at 00:49, loaded at BN, and was outbound at 11:02 with her ore cargo. Her fleetmate Joseph L. Block then raised anchor, making her arrival at 11:39, and tied up at BN to load. Edwin H. Gott's prop seal repairs were completed at Port Terminal on Wednesday evening and she departed via Superior at 18:05. Great Republic was inbound at 19:08 with limestone, likely for Hallett #5. Paul R. Tregurtha spent Wednesday taking on iron ore pellets at CN in Duluth and was expected to depart at 22:00. Also in port on the north side of the harbor Wednesday evening were Maria G., loading wheat at Riverland Ag; Finnborg, offloading cement at CRH; and Bluewing, taking on wheat at CHS 1. Tundra was anchored waiting to load at Riverland, while Manitoulin had her anchor down and will be loading at CN after the Tregurtha's departure. Joseph L. Block remained at BN on Wednesday night, and had no departure time posted.

Two Harbors-Silver Bay, MN – Gary A. Putney
Presque Isle departed Two Harbors on Dec. 3rd at 19:04 for Gary. Salarium arrived Two Harbors on Dec. 3rd at 22:26 for South of #2. She had been anchored off Two Harbors. She departed Two Harbors on Dec. 4th at 14:56 for Quebec City. Arriving Two Harbors on Dec. 4th at 15:31 was the Algoma Buffalo that also had been anchored in the lake. As of 19:10 she continued at South of #2. Arriving Two Harbors on Dec. 3rd at 21:17 was the Cason J. Callaway for North of #1 lay-by. She then departed Two Harbors on Dec. 4th at 16:57 heading for the Twin Ports. Arriving Two Harbors on Dec. 4th was the Great Republic at 13:26 to fuel at North of #2 and she departed for the Twin Ports at 16:10. The American Integrity arrived off Superior on Dec. 4th at approx. between 07:30 and 08:00 to anchor to await Two Harbors. Arriving off Two Harbors on Dec. 4th and going to anchor between Larsmont and Two Harbors was the Clyde S. VanEnkevort/Erie Trader. She had been scheduled to load in Duluth. Due to be in the Two Harbors area on Dec. 4th is the Walter J. McCarthy Jr. Tentatively due Two Harbors on Dec. 5th is the Edgar B. Speer. Also due late on Dec. 5th for Two Harbors is the Algoma Equinox. Possibly due Two Harbors on Dec. 5th is the Arthur M. Anderson. As of 19:10 on Dec. 4th the Hon. James L. Oberstar continues to load at Northshore Mining in Silver Bay. Due Silver Bay late on Dec. 4th/early on Dec. 5th is the Joyce L. VanEnkevort/Great Lakes Trader. As I post this report she was going to anchor off Sand Island.

Thunder Bay, ON
Tuesday; 22:21 The saltie Heerengracht arrived at Keefer Terminal to unload windmill parts. Wednesday; 2:03 Federal Biscay arrived at the G3 elevator to load grain. 6:56 Ojibway arrived at the Richardson Main Terminal to load grain and departed at 18:26 for Sorel.

Northern Lake Huron ports
Alpena: Wednesday; 8:43 Samuel De Champlain arrived to load cement products and departed at 18:51 for Duluth Superior. Stoneport: Tuesday; 22:19 John G Munson departed for Sarnia. Olive L Moore weighed and proceeded to the dock to load. She departed at 18:26 for Saginaw. Calcite: Tuesday; 21:06 Arthur M Anderson departed for Duluth Superior. Wednesday; 6:48 Calumet departed for Fairport. 7:14 Sam Laud arrived to load limestone.

Goderich, ON – Bruce Douglas
Cuyahoga arrived 7:53 am loaded salt, cleared 4.48 pm upbound.

Detroit. MI – Raymond H
H Lee White was loading slag at Zug Island on Wednesday.

Welland Canal and vicinity vessel passages – Wednesday December 4, Barry Andersen
Nanticoke - docked - arrival - docked - Dec 2 - tug Sharon M I & barge at 0425 and Algosea at 1915 - Dec 3 - Algoma Hansa at 1055 - Dec 4 - Jana Desgagnes at 1454 - departed - Dec 4 - Algosea at 1414 to the anchorage

Long Point Bay anchorage - Jana Desgagnes at 2117 - departed - Dec 4 - Algonova at 0948, Jana Desgagnes at 1443, Algosea at 1611 and Algoterra at 1815,

Welland Canal upbound - Dec 3 - Thunder Bay at 2008 from the anchorage and Federal Yukina (Mhl) at 2142 - Dec 4 - Algoma Enterprise at 1508, Tim S Dool at 1705 and Elbeborg (Nld) eta 2115

Welland Canal downbound - Dec 3 - tug Candace Elise & barges AM 2100 & AM 2101 at 0615 - stopped at wharf 16, Algoma Guardian at 1433. Iver Bright (Nld) at 1723 and Frontenac at 2319 - Dec 4 - Caroline (Atg) (ex Palmerton-19) at 0343, Algoma Strongfield at 0458, Federal Montreal (Mhl) at 0954, Blair McKeil at 1044, CSL St Laurent at 1111 and Paul A Desgagnes at 2007

Port Weller anchorage - arrivals - Nov 27 - Adfines Sea (Mlt) (ex Osttank Norway-12) at 0440 approx.- Dec 4 - Sarah Desgagnes at 1316 from Bronte

Hamilton - arrivals - Dec 4 - Algoma Transport at 1952 to load - anchored - Nov 30 - Federal Churchill (Mhl) at 1950 - Dec 3 - Federal Mackinac (Mhl) at 1950 - docked - Nov 17 - Rt Hon Paul J Martin at 1337 - Nov 29 - Federal Ems (Mhl) at 0540 - Dec 1 - Shoveler (Cyp) at 1125 - Dec 2 - Federal Nakagawa (Mhl) at 2254 and Belasitza (Mlt) at 2330 - departed - Dec 4 - Harbour Pioneer (Por) at 0426 eastbound, Algoma Transport at 0614 oout to the lake, Fairchem Steed (Mhl) at 1315 eastbound and Tim S Dool at 1513 to the canal

Clarkson - anchored - arrivals - Dec 3 - Algoma Enterprise at 1221 from the anchorage - departed Dec 4 at 1319 for the canal

Mississauga - docked - Dec 3 - Selasse (Gib) (ex Selay S-17) at 1550 - departed - Dec 4 - Hinch Spirit at 1855 eastbound

Toronto - arrival - docked - Nov 28 - Pacific Huron (Atg) at 1800 - Nov 30 - Elbeborg (Nld) at 1945 - Dec 3 - tug Petite Forte & St Marys Cement at 2219 - departed - Dec 4 - Elbeborg (Nld) at 1941 for Cleveland

Oshawa - docked - Dec 2 - Helena G. (Por) (ex Garganey-17) at 1403 - Dec 3 - Federal Alster (Mhl) at 0822

 

Closing of Seaway dates announced 2019

12/5 - Closing Dates – Montreal-Lake Ontario Section
• The corporations have decided to waive the operational surcharges on December 21, 22, 23 and 24.

• Any transit of the Montreal-Lake Ontario Section of the Seaway after 23:59 hours, December 24, if permitted, will be subject to prior written agreement. Arrangements are to be made at the St. Lambert office.

• Irrespective of operating conditions, all vessels must be clear of the Montreal-Lake Ontario Section at 12:00 hours on December 31, 2019.

Welland Canal
• Any transits of the Welland Canal after 23:59 hours, December 26, if permitted, will be subject to prior written agreement. Arrangements are to be made at the St. Catharines office.

• As part of a season extension pilot program this navigation season, the Welland Canal will remain open until 12:00 hours, January 8, 2020, operating conditions permitting.

Sault Ste. Marie Locks
Closing of the Sault Ste. Marie Locks (U.S.A.) is currently scheduled for January 15, 2020. Please note the Notice to Navigation Interests released by the US Army Corps of Engineers for further information.

Ports East of Montreal
Ship owners and operators are advised that there are a number of ports east of the Seaway (St. Lambert Lock) on the St. Lawrence River that remain open to navigation during the winter months.

 

Gary Works flooding caused $200 million hit to U.S. Steel's market cap

12/5 - Gary, IN – U.S. Steel's market capitalization plunged by about $200 million as a result of the flooding at Gary Works the day before Thanksgiving, but the steelmaker's stock price has been recovering as it cleans up and gets operations back online at its flagship mill at 1 N. Broadway.

The Pittsburgh-based steelmaker, one of Northwest Indiana's largest employers, saw its stock plummet by about 9% after the flooding, dropping from about $13.87 a share to as low as $12.57 a share Friday. After the company announced it hoped to have all its blast furnaces in Gary back online this week, its stock price rebounded, closing at around $13.67 a share Monday, restoring much of the lost market valuation.

U.S. Steel said last week it hoped to have a blast furnace back online over the weekend and to have all its blast furnaces back up and running this week at Gary Works, its largest mill with 7.5 million tons a year in raw steelmaking capacity.

The company continues to work toward restoring operations and determining exactly what happened to cause the severe flooding, with water entering employees' cars. Testing thus far has not shown any chemical discharges in excess of what the state permits.

"A 36-inch water line that supplies untreated Lake Michigan water for service throughout the facility developed a leak where the line exited the #1 pump house south valve house," Gary Works Environmental Control Director Joseph Hanning wrote in a letter to the Indiana Department of Environmental Management.

"The leak was significant and caused flooding throughout the blast furnace and central utilities area. All blast furnace and steelmaking operations were shut down. The flooded service water impacted critical basements in the central utilities area, the railroad tracks beneath the casthouses on the south blast furnaces, and other areas that presented risk of catastrophic equipment damage and potential threat to human health." Top articles

U.S. Steel notified the state of the flooding and that it observed a sheen in its outfall into the Grand Calumet River, which flows into Lake Michigan, a source of drinking water for millions of people throughout the Midwest. The steelmaker captured the sheen with a boom and has not identified any signs of fish distress or other impacts to the environment.

NWI Times

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  December 5

In 1927, ALTADOC crashed on the rocks of the Keweenaw Peninsula when her steering gear parted during a Lake Superior storm. The machinery and pilothouse of the wreck were recovered in 1928. The pilothouse was eventually refurbished in 1942 and opened as the Worlds Smallest Hotel in Copper Harbor, Michigan. The owners resided in the captains’ quarters, a gift shop was set up in the chart room, a guest lounge was set up in the wheelhouse, and there were two rooms for guests.

On 05 December 1897, the GEORGE W. MORLEY (wooden propeller bulk freighter, 193 foot, 1045 gross tons, built in 1888, at W. Bay City, Michigan) was sailing light from Milwaukee to Chicago when a fire started near her propeller shaft. It blazed up too quickly for the engineer to put it out and before he could get the fire pump started, the flames drove on deck. The firemen were kept at their posts as the vessel was steered to shore. She sank 100 yards off Greenwood Avenue, Evanston, Illinois. Luckily no lives were lost. The vessel’s engine was recovered in October 1898.

Tanker SATURN (Hull#218) was launched in 1973, for Cleveland Tankers at Jennings, Louisiana, by S.B.A. Shipyards, Inc.

SIR JAMES DUNN (Hull#109) was launched in 1951, for Canada Steamship Lines at Port Arthur, Ontario, by Port Arthur Shipbuilding Co. Ltd.

The keel was laid for the E.G. GRACE on December 5, 1942. This was the last of the six ships built by AmShip in the L6-S-A1 class for the United States Maritime Commission and was traded to the Interlake Steamship Company in exchange for older tonnage. She would later become the first of the "Maritime Class" vessels to go for scrap in 1984.

On 5 December 1874, the steam barge MILAN was scheduled to be hauled ashore at Port Huron to replace her "Mississippi wheel" with a propeller.

The wooden 100-foot schooner BRILLIANT was close to Sheboygan, Wisconsin, on 5 December 1857, where she was scheduled to pick up a load of lumber when she went on a reef close to shore and sank. No lives were lost.

1909: HENRY STEINBRENNER (i) sank in a snowstorm on Mud Lake following a collision with the HARRY A. BERWIND. The superstructure remained above water and the ship was later refloated and repaired.

1927: The wooden steamer ADVANCE went aground off Manitoulin Island and two sailors were lost. The ship was salvaged but tied up at Cornwall later in the month and never operated again.

1935: The lumber carrier SWIFT caught fire at Sturgeon Bay and was a total loss. The remains were scrapped in 1936.

1935: The 65-year old wooden tug LUCKNOW burned outside the harbor at Midland and the ship was beached as a total loss.

1952: The wooden tug GARGANTUA departed Collingwood under tow and sought shelter from a storm early the next day behind Cabot Head. The ship was scuttled to avoid the rocky shore with the main part of the hull above water. The intent was to refloat the vessel in 1953 but it was abandoned instead.

1964: FAYETTE BROWN, enroute to Bilbao, Spain, for scrap, broke loose of the tug BARENTSZ ZEE in the Gulf of St. Lawrence and drifted aground on the south shore of Anticosti Island. Salvage efforts were not successful and the remains of the hull, now broken into many pieces, are still there.

1971: VENUS CHALLENGER was sunk by a missile in the India-Pakistan war while 26 miles south of Karachi. The ship broke in two and sank in 8 minutes. All 33 on board were lost. The vessel was completely darkened and going at 16 knots when hit. The ship had been a Seaway trader earlier in 1971 and as b) PLEIAS in 1968.

1976: TATIANA L. and RALPH MISENER sustained minor damage from a collision in the St. Lawrence. The former was scrapped at Gadani Beach, Pakistan, as c) LUCKY LADY in 2009, while the latter arrived at Aliaga, Turkey, for dismantling as c) DON in September 2012.

1987: The CASON foundered off Punta Rostro, Spain, enroute from Hamburg to Shanghai, due to heavy weather. There were 8 survivors but another 23 sailors perished. There were explosions and fires in deck containers and the hull broke in two during a salvage effort in May 1988. The ship had come through the Seaway as b) WOLFGANG RUSS in 1978 and FINN LEONHARDT in 1979.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze , Russ Plumb, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Cleveland-Cliffs buying AK Steel in $1.1 billion stock deal

12/4 - Cleveland, OH – Cleveland-Cliffs will buy AK Steel in a stock deal valued at about $1.1 billion. The companies say the tie-up will create a vertically integrated company that pairs Cleveland-Cliff’s iron ore pellet production with AK Steel’s rolled and stainless steel operations.

Cleveland-Cliffs is the largest producer of iron ore pellets in North America.

After a brief spike in prices, U.S. steel producers have struggled since the Trump administration put a 25% steel tariff into place last year. Domestic demand has slumped as oil and gas drillers pull back on purchases of steel pipe, with prices for natural gas tumbling 45% over the past 12 months.

U.S. Steel in its last quarter reported its first loss since early 2017, and the division that makes pipes for energy companies lost $25 million. It has laid off workers and shut down some of its blast furnaces.

The price for hot rolled steel has slid almost 30% this year, and the stock of steel producers have fallen in tandem. The steel industry added just 1,800 jobs since February 2018, the month before the tariffs took effect, and it employs 10,000 fewer people than they did five years ago.

The job impact on the two Ohio companies’ current employees was not specifically spelled out in the announcement of the deal, but Cleveland-Cliffs said in a statement it will look for $120 million in cost cuts or “synergies.”

The cuts will be accomplished in the first year after the deal closes “primarily from consolidating corporate functions, reducing duplicative overhead costs, and procurement and energy cost savings, as well as operational and supply chain efficiencies.”

AK Steel will become a subsidiary of Cliffs and keep its branding and corporate identity. Cliffs will remain listed on the New York Stock Exchange. The company’s headquarters will stay in Cleveland, while maintaining a significant Ohio presence at AK Steel’s current offices in West Chester, with its research and innovation center in Middletown.

AK Steel Holding Corp. stockholders will receive 0.40 shares of Cliffs stock for each AK Steel share they own. Cliffs shareholders will own approximately 68% of the combined company and AK Steel shareholders will own about 32%.

The deal is expected to close in the first half of next year. Shares of Cleveland-Cliffs dropped 12% before the market open, while AK Steel’s stock gained 5.2%

The Columbus Dispatch

 

USCG Mackinaw, delivering 1,200 Christmas trees, sets sail

12/4 - Cheboygan, MI – The USCG cutter Mackinaw, also known this time of year as Chicago’s Christmas Tree Ship, set sail Monday morning out of Cheboygan and is on its way to deliver 1,200 trees to families in need in Chicago.

While the Mackinaw has been responsible for delivering 24,000 over the past 20 years, the voyage is also meant to commemorate a shipwreck that happened over 100 years ago. Along the route, the vessel will stop where the original ship, the schooner Rouse Simmons, sank and lay a wreath. The trees are scheduled to arrive in Chicago on Thursday, December 5.

Up North Live

 

Port Reports -  December 4

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day's news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known). Reporters needed for Lake Michigan ports, St. Marys River, Saginaw River and ports such as Johnstown, ON. If you would like to see your port represented, please consider becoming a news page volunteer and send us your information.

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
Duluth's lift bridge remained inoperative on Tuesday, once again forcing harbor traffic to use the Superior entry. Indiana Harbor arrived at 01:45 and headed up the harbor to Midwest Energy to load coal. Finnborg was inbound at 11:07 to discharge cement at CRH, and Michipicoten departed from Canadian National at 15:28 with a load of iron ore pellets. Indiana Harbor got underway from SMET at 19:05 and was headed for the Superior entry for departure, and Paul R. Tregurtha was due just before midnight to load ore at CN. In port on the Duluth side of the harbor Tuesday night were Edwin H. Gott, undergoing prop seal repairs at Port Terminal; Maria G., taking on wheat at Riverland Ag; and Finnborg, unloading cement at CRH. Bluewing and Tundra were both on the hook outside the harbor waiting to load wheat, however at 19:30 Bluewing raised her anchor and got underway for the Superior entry. Mesabi Miner continued loading at Burlington Northern in Superior for the second consecutive day on Tuesday, and although she had a departure time of 18:00 posted she hadn't yet left the dock as of 20:00. CML fleetmates Wilfred Sykes and Joseph L. Block were anchored waiting to load.

Two Harbors-Silver Bay, MN – Gary A. Putney
CSL Tadoussac departed Two Harbors on Dec. 2nd at 22:05 for Port Colborne. The Presque Isle then shifted from South of #1 to South of #2 where she continued to load as of 19:30 on Dec. 3rd. Both Salarium and Algoma Buffalo continue to be anchored where they were on Dec. 2nd. Due Two Harbors on Dec. 3rd is the Cason J. Callaway. As of 19:30 on Dec. 3rd she was north of the Apostle Islands. Due Two Harbors on Dec. 4th are the American Integrity that, as of 19:30 on Dec. 3rd, was running checked down. Also due Two Harbors on Dec. 4th is the Walter J. McCarthy Jr. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay saw the John J. Boland depart on Dec. 3rd at 19:17. She doesn't have an updated AIS, but she'll probably end up going to Toledo or Cleveland. Arriving Silver Bay on Dec. 3rd was the Hon. James L. Oberstar after spending the night anchored off the Bad River Reservation near Odanah, WI. Due Silver Bay on Dec. 4th is the Joyce L. VanEnkevort/Great Lakes Trader.

Thunder Bay, ON
Monday; 21:02 Algoma Harvester departed for Baie Comeau. Tuesday; 6:53 The saltie Irma weighed anchor and proceeded to the Superior Elevator to load grain. 9:46 Spruce Glen arrived at Viterra A to load grain. 11:08 Federal Leda arrived and went to anchor. 16:48 The saltie Fearless weighed and proceeded to Keefer Terminal to unload. 18:24 The saltie Wigeon departed and is down bound on Lake Superior.

Manitowoc, WI
An unusual visitor, Florence Spirit, remained in port Tuesday night.

Milwaukee, WI – Wisconsin Marine Historical Society
At Port Milwaukee Tuesday (12/03): Prentiss Brown/St. Marys Challenger arrived late Monday night and proceeded to the St. Marys Kinnickinnic River terminal. After discharging cement, she cleared Milwaukee and headed back to Charlevoix at 15:06. Canada Steamship’s Bay Comeau arrived Milwaukee 03:32 with road salt. After dropping her cargo at the open dock on the outer harbor, she departed for Thunder Bay at 11:13.

Southern Lake Michigan Ports
Stewart J. Cort and Federal Satsuki were at Burns Harbor Tuesday night. Federal Weser and Victoriaborg were moored at the mouth of the Calumet River.

Northern Lake Huron ports
Thessalon: Monday; 20:43 Algoma Innovator departed for Meldrum Bay.

Bruce Mines Tuesday; 3:25 Manitowoc departed for Calumet.

Meldrum Bay: Monday; 21:16 Cuyahoga departed. 23:35 Algoma Innovator arrived to load and departed Monday at 14:18 for Nanticoke.

Stoneport: Tuesday; 10:16 Defiance departed down bound on Lake Huron. John G Munson arrived to finish loading.

Calcite: Monday; 19:22 Arthur M Anderson arrived and wet to anchor. Tuesday; 0:46 After taking on a partial load John G Munson departed for Stoneport. 4:10 Philip R Clarke departed for Burns Harbor. 4:19 Arthur M Anderson weighed anchor and proceeded to the loading dock. 15:21 Calumet arrived to load limestone.

Sarnia, ON – Bill Moran
The saltwater vessel Carolina (ex Palmerton) departed Tuesday after unloading her cargo of high-tech pressure vessels for Nova Chemicals for their new plant about 8 miles south east of Sarnia, just south east of Corunna. By evening she was eastbound on Lake Erie. Maccoa remained at the grain elevator.

Cleveland, OH – Bill Kloss
American Courage arrived at 12:18 Monday with stone from Marblehead.

Welland Canal and vicinity vessel passages – Tuesday December 3, 2019 - Barry Andersen
Nanticoke - docked - arrival - Dec 3 - Algoma Hansa at 1055 - docked - Dec 2 - tug Sharon M I & Niagara Spirit at 0425 and Algosea at 1915

Long Point Bay anchorage - Jana Desgagnes eta 2110

Welland Canal upbound - Dec 2 - Algoma Equinox at 1500, Algoma Discovery at 1542, Whitefish Bay at 1657, Kaministiqua at 1728 and ALgonorth at 2033 - Dec 3 - Algoma Spirit at 0421, Thunder Bay at 2008 from the anchorage

Welland Canal downbound - Dec 2 - Algoma Transport at 1844 - Dec 3 - tug Candace Elise & barges at 0615 - stopped at wharf 16, Algoma Guardian at 1433, light tug Salvage Monarch at 1702, Iver Bright (Nld) at 1723

Port Weller anchorage - arrivals - Nov 27 - Adfines Sea (Mlt) (ex Osttank Norway-12) at 0440 approx.- Dec 3 - Thunder Bay at 1301 - departed - Dec 3 - Federal Alster (Mhl) at 0404 for Oshawa, Selasse (Gib) (ex Selay S-17) at 0800 for Mississauga, Sarah Desgagnes at 0835 for Bronte and Thunder Bay at 1940 for the canal

Welland Canal docks - departed - Dec 3 - tug Sarah Andrie & A-390 departed wharf 1 at 0834 and tug Petite Forte & St Marys Cement departed wharf 2 at 0655 - both eastbound

Hamilton - arrivals - Dec 3 - Algoma Transport at 0859, Tim S Dool at 1700 - anchored - Nov 30 - Federal Churchill (Mhl) at 1950 - Dec 3 - Federal Mackinac (Mhl) at 1950 - docked - Nov 17 - Rt Hon Paul J Martin at 1337 - Nov 29 - Federal Ems (Mhl) at 0540 - Dec 1 - Shoveler (Cyp) at 1125 - Dec 2 - Fairchem Steed (Mhl) at 1311, Harbour Pioneer (Por) at 1839, Federal Nakagawa (Mhl) at 2254 and Belasitza (Mlt) at 2330 - departed - Dec 3 - Algoma Spirit at 0227 westbound

Clarkson - anchored - Dec 2 - Algoma Enterprise anchored off Clarkson at 0805 - departed for the dock at 1218 - arrivals - Dec 3 - Thunder Bay at 0503 from Humber Bay anchorage and Algoma Enterprise at 1221 from the anchorage - departed - Dec 3 - Robert S Pierson at 0352 eastbound and Thunder Bay at 1032 for Port Weller anchorage Mississauga - anchored - Dec 3 - Hinch Spirit at 0834 and Selasse (Gib) (ex Selay S-17) at 1221 - departed - anchorage - Dec 3 - Selasse (Gib) at 1548 and Hinch Spirit at 1652 - arrivals at dock - Dec 3 - Selasse (Gib) (ex Selay S-17) at 1550 and Hinch Spirit at 1654

Toronto - arrival - docked - Nov 28 - Pacific Huron (Atg) at 1800 - Nov 30 - Elbeborg (Nld) at 1945 - departed NACC Argonaut at 1408 eastbound

Oshawa - Dec 3 - Federal Alster (Mhl) at 0822 - docked - Dec 2 - Helena G. (Por) (ex Garganey-17) at 1403 - both from Port Weller anchorage

Oswego, N.Y. – Ned Goebricher
On Tuesday tug Everlast and barge Norman McLeod unloaded fuel at the Oswego steam station.

 

Interlake Steamship 2020 calendar available at National Museum

12/4 - Toledo, OH - The National Museum of the Great Lakes is now selling the Interlake Steamship Co.2020 Calendar. "Each year Interlake Steamship Co. allows the museum to be the sole distributor of their wonderful wall calendar. All proceeds benefit museum operations including educational programming," said Kate Fineske, Director of Communications and Development for the museum.

The wall calendar measures 24" by 18" and features nine color photographs of various boats in their fleet. "Interlake's generous act of donating the calendars to the museum for sale is a great example of corporate philanthropy," Fineske added.

The public can order the calendar at the museum's website, www.nmglstore.org. Calendars are $9.95 plus shipping and handling. Calendars can also be purchased by calling 419-214-5000 extension 200.

National Museum of the Great Lakes

 

Information sought in case against Wade P. Streeter

12/4 - Charges have been filed against this defendant, however the matter is still under Federal criminal investigation. Anyone who has information that may be relevant to the investigation and/or concerned parents of children who may have encountered defendant Wade P. Streeter are encouraged to contact the FBI at 313-426-3880 or via e-mail at detroitshiptips@fbi.gov. If calling the FBI, please provide the case name, U.S. v. Wade Streeter, as a reference.

Please check this for additional updates on future court dates in this case. For questions or information regarding court events and/or hearings, please contact Sandy Palazzolo, Victim Witness Coordinator, at 313-226-9633. Those who plan on attending court events, are encouraged to contact Ms. Palazzolo one day prior to the scheduled event to confirm the date and time.

https://www.justice.gov/usao-edmi/united-states-v-wade-streeter-docket-19-mj-30602

 

Updates

The Great Lakes Bookshelf has been updated.

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  December 4

In 1947, EMORY L. FORD, Captain William J. Lane, departed the Great Northern Elevator in Superior, Wisconsin, with the most valuable cargo of grain shipped on the Great Lakes. The shipment, valued at more than $3 million, consisted of 337,049 bushes of flax valued at $7 a bushel and 140,000 bushels of wheat.

On 04 December 1891, the side-wheel wooden passenger steamer JEANIE, owned by John Craig & Sons, caught fire at the Craig & Sons shipyard in Toledo, Ohio, and burned to the water's edge. She was valued at $25,000 and insured for $10,000.

Algoma Central Marine's ALGOSOO was the last ship built on the Lakes with the traditional fore and aft cabins; her maiden voyage took place today in 1974.

IMPERIAL QUEBEC entered service on December 4, 1957. Renamed b.) SIBYL W. in 1987, and c.) PANAMA TRADER in 1992. Scrapped in Mexico in 1997.

LIGHTSHIP 103 completed her sea trials December 4, 1920.

At 0210 hours on December 4, 1989, the U.S.C.G.C. MESQUITE ran aground in 12 feet of water at a point one-quarter nautical mile off Keweenaw Point. After a struggle to save the ship, the 53 persons aboard abandoned ship at 0830 hours and boarded the Indian salty MANGAL DESAI, which was standing by.

On 4 December 1873, a gale struck Saginaw Bay while the CITY OF DETROIT of 1866 was carrying 8,000 bushels of wheat, package freight and 26 crew and passengers. She was also towing the barge GUIDING STAR. The barge was cut loose in the heavy seas at 3:30 a.m. and about 7 a.m. the CITY OF DETROIT sank. Captain Morris Barrett of the GUIDING STAR saw three of the CITY OF DETROIT's crew in one lifeboat and only one in another lifeboat. The CITY OF DETROIT went down stern first and the passengers and crew were seen grouped together on and about the pilothouse. Capt. Barrett and his crew of seven then abandoned GUIDING STAR. They arrived at Port Elgin, Ontario on 6 December in their yawl with their feet frozen. The barge was later found and towed in by the tug PRINDEVILLE.

On 4 December 1838, THAMES (wooden passenger/package-freight side-wheeler, 80 foot, 160 tons, built in 1833, at Chatham, Ontario) was burned at her dock in Windsor, Ontario by Canadian "patriots" during a raid on Windsor involving more than 500 armed men.

EMERALD ISLE completed her maiden voyage from Beaver Island to Charlevoix on December 4, 1997. Her first cargo included a few cars and 400 passengers. EMERALD ISLE replaced BEAVER ISLANDER as the main ferry on the 32-mile run.

1920: The first RENVOYLE went to saltwater for war service in 1915. It foundered in shallow water on this date in the Bay of Biscay in 1920. Salvage attempts failed. The hull was broken up by the elements and part was scrapped on site.

1951: CAPTAIN C.D. SECORD was disabled and under tow of the SIR THOMAS SHAUGHNESSY when it broke loose in a storm off Isle Royale. The ship was retrieved by U.S.C.G. WOODRUSH and taken to safety and eventually to Port Arthur for repairs.

1966: NAKWA RIVER sustained extensive fire damage at Montreal. The flames broke out while outbound from the Great Lakes.

1986: AMERICAN REPUBLIC was blown on the breakwall at Lorain, Ohio, and received a five-foot gash on the side about 15 feet above the waterline.

1990: IONIA caught fire in the engine room about 90 miles south of Puerto Rico while enroute from Tampa to Chittagong, Bangladesh. The damage was not repaired and the hull was towed to Aliaga, Turkey, as f) ONIA in 1991 and scrapped. The vessel began Seaway service in 1971 as the British flag freighter ZINNIA, returned as b) TIMUR SWIFT in 1983 and as d) ZENOVIA in 1985.

1992: ZEUSPLEIN caught fire in the bridge at Campana, Argentina, and became a total loss. The vessel was sold to shipbreakers in India and arrived for scrapping on June 1, 1993. It had first traveled the Seaway as a) ZEUS in 1972 and had been rebuilt as a container ship in 1983.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, S. Whelan, Russ Plumb, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Duluth's Aerial Lift Bridge not operating

12/3 - Duluth, MN – Duluth's Aerial Lift Bridge has not been operating since Monday morning, a city official confirmed. Vessels traversing in and out of the Duluth port will temporarily use the Superior entry. “A team is down there doing analysis,” city spokesperson Kate Van Daele said. "They haven't found anything yet, but it can't go up."

There is no timetable for if or when the bridge will be back in operation.

Given the number of post-blizzard issues associated with digging out the city, Van Daele was not hopeful the city would know more about the bridge issue on Monday. She said the city would communicate results once it knows more.

Using the Superior entry will require vessel captains to be extra cautious, the Duluth Seaway Port Authority said.

"The Superior front channel is slightly shallower than the Duluth ship canal and Duluth harbor basin, so captains must navigate with extra caution, particularly near some of the shoal areas," Port Authority spokesperson Jayson Hron said. "Additionally, the Superior front channel is longer than the Duluth entry, so rerouting to the Superior entry can equate to higher costs due to the additional time required to bring the ship through the Superior front channel to its Duluth destination."

Since its modification in 1929 to include the raising and lowering bridge deck, the Aerial Lift Bridge has been rehabilitated four times, 1986, 1999, 2007 and 2009, with each project addressing different needs, the Minnesota Department of Transportation website said.

MnDOT said past rehabilitation efforts generally included replacement of the operator’s house, select structural steel elements, the bridge sidewalk and retaining walls; repairs to the abutments, deck grating, machinery, superstructure and lighting system; bridge cleaning and painting; and guardrail.

The iconic bridge raises and lowers thousands of times a year to allow for ore boats, foreign ships, U.S. Coast Guard vessels and recreational vessel traffic to travel through the Duluth ship canal.

Superior Telegram

 

Duluth Lift Bridge operator: Waves reached heights of 14 feet

12/3 - Duluth, MN – Although scientific buoys are out of Lake Superior for the season, we’re still learning of wave heights in Duluth thanks to the Aerial Lift Bridge operators.

The Lift Bridge operator who spoke with members of the National Weather Service said on Saturday night, a few of the waves did reach the bridge deck. The operator says at its highest, the waves peaked at about 14-16 feet.

Waves caused flooding in Canal Park throughout the weekend and also caused the iconic sea stack at Tettegouche State Park to collapse into the lake.

KBJR

 

Record Lake Ontario outflows lead to economic loss in Canada and U.S.

12/3 - St. Catharines, ON – A five-month period of record outflows from Lake Ontario this year led to a loss of $2 million a day to the economies of both Canada and the United States. The Chamber of Marine Commerce said the losses came through 26 mitigation measures in place for navigation on the lake and St. Lawrence River.

"There were many costs. The loss of sailing time accumulated, draft restrictions meaning less cargo was carried, and extra fuel and operating costs," said Julia Fields, the chamber's director of communications.

She said the losses were felt not only by shippers — including domestic and ocean-going fleets — but all businesses related to the industry. "The shipping industry has been working hard with stakeholders for the six months to ensure safe navigation during the record outflows," said Fields.

Measures put in place to ensure vessel safety, even as outflows surpassed safe levels, included restrictive speeds, a strict mandate on creating wakes, and the use of tugs at Iroquois Lock at Iroquois, Ont.

The outflow of the lake, controlled through the 32-turbine Moses-Saunders dam between Cornwall, Ont., and Massena, N.Y., had been set at 10,400 cubic metres per second for nearly 70 days before being lowered somewhat in late August.

The last time the outflow was set that high was in 2017 when water levels on Lake Ontario reached an all-time high — 75.88 metres above sea level — due to a rainy spring and increased runoff from surrounding watersheds. This past spring, the lake rose to nearly 90 centimetres above average, reaching a record 75.92 metres above sea level before it stabilized.

With more water flowing into the St. Lawrence River, currents increased leading to delays as vessels had to deal with swirling waters. Those delays were up to two hours with mitigation measures in place.

The Standard

 

Port Reports -  December 3

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day's news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known). Reporters needed for Lake Michigan ports, St. Marys River, Saginaw River and ports such as Johnstown, ON. If you would like to see your port represented, please consider becoming a news page volunteer and send us your information.

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
The storm that has battered the Midwest over the past few days finally relented on Sunday, allowing vessel traffic to resume in the Twin Ports on Monday. However, the aerial lift bridge spanning the Duluth ship canal was rendered inoperable by the storm, leaving vessels no choice but to enter and leave port through the Superior entry. John J. Boland departed light from Hallett #5 at 09:04, bound for Silver Bay to load iron ore pellets. Maria G. weighed anchor, arrived at 13:14, and headed up the harbor to Riverland Ag to load wheat. Also in port on the Duluth side was Edwin H. Gott, tied up at Port Terminal undergoing repairs to a propeller seal leak that she developed. Both Finnborg and Bluewing had their anchors down outside the harbor and are waiting to load grain cargoes at CHS. Mesabi Miner had arrived in Superior late Sunday night and spent Monday loading iron ore pellets at Burlington Northern. She is expected to depart late Monday evening. Wilfred Sykes was on the hook offshore and will take the dock next.

Two Harbors-Silver Bay, MN – Gary A. Putney
Presque Isle arrived Two Harbors on Dec. 1st at 21:54 for South of #1 lay-by. Departing Two Harbors on Dec. 2nd was the Roger Blough at 14:22 for Conneaut. The CSL Tadoussac arrived Two Harbors at 15:10 for South of #2 after being anchored SW of Two Harbors. Anchored off Two Harbors were the Salarium, SW of Two Harbors and the Algoma Buffalo, anchored NE of Flood Bay. Due Two Harbors later in the day on Dec. 3rd is the Cason J. Callaway. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay saw the American Spirit depart on Dec. 1st at 23:10 for Cleveland. Also departing Silver Bay was the Herbert C. Jackson on Dec.2nd at 13:19 for Toledo. Arriving Silver Bay on Dec. 2nd at approx. 17:40 was the John J. Boland from Duluth after unloading stone. Due Northshore Mining on Dec. 3rd is the Hon. James L. Oberstar.

Thunder Bay, ON
Thunder Bay On: Sunday; 20:51 The saltie Wigeon weighed anchor and proceeded to the Richardson Main Terminal to load grain. Monday; 3:01 Algoma Buffalo weighed anchor departed for Two Harbors to load iron ore.

Milwaukee, WI – Wisconsin Marine Historical Society
At Port Milwaukee Monday (12/02): Saumuel deChamplain/Innovation cleared 08:35 after delivering cement to the Lafarge terminal. Federal Weser returned to the Federal Marine Terminals dock on the outer harbor with steel from Antwerp. She arrived Friday but headed out and anchored beyond the breakwall because of weather. Due in later: Prentiss Brown/St. Marys Challenger with cement for the St. Marys Kinnickinnic River terminal, and Baie Comeau with salt.

Northern Lake Huron ports
Thessalon; Monday; 12:22 Algoma Innovator arrived to unload road salt.

Bruce Mines: Monday; 13:04 Manitowoc arrived to load trap rock.

Meldrum Bay: Monday; 1:07 Mississagi departed for Bay City. 11:10 Cuyahoga arrived to load dolomite.

Stoneport: Monday; 5:30 Defiance arrived to load limestone.

Calcite: Monday; 8:47 Philip R Clarke arrived to load. 15:41 After a change in orders John G Munson arrived to load limestone.

Goderich, ON – Bruce Douglas
Algoma Innovator cleared 4:17 pm Monday laden with salt upbound for Milwaukee. Algoma Niagara finished unloading at elevators and moved over to salt dock to load.

Sarnia, ON – Bill Moran
Salties Palmerton (heavy lift vessel, at the Government Dock) and Maccoa (cargo ship, at the grain elevator) were both in port Monday. While in port Palmerton was renamed Caroline. Palmerton brought in high tech pressure vessels for Nova Chemicals for their new plant about 8 miles south east of Sarnia, just south east of Corunna. The last 10 miles have to be done by McKeil because of logistical issues. Sarnia Government dock has deep enough sheltered water and a strong dock to do the transfer. However, the route to the plant has overpasses, low bridges etc. The vessels are now loaded on the barge MM220, with the Vigilant l pushing her. The load will be taken to the stone dock in Courtright and loaded onto heavy lift road floats there. The dock doesn't have sufficient draft at the dock face to allow an easy transfer from the Palmerton. The load will travel south to Hwy 80, then east to Hwy 40 and north to Rokeby Line in St. Clair Township. Tight turns and several power lines will have to be disconnected to let the load through.

Detroit-Rouge River – Raymond H
Monday Arrivals: Joyce L VanEnkevort/Great Lakes Trader arrived at Zug Island to unload ore. Iver Bright arrived at the Waterfront Petroleum Terminal. Sam Laud arrived at Zug Island to unload coal.

Cleveland, OH – Bill Kloss
American Courage arrived at 12:18 Monday with stone from Marblehead.

Welland Canal and vicinity vessel passages – Monday December 2 – Barry Andersen
Nanticoke
- docked - arrival - Dec 2 - tug Sharon M I & barge at 0425 and Algosea at 1915

Long Point Bay anchorage - Dec 2 - Algosea arrived at 1356 - departed at 1850 for the dock

Welland Canal upbound - Dec 1 - Federal Mosel (Mhl) at 2010 and Algosea at 2357 - Dec 2 - Drawsko (Bhs) at 0230, Algoma Equinox at 1500, Algoma Discovery at 1542, Whitefish Bay at 1657, Kaministiqua at 1728

Welland Canal downbound - Dec 1 - Tecumseh at 1218 and Resko (Bhs) at 1731 - Dec 2 - CSL Welland at 0010, Algoma Transport at 1844

Port Weller anchorage - arrivals - Nov 27 - Adfines Sea (Mlt) (ex Osttank Norway-12) at 0440 approx. - Nov 29 - Selasse (Gib) (ex Selay S-17) at 2340 - Nov 30 - Federal Alster (Mhl) at 0230 - departed - Dec 1 - Helena G (Por) (ex Garganey-17) at 0940 for Oshawa - Dec 2- Algoma Enterprise at 0540 approx eastbound, Algoma Equinox at 1425, Algonorth at 1950

Welland Canal docks - Nov 30 - tug Petite Forte & St Marys Cement stopped wharf 2 at 1249 -Dec 1 - tug Sarah Andrie & A-390 at 0341 stopped wharf 1 at 0341 - departed - Dec 2 - tug Sea Eagle II & St Marys Cement II departed wharf 16 at 1935 approx. westbound

Hamilton - arrivals - Dec 2 - Fairchem Steed (Mhl) at 1311, Harbour Pioneer (Por) at 1839, Federal Nakagawa (Mhl) eta 2400 - Dec 1 - Nov 30 - Federal Churchill (Mhl) at 1914 anchored and Thunder Bay at 1842 - docked - Nov 17 - Rt Hon Paul J Martin at 1337 - Nov 29 - Federal Ems (Mhl) at 0540 - Dec 1 - Shoveler (Cyp) at 1125 and Algoma Spirit at 2039 - departed - Dec 1 - Robert S Pierson at 2236 eastbound - Dec 2 - Thunder Bay at 0445 eastbound

Clarkson - Dec 2 - Robert S Pierson anchored off dock at 0029, Algoma Enterprise anchored off Clarkson at 0805 and Thunder Bay anchored in Humber Bay at 0840 - both awaiting dock at Clarkson - departed anchorage for the dock - Robert S Pierson at 1705 - arrival - Dec 2 - at 1706

Mississauga - arrival - Dec 3 - Hinch Spirit eta 0800

Toronto - arrival - correction - arrival Nov 2 - NACC Argonaut at 0744 from Humber Bay anchorage - docked - Nov 28 - Pacific Huron (Atg) at 1800 - Nov 30 - Elbeborg (Nld) at 1945

Oshawa - Dec 2 - Helena G. (Por) (ex Garganey-17) at 1403 from Port Weller anchorage

Rochester, NY – Tom Brewer
Arrival: McKeil Spirit at 13:00 Monday for Lehigh Cement.

 

’Tis the season to post your Christmas cards

12/3 - The annual Christmas Card Gallery is now open on this site’s Information Search page. Click here to view or upload your own.

 

Casualties / demolitions

12/3 - Vessels with Great Lakes / Seaway connection reported as a casualty or sold for demolition. Taken from December 2019 issue of Marine News - Journal of the World Ship Society:

Casualties: OMNI ST. LAURENT - 1st trip into Seaway 1993 (5090012) (Dilligent-09) 161 / 1957 tug - Owned by Harmon Marine Inc. Canada, sank 23.09.2019 while moored at Stephensville, Newfoundland. No casualties were reported. She had been incorrectly reported as demolished in Marine News No.8 of 2010 - page 504

Demolitions: COPAN - (8515025; Belize) (Tobago-13, Antioxos-05, John N. Pateras-05, Shikoku Pride-02, Clipper Antares-00 - 1st trip into Seaway 1999, Clipper Crusader-92 - 1st trip into Seaway 1987) 10,681 / 1986 - bulk carrier. By Maya Land Shipping & Trading Co (Anmax Trading Corp Pte Ltd) Belize, to Unique Ship Breaking Corp, India and arrived Alang 14.02.2019 - commenced demolition 9.03.2019

Report prepared by Barry Andersen and René Beauchamp

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  December 3

In 1918, the forward end of the former Pittsburgh steamer MANOLA sank during a gale on Lake Ontario. The after end received a new forward end and sailed for several years as the MAPLEDAWN.

On 03 December 1881, the DE PERE (wooden propeller, 736 tons, built in 1875, at Manitowoc, Wisconsin) was caught in a severe southwest gale and blizzard on Lake Michigan. She was driven ashore near Two Rivers, Wisconsin. All efforts to free her failed, so she was left to winter where she lay. In April 1882, she was pulled free by the Goodrich tug ARCTIC and towed to Manitowoc for repairs. Little damage was found and she was back in service quickly.

On 03 December 1891, the OGEMAW (wooden propeller freighter, 167 foot, 624 gross tons, built in 1881, at St. Clair, Michigan) sprang a leak on Big Bay de Noc and sank. Her decks and cabins were blown off as she sank in 11 fathoms of water, 1 1/2 miles northwest of Burnt Bluff. Her crew was rescued by her consorts MAXWELL and TILDEN. Although the vessel was removed from enrollment as a total loss, she was later raised, rebuilt, and re-documented in 1894. However, 03 December was a fateful date for this steamer because on that date in 1922, she burned 1-1/2 miles below Grand Point, near Harsens Island, on the St. Clair River Ð this time to a total and final loss.

Upper Lakes Shipping Ltd.'s CANADIAN AMBASSADOR (Hull#70) was launched December 3, 1982, at St. Catharines, Ontario, by Port Weller Drydocks Ltd.

ROBERT W. STEWART, b.) AMOCO MICHIGAN in 1962) was launched in 1927, at Lorain, Ohio (Hull # 802), by the American Ship Building Co.

In 1909, LE GRAND S. DEGRAFF collided with the steamer HARVARD while down bound in the Detroit River in fog.

IRVING S. OLDS was laid up for the final time on December 3, 1981, at the Hallett Dock #5, Duluth, Minnesota, due to market conditions and her inability to compete with the 60,000-ton carrying capacity of the self-unloading thousand-foot bulk freighters.

On 3 December 1872, the officers and crew of the schooner E. KANTER arrived home in Detroit, Michigan. They reported that their vessel was driven ashore near Leland, Michigan in Lake Michigan on 26 November and was broken up by the waves.

On 3 December 1850, HENRY CLAY (2-mast wooden brig, 87 foot, 163 tons, built in 1842, at Huron, Ohio) was driven ashore at Point Nipigon in the Straits of Mackinac. She suffered little damage, but she was high and dry and unsalvageable. Her crew and passengers were picked up by the passing steamer TROY.

Back during the rough days of November on the lakes, the crews of the Imperial Oil tankers would wet the tablecloths in the mess rooms to keep plates, glasses and silverware from sliding off the tables.

1909: BARGE 101, a whaleback built on the Great Lakes in 1888, sank off Seal Island, Maine enroute from Boston to Halifax with coal tar. The crew of seven was lost.

1942: Yesterday and today the tug ADMIRAL and petroleum barge CLEVECO were lost with all hands off Euclid Beach, Ohio. A total of 32 sailors perished.

1954: The tug ROUILLE sank off Cape Smoky, NS with the loss of 5 lives. The vessel was built in 1929 as Hull 83 at the Collingwood Shipyard and had been on the lakes earlier in the year.

1959: THEODORUS A., seized earlier on Lake St. Clair due to debts, went aground twice while under tow to be unloaded. The vessel was released and spent the winter on the lakes. The crew was sent home.

1963: LIONEL and MANCHESTER MERCHANT collided at the entrance to the Seaway. The former caught fire and was beached at Ronde Island with heavy damage. It was rebuilt at Drammen, Norway, in 1964, returned inland as b) SKAGATIND in 1965 and was scrapped following another fire as e) ALECOS in 1982.

1967: TORONTO CITY, a Seaway trader from 1959 through 1962, went aground near the Elbe I Light enroute from Rostock, Germany, to Rotterdam, Holland, as d) EMMANUEL M. The crew was rescued and the ship was refloated July 7, 1970, sold for scrap, and broken up at Hamburg, Germany.

1985: An engine room fire broke out aboard the SKRADIN at Augusta, Italy, and the ship was a total loss. It had been a Seaway trader as b) BALTIC WASA beginning in 1971 and first returned under the current name in 1976. The damaged vessel was quickly sold for scrap and arrived at Split, Yugoslavia, December 28, 1985, for dismantling.

1987: The former Straits of Mackinac passenger and auto ferry VACATIONLAND sank off Oregon while under tow for scrapping in the Far East.

1993: HOPE I was seriously damaged when it hit bottom east of Quebec City. The ship had traded inland as a) NOSIRA MADELEINE beginning in 1983 and had returned as b) HOPE I earlier in 1993. It was repaired at Lauzon and continued Great Lakes service through 2002. The bulk carrier was back as c) HOPE in 2004.

1995: The former Canada Steamship Lines bulk carrier RIMOUSKI, renamed b) CANADIAN HARVEST, broke in two 114 miles NE of Sable Island while under tow for scrapping in India. The stern sank first. The bow was released two days later and was also lost.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ron LaDue, Russ Plumb, Historical Collections of the Great Lakes, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

After a bump from tariffs, will steel’s slowdown harm Iron Range?

12/2 - Duluth, MN – The latest financial results for the three companies mining iron ore in Minnesota were less than promising.

U.S. Steel, which owns the Keetac and Minntac mines and taconite plants in Keewatin and Mountain Iron, lost $84 million in the third quarter of 2019 amid “challenging market conditions.” The company laid off non-union workers across the company earlier this month, including at least 30 at Keetac and Minntac, as part of a $200 million reduction to its annual fixed costs, and idled one production line at Minntac in October. In July, it announced three of its blast furnaces, in Indiana, Michigan and Europe, were idling amid low steel prices and low demand.

Earlier this month, ArcelorMittal, which owns the Minorca mine in Virginia and owns the largest stake of and manages Hibtac in Hibbing, said it was facing “tough market conditions" due to low steel prices. It shut down an Indiana blast furnace supplied by Minorca for maintenance until demand increases, but its shutdown was not expected to impact Minorca.

Cleveland Cliffs, owner of United Taconite in Eveleth and Northshore Mining in Babbitt and Silver Bay, reported lower profits in its third-quarter call as well. CEO Lourenco Goncalves blamed a historic month-over-month decrease in pellet premiums, which impacted the company's exports.

Will those “challenging” and “tough” market conditions cause mass layoffs at Iron Range mines and taconite plants? Maybe not. Tony Barrett, a retired economics professor at the College of St. Scholastica who plans on returning to teach next semester, said he doesn't think this mirrors the 2008 downturn, during a severe global recession, or the 2015 downturn, when China dumped cheap steel in the U.S.

After a few years boosted by anti-steel-dumping measures by the Obama administration and steel tariffs by the Trump administration, Barrett said the industry is falling “back into a more traditional pattern.”

“Personally, I don’t see a recession coming, and very few economists do. If we have a full-blown recession, the Range is going to feel it,” Barrett said. “If you believe, like I do, that the U.S. economy is probably going to pick up a little bit in 2019, we should be fine.”

According to the World Steel Association, global demand for steel is expected to grow by 3.9% through 2019, but in 2020 steel demand is expected to grow by only 1.7%.

“Steel demand slowed in 2019 as uncertainty, trade tensions and geopolitical issues weighed on investment and trade,” Al Remeithi, chairman of the Worldsteel Economics Committee said in a short-range outlook released last month. “Manufacturing, particularly the auto industry, has performed poorly contracting in many countries; however in construction, despite some slowing, a positive momentum has been maintained.”

Peter Kakela, professor emeritus at Michigan State University and a taconite industry analyst, believes the slowdown is caused in part by continued steel imports, despite tariffs, and by the “mature economy” in the U.S. that leads to a sluggish demand.

“I think it’s more of a slowdown because of some imported steel, and maybe a maturing of our industrial society. Maybe we’ve built enough roads right now, and buildings, and bridges. .... We’re at the repair end rather than the original construction end of things,” Kakela said.

And then there are goods like cars that are using less steel and more plastic, Kakela added. “We've still got good ore, we've still got some good processing going on. We just don't need quite as much."

Barrett maintains the anti-dumping measures and tariffs put on steel have worked, and any further drop in demand for domestic steel will be tied to the economy.

“The steel industry has definitely benefited from (tariffs),” Barrett said. “It doesn’t protect them from a downturn in the U.S. economy, but it certainly protects the U.S. from being the dumping ground for everyone else's excess steel.”

But Kelsey Johnson, president of the Iron Mining Association of Minnesota, said excess foreign steel is still a problem, even if tariffs have helped.

“What the tariffs did immediately is they bumped up the capacity utilization of many of the blast furnaces in the steel-making facilities,” Johnson said.

And as long as the steel industry’s capacity utilization remains above 80%, Johnson said, then the taconite industry and Iron Range should be safe. But, she acknowledged, that capacity utilization is now “kind of falling off.”

According to the American Iron and Steel Institute’s Nov. 16 weekly raw-steel production update, the U.S. steel capacity was still producing at 81.1%.

Johnson said the taconite industry’s immediate threat is a rate increase proposed by Minnesota Power for 7.7% that could take place as soon as Jan. 1 and could grow to a 10% increase for businesses if it’s fully approved by the Minnesota Public Utilities Commission.

Electricity bills account for about 25% of the taconite production costs, Johnson said.

“Every time we do something like that, we become a little less competitive,” Johnson said. Minnesota Power said the increase is necessary to invest in cleaner energy, make up for expiring power sales and combat rising costs.

In the meantime, Barrett isn’t worried things will get worse at the mines and taconite plants. “There's no evidence of any overexpansion going on up on the Range — far from it,” Barrett said. “The steel industry knows it's going to have ups and downs, and it stays pretty lean. So I don't see these recent announced layoffs by U.S. Steel as being a harbinger of a worse downturn coming.”

Duluth News Tribune

 

Port Reports -  December 2

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day's news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known). Reporters needed for Lake Michigan ports, St. Marys River, Saginaw River and ports such as Johnstown, ON. If you would like to see your port represented, please consider becoming a news page volunteer and send us your information.

Two Harbors-Silver Bay, MN – Gary A. Putney
Roger Blough got underway off Sand Island on Dec. 1st at approx. 13:30 and arrived Two Harbors at 15:57 for South of #2. Arriving off Two Harbors on Dec. 1st was the CSL Tadoussac that had been in Thunder Bay. She anchored off Two Harbors at approx. 16:40. Also arriving off Two Harbors on Dec. 1st was the Presque Isle after getting underway off Bayfield, WI at approx. 13:30. Due Two Harbors on Dec. 2nd are the Salarium and the Algoma Buffalo. Another possibility for Two Harbors is the Indiana Harbor that as of 19:00 is below the locks showing an AIS of Two Harbors. As of 19:00 on Dec. 1st the American Spirit and Herbert C. Jackson were still at Northshore Mining in Silver Bay. Scheduled for Silver Bay is the John J. Boland that remains at Hallett #5 in Duluth. An Update: At last report over two days Duluth received over 22 inches of snow. That's in addition to the nine inches of snow received on Nov. 27th.

Thunder Bay, ON
Sunday; 4:37 CSL Tadoussac departed for Two Harbors to load iron ore. 9:03 Federal Montreal departed for the Port of Montreal. 9:31 Maria Desgagne departed the Suncor Terminal and shifted to Keefer Terminal. 9:56 Algoma Harvester weighed anchor and proceeded to the Superior Elevator to load wheat. 10:22 Mesabi Miner weighed anchor and departed for Duluth Superior. 11:31 CSL St Laurent departed and is down bound along the north shore of Lake Superior. 17:04 Algoma Buffalo arrived and went to anchor to wait out weather. 17:32 Blair McKeil departed for Sorel. 18:35 Federal Cedar arrived and went to anchor.

Northern Lake Huron ports
Parry Sound: Saturday; 7:15 Algoma Innovator departed for Goderich.

Bruce Mines: Saturday; 18:55 Mississagi arrived to a partial of load trap rock and departed Sunday at 7:53 for Meldrum Bay.

Meldrum Bay: Sunday; 14:54 Mississagi arrived to finish loading

. Stoneport: Saturday; 7:34 Great Republic departed for Cleveland. 1:44 Laura L Vanenkevort arrived to load and departed at 20:10 for Lorain.

Calcite: Saturday; 0:28 H Lee White departed for Green Bay.

Alpena: Friday; 23:24 The cement carrier Alpena departed for Detroit.

A number of boats were delayed Sunday due to weather. John G Munson, bound for Stoneport ,went to anchor in Little Traverse Bay. Hon. James L Oberstar, bound for Marquette, went to anchor between Bois Blanc Island and Grand View. Lee A Tregurtha, Frontenac and Philip R Clarke were at anchor in the St Marys River north of Detour.

Goderich, ON – Bruce Douglas
Algoma Innovator arrived 1 am Sunday, loading salt at Compass Minerals.

Cleveland, OH – Bill Kloss
Great Republic arrived from Calcite at 11:56 Sunday for Ontario Stone''s lower dock. Joyce L. VanEnkevort/Great Lakes Trader arrived to the Bulk Terminal at 09:57. Dorothy Ann/Pathfinder arrived at 19:56.

Welland Canal and vicinity vessel passages – Sunday December 1, 2019 - Barry Andersen
Welland Canal upbound - Nov 30 - Alina (Atg) (Beluga Faith-11, laid down as Beluga Modification) at 2108 - Dec 1 - Federal Mosel (Mhl) eta 2050 and Algosea at 2250

Welland Canal downbound - Nov 30 - Algoma Enterprise at 1330, tug Sarah Andrie & barge A-390 at 1341 stopping wharf 1, Federal Baltic (Mhl) at 1438 and Brant (Cyp) at 1609 - Dec 1 - Algoma Spirit at 0617, Isa (Cyp) at 0702, CSL Assiniboine at 0833, Tecumseh at1218, Sloman Hera (Atg) at 1140 and Resko (Bhs) at 1731

Port Weller anchorage - arrivals - Nov 27 - Adfines Sea (Mlt) (ex Osttank Norway-12) at 0440 approx. - Nov 29 - Selasse (Gib) (ex Selay S-17) at 2340 - Nov 30 - Federal Alster (Mhl) at 0230, Helena G (Por) (ex Garganey-17) at 0240 and Algoma Equinox at 2056 - Dec 1 - Algoma Enterprise at 0102, Algonorth at 0336,

Welland Canal docks - Nov 30 - tug Petite Forte & St Marys Cement stopped wharf 2 at 1249 and tug Sea Eagle II & St Marys Cement II stopped wharf 16 at 1957 - Dec 1 - tug Sarah Andrie & A-390 at 0341 stopped wharf 1 at 0341

Hamilton - arrivals - Dec 1 - Shoveler (Cyp) at 1125 and Algoma Spirit eta 2055 - anchored - Robert S Pierson at 0044 - Nov 30 - Federal Churchill (Mhl) at 1914 anchored and Thunder Bay at 1842 - docked - Nov 17 - Rt Hon Paul J Martin at 1337 - Nov 29 - Federal Ems (Mhl) at 0540

Bronte - anchored - Sarah Desgagnes at 1145 awaiting dock - departed - Dec 1- Sarah Desgagnes at 0843 for Port Weller anchorage

Toronto - arrival - Nov 1 - NACC Argonaut eta 2055 anchoring in Humber Bay - docked - Nov 28 - Pacific Huron (Atg) at 1800 - Nov 30 - Elbeborg (Nld) at 1945

Oswego, NY – Ned Goebricher

On Sunday, McKeil Spirit unloaded cement.

 

Updates

The Great Lakes Bookshelf has been updated.

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  December 2

On this day in 1942, the tug ADMIRAL and tanker-barge CLEVCO encountered a late season blizzard on Lake Erie. The ADMIRAL sank approximately 10 miles off Avon Point, Ohio, with a loss of 11. The CLEVCO sank 30 hours later off Euclid Beach with a loss of 19.

On 02 December 1857, the NAPOLEON (wooden propeller, 92 foot, 181 tons, built in 1845, at Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan, as a schooner) went to the assistance of the schooner DREADNAUGHT. In the rescue attempt, the NAPOLEON bent her rudder and disabled her engine. Helpless, she went on a reef off Saugeen, Ontario, and was pounded to pieces. Her engine, boiler and gear were salvaged in the autumn of 1858, and sold at Detroit, Michigan.

Hall Corporation of Canada’s OTTERCLIFFE HALL (Hull # 667) was launched December 2, 1968, at Lauzon, Quebec, by Davie Shipbuilding Co. Ltd.

GEORGE R. FINK, b) ERNEST T. WEIR under tow passed Gibraltar on December 2, 1973, and arrived at Gandia, Spain, prior to December 7, 1973, for scrapping.

Pittsburgh Steamship Co.’s GOVERNOR MILLER (Hull # 810) was launched in1937, at Lorain, Ohio, by American Ship Building Co.

NIPIGON BAY last ran in 1982, and was laid up at Montreal on December 2nd.

December 2, 1975, the brand new carferry WOLFE ISLANDER III sailed into Kingston from Thunder Bay, Ontario. The new 55-car ferry would replace the older ferries WOLFE ISLANDER and UPPER CANADA.

On 2 December 1874, the steam barge GERMANIA was launched at King's yard in Marine City, Michigan. The Port Huron Times of 4 December 1874 reported that she "is probably the cheapest boat ever built in Marine City, wages and material, iron, etc. being very low." This was due to the nation just recovering from the "Panic of 1873." The vessel's dimensions were 144 feet overall x 56 feet 2 inches x 11 feet 9 inches.

On 2 December 1832, the wooden schooner CAROLINE was carrying dry goods worth more than $30,000 from Oswego to Ogdensburg, New York, in a violent storm. She capsized and sank off Ducks Island on Lake Ontario with the loss of one life. Five survived in the yawl and made it to the island in 6 hours. After much suffering from the cold and snow, they were rescued by the schooner HURON.

Duluth - December 2, 1950 - In the early part of this week there were as many as 41 Great Lakes vessels lined up in the Duluth-Superior harbor awaiting their turn to take on their cargoes of iron ore. Freezing temperatures prevailed at the head of the lakes and ore steaming operations permitted loading only of about 10 boats per day.

1964: The anchors of AGIOS NICOLAOS II dragged in a storm on the Gulf of St. Lawrence and the ship drifted aground at Sea-Cow Head, near Summerside, Prince Edward Island. The ship was released and towed to Halifax but not repaired. It had first come through the Seaway as a) ALKAID in 1961 and made one trip inland as b) AGIOS NICOLAOS II in 1964. Following a sale for scrap, the ship arrived at Bilbao, Spain, under tow of the tug PRAIA DE ADRAGA, on April 2, 1965.

1967: The tanker LUBROLAKE and tug IRVING BEECH were blown aground on Cape Breton Island, near New Waterford, NS at a site called the No. 12 Stone Dump. Both ships were abandoned and broken up to the waterline there at a later date.

1976: PEARL ASIA went aground off Port Weller while waiting clearance to head upbound to Thorold with a cargo of bauxite. After being lightered to MAPLEHEATH, the vessel was pulled free. It had begun Seaway trading as a) CRYSTAL CROWN in 1960 and first returned as b) PEARL ASIA in 1971.

1977: KEFALONIA SKY arrived at New Orleans with engine trouble that was later deemed beyond economic repair. The vessel was sold for scrapping at Brownsville, Texas, in 1978. It had first visited the Seaway as NIEUWE TONGE in 1960 and returned as b) AMSTELDIEP in 1963.

2006: The tug SENECA broke loose of the SUSAN B. HOEY on Lake Superior and was blown aground 21 miles east of Grand Marais, Mich. It was refloated on Dec. 23 and taken to Sault Ste. Marie for assessment.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Dave Wobser, Brian Johnson, Russ Plumb, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Storm surge on Lake Michigan uncovers shipwreck off Muskegon coast

12/1 - Muskegon, Mi - A shipwreck that had been buried under sand just off the Muskegon coast was discovered after Wednesday's storm with strong winds and massive waves uncovered it.

Gary Passon and John Hanson with the West Michigan Underwater Preserve (WMUP) were taking measurements and investigating the ship's construction Friday, hoping to gather enough information to identify the wreck.

The WMUP is a non-profit organization that partners with the state of Michigan to help preserve shipwrecks and educate the public on them. Hanson said they are working with the state marine archaeologist to identify the ship.

Hanson said storm surge uncovered the wreck, which is off the coast of private property in Muskegon.

Wednesday's storm caused significant damage to the Lake Michigan shoreline, which has already been battered by fall storms. In Holland, the high water levels and the storm surge produced near-record high water levels. At Holland State Park, sidewalks along the Lake Macatawa channel fell apart as the sand beneath them eroded. In Ludington, the destruction was similar.

The last time the water levels reached that high was in 1985, according to the National Weather Service.

https://www.wzzm13.com/article/news/local/lakeshore/muskegon-shipwreck-uncovered/69-22f32c5b-7a24-43a5-aaa1-b301b81cc7d1

 

Port Reports -  December 1

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day's news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known). Reporters needed for Lake Michigan ports, St. Marys River, Saginaw River and ports such as Johnstown, ON. If you would like to see your port represented, please consider becoming a news page volunteer and send us your information.

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
Heavy weather on Lake Superior kept traffic at a standstill in the Twin Ports on Saturday. In port were John J. Boland, unloading limestone at Hallett #5, and Edwin H. Gott, offloading her iron ore cargo into the hopper at CN. The Boland is waiting for improved weather conditions to allow her to depart and head for Silver Bay to load, while the Gott will likely be shifting over to Port Terminal for repairs once she finishes unloading. Maria G. spent the day outside the harbor riding out the storm.

Two Harbors-Silver Bay, MN – Gary A. Putney
Roger Blough departed Two Harbors on Nov. 29th at 19:54 and went across the lake to go to anchor off Sand Island. She went to anchor between 22:30 and 23:00 on the 24th. Presque Isle was due Two Harbors on Nov. 30th, but as of 19:00 on the 30th she went for shelter off Bayfield, WI. Tentatively due Two Harbors on Dec. 1st are the Algoma Buffalo and the Salarium. Once they get off Two Harbors they probably will be going to anchor to wait for the dock. As of 19:00 on Nov. 30th the American Spirit and Herbert C. Jackson were both at Northshore Mining in Silver Bay. Tentatively due Silver Bay is the John J. Boland that as of 19:00 on Nov. 30th is at Hallett #5 in Duluth. Due to blizzard conditions in the Twin Ports, Northshore, and South Shore there is no estimate as to when traffic will get moving to the North Shore loading docks.

Thunder Bay, ON
Friday; 23:29 Blair McKeil arrived at the Richardson Current River Terminal to load. Saturday; 3:35 Maria Desgagne arrived and to anchor. 5:02 CSL Tadoussac arrived at Keefer Terminal. 8:13 Maria Desgagne weighed anchor and proceeded to the Suncor Terminal to unload petroleum products. 11:28 Algoma Conveyor departed and is down bound along the north shore of Lake Superior. 11:39 The saltie Fearless arrived and went to anchor. 13:55 Algoma Harvester weighed anchor, proceeded to south of the Welcome Islands and went to anchor. She will be loading at one of the Mission River elevators. 16:12 Algoma Strongfield departed and is down bound along the north shore of Lake Superior. 20:10 Mesabi Miner arrived and went to anchor off of St Marys Island to wait out weather.

St. Marys River
Wilfred Sykes passed upbound for Superior, WI, around 2 p.m. on a rare trip to Lake Superior. As she approached the MacArthur Lock, she met two other classics, Frontenac and Saginaw.

Muskegon, MI – Brendan Falkowski
Saturday the Kaye E. Barker was inbound at 6:26 with stone from Meldrum Bay for the Mart Dock, departing at 14:25 for Marquette. The tug Prentiss Brown and barge St. Marys Conquest arrived at 12:55, anchoring in the southwest corner of Muskegon Lake to wait out weather on Lake Michigan.

Goderich, ON – Bruce Douglas
Algoma Niagara arrived 5:10 pm Sunday and nudged up to elevators with help from the tug Escorte.

Detroit/Rouge River – Raymond H
Saturday Arrivals: Candace Elise and barge arrived at Nicholson's Detroit Terminal to load/unload. Sam Laud arrived at the Carmeuse Dock to unload coal. Alpena arrived at Lafarge to unload cement.

Welland Canal and vicinity vessel passages – Saturday November 30, 2019 ... Barry Andersen
Nanticoke - docked -arrival - Nov 29 - Paul R Tregurtha at 2057 - departed Nov 30 at 1602 westbound

Welland Canal upbound - Nov 29 - tug Salvage Monarch with workboat Americo Dean and scows PWD 56 and PWD 53 at 1226 tiedup West Street Port Colborne, light tug Salvage Monarch carried on, Algoterra at 1917, Federal Leda (Mhl) at 2042 and Algoma Transport at 2207 - Nov 30 - Paul A Desgagnes at 0325, Algoma Guardian at 0637, tug Sea Eagle II & St Marys Cement II at 1051 stopping wharf 16, Ojibway at 1128 and Alina (Atg) (Beluga Faith-11, laid down as Beluga Modification) at 2036 Welland Canal downbound - Nov 29 - NACC Argonaut at 1630, CSL Laurentien at 2317 - Nov 30 - tug Petite Forte & St Marys Cement at 0341 stopping at wharf 2, Algoma Enterprise at 1330, tug Sarah Andrie & barge A-390 at 1341, Federal Baltic (Mhl) at 1438 and Brant (Cyp) at 1609

Port Weller anchorage - arrivals - Nov 27 - Adfines Sea (Mlt) (ex Osttank Norway-12) at 0440 approx. - Nov 29 - Selasse (Gib) (ex Selay S-17) at 2340 - Nov 30 - Federal Alster (Mhl) at 0230, Helena G (Por) (ex Garganey-17) at 0240 and Algoma Equinox at 2056

Welland Canal docks - Nov 30 - tug Petite Forte & St Marys Cement stopped at wharf 2 1249 and tug Sea Eagle II & St Marys Cement II stopped wharf 16 at 1957

Hamilton - arrivals - Nov 29 - Algoma Equinox at 2303 - Nov 30 - Federal Churchill (Mhl) at 1130 and Thunder Bay at 1842 - docked - Nov 17 - Rt Hon Paul J Martin at 1337 - Nov 29 - Federal Ems (Mhl) at 0540 - departed - Nov 30 - Algoma Guardian at 0142 for the canal, Rossi A Desgagnes at 0831 eastbound, and Algoma Equinox at 1831 for the canal

Bronte - anchored - Nov 29 - Sarah Desgagnes at 1145 awaiting dock - departed - Nov 30 - Paul A Desgagnes at 0102 for the canal

Mississauga - docked - Nov 28 - Selasse (Gib) (ex Selay S-17) at 2012 from Port Weller anchorage - departed Nov 29 at 2140 for Port Weller anchorage

Toronto - arrival - Elbeborg (Nld) at 1945 - docked - Nov 28 - Pacific Huron (Atg) at 1800 - departed - Nov 30 - Alina (Atg) (Beluga Faith-11, laid down as Beluga Modification) at 1850 for Port Weller anchorage

Oshawa - arrivals - Nov 30 - none - docked - Nov 29 - CSL Niagara at 1729 - departed Nov 30 at 1918 eastbound

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  December 1

In 1940, the Columbia Transportation steamer CARROLLTON laid up in the Cuyahoga River with a storage load of 75,000 bushels of potatoes.

On 01 December 1884, the N BOUTIN (wooden propeller tug, 68 foot, 46 gross tons, built in 1882, at Buffalo, New York) sank in ten feet of water near Washburn, Wisconsin. Newspaper reports stated that she was leaking badly and was run toward shore to beach her but no details are given regarding the cause of the leak. She was recovered and repaired.

On December 1, 1974, the Canadian motor vessel JENNIFER foundered on Lake Michigan in a storm. Her steel cargo apparently shifted and she foundered 24 miles southwest of Charlevoix, Michigan. The JENNIFER went to the bottom in water too deep for any salvage attempt.

FRED G. HARTWELL, the last boat built for the Franklin Steamship Co., was delivered to her owners on December 1, 1922, but her maiden voyage didn't occur until early 1923, because of unfavorable weather conditions.

The SASKATOON's ownership was transferred to the Canada Steamship Lines Ltd., Montreal, on December 1, 1913, when the company was formed and all six vessels of the Merchants Mutual Line were absorbed by CSL in 1914.

HUDSON TRANSPORT was put up for sale by Marine Salvage in December 1982.

On 1 December 1875, BRIDGEWATER (3-mast wooden schooner, 706 tons, built in 1866, at Buffalo, New York, as a bark) grounded on Waugoshance Point in the Straits of Mackinac. She was released fairly quickly and then was towed to Buffalo, New York, for repairs. In Buffalo, she was gutted by fire. In 1880-82, the propeller KEYSTONE was built on her hull.

In 1909, the MARQUETTE & BESSEMER NO 2 sank on Lake Erie, 31 lives were lost.

December 1, 1985 - SPARTAN broke loose from her moorings at Ludington in a storm and ended up near Buttersville Island. She was pulled off on December 5, by the Canonie tugs SOUTH HAVEN and MUSKEGON with the help of the CITY OF MIDLAND 41. It took about 10 hours.

On 1 December 1875, the Port Huron Times reported: "The schooner MARY E. PEREW went ashore in the Straits of Mackinac and by the brave efforts of the people on shore, her crew was rescued from perishing in the cold. Her decks were completely covered with ice and the seas were breaking over her. The vessel has a large hole in her bottom made by a rock that came through her. She will prove a total loss." On 7 December 1875, that newspaper reported that MARY E. PEREW had been raised by a wrecker and would be repaired.

On 1 December 1882, DAVID M. FOSTER (wooden 3-mast schooner, 121 foot, 251 tons, built in 1863, at Port Burwell, Ontario as a bark) was carrying lumber from Toronto to Oswego, New York, in a storm. She was picked up by a harbor tug outside of Oswego for a tow into the harbor, but the towline broke. The FOSTER went bows-on into the breakwater. She was holed and sank. No lives were lost. Her loss was valued at $3,300.

On 01 December 1934, the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter ESCANABA (WPG 64) (165 foot, 718 gross tons, built in 1932, at W. Bay City, Michigan) was involved in the rescue of the crew of the whaleback HENRY CORT off the piers at Muskegon, Michigan. Also that winter, she delivered food to the residents of Beaver Island, who were isolated due to the bad weather.

SULLIVAN BROTHERS (steel straight-deck bulk freighter, 430 foot, 4897 gross tons, built in 1901, at Chicago, Illinois as FREDERICK B. WELLS) grounded at Vidal Shoal on Tuesday evening, 01 Dec 1953. She was loaded with grain and rested on solid rock. She was recovered.

1934: The whaleback steamer HENRY CORT hit the north pier at Muskegon, MI and was wrecked. All on board were saved but one rescuer perished when the U.S.C.G. surfboat overturned. HENRY CORT was cut up for scrap on location during World War Two.

1961: The Canada Steamship Lines bulk canaller ELGIN struck the Charelvoix Bridge on the Lachine Canal when the structure did not open properly due to a faulty bridge mechanism. The waterway was closed for several days but the ship was not damaged.

1961: ARIE H., a Liberian flagged Liberty ship, went aground near the Snell Lock but was refloated and, the following day, departed the Seaway as the last oceangoing ship of the season.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Russ Plumb, Father Dowling Collection, Historical Collections of the Great Lakes, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

No early closure of St. Lawrence Seaway, IJC says

11/30 - The International Joint Commission (IJC) has no plans to shut the St. Lawrence Seaway early, soothing fears of a shipping industry that was sounding dire warnings of the economic impact of an early-December shutdown.

But the commission is keeping open its option of extending the Seaway’s winter closure in the spring to drain more water from Lake Ontario, according to Sarah Lobrichon, who speaks for the IJC. While the IJC is committed to lowering the water levels as much as it can, Lobrichon said it would be difficult to remove more water before next spring than the IJC is already doing.

“The options for increasing the flow would provide limited additional relief – on the order of two to four centimetres – and would have considerable negative impacts on other interests, including flooding downstream,” she said in an email. “No adjustments in the flow rate will determine whether or not it floods next year.”

Nonetheless, any additional water that can safely be removed from Lake Ontario will help, Lobrichon said. “The IJC continues to review options for higher flows, including those that would result in Seaway navigation opening later than it otherwise would in 2020.”

Lobrichon said the IJC is greatly concerned about the possibility of spring flooding again in 2020. Lake Ontario is currently 47 centimetres – more than 18.5 inches – above its long-term average level for this time of year “and inflows from the upper Great Lakes will remain high at least through the winter,” she said.

Lobrichon’s comments came in response to the Chamber of Marine Commerce’s warning that closing the Seaway in December would have devastating impacts on its business and the Canadian and American economies in general.

“Closing the St. Lawrence Seaway in December to accommodate higher water outflow at the Moses-Saunders dam would cost the Canadian and U.S. economies $250 million per week, impacting farmers’ grain exports, manufacturing plant operations and disrupting deliveries of fuel, construction materials and road salt for winter safety to cities throughout the region,” the chamber warned in a statement.

It was reacting to recent demands by New York Governor Andrew Cuomo and politicians and riverfront residents on both sides of the border that outflows at the dam be increased dramatically, which could lead to the early closing of the Seaway. The chamber also echoed the IJC’s comments that opening the dam outflows at this time wouldn’t do much to help the beleaguered property owners dealing with high water in the spring.

“Increasing outflows above the safe navigation limit to the highest levels possible would lower Lake Ontario levels less than four centimetres a week,” the chamber said.

And it couldn’t be done immediately, it said. Closing the Seaway would take more than two weeks to clear ship traffic and remove buoys before outflows began, it said. Ice conditions could also prohibit maximum water-flow levels.

Chamber president Bruce Burrows said the marine industry has great sympathy for residents and business owners affected by flooding, which it blames on unprecedented weather conditions. Burrows urged the IJC and government leaders to find solutions that look at shoreline resiliency, flood management zones and what can be done during the winter when the St. Lawrence Seaway is closed to navigation.

“Halting St. Lawrence Seaway shipping altogether would cause major harm to our economy and achieve no noticeable benefit for flooding victims,” he said.

The Recorder and Times

 

Port Reports -  November 30

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day's news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known). Reporters needed for Lake Michigan ports, St. Marys River, Saginaw River and ports such as Johnstown, ON. If you would like to see your port represented, please consider becoming a news page volunteer and send us your information.

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
Duluth harbor saw quite a bit of traffic on Friday after a quiet Thanksgiving due to inclement weather. Michipicoten was inbound at 05:02 Friday morning to load a split cargo of blast furnace trim and iron ore pellets at Hallett #5 and Canadian National, respectively. Herbert C. Jackson left port at 05:54 light after offloading stone at Hallett #5, and American Century departed at 07:44 carrying coal from SMET. John J. Boland arrived at 14:50 to discharge limestone at Hallett #5. Edwin H. Gott, which had departed from Superior laden with ore on Thursday and anchored offshore, arrived in Duluth at 17:20 Friday and backed into the CN shiploader to discharge that ore into the hopper. It has been reported that she is experiencing mechanical issues and must unload all or part of her cargo in order for repairs to be completed. Also on Friday evening, Michipicoten departed at 17:48 with her split load, bound for Sault Ste. Marie. Maria G. was still anchored outside the harbor, and is due to arrive on Sunday to load wheat at Riverland Ag. The only traffic through the Superior entry on Friday was Stewart J. Cort, which departed at 09:40 after taking on iron ore pellets at Burlington Northern.

Two Harbors-Silver Bay, MN – Gary A. Putney
Roger Blough arrived Two Harbors on Nov. 29th at 18:02. CSL Tadoussac had been showing a Two Harbors AIS, but is now showing Duluth. As of 19:40 on Nov. 29th she was NE of Silver Bay heading NE at 11.5 knots and possibly going to anchor near Isle Royale. Tentatively scheduled for Two Harbors on the 30th is the Presque Isle. She was above the Soo Friday night. With gale warnings on Lake Superior, she probably will go North. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay saw the arrival of the Herbert C. Jackson on Nov. 29th at 10:08 after unloading stone at Hallett #5 in Duluth. As of 19:40 on Nov. 29th the American Spirit continued at the dock. Tentatively due Silver Bay is the John J. Boland that as of 19:40 on Nov. 29th was unloading stone at Hallett #5 in Duluth.

Thunder Bay, ON
Thursday; 21:40 Saginaw arrived at the Richardson Current River Terminal. Friday; 2:41 Algoma Niagara departed for Goderich. 5:35 Algoma Strongfield arrived at the Richardson Main Terminal to load wheat. 6:00 Federal Montreal weighed anchor and proceeded to the Superior Elevator to load grain. 8:18 CSL St Laurent arrived at the G3 elevator to load. 12:47 Frontenac departed for Montreal. 20:13 Saginaw departed and is downbound on Lake Superior.

St. Marys River
Wilfred Sykes in due at the Soo Locks at 2 p.m. Saturday, weather permitting. She is headed to Superior, WI, to load. Joseph L. Block was anchored in the lee of Whitefish Point Friday, likely for weather.

Northern Lake Huron ports
Parry Sound: Friday; 10:49 Algoma Innovator arrived to unload road salt.

Meldrum Bay Friday; 6:22 Kaye E Barker departed for Muskegon.

Stoneport: Friday; 12:06 Great Republic arrived to load.

Calcite: Friday; 1:38 Arthur M Anderson departed for Buffington. 3:00 H Lee White arrived to load.

Alpena: Friday; 12:18 Samuel De Champlain departed for Milwaukee. 12:51 The cement carrier Alpena arrived to load.

Goderich, ON – Bruce Douglas
There were no vessels in port Friday.

Saginaw River
Calumet arrived on Thanksgiving Day. At 9:50 p.m. Friday she was still up near the Zilwaukee Bridge.

Detroit/Rouge River – Raymond H
Friday Arrivals: Philip R Clarke-arrived with a split load of stone for the McCoig Concrete and Motor City Materials docks. Manitoulin-arrived at the St. Clair Aggregates dock to unload stone. Federal Baltic-arrived at the Waterfront Petroleum Terminal to fuel.

Cleveland, OH – Bill Kloss
American Courage is on the shuttles. Sam Laud delivered to ArcelorMittal Steel, departed Cleveland at 15:02 and arrived in Sandusky at 20:00.

Welland Canal and vicinity vessel passages – Friday November 29 – Barry Andersen
Nanticoke
- docked -arrival - Nov 29 - Paul R Tregurtha at 2057 - departed Nov 29 - Sloman Hermes (Mlt) at 2326 for Windsor

Long Point Bay anchorage - Nov 27 - Algoscotia at 0237 - departed Nov 29 at 1855 westbound

Welland Canal upbound - Nov 28 - Palmerton (Atg) at 1519 - Nov 29 - Tundra (Cyp) at 0113, Spruceglen at 0327, light tug H H Misner, tug Salvage Monarch with workboat Americo Dean and scows PWD 56 and PWD 53 at 1226, Algoterra at 1917, Federal Leda (Mhl) at 2042 and Algoma Transport eta 2200

Welland Canal downbound - Nov 28 - Algoma Transport at 1219, G3 Marquis at 1308 and Algoma Guardian at 1809 - Nov 29 - Sarah Desgagnes at 0021, NACC Argonaut at 1630, CSL Laurentien eta 2300

Port Weller anchorage - arrivals - Nov 27 - Adfines Sea (Mlt) (ex Osttank Norway-12) at 0440 approx.

Hamilton - arrivals - Nov 29 - Rossi A Desgagnes at 0109, Algoma Guardian at 1001 - docked - Nov 17 - Rt Hon Paul J Martin at 1337 - Nov 29 - Federal Ems (Mhl) at 0540 - departed - Nov 28 - Tundra (Cyp) at 2303 for Duluth - Nov 29 - CSL Niagara at 0127 eastbound, Sunda (Lbr) (ex Emilie-18) at 1740 eastbound and Algoma Transport at 1926

Bronte - Nov 29 - Paul A Desgagnes at 1246 - anchored - Nov 29 - Sarah Desgagnes at 1145 awaiting dock

Mississauga - docked - Nov 28 - Selasse (Gib) (ex Selay S-17) at 2012 from Port Weller anchorage

Toronto - docked - Nov 28 - Pacific Huron (Atg) at 1800 and Alina (Atg) (Beluga Faith-11, laid down as Beluga Modification) at 2007 - departed - Nov 28 - McKeil Spirit at 2043 eastbound

Oshawa - arrivals - Nov 28 - NACC Quebec 1905 - Nov 29 - CSL Niagara anchored at 1150 - departed 1713 - docked at 1729 - departed Nov 29 - Federal Leda (Mhl) at 1730 for Thunder Bay

 

High winds batter Lake Michigan shoreline, result in flooding and power outages

11/30 - South Haven, MI – The wind whipped through South Haven Wednesday with gusts over 40 mph, churning up big waves on Lake Michigan and knocking out power, at least temporarily, for many local residents.

The storm system moving across Michigan Wednesday resulted in heavy snow in Michigan's Upper Peninsula and high winds gusting up to 60 mph. Another winter storm is expected to blow across the northern Great Lakes this weekend.

View a view at this link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c6bKT5P-pY0

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  November 30

On 30 November 1896, CITY OF KALAMAZOO (wooden propeller passenger/package freight steamer, 162 foot, 728 gross tons, built in 1892, at South Haven, Michigan) burned at her lay-up dock at South Haven, Michigan, with the loss of four lives. She was rebuilt and lasted until 1911, when she burned again.

On November 30, 1910, ATHABASCA (steel propeller passenger steamer, 263 foot, 1,774 gross tons, built in 1883, in Scotland) collided with the tug GENERAL near Lime Island in the St. Mary's River. As a result of the collision, the GENERAL sank. She was later recovered and rebuilt as a bulk freighter and lasted until she was broken up in 1948.

On 30 November 1934, HENRY CORT (steel propeller whaleback crane vessel, 320 foot, 2,394 gross tons, built in 1892, at W. Superior, Wisconsin as PILLSBURY) was driven onto the north pier at Muskegon, Michigan, in a storm. The U.S. Coast Guard Cutter ESCANABA rescued her crew, but one Coast Guardsman lost his life. The vessel settled in shallow water and then broke in half. Her remains were scrapped the following year.

CANADIAN PIONEER suffered a major engine room fire on 30 Nov 1987, at Nanticoke, Ontario.

On November 30, 1981, A.H. FERBERT was laid up for the last time at the Hallett Dock #5, Duluth, Minnesota. The PERE MARQUETTE 22 passed down the Welland Canal on November 30, 1973 in tow of the tugs JOHN PURVES and YVON SIMARD en route to Sorel, Quebec, where she was cut down to a barge for off-Lakes use.

On 30 Nov 1967, the CITY OF FLINT 32 was laid up, never to run again.

On 30 Nov 1900, ALMERON THOMAS (2-mast wooden schooner, 50 foot, 35 gross tons, built in 1891, at Bay City, Michigan) was carrying gravel in a storm on Lake Huron when she sprang a leak and ran for the beach. She struck bottom and then capsized. She broke up in twenty feet of water near Point Lookout in Saginaw Bay. No lives were lost.

The schooner S.J. HOLLY came into the harbor at Oswego, New York, on 30 November 1867, after a hard crossing of Lake Ontario. The previous day she left the Welland Canal and encountered a growing gale. Capt. Oscar Haynes sought calm water along the north shore, but the heavy seas and freezing winds made sailing perilous. The ropes and chains froze stiff and the schooner was almost unmanageable. The only canvas out was a two-reef foresail and it was frozen in place. With great skill, the skipper managed to limp into port, having lost the yawl and sustained serious damage to the cargo. Fortunately no lives were lost.

1905: The steel consort barge MADEIRA stranded at Split Rock, while under tow of the WILLIAM EDENBORN, broke in two and became a total loss.

1908: D.M. CLEMSON (i) disappeared on Lake Superior while upbound with a cargo of coal from Lorain to Superior. All 24 on board were lost and only 2 bodies were ever found.

1911: Three lives were lost when the wooden steamer RALEIGH sank off Port Colborne. The crew took to the yawl boats but these capsized. Spectators on shore helped pull the sailors to safety.

1922: MAPLEHURST foundered near the West Portage entry Lake Superior while upbound with coal. The captain sought shelter from a storm but the engine failed and the anchors did not hold. There were 11 casualties and the ship was a total loss.

1924: MAPLEDAWN was wrecked at Christian Island, Georgian Bay while downbound with barley. The hull was pounded and could only be salvaged in pieces for scrap about 1942.

1926: CITY OF BANGOR stranded on Keweenaw Point in a blizzard with zero visibility. The ship fell into the trough and was carried ashore. It could not be salvaged and the hull was cut up for scrap during World War II.

1943: RIVERTON, aground for two weeks at Lottie Wolf Shoal, Georgian Bay, was released and taken to Collingwood for repairs. It resumed sailing in 1944 as MOHAWK DEER.

1945: OUTARDE (i) sank at the Consul-Hall Coal Dock, Clayton, NY after being repeatedly pounded against the structure in a wild storm and holed by an underwater piece of steel. The ship was finally refloated on April 18, 1946.

1961: ALGOWAY (i) was damaged while shifting at Port Arthur when it hit a discarded underwater oxygen tank.

1987: A fire aboard the ULS self-unloader CANADIAN PIONEER at Nanticoke damaged the wiring under the control panel. The ship went to the Welland Dock for repairs and then left the Seaway for Sorel where it was reflagged Vanuatu and renamed b) PIONEER.

1997: The tug CAROLYN JO suffered a fire in the engine room off Snake Island, Lake Ontario, and had to be towed to Kingston. The ship is still sailing as d) SEAHOUND.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Laker contacted shore in Beauharnois Canal, St. Lawrence River

11/29 - Further to Wednesday’s News Page report: The bulk carrier Kaministiqua contacted the canal edge at Beauharnois, St. Lawrence River below Montreal in the morning of Nov 27 while proceeding downstream. A ballast tank or tanks were breached with an ensuing ballast water leak. The vessel contacted the shore while bypassing an oncoming ship. She was berthed at Beauharnois after the accident, and as of the morning of Nov 28, remained in the same position.

FleetMon

 

Port Reports -  November 29

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day's news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known). Reporters needed for Lake Michigan ports, St. Marys River, Saginaw River and ports such as Johnstown, ON. If you would like to see your port represented, please consider becoming a news page volunteer and send us your information.

Two Harbors-Silver Bay, MN – Gary A. Putney
Algoma Spirit departed Two Harbors from South of #2 on Nov. 27th at 23:13 for Hamilton. Edgar B. Speer arrived Two Harbors on Nov. 28th at 00:55 and departed from South of #2 on Nov. 28th at 14:33 for Gary. An update on the CSL Assiniboine: When she departed Two Harbors she had no updated AIS. She is headed for Quebec City. Tentatively due Two Harbors late on Nov. 29th are the CSL Tadoussac and the Roger Blough. Weather will be the determining factor as to when they arrive. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay saw the departure of the Joyce L. VanEnkevort/Great Lakes Trader on Nov. 28th at 10:27 for Cleveland. Due Silver Bay on Nov. 28th is the American Spirit. She should be arriving around 20:00. Tentatively due Silver Bay on Nov. 29th is the John J. Boland arriving after unloading stone at Hallett #5 in Duluth. Herbert C. Jackson was unloading stone at Hallett #5, then was due Northshore Mining to load pellets.

Thunder Bay, ON
Wednesday; 23:58 Walter J McCarthy Jr weighed anchor and departed for Indiana Harbor. Thursday; 4:55 Algoma Niagara weighed anchor and proceeded to the Superior Elevator to finish loading wheat. 9:37 Frontenac shifted to Keefer Terminal for repairs. 12:55 Tecumseh departed for Sorel. 16:39 The saltie Resko departed for Montreal. 18:50 CSL Welland departed and is down bound on Lake Superior. 19:18 Algoma Conveyor arrived at Viterra A to load grain.

Muskegon, MI – Brendan Falkowski
Wilfred Sykes was inbound at 2:55 on Wednesday, anchoring in the southwest corner of Muskegon Lake to wait out the weather. She departed at 11:34 on Thanksgiving morning for Indiana Harbor.

Northern Lake Huron ports
Bruce Mines: Thursday; 3:50 Manitoulin departed for Detroit.

Meldrum Bay: 11:07 Kaye E Barker arrived to load.

Port Dolomite: Thursday 6:48 Mississagi arrived to load and departed at 17:56 down bound on Lake Huron.

Calcite: Thursday; 8:59 Arthur M Anderson arrived to load. 18:16 The tug Candice Elise departed for Detroit.

Parry Sound: Thursday; 00:56 Cuyahoga arrived to unload road salt and departed at 9:00

Brevort: Thursday; 20:19 The cement carrier Alpena weighed anchor and departed for Alpena.

Port Inland: Thursday; 2:39 Philip R Clarke departed for Detroit.

Goderich, ON – Bruce Douglas Algoma Innovator arrived 2:55 pm Tuesday, load salt and cleared 3:30 am Wednesday for Parry Sound.

Detroit/Rouge River – Raymond H
Thanksgiving Day Arrivals: Sarah Andrie and her tank barge shifted to the Marathon Asphalt Terminal to load. Laura L VanEnkevort/Joseph H Thompson arrived with a split load of stone for the St. Clair Aggregates and Prairie Materials docks.

Welland Canal and vicinity vessel passages – Thursday November 28 – Barry Andersen
Nanticoke docked - Nov 26 - Sloman Hermes (Mlt) at 1929

Long Point Bay anchorage - Nov 27 - Algoscotia at 0237 and Kitikmeot W at 2125 returned to anchorage for weather - departed - Nov 28 - Kitikmeot W at 0745, Algoma Buffalo at 0837, and Salarium at 0913 - all westbound - Algoma Transport at 0833 and G3 Marquis at 0850 - both eastbound

Welland Canal upbound - Nov 27 - Federal Biscay (Mhl) at 1451 - Nov 28 - Florence Spirit at 0525 and Federal Satsuki (Mhl) at 0608, Victoriaborg (Nld) at 0852, Iver Bright (NLd) at 0956, Baie Comeau at 1432 and Palmerton (Atg) at 1519

Welland Canal downbound - Nov 27 - Narie (Bhs) at 0122 - Nov 28 - CCGS Griffon at 0620 approx from West Street wharf, Algoma Transport at 1219, G3 Marquis at 1308 and Algoma Guardian at 1809

Welland Canal docks - departed - Nov 26 - Salarium at 2320 for Long Point anchorage

Port Weller anchorage - arrivals - Nov 27 - Adfines Sea (Mlt) (ex Osttank Norway-12) at 0440 approx - departed - Nov 28 - Florence Spirit at 0450 for the canal, Federal Satsuki (Mhl) at 0540 for Burns Harbour, Paul A Desgagnes at 1015 for Bronte - Narie (Bhs) at 2155 eastbound - Nov 28 - Victoriaborg (Nld) at 0900 for Chicago, Selasse (Gib) (ex Selay S-17) at 1800 returning to Mississauga

Hamilton - arrivals - Nov 29 - Rossi A Desgagnes eta 0100 - anchored - Nov 27 - Federal Ems (Mhl) at 1345 - docked - Nov 17 - Rt Hon Paul J Martin at 1337 - Nov 21 - Tundra (Cyp) at 2354 - Nov 26 - Sunda (Lbr) (ex Emilie-18) at 0720 and Adfines Sea (Mlt) (ex Osttank Norway-12) at 2220 from Mississauga - Nov 27 - CSL Niagara at 1135 - departed - Nov 27 - Adfines Sea (Mlt) (ex Osttank Norway-12) at 0256 for Port Weller anchorage and Robert S Pierson at 0815 eastbound and tug Sea Eagle II & St Marys Cement II at 2106 eastbound

Bronte - Paul A Desgagnes at 1246 from Port Weller anchorage

Mississauga - arrival - Nov 28 - Selasse (Gib) (ex Selay S-17) at 2012 from Port Weller anchorage

Toronto - arrival - Nov 28 - Pacific Huron (Atg) at 1800 and Alina (Atg) at 2007 - docked - Nov 26 - McKeil Spirit at 2353

Oshawa - Nov 25 - Federal Leda (Mhl) at 2157

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  November 29

In 1953, BENJAMIN F. FAIRLESS, Captain H. C. Buckley, transported the last iron ore of the season through the Soo Locks. The ore originated at Two Harbors and was unloaded at Conneaut. After unloading, the FAIRLESS headed for Monroe, Michigan, for layup.

On 29 November 1886, ALFRED P. WRIGHT (wooden propeller tug, 56 gross tons, built in 1877, at Buffalo, New York) was towing the schooner A J DEWEY in a blizzard and gale in the harbor at Manistee, Michigan. The towline parted and fouled the WRIGHT's propeller. Disabled, she capsized and her crew clung to the overturned hull. One crewman swam 1,000 feet to shore and summoned the U.S. Lifesaving Service. The WRIGHT's and DEWEY's crews were both rescued but three lifesavers were lost in this effort.

On November 29, 1966, the DANIEL J. MORRELL sank approximately 20 miles north of Harbor Beach in Lake Huron. Her nearly identical sistership, the EDWARD Y. TOWNSEND, was traveling about 20 miles behind the MORRELL and made it to the Lime Island Fuel Dock in the St. Marys River where cracks were found in her deck; the TOWNSEND proceeded to Sault Ste. Marie where she was taken out of service. The TOWNSEND sank in the Atlantic on October 7, 1968, while being towed overseas for scrap.

E. B. BARBER was laid up for the last time at Toronto, Ontario, on 29 Nov. 1984.

On November 29, 1903, snow and stormy seas drove the two-and-a-half year old J. T. HUTCHINSON onto an uncharted rock (now known as Eagle River Reef) one-half mile off shore and 10 miles west of Eagle Harbor, Michigan near the northwestern coast of the Keweenaw Peninsula.

On November 29, 1974, the PERE MARQUETTE 21 was loaded with remnants of Port Huron's Peerless Cement Dock, which reportedly were bound for Saudi Arabia, and cleared there in tow of the Great Lakes Towing Co., tugs AMERICA and OHIO.

SYLVANIA was in a collision with the DIAMOND ALKALI in the Fighting Island Channel of the Detroit River on 29 Nov 1968, during a snow squall. SYLVANIA's bow was severely damaged.

The propeller BURLINGTON had barges in tow up bound on Lake Erie when she was damaged by the ice and sank in the Pelee Passage.

On 29 November 1856, ARABIAN (3-mast wooden bark, 116 foot, 350 tons, built in 1853, at Niagara, Ontario) had stranded on Goose Island Shoal, 10 miles ENE of Mackinac Island ten days earlier. She was relieved of her cargo and was being towed to Chicago by the propeller OGONTZ when a gale blew in and the towline parted. ARABIAN made for shore, her pumps working full force and OGONTZ following. During the night they were separated and ARABIAN sank off Point Betsey in Lake Michigan. Her crew escaped in her yawl.

In 1903, the PERE MARQUETTE 19 arrived Ludington on her maiden voyage. Captain John J. Doyle in command.

On 29 November 1881, the 149 foot wooden propeller NORTHERN QUEEN, which had been involved in a collision with the 136 foot wooden propeller canaller LAKE ERIE just five days before, struck the pier at Manistique so hard that she was wrecked. Besides her own crew, she also had LAKE ERIE's crew on board.

On 29 Nov 1902, BAY CITY (1-mast wood schooner-barge, 140 foot, 306 gross tons, built in 1857, at Saginaw, Michigan as a brig) was left at anchor in Thunder Bay by the steamer HURON CITY during a storm. BAY CITY's anchor chain parted and the vessel was driven against the Gilchrist dock at Alpena, Michigan and wrecked. Her crew managed to escape with much difficulty.

1902: The wooden bulk freighter CHARLES HEBARD (i) stranded on the Ontario shore of Lake Superior at Point Mamaise in a snowstorm. The hull broke up but all on board were rescued.

1950: ESSO ROCHESTER, a T-2 tanker, broke in two in heavy weather off Anticosti Island, in the Gulf of St. Lawrence while enroute, in ballast, from Montreal to Aruba. The two sections were taken in tow but the bow had to be cut loose in a storm on December 21, rolled over and was lost. The stern was taken to Newport News, VA and rebuilt. It was a Seaway trader in 1959 and scrapped at Onimichi, Japan, in July 1966.

1959: VILJA went aground in fog while outbound through the Brockville Narrows. The 14-year old ship was refloated on December 13 and had to spend the winter at Prescott. The Norwegian-flag freighter never returned inland and was scrapped at Kaohsiung, Taiwan, as c) SILVER HOPE in 1974.

1960: FRANCISCO MORAZON went aground on the rocks of South Manitou Island, Lake Michigan and the remains of the hull are still there.

1960: CATO II, a small survey vessel, was cut loose by vandals at Port Dalhousie, drifted with the current into Lake Ontario, and stranded on the rocks of the west pier off Port Weller. Despite gale force winds and cold, the hull was salvaged the next day. At last report, the ship was still intact and was owned by Seneca College of Toronto.

1964: The MARIA COSULICH was wrecked at the breakwall at Genoa, Italy, when the engine failed while outbound. The crew was saved but the vessel was a total loss. It had been built at Sturgeon Bay in 1943 as WILLIAM HOMAN.

1985: JALAGODAVARI sliced into the St. Louis road and rail bridge on the Seaway and navigation had to be suspended for seven days. The vessel was removed, taken to Montreal and arrested for damages. The ship was repaired and survived until scrapping as f) BLUE OCEAN in 2000-2001.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Russ Plumb, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Ghost ship CTC No. 1 to finally be removed from Port of Chicago

11/28 - Chicago, Il – A rusting ghost ship that's been docked under a towering concrete grain elevator on Lake Calumet at the Port of Chicago will finally be moved after sitting there for decades.

The 620-foot long CTC No. 1, a Great Lakes freighter that first set sail in 1943, has been a landmark on the Bishop Ford Expressway and a highly visible symbol of Rust Belt decline in the bi-state Calumet Region. The hulking ship on the lake just off the Calumet River is hard to miss, rusting away under the Illinois International Port sign just off a 10-lane highway.

The CTC No. 1originally hauled cargo, including raw materials for steelmakers, across the Great Lakes, but had most recently been used for cement storage until 2009. The abandoned-looking bulk carrier is now colloquially known as the ghost ship or mystery ship.

Illinois International Port District Executive Director Clayton Harris III said ship owner Grand River Navigation, a division of Rand Logistics, should tow the ship away and scrap it in the next few weeks. "The goal is to have it removed by the end of this month, but I don't know if that's truly going to happen," Harris said. "We're hopeful it will be removed by the end of the year, before the lake freezes."

The Maritime Class bulk carrier was built by Great Lakes Engineering Works in River Rouge, Michigan for $2.26 million 76 years ago. The ship was originally named the McIntyre, after an iron ore mine in the Adirondack Mountains, but was almost immediately renamed Frank Purnell after the president of Youngstown Sheet and Tube, according to the Boat Nerd website about Great Lakes shipping.

In its heyday, the self-unloading bulker could haul up to 16,300 tons of cargo in its four holds. In 1965, it was acquired by Bethlehem Steel Corp. and renamed Steelton after a steel mill in Pennsylvania. In 1974, it struck a bridge on the Welland Canal by Port Robinson in Ontario, causing extensive damage to the vessel and putting the bridge out of commission permanently, after it was determined repairs would cost up to $20 million.

Bethlehem sold the ship a few years later to Cement Transit Co. in Detroit, which turned it into a cerement storage barge – its current name CTC being an acronym for the company. It was towed by the tugs John M. Selvick and Minnie Selvick to the Port of Chicago in 1982, where it was used to store and transfer concrete until a decade ago. It has since floated in limbo.

Harris estimates the ship's metal will fetch over $1 million when scrapped. "With no disrespect to where it's been, it's been a stigma on the port, being in the same exact spot for so long," Harris said. "It's been there forever. This will improve the aesthetic look of the port."

The ship's removal also will free up more dock space the port can lease out. "The main benefit is the aesthetics," Harris said.

NWI Times

 

Strong winds affect shipping; Star Line ferry breaks loose from dock

11/28 - Great Lakes vessels were anchoring for weather or taking more sheltered courses Wednesday as a November storm swept through the region.

The Star Line Mackinac Island ferry Algomah was torn from her moorings and was blown on the beach. The ferry, which hasn’t sailed for a number of years, was returned to her dock in the early afternoon. At Sault Ste. Marie, the Sugar Islander ferry suspended its runs due to the wind.

Many vessels on Lake Superior were hugging the north shore. Wednesday’s forecast for the big lake was northeast winds to 45 knots with waves 10-18 feet, moderating on Thursday.

 

TSB deploys a team following Kaministiqua incident near Beauharnois

11/28 - Quebec, QC – The Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB) is deploying a team of investigators following an incident where the bulk carrier Kaministiqua made bottom contact in the St. Lawrence River near Beauharnois, QC. The TSB will gather information and assess the occurrence.

Transportation Safety Board of Canada, Brenda Benoit

 

Port Reports -  November 28

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day's news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known). Reporters needed for Lake Michigan ports, St. Marys River, Saginaw River and ports such as Johnstown, ON. If you would like to see your port represented, please consider becoming a news page volunteer and send us your information.

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
Stormy weather on Lake Superior prevented any harbor traffic from moving in the Twin Ports on Wednesday. In port were James R. Barker, tied up at Canadian National waiting for conditions to improve so she could depart with her iron ore cargo; American Integrity, loading coal at SMET; Isa, loading wheat at Gavilon; and Maria G, at anchor outside the harbor. Edwin H. Gott was moored at Burlington Northern in Superior and was also waiting on weather to allow for her departure.

Two Harbors-Silver Bay, MN – Gary A. Putney
CSL Assiniboine departed Two Harbors from South of #2 on Nov. 27th at 11:57. No updated AIS. She was hugging the North Shore doing a little over 5 knots. Arriving Two Harbors on Nov. 27th at 12:31 was the Algoma Spirit where, as of 19:30 on the 27th, she was still loading. The Edgar B. Speer went to anchor on Nov. 26th at 22:00 in the lee of Sand Island. As of 19:30 on the 27th she remained at anchor. There is no other traffic scheduled for Two Harbors on Nov. 28th. As of 19:30 on Nov. 27th the Joyce L. VanEnkevort/Great Lakes Trader remained at the dock. Tentatively due Silver Bay on Nov. 28th is the American Spirit.

Thunder Bay, ON
Tuesday 21:56 Tecumseh arrived at the Richardson Current River Terminal to load wheat. Wednesday; 0:28 Federal Baltic departed for Detroit. 9:32 The saltie Wigeon arrived and went to anchor. 12:23 Walter J McCarthy Jr. went to anchor north of the main anchorage to wait out the weather.

Northern Lake Huron ports
Bruce Mines: Wednesday; 14:19 Manitoulin arrived to load trap rock.

Port Dolomite: Wednesday 17:53 John J Boland departed and went to anchor at 21:09 in the St Marys River north of Detour to wait out the weather.

Calcite: Wednesday; 15:02 Great Republic departed for Saginaw. 15:32 The tug Candice Elise arrived at the inner harbor to wait out the weather.

Stoneport: Wednesday; 4:11 Laura L Vanenkevort departed for Detroit. 18:42 Olive L Moore arrived to load.

Alpena: Monday; Wednesday; 12:32 Olive L Moore weighed anchor and departed for Stoneport to load.

Brevort: Wednesday; 15:39 The cement carrier Alpena went to anchor to wait out the weather.

Detroit/Rouge River – Raymond H
Wednesday Arrivals: Tug Rebecca Lynn and barge arrived at Nicholson's Detroit Terminal to unload. GL Ostrander/Integrity arrived at Lafarge to unload cement.

Welland Canal and vicinity vessel passages – Wednesday November 27, 2019 - Barry Andersen
Nanticoke arrivals - docked - Nov 26 - Sloman Hermes (Mlt) at 1929 from the anchorage - departed - Nov 27 - Mesabi Miner at 0430 and Kitikmeot W At 1241 both westbound

Long Point Bay anchorage - Nov 27 - Algoscotia at 0237, Algoma Buffalo at 02318 Salarium at 0408, G3 Marquis at 1315, Algoma Transport at 1358 and Kitikmeot W eta 2135 returned to anchorage - all for weather

Welland Canal upbound - Nov 26 - Salarium departed wharf 16 at 2320 westbound - Nov 27 - Maccoa (Cyp) at 0232, Federal Biscay (Mhl) at 1312 - (delayed in Lk.2 at 1451), Florence Spirit eta 2100 and Federal Satsuki (Mhl) at 2315

Welland Canal downbound - Nov 25 - CCGS Griffon at 0827 stopping West Street, Whitefish Bay at 1819, CSL Niagara at 1912 and Algoma Sault at 1938 stopping wharf 16 - Nov 27 - Narie (Bhs) at 0122

Welland Canal docks - Nov 25 - Salarium arrived wharf 16 at 1406 - departed Nov 26 at 2320 for Long Point anchorage

Port Weller anchorage - arrivals - Nov 26 - Paul A Desgagnes at 2032 - Nov 27 - Selasse (Mlt) (ex Selay S-17) at 0400 approx., Adfines Sea (Mlt) (ex Osttank Norway-12) at 0440 approx and Narie (Bhs) at 1250

Hamilton - arrivals - Nov 27 - Robert S Pierson at 0815, Federal Ems (Mhl) at 1345 and CSL Niagara at 1135 - all to the anchorage - docked - Nov 17 - Rt Hon Paul J Martin at 1337 - Nov 21 - Tundra (Cyp) at 2354 - Nov 26 - tug Sea Eagle II & St Marys Cement II at 0531, Sunda (Lbr) (ex Emilie-18) at 0720, Victoriaborg (Nld) at 2123 and Adfines Sea (Mlt) (ex Osttank Norway-12) at 2220 from Mississauga - departed - Nov 27 - Adfines Sea (Mlt) (ex Osttank Norway-12) at 0256 for Port Weller anchorage

Clarkson - Nov 26 - Robert S Pierson at 2055 - departed Nov 27 at 0629 westbound

Mississauga - arrival - Nov 26 - Selasse (Mlt) (ex Selay S-17) at 2126 from Port Weller - departed - Nov 27 at 0157 back to Port Weller anchorage

Toronto - arrival - Nov 26 - McKeil Spirit at 2353

Oshawa - Nov 25 - Federal Leda (Mhl) at 2157

 

Great Lakes water levels, St. Clair River likely to rise in 2020

11/28 - St. Clair, MI - Prepare for higher water levels next year in the Great Lakes and the St. Clair River. That's the word from the St. Clair County Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Management. Representatives from the office have been visiting city council and township board meetings, urging officials and residents to be prepared.

Director Justin Westmiller addressed the Marysville City Council at its regular meeting on Nov. 25. Assistant Director Mark White visited the St. Clair City Council on Nov. 18. "We are 11 inches higher right now than we were at this time in 2018," Westmiller said. "We're at the lowest point of the year right now and from this point forward water levels will rise."

September saw a lot of rain, resulting in Lake Michigan/Huron — hydrologically one lake — rising to 35 inches above its long-term average and Lake St. Clair 33 inches above its long-term average.

"Our office has had quite a few meetings with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and National Weather Service and our big concern is what's coming our way," said White.

Lake Superior, Lake St. Clair, Lake Erie and Lake Ontario set all-time records for high water this year; Lake Michigan/Huron missed a record high by an inch. Westmiller said that river levels are likely to be 7 to 12 inches higher next spring and summer than a year ago.

"It's not just St. Clair County," said White. "A lot of coastal communities in Michigan are being impacted ... by the weather we've had, the amount of precipitation, the amount of snow pack, the amount of melting and runoff, everything that comes from Lake Superior on down has been huge. Predictions are that conditions in the coming year are going to be probably worse."

In order for the water levels to fall, the Great Lakes Basin would need a warmer than normal winter, in which the lakes experienced little freezing, allowing for accelerated evaporation. And less snowfall. But forecasters are calling for a colder than normal winter.

Ice jams in the St. Clair River in the late winter and early spring are a growing concern. "The river can shoot up two-three feet in eight hours," Westmiller said. "Are we going to get first-floor flooding in Marysville like we're going to get in Clay Township, Algonac, Marine City and East China?"

No, he said. St. Clair and Marysville sit relatively high compared to downriver communities. "But we're likely to see seawalls over-topped," Westmiller said.

Tributaries of the big river are likely to flood again. In St. Clair, the Pine River overran a portion of Pine Shores Golf Course this year. "Look for that to continue and get a hair worse," said White.

Canals and drains experienced significant flooding in 2019. "The Marine City Drain used to look like a little ditch," said White. "This year, it was like the Amazon River. It was horrible."

The U.S. Coast Guard will have two ice breakers available to work the river and so will the Canadians. The USCGC Mackinac, responsible for Lake Michigan/Huron, may also be able to help keep the river clear of ice.

Westmiller cautioned that the Coast Guard's first service priority is search and rescue, followed by urgent response, exigent circumstances, such as flooding, and facilitation of navigation.

Westmiller said the high water levels will allow three international freighters, colloquially called "salties," to make runs all winter, which should help keep the river open. "If you have any concerns, check your insurance," said Westmiller.

The Voice

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  November 28

In 1949, sea trials for the largest freighter built on the Great Lakes, the WILFRED SYKES, were held off Lorain, Ohio. SYKES was converted to a self-unloader in 1975.

In 1942, the Canadian grain carrier JUDGE HART grounded and then sank in Ashburton Bay, Lake Superior. The entire crew of the JUDGE HART was rescued by the JAMES B. EADS, Captain Stanley J. Tischart, and the whaleback JOHN ERICSSON, Captain Wilfred E. Ogg.

On 28 November 1867, MARQUETTE (wooden bark, 139 foot, 426 tons, built in 1856, at Newport [Marine City], Michigan) was carrying corn from Chicago to Collingwood, Ontario when she sprang a leak during a storm on Lake Huron. She was run ashore on Hope Island on Georgian Bay.

On November 28, 1905, the Pittsburgh Steamship Company vessel MATAAFA was wrecked as it tried to re-enter the Duluth Ship Canal in a severe storm. The MATAAFA had departed Duluth earlier but had decided to return to safety. After dropping her barge in the lake, the vessel was picked up by waves, was slammed against the north pier and was swung around to rest just hundreds of feet offshore north of the north pier, where it broke in two. Much of the crew froze to death in the cold snap that followed the storm, as there was no quick way to get out to the broken vessel for rescue. The MATAAFA was repaired prior to the 1906, season; she ultimately ended her career as an automobile carrier for the T.J. McCarthy Steamship Company and was sold for scrap in 1965.

The CANADIAN OLYMPIC's maiden voyage was 28 Nov 1976, to load coal at Conneaut, Ohio for Nanticoke, Ontario. Her name honored the Olympic games that were held at Montreal that year.

On November 28, 1983, while up bound after leaving the Poe Lock, the INDIANA HARBOR was in a collision, caused by high winds, with the downbound Greek salty ANANGEL SPIRIT resulting in a 10 foot gash in the laker's port bow.

LANCASHIRE (Hull#827) was launched at Lorain, Ohio on November 28, 1942. She would soon be renamed b) SEWELL AVERY.

CATHY B towed the GOVERNOR MILLER to Vigo, Spain on November 28, 1980, where she was broken up.

BENSON FORD was renamed e) US265808 and departed River Rouge on November 28, 1986, towed by the Sandrin tugs TUSKER and GLENADA bound for Ramey's Bend in the Welland Canal.

FRONTENAC arrived at the Fraser Shipyard, Superior, Wisconsin on November 28, 1979. Her keel, which had hogged four feet, was declared a constructive total loss.

The BRANSFORD stranded on a reef off Isle Royale in Lake Superior during a major storm on 28 November 1905, (the same storm that claimed the steamer MATAAFA). She was recovered.

On her third trip in 1892, the ANN ARBOR NO 1 again ran aground, this time three miles north of Ahnapee (now called Algoma). There was $15,000 damage to her cargo.

In 1906, the ANN ARBOR NO 4 left Cleveland bound for Frankfort on her maiden voyage. The ANN ARBOR NO 4 ran aground off Kewaunee in 1924.

On 28 November 1905, AMBOY (2-mast wooden schooner-barge, 209 foot, 894 gross tons, formerly HELENA) was carrying coal in tow of the wooden propeller GEORGE SPENCER in a gale on Lake Superior. In an effort to save both vessels, AMBOY was cut loose. The SPENCER was disabled quickly and was driven ashore near Little Marais, Minnesota. AMBOY struggled against the gale for a full day before finally going ashore near Thomasville, Ontario on 29 November. No lives were lost from either vessel.

On 28 November 1872, W O BROWN (wooden schooner, 140 foot, 306 tons, built in 1862, at Buffalo, New York) was carrying wheat in a storm on Lake Superior when she was driven ashore near Point Maimanse, Ontario and pounded to pieces. Six lives were lost. Three survivors struggled through a terrible cold spell and finally made it to the Soo on Christmas Day.

On 28 Nov 1874, the propeller JOHN PRIDGEON JR was launched at Clark's shipyard in Detroit, Michigan. She was built for Capt. John Pridgeon. Her dimensions were 235 X 36 X 17 feet. The engines of the B F WADE were installed in her.

On 28 Nov 1923, the Detroit & Windsor Ferry Company and Bob-Lo docks were destroyed by a fire caused by an overheated stove in the ferry dock waiting room. The blaze started at 3 a.m.

CANADIAN TRANSFER underwent repairs most of Tuesday, 28 Nov. 2000, at the Algoma Steel dock at Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario. She had run aground the previous night in the Canadian channel approaching Algoma Steel. CANADIAN TRANSFER was freed by two Purvis Marine tugs. The vessel suffered a crack or hole in the hull plating about 10 feet from the bottom along its port side.

1918: The bow section of the former passenger steamer NORTH WEST sank in Lake Ontario. The ship had been cut in two for a tow out of the Great Lakes. The stern was later rebuilt as b) MAPLECOURT.

1923: LINDEN, a wooden bulk carrier, burned as a total loss in Tawas Bay.

1932: The Canadian freighter GEORGIAN stranded at Munising while downbound from Port Arthur to Detroit. The crew was rescued on December 3. The first salvage attempt failed on December 5 and the vessel was not released until May 1933.

1961: IQUITOS, enroute from Callao, Peru, to Manzanillo, Mexico, with fish meal, caught fire off the coast of Mexico and was abandoned by the crew. The vessel first visited the Great Lakes as a) RUTENFJELL in 1936 and returned on numerous occasions. It was back as b) POLYRIVER from 1951 to 1958. The abandoned IQUITOS drifted for months and was finally sunk by a U.S. destroyer as a hazard to navigation about 100 miles southeast of the Christmas Islands, on April 9, 1962.

1966: The Liberty ship TEGEAN ran aground on The Sisters rocks in fog south of Halifax while inbound for bunkers. All on board were saved by Coast Guard and Navy helicopters. The hull broke into 3 pieces and was dynamited by Navy divers as a hazard on December 16, 1966. The vessel had traded through the Seaway as b) ST. MALO in 1962.

1981: LONDON EARL went aground at Pointe aux Trembles while outbound from Thunder Bay to Hamburg, West Germany, with a cargo of wheat. Five tugs released the ship, with only minimal damage, on November 30. The vessel later returned through the Seaway as b) OLYMPIC LIBERTY beginning in 1983, as c) STABERG in 1990 and as d) ITHAKI in 1996. It was scrapped at Alang, India, in 2001.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Russ Plumb, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Lakes limestone trade up 11.4 percent in October

11/27 - Cleveland, OH – Shipments of limestone on the Great Lakes totaled 3.8 million tons in October, an increase of 11.4 percent compared to a year ago. Limestone cargos also bettered the month’s 5-year average by 8.5 percent.

Loadings from U.S. quarries totaled 3.1 million tons, an increase of 10.6 percent. Shipments from Canadian quarries totaled 696,978 tons, an increase of 15.5 percent.

Year-to-date the limestone trade stands at 27.2 million tons, an increase of 11.5 percent compared to a year ago. Loadings from Michigan and Ohio quarries total 22.3 million tons, an increase of 12.2 percent. Shipments from Ontario quarries total 4.96 million tons, an increase 8.5 percent.

Lake Carriers’ Association

 

2019 shipping season may end early, would cost Twin Ports millions

11/27 - Duluth, MN – Flooding on Lake Ontario could shut down the shipping season early. Authorities are considering opening the Moses-Saunders Power Dam in the St. Lawrence Seaway to allow water to drain from Lake Ontario, through the seaway and into the Atlantic Ocean.

The dam would open two weeks before the normal December 31st end of the shipping season. People in favor of the idea say the water level on Lake Ontario would lower approximately one inch, potentially alleviating flooding along the shorelines.

If the dam were opened, ships wouldn’t be able to navigate due to the strong current. The move would also cost the US and Canadian shipping industries $193 million each week.

The Port Authority in Duluth says the impact on shipping would be large.

“To close shipping two weeks early doesn’t provide them meaningful relief. At the same time, it exacerbates that economic damage by piling on the economic damage that would be piling on because of that stoppage of the seaway traffic. That has both short and long term affects to shipping,” said Deb DeLuca, the Executive Director of the Duluth Seaway Port Authority.

The Port Authority says if the shipping season closes early, the cost to the Port of Duluth-Superior more than $4.5 million.

KBJR6

 

Port Reports -  November 27

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day's news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known). Reporters needed for Lake Michigan ports, St. Marys River, Saginaw River and ports such as Johnstown, ON. If you would like to see your port represented, please consider becoming a news page volunteer and send us your information.

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
Brant departed Duluth at 04:03 Tuesday morning with a load of wheat from CHS 1, and James R. Barker arrived at 08:11 to pick up iron ore pellets at CN. She is expected to depart early Wednesday. Also in port on Tuesday was Isa, taking on wheat at Gavilon. In Superior, American Integrity arrived at 01:10 for some sort of repairs at Lakehead Pipeline. Paul R. Tregurtha left at 02:12 for Nanticoke after loading iron ore pellets at Burlington Northern, at which point Burns Harbor shifted to BN from Lakehead Pipeline where she had been waiting. After loading throughout the day, she was outbound at 16:28. Edwin H. Gott then arrived at 17:35 and tied up at BN to load.

Two Harbors-Silver Bay, MN – Gary A. Putney
The Walter J. McCarthy Jr. departed Two Harbors at 15:52 on Nov. 26th after having been at the dock since Saturday. She departed for Indiana Harbor. The CSL Assiniboine got underway off Superior on Nov. 26th at approx. 10:25 and arrived Two Harbors after the departure of the McCarthy Jr. The Algoma Spirit anchored South of Two Harbors where she awaits South of #2. The Gott that was scheduled for Two Harbors went to BNSF #5 on the afternoon of Nov. 26th. Due Two Harbors on Nov. 27th is the Edgar B. Speer. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay saw the arrival of the Joyce L. VanEnkevort/Great Lakes Trader on Nov. 26th at 09:30. There is no scheduled traffic for Silver Bay on Nov. 27th.

Thunder Bay, ON
Tuesday; 13:09 CSL Welland arrived at Viterra A to load grain. 13:29 Algoma Niagara departed and went to anchor south of the Welcome Islands to wait out weather. =

Sturgeon Bay, WI – Jim Stiefvater
Beaver Island ferry Emerald Isle departed Bay Ship Building after approx. two months service and repair.

Northern Lake Huron ports
Meldrum Bay: Monday; 20:13 Clyde S Vanenkevort departed for Marquette. Tuesday; 3:19 Herbert C Jackson arrived to finish loading and departed at 9:30 for Duluth Superior.

Port Dolomite: Tuesday; 16:59 John J Boland arrived to load.

Calcite: Tuesday; 1:34 Defiance arrived to load. 2:16 Great Republic arrived to load lime stone. 15:39 Defiance departed for Cleveland.

Stoneport: Monday; 15:32 Manitowoc arrived and went to anchor. 23:19 Herbert C Jackson departed for Meldrum Bay to finish loading. to load. Manitowoc weighed anchor and proceeded to the dock to load. 12:34 Manitowoc departed. Laura L Vanenkevort arrived to load.

Alpena: Monday; 23:12 Samuel De Champlain arrived. Tuesday: 11:57 Olive L Moore arrived and went to anchor in the bay to wait out weather before proceeding to Stoneport to load. 18:16 G L Ostrander departed for Detroit. Samuel De Champlain shifted from the material dock to the cement loading dock.

Port Inland: Tuesday; 15:00 Philip R Clarke arrived to load limestone.

Detroit/Rouge River – Raymond H
Tuesday Arrivals: Kaye E Barker arrived at Zug Island to unload coal. Tug Capt. Keith arrived at Nicholson's Ecorse Terminal. Lee A Tregurtha arrived at AK Steel to unload ore. Dorothy Ann/Pathfinder arrived at the St. Clair Aggregates dock to unload stone.

Cleveland, OH
Heerengracht departed at 17:15 Tuesday. American Courage is running shuttles after she delivered stone to LaFarge. NACC Argonaut was arriving Tuesday night, ETA is 22:00.

Welland Canal and vicinity vessel passages – Tuesday November 26 – Barry Andersen
Nanticoke arrivals - Nov 26 - Kitikmeot W at 0826, Mesabi Miner at 1026 (from the anchorage) and Sloman Hermes (Mlt) at 1929 from the anchorage - departed - Nov 26 - tug Michigan & Great Lakes at 1920 westbound

Buffalo - Nov 24 - American Mariner at 0616 - departed - Nov 26 - at 1016 westbound

Welland Canal upbound - Nov 24 - Selasse (Mlt) at 2250 to the anchorage - Nov 25 - Salarium at 0635 stopped at wharf 16, and Algoma Enterprise at 2025 and NACC Argonaut 2146 - Nov 26 - Algoscotia at 1203

Welland Canal downbound - Nov 24 - Algoma Buffalo at 1324 for wharf 6 Thorold and Radcliffe R Latimer at 1134 - Nov 25 - Mandarin (Cyp) at 2311 - Nov 26 - Eeborg (Nld) 0817, CCGS Griffon at 0827 stopping West Street, Whitefish Bay at 1819, CSL Niagara at 1912 and Algoma Sault at 1938 stopping wharf 16

Welland Canal docks - Nov 25 - Salarium arrived wharf 16 at 1406 - departed - Nov 26 - Federal Weser (Mhl) from wharf 2 at 2004 for Milwaukee and Algoma Buffalo from wharf 6 at 2005

Port Weller anchorage - arrivals - Nov 26 - Mandarin (Cyp) at 1007 and Paul A Desgagnes at 2032 - departed - Nov 25 - supply vessel Highland Eagle (GBr) at 2345 eastbound - Nov 26 - Selasse (Mlt) (ex Selay S-17, Yildirim-08) at 1900 for Mississauga and Mandarin (Cyp) etd at 2230

Hamilton arrivals - Nov 26 - tug Sea Eagle II & St Marys Cement II at 0531, Victoriaborg (Nld) eta 2135 - anchored - Sunda (Lbr) (ex Emilie-15) at 0155 - docked - Nov 17 - Rt Hon Paul J Martin at 1337 - Nov 20 - Federal Cedar (Mhl) 0301 - Nov 21 - Tundra (Cyp) at 2354 - departed - Nov 25 - Radcliffe R Latimer at 2226 eastbound

Bronte arrival - none

Clarkson - Nov 26 - Robert S Pierson eta 2057

Mississauga - arrival - Nov 26 - Selasse (Mlt) (ex Selay S-17, Yildirim-08) eta 2150

Toronto - arrival - Nov 26 - none

Oshawa - Nov 25 - Federal Leda (Mhl) at 2157

 

Shipping industry leaders urge against flood relief on Lake Ontario

11/27 - Industry leaders joined congressional counterparts Monday in opposing a remedy to relieve flooding Lake Ontario by opening higher outflows at the Moses-Saunders dam on the nearby St. Lawrence River.

Last week, the International Joint Commission in charge of water regulation approved a plan to open the floodgates in order to lower lake levels on the easternmost of the Great Lakes.

Closing the St. Lawrence Seaway in December to accommodate higher water outflow at the Moses-Saunders dam could cost the Canadian and U.S. economies $193 million per week, the Chamber of Marine Commerce said Monday. This would impact farmers’ grain exports and manufacturing plant operations and disrupt deliveries of fuel, construction materials and road salt for winter to cities throughout the region.

Taconite iron ore shipments would not be impacted since ore boats traverse mainly through the four other lakes.

“As residents ourselves of Great Lakes communities affected by flooding and storm damage, we share in the concern regarding record-high water levels," Deborah DeLuca, Duluth Seaway Port Authority executive director, said in a news release. "However, the minor water level relief that would result from increased December outflow through the Moses-Saunders Dam would be negligible at best. Concurrently, increasing the outflow to levels unsafe for navigation would do immeasurable and long-term harm to producers and consumers throughout the entire Great Lakes region and the United States as a whole.

"We’re all eager for solutions, but opening the flow on a single dam in December isn’t a meaningful solution, especially when weighed against the associated adverse effects.”

The Chamber of Marine Commerce said a negligible 4-centimeter-per-week reduction would result from the plan — coming at a huge cost to commercial navigation.

“We have the greatest sympathy for Lake Ontario and St. Lawrence River residents and business owners that have been impacted by flooding due to unprecedented weather conditions. This situation has also cost our supply chain millions of dollars,” Chamber of Marine Commerce President Bruce Burrows said. “Halting St. Lawrence Seaway shipping altogether would cause major harm to our economy and achieve no noticeable benefit for flooding victims."

Burrows called on the International Joint Commission and government leaders to collaborate with affected stakeholders to find solutions that look at shoreline resiliency, flood management zones and what can be done during the winter when the St. Lawrence Seaway is closed for eight weeks to navigation starting Jan. 15.

"The costs of stopping commercial navigation at this critical point in December will significantly affect industries that have organized their supply chains around the Seaway’s shipping season," the Chamber said. "Even if companies were able to find alternative transportation (with this very short notice), this would cost considerably more and force huge volumes of cargo onto thousands of trucks at the detriment to the environment and road congestion."

In a Nov. 20 letter, 20 members of Congress from the Great Lakes region, including Rep. Pete Stauber, R-Hermantown, urged the International Joint Commission to ensure the seaway remains open during the navigation season.

"The Great Lakes, including communities in our districts are facing high-water levels. We understand that this problem is real. However, we urge the commission to reject a short-term solution for Lake Ontario that risks commerce in the region by causing the Saint Lawrence Seaway to close during the navigation season," they wrote. "Any closure of the Seaway during the navigation season will impede maritime commerce and negatively impact international trade to and from our states."

The International Joint Commission did not respond to a News Tribune request for comment Monday.

In June, the Chamber of Marine Commerce and Duluth Seaway Port Authority opposed a similar plan by the International Joint Commission to open the Moses-Saunders Dam wider to alleviate Lake Ontario's high water levels.

The groups warned it could cost the shipping industry upward of $1 billion in financial damage to the U.S. and Canadian economies. Ultimately, the commission maintained outflow levels through the dam that still allowed for safe shipping.

Duluth News Tribune

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  November 27

At 4:00 a.m. on 27 November 1872, the wooden schooner MIDDLESEX was struck by a terrible winter storm on Lake Superior. The winds caught the vessel with such force that she listed at a 45 degree angle and her cargo shifted. In danger of sinking, the crew jettisoned much of the cargo and the ship righted herself. Her lifeboat and much of her rigging and sails were washed away. She limped into Waiska Bay and anchored to ride out the storm. However, she had developed a leak and it was so cold that her pumps had frozen. To save the vessel, she was run ashore and sank in shallow water. The crew climbed into her rigging until the tug W. D. CUSHING rescued them.

ALGOSEA entered Lake service as a self-unloader for the first time with salt loaded at Goderich, Ontario and passed down bound in the Welland Canal November 27, 1976, for Quebec City.

AVONDALE was condemned and was not allowed to carry cargo after she arrived at Toledo, Ohio on November 27, 1975, to load soybeans.

The steam barge CHAUNCY HURLBUT was launched at the shipyard of Simon Langell at St. Clair, Michigan on Thanksgiving Day, 27 November 1873. She was built for Chandler Bros. of Detroit.

On 27 November 1886, COMANCHE (wooden schooner, 137 foot, 322 tons, built in 1867, at Oswego, New York) was carrying corn in a storm on Lake Ontario when she ran on a shoal and sank near Point Peninsula, New York. A local farmer died while trying to rescue her crew of 8. His was the only death. She was later recovered and rebuilt as THOMAS DOBBIE.

The PERE MARQUETTE 22 collided with the WABASH in heavy fog in 1937.

In 1966, the CITY OF MIDLAND 41 ran aground at Ludington, Michigan in a storm. Stranded on board were a number of passengers and 56 crewmen. Ballast tanks were flooded to hold the steamer on until the storm subsided. She was pulled off four days later by the Roen tug JOHN PURVES.

The propeller MONTGOMERY, which burned in June 1878, was raised on 27 November 1878. Her engine and boiler were removed and she was converted to a barge. She was rebuilt at Algonac, Michigan in the summer of 1879.

On 27 November 1866, the Oswego Advertiser & Times reported that the schooner HENRY FITZHUGH arrived at Oswego, New York with 17,700 bushels of wheat from Milwaukee. Her skipper was Captain Cal Becker. The round trip took 23 days, which was considered "pretty fast sailing".

The CITY OF FLINT 32 was launched in Manitowoc on 27 Nov 1929. Cut down to a rail barge at Nicholson's, Ecorse in 1970, renamed b.) ROANOKE.

On Monday, 27 Nov 1996, the Cyprus flag MALLARD of 1977, up bound, apparently bounced off the wall in the Welland Canal below Lock 1 and into the path of the CANADIAN ENTERPRISE. It was a sideswipe rather than a head on collision. The ENTERPRISE was repaired at Port Weller Dry Docks. The repairs to the gangway and ballast vent pipes took six hours. The MALLARD proceeded to Port Colborne to be repaired there.

At 10:20 p.m. on Monday, 27 Nov. 2000, CANADIAN TRANSFER radioed Soo Traffic to report that the vessel was aground off Algoma Steel and "taking on water but in no danger." The crew reported that they had two anchors down and one line on the dock. Purvis Marine was contacted.

1905: LAFAYETTE stranded at Encampment Island, Lake Superior, broke in two and was a total loss. MANILA, its consort barge, also came ashore but was later salvaged.

1942: JUDGE HART stranded at Fitzsimmons Rock, Ashburton Bay, Lake Superior, enroute to Toronto with 101,500 bushels of grain. All on board were rescued and the ship later slid off the rocks, drifted and sank.

1981: LOUKIA, a Greek flag visitor to the Great Lakes in 1976, arrived at Monrovia, Liberia, as f) DESPOULA and was abandoned. The vessel was looted before being sold for scrap. On September 2, 1982, while under tow for Yugoslavia for dismantling, the vessel broke loose in heavy seas and grounded about 14 miles north of Monrovia.

2006: SPAR OPAL had mechanical problems and ran aground near the Iroquois Lock. It was released on November 29. It did not return through the Seaway in 2007 but was back for two final trips in 2008. The ship was renamed h) ARWAD PRINCESS in 2012 and re-registered in Belize.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Russ Plumb, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

 

Vectis Falcon loses power

11/26 - Johnstown, ON – Vectis Falcon lost power Monday night and anchored before she grounded. She is in South Lancaster with her destination the Port of Johnstown.

Brenda Benoit

 

Great Lakes iron ore trade down 7.5 percent in October

11/26 - Cleveland, Ohio – Shipments of iron ore on the Great Lakes totaled 5.3 million tons in October, a decrease of 7.5 percent compared to a year ago. Shipments were nearly equal to the month’s 5-year average.

Year-to-date the iron ore trade stands at 43.9 million tons, a decrease of 1.7 percent compared to the same point in 2018. Through October iron ore loadings are 4.2 percent ahead of their 5-year average for the January-October timeframe.

Lake Carriers’ Association

 

Historic U.S. Coast Guard ship Bramble to be sold on steps of Mobile courthouse

11/26 - Mobile, Al - A 76- year-old former U.S. Coast Guard ship that was one of the first vessels to pass through the indomitable Northwest Passage and circumnavigate the entire North American continent, will be auctioned off on the steps of the U.S. District Courthouse in Mobile at Noon on Dec. 4.

The USCGC Bramble, which was launched in Oct. 1943 and present during nuclear testing at Bikini Atoll in 1947, served in the Pacific, Caribbean and Atlantic waters, as well as time in the Great Lakes. However, a recent federal lawsuit relating to nearly $180,000 in unpaid bills mean the ship will have to be sold, according to court documents.

The ship was decommissioned by the U.S. Coast Guard in May 2003 and served as a museum in Port Huron until 2011. It was sold twice and ended up in the hands of a private citizen who had plans to restore the ship and replicate her 1957 journey around the continent and through the Northwest Passage.

However, court documents indicate that the owner did not pay for the extensive restoration and the ship was taken under asset forfeiture laws. U.S. Marshals seized the ship in August before handing it to a substitute custodian.

 

Port Reports -  November 26

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day's news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known). Reporters needed for Lake Michigan ports, St. Marys River, Saginaw River and ports such as Johnstown, ON. If you would like to see your port represented, please consider becoming a news page volunteer and send us your information.

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
The only harbor traffic in Duluth on Monday was Isa, which arrived at 04:57 and tied up at Gavilon to load wheat. Brant spent the day taking on wheat at CHS 1 and was due to depart around 21:00. In Superior, Algoma Guardian departed at 01:18 Monday morning for Hamilton with iron ore, and Paul R. Tregurtha arrived at 01:52 to load at Burlington Northern. She had a departure time of 18:15 listed but was still loading as of 20:00. Burns Harbor remained at Lakehead Pipeline for repair work on Monday and was tentatively expected to shift to BN to load once the Tregurtha cleared. American Integrity was due at 23:45, also to take a delay at Lakehead Pipeline.

Two Harbors-Silver Bay, MN – Gary A. Putney
As of 19:30 on Nov. 25th the McCarthy Jr. was still at South of #2 in Two Harbors. Also as of 19:30 on Nov. 25th the CSL Assiniboine remained anchored off Superior. The Algoma Spirit is due Two Harbors and as of 19:30 on Nov. 25th she was near Outer Island. Due Two Harbors on Nov. 26th are the Edwin H. Gott and the Edgar B. Speer. American Integrity is now showing a Superior destination. She could be taking a delay. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay saw Sam Laud depart on Nov. 25th between 04:30 and 05:00 for Cleveland. Cason J. Callaway arrived Silver Bay on Nov. 25th at 05:50 and she departed on Nov. 25th at 16:57 for Toledo. Due Silver Bay on Nov. 26th is the Joyce L. VanEnkevort/Great Lakes Trader.

Thunder Bay, ON
Monday; 0:16 G3 Marquis departed for Baie Comeau. 6:26 Federal Baltic weighed anchor and proceeded to the Superior Elevator to load grain. 10:19 Federal Montreal arrived and went to anchor.

Manitowoc, WI – Connor Siemers
McKeil Marine’s Blair McKeil arrived Monday to unload at Trans Link Dock.

Northern Lake Huron ports
McGregor Bay: Sunday; 22:39 Samuel De Champlain arrived at the LaFarge Whitefish Terminal to unload cement product and departed Monday at 10:50 for Alpena.

Meldrum Bay: Monday; 1:50 Algoma Innovator departed for Sarnia. 2:42 Clyde S Vanenkevort arrived to load dolomite.

Stoneport: Monday; 14:35 Dorothy Ann departed for Detroit. Herbert C Jackson weighed anchor and proceeded to the dock to load.

Alpena: Sunday; 15:58 G L Ostrander arrived to load cement products.

Detroit/Rouge River – Raymond H
Monday Arrivals: Calusa Coast and Delaware-arrived at the Marathon Asphalt Terminal to load. Federal Cedar arrived at Nicholson's Detroit Terminal to unload general cargo. Kaye E Barker arrived at AK Steel to unload ore. CSL Tadoussac arrived at St. Marys Cement to unload clinker. Sarah Andrie and tank barge arrived at the Buckeye Terminal. Arthur M Anderson arrived at the Revere Dock to unload stone. Albert/Margaret arrived at the Waterfront Petroleum Terminal. American Spirit arrived at Zug Island to finish unloading ore.

Cleveland, OH
American Spirit unloaded at the Bulk Terminal Monday and departed at 07:27. American Courage arrived from Marblehead at 06:05 with stone for LaFarge.

Welland Canal and vicinity vessel passages – Monday November 25, Barry Andersen Nanticoke arrivals - Nov 25 - Mesabi Miner at 1411 and tug Michigan & Great Lakes at 2023 - docked - departed - Nov 24 - CSL Niagara at 2141 westbound - departed -Nov 25 - Mesabi Miner at 1501 back to anchor and Algoma Hansa at 2016 westbound,

Long Point Bay anchorage - anchored - Nov 25 - Sloman Hermes (Mlt) at 1023 - departed - Nov 24 - tug Michigan & Great Lakes at 0101 for the dock

Buffalo - Nov 24 - American Mariner at 0616

Welland Canal upbound - Nov 24 - Jana Desgagnes at 1601, John D Leitch at 1834, CSL St Laurent at 1912 Selasse (Mlt) at 2250 to the anchorage - Nov 25 - Sarah Desgagnes at 0157, Heerengracht (Nld) (ex HHL Amur-19, Beluga Felicity-11)at 0338, Salarium at 0635, Algoma Strongfield at 0730, CSL Laurentien at 0808, Fearless (Lbr) (ex Bright laker-17) at 1014, Algoma Enterprise at 2025 and NACC Argonaut eta 2120

Welland Canal downbound - Nov 24 - Algoma Buffalo at 1324 for wharf 6 Thorold and Radcliffe R Latimer at 1134 - Nov 25 - Algonorth at 1011, tug Sea Eagle II & St Marys Cement II at 1830, Baie Comeau at 1954 and Mandarin (Cyp) eta 2245

Welland Canal docks - Nov 24 - Federal Weser (Mhl) arrived wharf 2 at 0539 and Algoma Buffalo arrived wharf 6 at 1640 - Nov 25 - tug Petite Forte & St Marys Cement from wharf wharf 16 at 1910 westbound

Port Weller anchorage - arrivals - Nov 24 - Highland Eagle (GBr) at 1606 and Selasse (Mlt) (ex Selay S-17, Yildirim-08) at 2320 - departed - Nov 25 - Iryda (Cyp) at 1202 approx eastbound

Hamilton - arrivals - anchored - Sunda (Lbr) (ex Emilie-15) at 0155 - docked - Nov 17 - Rt Hon Paul J Martin at 1337 - Nov 20 - Federal Cedar (Mhl) 0301 - Nov 21 - Tundra (Cyp) at 2354 - departed - Nov 25 - Salarium at 0436 and Algoma Strongfield at 0537 - both westbound

Bronte - arrival - Nov 23 - Sarah Desgagnes at 1523 - departed Nov 25 at 0014 westbound

Clarkson - Nov 25 - Robert S Pierson at 1042 - departed Nov 25 at 2030 eastbound

Toronto - arrival - Nov 25 - none - departed - Nov 25 - CSL Laurentien at 0525 westbound and McKeil Spirit at 0232 eastbound

 

Seaway shipping stoppages in December would cost economy U.S.$193 million/per week

11/26 - - Closing the St. Lawrence Seaway in December to accommodate higher water outflow at the Moses-Saunders dam would cost the Canadian and U.S. economies U.S.$193 million/per week – impacting farmers’ grain exports, manufacturing plant operations and disrupting deliveries of fuel, construction materials and road salt for winter safety to cites throughout the region.

The Chamber of Marine Commerce is issuing today’s comments to provide a wider context of the economic repercussions related to calls to increase the water outflow at Moses-Saunders dam to levels that would be unsafe for navigation and halt shipping on the St. Lawrence Seaway during December.

Increasing outflows above the safe navigation limit to the highest levels possible would lower Lake Ontario levels less than 4 centimetres a week. In a closure situation, it would take more than two weeks to clear ship traffic and removal of buoys duties before outflows begin. Ice conditions could also prohibit maximum levels. This negligible reduction would come at a huge cost to commercial navigation.

“We have the greatest sympathy for Lake Ontario and St. Lawrence River residents and business owners that have been impacted by flooding due to unprecedented weather conditions. This situation has also cost our supply chain millions of dollars,” says Chamber of Marine Commerce President Bruce Burrows. “Halting St. Lawrence Seaway shipping altogether would cause major harm to our economy and achieve no noticeable benefit for flooding victims. We call on the IJC and government leaders to collaborate with affected stakeholders to find solutions that look at shoreline resiliency, flood management zones and what can be done during the winter when the St. Lawrence Seaway is closed to navigation.”

The costs of stopping commercial navigation at this critical point in December will significantly affect industries that have organized their supply chains around the Seaway’s shipping season. Even if companies were able to find alternative transportation (with this very short notice), this would cost considerably more and force huge volumes of cargo onto thousands of trucks at the detriment to the environment and road congestion.

The fall is the busiest grain export season right up to the end of December, and by March the elevator systems are normally full and pushing for Seaway vessels as soon as the system opens. U.S. and Canadian communities move road salt in great volumes at the end of the season and again at opening, as their inventories often struggle to make it through an entire winter.

Deborah DeLuca, Executive Director, Duluth-Seaway Port Authority, says: “As residents ourselves of Great Lakes communities affected by flooding and storm damage, we share in the concern regarding record high water levels. However, the minor water level relief that would result from increased December outflow through the Moses-Saunders Dam would be negligible at best. Concurrently, increasing the outflow to levels unsafe for navigation would do immeasurable and long-term harm to producers and consumers throughout the entire Great Lakes region and the United States as a whole. We’re all eager for solutions, but opening the flow on a single dam in December isn’t a meaningful solution, especially when weighed against the associated adverse effects.”

Political leaders in U.S. Great Lakes states have lent their support to keep the St. Lawrence Seaway open as normal in December.

 

Community invited to Great Lakes Maritime Academy’s 50th anniversary event

11/26 - Traverse City, MI – The community is invited to join in Northwestern Michigan College's celebration of the 50th anniversary of its Great Lakes Maritime Academy at a special event Saturday, Dec. 7 from 6:30-8:30 p.m. at the Hagerty Center on the Great Lakes campus. Tickets are on sale now at nmc.edu/glma50.

The event will honor Maritime cadets, industry partnerships, and the success of alumni. A division of Northwestern Michigan College, GLMA is one of only six state maritime academies in the United States and the only one located on freshwater. The Academy graduates 50 cadets annually, and the employment rate is virtually 100 percent within 90 days of graduation.

Rear Adm. Mark H. Buzby, U.S.N., Ret., will serve as the keynote speaker. A 1979 graduate of the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy, Buzby earned his Bachelor of Science in Nautical Science and U.S. Coast Guard Third Mate License. He was commissioned in the U.S. Navy in June 1979, is a graduate of the Joint Forces Staff College, and holds master’s degrees from the U.S. Naval War College in Strategic Studies, and Salve Regina University in International Relations.

The evening includes heavy hors d'oeuvres and a cash bar. Tickets are $50 per person. Tickets and sponsorship opportunities are available at nmc.edu/glma50 or by calling (231) 995-1021.

Northwestern Michigan College Foundation

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  November 26

In 1952, the PHILIP R. CLARKE was launched at the American Ship Building yard at Lorain, Ohio. The 647- foot-long freighter became the flagship of the Pittsburgh Steamship Company. She was lengthened by 120 feet in 1974 and converted to a self-unloader in 1982.

On 26 November 1856, CHEROKEE (2-mast wooden schooner, 103 foot, 204 tons, built in 1849, at Racine, Wisconsin) foundered in a gale 7 miles south of Manistee, Michigan, on Lake Michigan. All aboard (estimates range from ten to fourteen persons) were lost.

The U.S.C.G.C. MESQUITE departed Charlevoix and locked through the Soo on November 26, 1989, to begin SUNDEW's normal buoy tending duties on Lake Superior.

The ELIZABETH HINDMAN was launched November 26, 1920, as a.) GLENCLOVA (Hull#9) at Midland, Ontario, by Midland Shipbuilding Co. Ltd.

On 26 November 1872, the steamer GEO W. REYNOLDS burned at 1 in the morning at the dock in Bay City. The fire supposedly originated in the engine room. She was owned by A. English of East Saginaw.

On 26 November 1853, ALBANY (wooden side wheel passenger/package freight, 202 foot, 669 tons, built in 1846, at Detroit, Michigan) was carrying passengers and miscellaneous cargo in a storm on Lake Huron.. She was making for the shelter of Presque Isle harbor when the gale drove her over a bar. Her crew and 200 passengers came ashore in her boats. Plans were made to haul her back across the bar when another storm wrecked her. Her boiler and most of her machinery were recovered the following year.

LAKE BREEZE (wooden propeller, 122 foot, 301 gross tons, built in 1868, at Toledo, Ohio) burned at her dock in Leamington, Ontario, on 26 November 1878. One man perished in the flames. She was raised in 1880, but the hull was deemed worthless. Her machinery and metal gear were removed in 1881, and sold to an American company.

The ANN ARBOR NO 5 (steel carferry, 359 foot, 2,988 gross tons) was launched by the Toledo Ship Building Company (Hull #118) on 26 Nov 1910. She was the first carferry to be built with a sea gate, as a result of the sinking of the PERE MARQUETTE 18 in September of 1910.

On 26 Nov 1881, JANE MILLER (wooden propeller passenger-package freight coaster, 78 foot, 210 gross tons, built in 1878, at Little Current, Ontario) departed Meaford, Ontario, for Wiarton - sailing out into the teeth of a gale and was never seen again. All 30 aboard were lost. She probably sank near the mouth of Colpoy's Bay in Georgian Bay. She had serviced the many small ports on the inside coast of the Bruce Peninsula.

HIRAM W. SIBLEY (wooden propeller freighter, 221 foot, 1,419 gross tons, built in 1890, at E. Saginaw, Michigan) was carrying 70,000 bushels of corn from Chicago for Detroit. On 26 Nov 1898, she stranded on the northwest corner of South Manitou Island in Lake Michigan during blizzard. (Some sources say this occurred on 27 November.) The tugs PROTECTOR and SWEEPSTAKES were dispatched for assistance but the SIBLEY refloated herself during the following night and then began to sink again. She was put ashore on South Fox Island to save her but she broke in half; then completely broke up during a gale on 7 December 1898.

During the early afternoon of 26 Nov 1999, the LOUIS R. DESMARAIS suffered an engine room fire while sailing in the western section of Lake Ontario. Crews onboard the DESMARAIS put out the fire and restarted her engines. The DESMARAIS proceeded to the Welland Canal where she was inspected by both U.S. and Canadian investigators. No significant damage was noted and the vessel was allowed to proceed.

1924: The wooden steamer J.C. FORD was destroyed by a fire while on the St. Marys River near DeTour.

1940: The coal-laden CHEYENNE went aground in a storm near Port Colborne while enroute to Montreal. The ship was released on December 1. It last sailed as c) SORELDOC (ii) in 1965 before being scrapped at Hamilton.

1942: L.E. BLOCK went aground in the Straits of Mackinac during a snowstorm.

1951: JOHN H. PRICE was at Ste. Anne des Monts to load pulpwood when a storm swept the Gulf of St. Lawrence. The ship broke loose early the next day, drifted to shore and was pounded on the rocks. All on board were saved and the vessel was refloated May 30, 1952.

1964: The Norwegian tanker STOLT DAGALI, a Seaway caller as a) DAGALI in 1960-1962, was sliced in two by the passenger vessel SHALOM about 28 miles southeast of the Ambrose Channel Light Vessel. The stern of the tanker sank but the bow was rebuilt using the stern of the C.T. GODSTAD that had grounding damage. The rebuilt ship resumed sailing as STOLT LADY.

1979: Despite clear visibility, PIERSON DAUGHTERS and JABLANICA collided off Alexandria Bay, NY, and both ships were damaged. The latter went aground on Broadway Shoal and had to be lightered before being released. It was a regular Seaway trader and was also back as b) ELLIE beginning in 1993. The ship was scrapped at Alang, India, as d) PINE TRADER in 2009.

1981: EURO PRINCESS, a Seaway trader beginning in 1976, went aground in the Atlantic near Sable Island and the crew of 26 was airlifted to safety. Despite a cracked hull, the ship was refloated and was back on the Great Lakes as c) EUROPEGASUS in 1985 and survived until scrapping in India in 1997-1998.

2000: The former BALSA I, a Seaway trader beginning in 1981, reported taking water off Hainan Island in the South China Sea and sank. The crew was saved by a passing freighter.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Russ Plumb, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 
 

Oil leak stopped traffic on Seaway last Thursday

11/25 - An oil leak stopped the ships on the St. Lawrence Seaway on Thursday at Beauharnois. The presence of "polluting substances" was reported around 11 am, forcing the authorities to close three locks. "A ship passed through our locks, and we noticed a leak after its passage. There were scents of oil, gas, petroleum products, "said Pierre Morin, spokesperson for the St. Lawrence Seaway. Thursday night, the Canadian Coast Guard was still unaware of the nature of the leak from the ship Federal Leda, stopped in Saint-Zotique anchorage. About 10 liters would have been dumped in the water. Containment equipment was deployed and inspections will be conducted with environmental experts.

Since the article was written, Federal Leda moved to the lower wall of the upper Beauharnois lock (Lock No. 4). for inspection and repairs. Sunday morning she departed downbound to turn around on Lac St.Louis and was next upbound at Lock 3 for Oshawa.

La Presse, Rene Beauchamp

 

Port Reports -  November 25

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day's news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known). Reporters needed for Lake Michigan ports, St. Marys River, Saginaw River and ports such as Johnstown, ON. If you would like to see your port represented, please consider becoming a news page volunteer and send us your information.

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
After weather prevented vessels from reaching Duluth on Saturday, Sunday saw quite a bit of traffic, starting with the arrival of Saginaw at 02:10 to load an iron ore cargo at Canadian National. Sam Laud came in on a rather rare visit at 02:59 with limestone for Hallett #5. Her fleetmate H. Lee White was inbound at 07:36 to load petroleum coke at Midwest Energy, and Cason J. Callaway arrived at 10:27 to unload stone at Hallett #5. The Laud finished unloading and was outbound at 12:19 for Silver Bay, and Saginaw departed at 13:47 with her ore cargo. Industrial Strength finished unloading at Port Terminal and departed at 18:31 for Toledo. Also in port on Sunday was Brant, taking on wheat at CHS 1. The Callaway and White are both expected to depart early Monday morning. On the south side of the harbor, Indiana Harbor departed from Burlington Northern at 12:26 Sunday, and Algoma Guardian arrived from anchor at 13:02 to load iron ore pellets. She is expected to depart mid-day Monday. Burns Harbor remained tied up at Lakehead Pipeline, and is currently scheduled to shift to BN on Monday night or Tuesday morning to load.

Two Harbors-Silver Bay, MN – Gary A. Putney
As of 17:30 on Nov. 24th the Walter J. McCarthy Jr. is still loading at South of #2 in Two Harbors. The CSL Assiniboine went to anchor off Superior at approx. 17:55 on Nov. 24th to await Two Harbors. Due Two Harbors on Nov. 25th is the American Integrity that has been delayed by weather. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay saw the arrival of the Hon. James L. Oberstar on Nov. 24th at 00:50. She went bow first into the dock. The Oberstar departed Silver Bay on Nov. 24th at approx. 17:00 with a tug assist from Heritage Marine's Nels J. that made the trip up from Two Harbors. Arriving Silver Bay on Nov. 24th at 17:23 was the Sam Laud that arrived from Duluth after unloading at Hallett #5. Due Silver Bay on Nov. 25th is the Cason J. Callaway arriving from Duluth after unloading at Hallett #5 in Duluth.

Thunder Bay, ON
Saturday; 6:02 Algoma Harvester arrived and went to anchor. 6:25 Frontenac arrived at the G3 elevator to load wheat. 9:29 Algoma Niagara arrived at the Richardson Main Terminal to load wheat.

Muskegon, MI – Brendan Falkowski
11/20 Wilfred Sykes was in port last Wednesday to unload slag at the Verplank Lakeside Dock, arriving at 12:32. She departed at around 18:03. 11/23 Algoma Innovator arrived at 5:03 with a load of road salt for the Verplank Salt Dock. She departed at 12:53.

Northern Lake Huron ports
Thessalon: Sunday; Algoma Innovator arrived to take on a partial load of stone and departed at 12:02 to Meldrum Bay to finish loading.

Meldrum Bay: Sunday; 14:22 Algoma Innovator arrived to finish loading.

Stoneport: Saturday: Manitowoc departed for Marquette. Sunday; 0:50 Olive L Moore arrived to load and departed at 12:16 down bound on Lake Huron. 12:35 Herbert C Jackson arrived and went to anchor.14:05 Dorothy Ann arrived to load.

Alpena: Sunday; 10:40 Samuel de Champlain arrived to load cement products and departed at 15:00 for McGregor Bay.

Goderich, ON – Bruce Douglas
Manitoulin arrived 2:37 pm Sunday, loading salt at Compass Minerals.

Detroit/Rouge River – Raymond H
Sunday Arrivals: American Spirit arrived at Zug Island to unload ore. Sharon M I and barge Huron Spirit arrived at Nicholson's Detroit Terminal to unload steel coils. Joseph L Block arrived at the Waterfront Petroleum Terminal to fuel. Algoma Sault shifted to Nicholson's Ecorse Terminal. Great Republic arrived at the Carmeuse Dock to unload stone.

Cleveland, OH
Wilfred Sykes left Cleveland at 9 p.m. Sunday. ETA Detroit River Light 0400. She was due to fuel in Detroit at Mistersky 0630. Depart 0830. Port Huron about 130 p.m. All times are approximate.

Welland Canal and vicinity vessel passages – Sunday November 24 – Barry Andersen
Nanticoke arrivals - Nov 24 - CSL Niagara at 1147 and Mesabi Miner eta 2340 - docked - Nov 23 - Algoma Hansa at 2129 from the anchorage - departed - Nov 23 - Sloman Hera (Atg) at 2212 westbound and tug Michigan & Great Lakes at 2242 for the anchorage

Long Point Bay anchorage - anchored - Nov 21 - Sloman Hermes (Mlt) at 1150 - departed - Nov 23 - Algoma Hansa 2111 for the dock - Nov 24 - tug Michigan & Great Lakes at 0101

Buffalo - Nov 24 - American Mariner at 0616

Welland Canal upbound - Nov 23 - Maria G (Mlt) (ex Gadwall-17) at 1829 and CSL Tadoussac at 2030 - Nov 24 - Federal Cedar (Mhl) at 0043, Bluewing (Cyp) at 0320, Federal Weser (Mhl) at 0456, Wigeon (Lbr) at 0603, Algoma Transport at 0954, Jana Desgagnes at 1601, John D Leitch at 1834, CSL St Laurent at 1912,

Welland Canal downbound - Nov 23 - tug Wilf Seymour & Alouette Spirit at 0044, Sarah Desgagnes at 0329, tug Everlast & Norman McLeod at 0411, Iryda (Cyp) at 0614 Federal Margaree (Mhl) at 0714, tug Leo A McArthur & John J Carrick at 0816 and Algosea at 2132, Nov 24 - Spruceglen at 0215, Highland Eagle (GBr) at 0805, Algoma Buffalo at 1324 for wharf 6 Thorold and Radcliffe R Latimer at 1134

Welland Canal docks - Nov 21 - tug Petite Forte & St Marys Cement stopped wharf 16 at 1640 - departed - Nov 23 - tug Wyatt M & MM180 departed Heddle DD fitout wall at 2147 westbound - Nov 24 - Algoma Buffalo arrived wharf 6 at 1640

Port Weller anchorage - arrivals - Nov 23 - Iryda (Cyp) at 1846 - Nov 24 - Highland Eagle (GBr) at 1606 and Selasse (Mlt) (ex Selay S-17, Yildirim-08) eta 2024 - departed - Nov 24 - Federal Margaree (Mhl) at 1000 eastbound

Hamilton - arrivals - Nov 24 - Algoma Strongfield at 1126 and Salarium at 1624 - anchored - Sunda (Lbr) (ex Emilie-15) - docked - Nov 17 - Rt Hon Paul J Martin at 1337 - Nov 20 - Federal Cedar (Mhl) 0301 - Nov 21 - Tundra (Cyp) at 2354 - departed - Nov 23 - Federal Cedar (Mhl) at 2225 for Detroit - Nov 24 - Nov 18 - Wigeon (Lbr) at 0351

Bronte - arrival - Nov 23 - Sarah Desgagnes at 1523

Clarkson - Nov 23 - Robert S Pierson at 2339 - departed Nov 24 at 0912 eastbound

Toronto - arrival - Nov 24 - CSL Laurentien at 1901 - docked - Nov 23 - McKeil Spirit at 0746 - departed - Nov 23 - Sunda (Lbr) (ex Emilie-15) at 1834 - Nov 24 - NACC Argonaut at 1209 - both eastbound

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  November 25

In 1890, the WESTERN RESERVE delivered a record cargo of 95,488 bushels of wheat from Duluth to Buffalo.

In 1913, the schooner ROUSE SIMMONS, Captain August Schuenemann, departed Thompson Harbor (Michigan) with a load of fresh cut Christmas trees bound for Chicago. Somewhere between Kewaunee and Two Rivers, Wis., the SIMMONS was lost with all hands.

On 25 November 1857, ANTELOPE (wooden schooner, 220 tons, built in 1854, at Port Robinson, Ontario) was driven ashore by a gale near St. Joseph, Michigan. Five lives were lost. She was recovered the next year and rebuilt.

INCAN SUPERIOR was withdrawn from service after completing 2,386 trips between Thunder Bay and Superior and on November 25, 1992, she passed down bound at Sault Ste. Marie for service on the Canadian West Coast. Renamed PRINCESS SUPERIOR in 1993.

ROBERT C. STANLEY was laid up for the last time November 25, 1981, at the Tower Bay Slip, Superior, Wisconsin. She was scrapped at Aliaga, Turkey in 1989.

CITY OF MILWAUKEE (Hull#261) was launched November 25, 1930, at Manitowoc, Wisconsin, by Manitowoc Shipbuilding Co. She was sponsored by Mrs. Walter J. Wilde, wife of the collector of customs at Milwaukee, Wisconsin. She entered service in January of 1931.

On 25 November 1866, F. W. BACKUS (wooden propeller, 133 foot, 289 tons, built in 1846, at Amherstburg, Ontario) was carrying hay, horses and cattle off Racine, Wisconsin. She was run to the beach when it was discovered that she was on fire. Her crew and passengers disembarked. The tug DAISY LEE towed her out while she was still burning, intending to scuttle her, but the towline burned through and she drifted back to shore and burned to the waterline. Her live cargo was pushed overboard while she was still well out and they swam to shore.

On 25 November 1874, WILLIAM SANDERSON (wooden schooner, 136 foot, 385 gross tons, built in 1853, at Oswego, New York) was carrying wheat in a storm on Lake Michigan when she foundered. The broken wreck washed ashore off Empire, Michigan, near Sleeping Bear. She was owned by Scott & Brown of Detroit.

During a storm on 25 November 1895, MATTIE C. BELL (wooden schooner, 181 foot, 769 gross tons, built in 1882, at E. Saginaw, Michigan) was in tow of the steamer JIM SHERRIFS on Lake Michigan. The schooner stranded at Big Summer Island, was abandoned in place and later broke up. No lives were lost.

On 25 Nov 1947, the CAPTAIN JOHN ROEN was renamed c.) ADAM E. CORNELIUS by the American Steamship Co. in 1958, CORNELIUS was renamed d.) CONSUMERS POWER. Eventually sold to Erie Sand, she was scrapped at Kaohsiung, Taiwan in 1988. Built in 1927, as a.) GEORGE M. HUMPHERY.

On 25 Nov 1905, the JOSEPH G. BUTLER JR (steel straight-deck bulk freighter, 525 foot, 6,588 gross tons) entered service, departing Lorain, Ohio, for Duluth on her maiden voyage. The vessel was damaged in a severe storm on that first crossing of Lake Superior, but she was repaired and had a long career. She was renamed DONALD B GILLIES in 1935, and GROVEDALE in 1963. She was sunk as a dock in Hamilton in 1973, and finally sold for scrap in 1981.

1904: B.W. BLANCHARD stranded near Alpena, MI and was wrecked. The ship had become unmanageable in heavy weather while enroute to Detroit with a cargo of lumber and was a total loss.

1908: NORTH STAR sank in Lake Huron off Port Sanilac after a collision with NORTHERN QUEEN. The accident occurred in dense fog and the ship went down quickly. All were saved.

1927: THOUSAND ISLANDER cleared Sarnia for Midland under tow of C.S.L. fleetmate COLLINGWOOD and they encountered heavy weather on Lake Huron. The ship was overwhelmed southeast of Thunder Bay Island and sank.

1950: The cargo of steel and package freight aboard the C.S.L. steamer WEYBURN shifted on Lake Ontario in a wild fall storm and the ship took on a precarious list and almost capsized. The ship was escorted to Toronto by RENVOYLE where the problem was corrected.

1971: The Greek freighter ESTIA sank on the Caribbean north of French Guiana after a violent engine room explosion. The ship was bound for Brazil with phosphates and all on board were saved. The vessel had been a Great Lakes visitor as MANCHESTER SPINNER beginning in 1963.

2003: The yacht ALISON LAKE, rebuilt at Toronto from the U.S. Coast Guard ship SAUK, hit a submerged object and sank in very deep water south of Key West, FL. All on board were rescued.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Jody Aho, Russ Plumb, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Port Reports -  November 24

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day's news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known). Reporters needed for Lake Michigan ports, St. Marys River, Saginaw River and ports such as Johnstown, ON. If you would like to see your port represented, please consider becoming a news page volunteer and send us your information.

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
Rough weather conditions on Lake Superior prevented any traffic from moving through the Duluth harbor on Saturday. Three salties were tied up in port - Industrial Strength was offloading project equipment at Port Terminal, Narie was taking on wheat at CHS 1, and Brant was at CHS 2 loading. Narie had a tentative departure time of 21:30 posted. The Superior entry was also quiet on Saturday until the evening, when Indiana Harbor arrived at 19:42 to load iron ore pellets at Burlington Northern. Her fleetmate Burns Harbor was tied up at Lakehead Pipeline taking a delay.

Two Harbors-Silver Bay, MN – Gary A. Putney
When the Presque Isle departed Two Harbors on the 22nd she went to off of Duluth and went to anchor at approx. 21:30. She got underway on Nov. 23rd between 07:00 and 07:30 for Indy 7H. The Roger Blough departed Two Harbors on Nov. 23rd at 17:24 for Gary. The Walter J. McCarthy Jr. arrived off Duluth on the 23rd at 08:40 and then got underway on the 23rd at 16:25 for South of #2 in Two Harbors. She arrived Two Harbors. at 18:33. Due Two Harbors on Nov. 24th is the CSL Assiniboine. She had anchored in Keweenaw Bay mid-day on Nov. 23rd. She got underway late in the afternoon on the 23rd. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay had no traffic on Nov. 23rd. Due Silver Bay early on Nov. 24th is the Hon. James L. Oberstar. She had been anchored in Keweenaw Bay late on the 22nd. Tentatively due in Silver Bay on Nov. 24th is the Sam Laud arriving from Duluth after unloading stone at Hallett #5. Tentatively due Silver Bay on Nov. 24th is the Cason J. Callaway also after unloading stone in the Twin Ports.

Thunder Bay, ON
Friday; 19:14 Whitefish Bay arrived at Viterra A to load grain. Saturday; 9:27 The saltie Irma arrived and went to anchor. 12:46 G3 Marquis arrived at the Superior Elevator to load wheat.

Northern Lake Huron ports
Thessalon: Thursday; 19:10 Algoma Innovator weighed anchor and proceeded to the dock to unload road salt. She then took on a load of stone and departed early Friday morning for Muskegon.

Bruce Mines: Friday; 21:15 Michipicoten arrived to take on a partial load of trap rock and departed Saturday at 7:54.

Meldrum Bay: Saturday; 10:52 Michipicoten arrived to finish loading and departed at 14:51 for Grand Haven.

Stoneport: Friday; Olive L Moore departed for Bay City. Saturday; 9:20 Manitowoc arrived to load lim stone. 14:46 Olive L Moore arrived and went to anchor.

Detroit/Rouge River – Raymond H
Saturday Arrivals: Dorothy Ann/Pathfinder, Manitoulin-both arrived at the Motor City Materials dock to unload salt. Samuel De Champlain/Innovation-ariived at Lafarge to unload cement. Herbert C Jackson, Algoma Sault-both arrived at Zug Island to unload coal.

Cleveland, OH – Bill Kloss
Algoma Buffalo arrived at 02:09 for Cargill to load salt. American Courage arrived at 08:55 with a shuttle from Ashtabula for ArcelorMittal. Wilfred Sykes arrived at 13:26 with coke from Detroit for ArcelorMittal. Joseph L. Block is still in Lorain loading millscale for Indiana Harbor.

Welland Canal and vicinity vessel passages – Saturday November 23, Barry Andersen
Nanticoke - arrivals - Nov 23 - none docked - Nov 22 - tug Michigan & Great Lakes at 01103, Sloman Hera (Atg) at 1904 and Baie Comeau at 2007 - departed Nov 23 - Baie Comeau at 0805 westbound

Long Point Bay anchorage - anchored - Nov 20 - Algoma Hansa at 2332 - Nov 21 - Sloman Hermes (Mlt) at 1150

Welland Canal upbound - Nov 22 - Algoma Spirit at 1608 - Nov 23 - CCGS Griffon at 0807, CSL Welland at 0834, Maria G (Mlt) (ex Gadwall-17) at 1829 and CSL Tadoussac at 2030

Welland Canal downbound - Nov 22 - Iver Bright (Nld) at 1954, Tim S Dool at 2140 and Evans Spirit at 2353 - Nov 23 - tug Wilf Seymour & Alouette Spirit at 0044, Sarah Desgagnes at 0329, tug Everlast & Norman McLeod at 0411, Iryda (Cyp) at 0614 Federal Margaree (Mhl) at 0714, tug Leo A McArthur & John J Carrick at 0816 and Algosea at 2012

Welland Canal docks - Nov 21 - tug Wyatt M & barge MM180 at 1340 from dry dock to Heddle DD fitout wall and tug Petite Forte & St Marys Cement stopped wharf 16 at 1640 - departed - departed - Federal Montreal (Mhl) at 1845 from wharf 12 for Thunder Bay - Nov 23 tug Spartan & Spartan II from wharf 13 at 0105 approx., tug Calusa Coast & Delaware from wharf 1 at 1400 approx. and tug Wilf Seymour & Alouette Spirit departed wharf 17 at 1450 -

Port Weller anchorage - arrivals - Nov 23 - Iver Bright (Nld) at 0526, Iryda (Cyp) at 1846 and Federal Margaree (Mhl) 2024 - departed - Nov 23 - Mamry (Bhs) at 1006 and Iver Bright (Nld) at 1800 - both eastbound

Hamilton - arrivals - Nov 23 - none - docked - Nov 17 - Rt Hon Paul J Martin at 1337 - Nov 18 - Wigeon (Lbr) at 0510 - Nov 20 - Federal Cedar (Mhl) 0301 - Nov 21 - Tundra (Cyp) at 2354 departed - Nov 22 - Algoma Spirit at 1411 westbound - Nov 23 - Ojibway at 1113 eastbound Toronto - arrival - Nov 23 - McKeil Spirit at 0746 and NACC Argonaut at 1637 - docked - Nov 16 - Sunda (Lbr) (ex Emilie-15) at 1834 - departed Nov 22 - Robert S Pierson at 2144 eastbound

Oshawa - docked - Nov 19 - Maria G (Mlt) (ex Gadwall-17) at 0719 - departed Nov 23 at 1445 for Detroit

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  November 24

On this day in 1966, Hjalmer Edwards became ill while working as a second cook on the steamer DANIEL J. MORRELL. He was transferred to the hospital at Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan when the MORRELL transited the locks for the last time on Thanksgiving Day. Five days later, the DANIEL J. MORRELL sank during a severe storm on Lake Huron with just Dennis Hale as its lone survivor.

On 24 November 1945, SCOTT E. LAND (steel propeller C4-S-A4 cargo ship, 496 foot, 10,654 gross tons) was launched at Kaiser Corporation (Hull #520) in Vancouver, Washington for the U.S. Maritime Commission. She was converted to a straight-deck bulk freighter at Baltimore, Maryland in 1951, and renamed TROY H. BROWNING. In 1955, she was renamed THOMAS F. PATTON. After serving on the Great Lakes, she was scrapped in Karachi, Pakistan, in 1981.

On November 24, 1950, while bound for South Chicago with iron ore, the ENDERS M. VOORHEES collided with the up bound steamer ELTON HOYT II (now the ST. MARYS CHALLENGER) in the Straits of Mackinac during a blinding snowstorm. Both vessels received such serious bow damage that they had to be beached near McGulpin Point west of Mackinaw City to avoid sinking.

ROSEMOUNT, stored with coal, sank alongside CSL's Century Coal Dock at Montreal, Quebec, on November 24, 1934.

Paterson's PRINDOC (Hull#657) was launched November 24, 1965, at Lauzon, Quebec, by Davie Shipbuilding Co. Ltd.

November 24, 1892 - The ANN ARBOR NO 1 ran aground on her first trip just north of the Kewaunee harbor.

On 24 Nov 1881, LAKE ERIE (wooden propeller canaller, 136 foot, 464 gross tons, built in 1873, at St, Catharine's, Ontario) collided with the steamer NORTHERN QUEEN in fog and a blizzard near Poverty Island by the mouth of Green Bay. LAKE ERIE sank in one hour 40 minutes. NORTHERN QUEEN took aboard the crew but one man was scalded and died before reaching Manistique.

The CITY OF SAGINAW 31 entered service in 1931.

On 24 November 1905, ARGO (steel propeller passenger/package freight, 174 foot, 1,089 tons, built in 1896, at Detroit, Michigan) dropped into a trough of a wave, hit bottom and sank in relatively shallow water while approaching the harbor at Holland, Michigan. 38 passengers and crew were taken off by breeches' buoy in a thrilling rescue by the U.S. Lifesaving Service.

NEPTUNE (wooden propeller, 185 foot, 774 gross tons, built in 1856, at Buffalo, New York) was laid up at East Saginaw, Michigan, on 24 November 1874, when she was discovered to be on fire at about 4:00 a.m. She burned to a total loss.

The ANN ARBOR NO 1 left Frankfort for Kewaunee on November 24, 1892. Because of the reluctance of shippers to trust their products on this new kind of ferry it was difficult to find cargo for this first trip. Finally, a fuel company which sold coal to the railroad routed four cars to Kewaunee via the ferry.

1905: ARGO missed the entrance to the harbor at Holland, MI while inbound from Chicago and went aground. All on board, an estimated 72 passengers and crew, were rescued by breeches buoy in a very challenging task. The ship was salvaged in January 1906.

1938: The idle former passenger ship CITY OF BENTON HARBOR was gutted by a fire at Sturgeon Bay.

1970: C.W. CADWELL hit a submerged rock in the Niagara River near Queenston and was stranded.

1988: KATIA was abandoned off Nova Scotia, enroute from Brazil to Carleton, QC, and all 27 on board were taken off by rescue helicopter. Despite salvage efforts, the listing ship sank November 26. It had been through the Seaway earlier in 1987 after previous inland voyages as c) TIMI in 1978 and d) HAPPY MED in 1981.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Jody Aho, Russ Plumb, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II, The Marine Historical Society of Detroit and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Port Reports -  November 23

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day's news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known). Reporters needed for Lake Michigan ports, St. Marys River, Saginaw River and ports such as Johnstown, ON. If you would like to see your port represented, please consider becoming a news page volunteer and send us your information.

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
Brant arrived Duluth at 08:11 Friday morning to load wheat at CHS 2, and Industrial Strength was inbound at 13:36 with project equipment to unload at Port Terminal. Mandarin left port at 18:49 after taking on wheat at Riverland Ag. Also in port was Narie, loading wheat at CHS 1, and Eeborg, moored at Gavilon taking on beet pulp pellets. The latter vessel had a tentative departure time of 20:00 posted. There was no traffic through the Superior entry on Friday, however Burns Harbor was due around 21:30 to take a delay at Lakehead Pipeline.

Two Harbors-Silver Bay - Gary Putney
Presque Isle departed Two Harbors on Nov. 22nd at 17:54 with no AIS. The Roger Blough continues at the CN ore docks in Two Harbors. Due Two Harbors on Nov. 23rd are the Walter J. McCarthy Jr. and the CSL Assiniboine, both having been delayed by weather. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay saw the departure of the Philip R. Clarke on Nov. 22nd at 02:34 for Toledo. Due Silver Bay on Nov. 23rd is the Hon. James L. Oberstar that is currently following the Michigan coast of Lake Superior.

Green Bay, WI
The Tug G.L. Ostrander / barge Integrity arrived from Chicago with slag for the Lafarge Terminal.

Goderich, ON – Bruce Douglas
Algoma Innovator arrived 9:49 am Tuesday, loaded salt cleared 8:19 pm for Thessalon. Algoma Buffalo arrived 1.23 am Wednesday loaded salt cleared down bound for Sandusky Ohio. Algoma Compass arrived 6:59 pm Friday to load salt at Compass Minerals.

Detroit, MI – Raymond H
Wilfred Sykes made a rare visit to the Port of Detroit on Friday, arriving at Zug Island to load coke for Cleveland. Her last trip to Detroit was in December 2018.

Lorain, OH – Drew Leonard
The Joseph L Block headed up the Black River around 4:30 p.m Friday headed for Jonick Dock & Terminal to take on a load of mill scale.

Cleveland, OH – Bill Kloss
Updated report: Isa, Samuel deChamplain and Dorothy Ann all departed Cleveland between 15:00 and 15:30 Friday.

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  November 23

In 1940, the CONSUMERS POWER, a.) HARRY YATES of 1910, collided with the MARITANA on the Detroit River. The MARITANA sustained $11,089.91 in damage. MARITANA was scrapped at Hamilton, Ontario, in 1947.

On 23 November 1863, BAY OF QUINTE (wooden schooner, 250 tons, built in 1853, at Bath, Ontario) was carrying 7,500 bushels of wheat to Toronto when she was driven ashore on Salmon Point on Lake Ontario and wrecked. No lives were lost.

On 23 November 1882, the schooner MORNING LIGHT (wooden schooner, 256 tons, built in 1857, at Cleveland, Ohio) was sailing from Manistee for Chicago with a load of lumber when a storm drove her aground off Claybanks, south of Stony Lake, Michigan. One crewman swam to shore, the rest were saved by a lifesaving crew, local fishermen and the tug B. W. ALDRICH. Earlier that same year, she sank near St. Helen Island in the Straits of Mackinac. She was salvaged and put back in service, but she only lasted a few months.

After discharging her cargo, the SAMUEL MATHER, launched as a.) PILOT KNOB b.) FRANK ARMSTRONG (1943-73), proceeded to DeTour, Michigan, laying up for the last time at the Pickands Mather Coal Dock on November 23, 1981. She was scrapped at Aliaga, Turkey in 1988.

In 1987, the self-unloader ROGERS CITY was towed out of Menominee, Michigan, for scrapping in Brazil.

STADACONA's sea trials were completed on November 23, 1952, and was delivered to Canada Steamship Lines the next day.

On 23 November 1872, Capt. W. B. Morley launched the propeller JARVIS LORD at Marine City, Michigan. Her dimensions were 193 feet X 33 feet X 18 feet, 1,000 tons. She was the first double decker built at Marine City. Her engine was from Wm. Cowie of Detroit.

On 23 November 1867, S. A. CLARK (wooden propeller tug, 12 tons, built in 1863, at Buffalo, New York) was in Buffalo's harbor when her boiler exploded and she sank.

November 23, 1930 - The Ann Arbor carferry WABASH grounded in Betsie Lake. She bent her rudder stock and her steering engine was broken up.

On 23 November 1853, the wooden schooner PALESTINE was bound from Kingston to Cleveland with railroad iron at about the same time as the like-laden schooner ONTONAGON. Eight miles west of Rochester, New York, both vessels ran ashore, were pounded heavily by the waves and sank. Both vessels reported erratic variations in their compasses. The cargoes were removed and ONTONAGON was pulled free on 7 December, but PALESTINE was abandoned. A similar event happened with two other iron-laden vessels a few years previously at the same place.

On 23 November 1853, the Ward Line's wooden side-wheeler HURON struck an unseen obstruction in the Saginaw River and sank. She was raised on 12 December 1853, towed to Detroit and repaired at a cost of $12,000. She was then transferred to Lake Michigan to handle the cross-lake traffic given the Ward Line by the Michigan Central Railroad. The carferry GRAND HAVEN was sold to the West India Fruit & Steamship Co., Norfolk, Virginia in 1946, and was brought down the Mississippi River to New Orleans, Louisiana for reconditioning before reaching Port Everglades and the Port of Palm Beach, Florida. She was brought back to the Lakes and locked up bound through the Welland Canal on 23 Nov 1964. She was intended for roll on/roll off carrier service to haul truck trailers laden with steel coils from Stelco's plant at Hamilton, Ont.

CSL NIAGARA a.) J. W. McGIFFIN, passed Port Huron, Michigan on 23 Nov 1999, on her way to Thunder Bay to load grain. This was her first trip to the upper lakes since the vessel was re-launched as a SeawayMax carrier in June 1999.

1901: QUITO stranded off Lorain, Ohio, and broke up in a Lake Erie storm. All on board were saved.

1902: SILVANUS J. MACY was last observed battling heavy seas in Lake Erie off Port Burwell. The coal laden, wooden steamer was lost with all hands.

1936: A fire at Portsmouth, Ontario, just west of Kingston, destroyed several idle wooden steamers including the SIMON LANGELL and PALM BAY. Their remains were towed into Lake Ontario and scuttled in 1937.

1961: AMVRAKIKOS ran aground on Pancake Shoal, Lake Superior, on its first and only visit to the Great Lakes. This World War Two vintage Liberty ship was refloated on November 26, loaded scrap steel at Toledo for Japan and was the last saltwater ship of the 1961 season to depart the St. Lawrence Seaway.

1997: AN TAI, an SD 14 cargo carrier registered in Belize, began to list and then the hull cracked at the dock in Port Klang, Malaysia. The ship sank at the wharf the next day. The vessel had visited the Great Lakes, first as a) LONDON GRENADIER in 1972 and again as b) FIRST JAY in 1979. Subsequent salvage efforts failed and the hull was cut into sections, taken out to sea, and dumped in a fish breeding grounds.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Russ Plumb, Steve Haverty, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

 

Donjon Shipbuilding prepares for winter repair season

11/22 - Erie, PA – Within the next month, Donjon Shipbuilding & Repair should see its employment double as its workforce settles in for winter repair and maintenance season. Several vessels are scheduled for service this winter at the 44-acre shipbuilding facility at 220 E. Bayfront Parkway.

Soon, the shipyard will see an influx of welders, shipfitters, pipe welders, pipe fitters and electricians gearing up for the company’s busiest time of the year. In recent months, Donjon’s employment has hovered at about 77 full-time workers, including five contractors.

“The time crunch on all the boats is not as persistent this year,” Hammer said. “It’s one boat, then the next, then the next, whereas last year, it was all the boats at the same time that needed to be done. We have a little more room, so we can work our core guys on almost every job without having to bring in a bunch of extra individuals.”

From late December 2018 through March, Donjon crews replaced about 450,000 pounds of steel on a handful of vessels during the 2018-2019 winter repair season.

“We had a great year last year,” Hammer said. “That was the most amount of steel we’ve ever done in a season. It was a tremendous amount of work. It’s a little lighter this year, but still a decent amount of work for us. We’re excited to get going on it.” More online

Vessels scheduled for service at Donjon this winter are:
Tug Joseph H. Thompson Jr. Work will be done to modify the tug so it can fit with and push a new barge that is being built at another shipyard.
U.S.-flagged river push tug. This 78-foot-long tug is undergoing construction for Donjon’s New Jersey-based parent company, Donjon Marine.
J.S. St. John, a dry bulk carrier that collects sand in Lake Erie. Repairs are scheduled. Presque Isle barge, owned by Great Lakes Fleet, of Duluth, Minnesota. Crews will perform steel work and side shell repairs.
Cason J. Callaway, a self-unloading freighter. Internal steel repairs are scheduled.
Tug Dorothy Ann, owned by the Cleveland-based Interlake Steamship Co. A dry dock survey is scheduled.
Barge Pathfinder. Internal steel repairs will be completed.

Donjon crews recently completed some emergency minor repairs to the American Spirit, a 1,000-foot-long self-unloading freighter owned by the American Steamship Co., of Buffalo. The vessel was at the Erie shipyard for about a week before it departed earlier this week.

Donjon’s winter work load could increase if the company successfully lands a couple additional bids it is seeking, Hammer said.

Earlier this year, Donjon was awarded a contract from the New York Power Authority to construct nine hopper barges in the next several years. Donjon crews have already constructed two of the barges, which have been delivered to the authority.

“The project is based on yearly budgets, so every year, you have to wait for that budget to come out before they release the next barge,” Hammer said. “They’re extremely happy and they’re looking for us to potentially price a tug boat for them also because they’re impressed with the work we’ve done on the barges.”

Donjon is owned by New Jersey-based marine services provider Donjon Marine Co. Inc., which expanded and diversified its operation with the creation of its Erie shipbuilding and repair services division in 2009. Donjon moved into the Erie shipyard in 2010.

Major renovations to the shipyard have occurred in recent years. It underwent $8.3 million in repairs to the dry dock, roof and gutters from spring 2017 through early December 2017. Dry dock work involved a $6.7 million project to remove the top 2 inches of crumbling, deteriorating concrete, installing steel reinforcing rods and adding a top coat of 8 inches of new concrete, raising the dry dock bed 6 inches.

Another $1.5 million in 2017 was earmarked for repairs to 230,000 square feet of shipyard roofing and gutters.

“Those improvements have had a huge impact – just the safety alone,” Hammer said. “Whenever you have water leaking into a building and things that are not supposed to be wet, that’s a huge safety concern. It’s 100 percent better with the roof being repaired. The dry dock floor had holes in it and ice and was dangerous. It was a hazardous environment, and these repairs make it so much easier to manage and enable us to keep our guys safe and being able to control the risk out there.”

This past summer, a $1.1 million project, funded by Pennsylvania Department of Transportation grant monies, involved renovation of the shipyard’s deteriorating dry dock sidewalls. Donjon’s dry dock measures about 1,250 feet in length and 130 feet wide.

An additional $600,000 in shipyard improvements is planned for 2020, Erie-Western Pennsylvania Port Authority Executive Director Brenda Sandberg said. Summer renovation work will involve improvements to pumps and piping, a gate and seal work. The project is funded through PennDOT grants.

“We are hoping the improvements we will complete this summer is the final phase of some long-needed shipyard repairs,” Sandberg said.

View images at this link: https://www.goerie.com/business/20191121/donjon-shipbuilding-prepares-for-winter-repair-season

 

Sykes, Block both on Lake Michigan Thursday headed for lower lakes ports

11/22 - Two vessels that seldom venture down Lake Huron, the Wilfred Sykes and Joseph L. Block, were both downbound on the lake on Thursday. The Sykes is headed to Detroit’s Zug Island to load for Cleveland. The Block is going to Lorain. They are expected to pass Port Huron early Friday morning.

 

Port Reports -  November 22

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day's news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known). Reporters needed for Lake Michigan ports, St. Marys River, Saginaw River and ports such as Johnstown, ON. If you would like to see your port represented, please consider becoming a news page volunteer and send us your information.

Two Harbors-Silver Bay, MN – Gary A. Putney
As of 19:30 on Nov. 21st the Presque Isle is still at the dock in Two Harbors. The Roger Blough arrived Two Harbors on Nov. 21st for North of #2. When the Munson departed Two Harbors on Nov. 20th she had no updated AIS. She is going to Gary. Also when the Joyce L. VanEnkevort/Great Lakes Trader departed Two Harbors on Nov. 19th she had no updated AIS. She is headed to Conneaut. Due Two Harbors on Nov. 22nd are the Walter J. McCarthy Jr. and the CSL Assiniboine. Both will probably be late on the 22nd or early on the 23rd. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay saw the American Spirit depart on Nov. 21st at 10:51 for Cleveland. The Philip R. Clarke arrived Silver Bay on Nov. 21st at 14:06 after unloading stone at Graymont in Superior. There is no inbound traffic scheduled for Silver Bay on Nov. 22nd.

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
After unloading limestone at Graymont Superior, Philip R. Clarke departed Duluth at 09:31 Thursday morning, headed for Silver Bay to load. Eeborg raised her anchor and entered port at 10:08 to load beet pulp pellets at Gavilon, and Narie arrived at 17:50 and headed to CHS 1 to load wheat. Mandarin continued taking on wheat at Riverland Ag on Thursday. In Superior, Mesabi Miner departed at 13:44 with a load of iron ore for Nanticoke. Her fleetmate Stewart J. Cort, which had arrived via the Duluth entry on Wednesday night and docked at Port Terminal, then shifted down to Burlington Northern and began loading. She should depart early Friday.

Thunder Bay, ON
Thursday: 0:30 Spruceglen departed for Montreal. 2:27 After loading coal at Thunder Bay Terminals, Algoma Sault departed for Detroit.

Northern Lake Huron ports
Thessalon: Thursday; Algoma Innovator arrived with a load of road salt and went to anchor. She’s waiting for calmer conditions at the dock.

Port Dolomite: Thursday; 1:00 Mississagi departed for Windsor. 1:04 Cason J Callaway arrived to load and departed at 14:35 for Duluth Superior. She went to anchor in the St Marys River, north of De Tour to wait out weather.

Stoneport: Thursday; 1:49 Manitowoc departed for Detroit. 2:00 Olive L Moore arrived to load.

Calcite: Wednesday; 23:32 Sam Laud departed for Duluth Superior and went to anchor in the St Marys River, north of De Tour to wait out weather.

Detroit/Rouge River – Raymond H
Thursday Arrivals: Everlast/Norman McLeoad-arrived at thr Waterfront Petroleum Terminal. John J Boland-arrived at Zug Island to unload coal.

Cleveland, OH – Bill Kloss
Herbert C. Jackson arrived at 04:21 Thursday to lighter at the Bulk Terminal then head up the Cuyahoga to finish the unload at ArcelorMittal. Dorothy Ann/Pathfinder arrived at 02:33 to unload stone. She then proceeded to Cargill to load salt. Samuel de Champlain/Innovation arrived at 15:48 to unload at LaFarge. Isa, Wilf Seymour and Sea Eagle II were still in Cleveland.

Welland Canal and vicinity vessel passages – Thursday November 21, 2019 - Barry Andersen
Nanticoke - arrival - Nov 21 - none - departed - Nov 21 - tug Michigan & Great Lakes at 0848 and Sloman Hermes (Atg) at 0852 - both out to the anchorage

Long Point Bay anchorage - anchored - Nov 20 - Algoma Hansa at 2332 - Nov 21 - tug Michigan & Great Lakes at 0907 and Sloman Hermes (Mlt) at 1150 - both from the dock Buffalo - departed - Nov 20 - NACC Argonaut at 0540 at 1908 eastbound

Port Colborne anchorage - anchored - Nov 21 Sloman Hera (Atg) headed to Nanticoke

Welland Canal Upbound - Nov 20 - tug Spartan & Spartan II at 1931 stopped wharf 13 - weather, Algoma Conveyor at 1902, Algoma Harvester 2033, tug Petite Forte & St Marys Cement at 2120 stopped at wharf 1 Nov 21 - Algoma Niagara at 0313, tug Calusa Coast & Delaware at 0725 stopped wharf 1 and CSL Niagara at 0921, Maria Desgagnes at 1200, Blair McKeil at 1450 and Manitoulin at 1859

Welland Canal Downbound - Nov 20 - Algoma Spirit at 1809, Atlantic Huron and CSL Tadoussac at 1910, Frontenac at 2103 and NACC Argonaut at 2336 - Nov 21 - Robert S Pierson at 0232, Algoma Transport at 0511 and Mamry (Bhs) eta 1931 Welland Canal docks - Nov 18 - Federal Montreal (Mhl) arrived wharf 12 at 0400 - Nov 20 - Nov 21 - tug Wyatt M & barge MM180 at 1340 from dry dock to Heddle DD fitout wall

Port Weller anchorage - arrivals - Nov 21 - Rossi A Desgagnes at 1644 from Bronte, Exeborg (Nld) at 1648 and Algoma Transport at 1923 - departed - Nov 20 - Adfines Star (Mlt) (ex Osttank Sweden-11) at 1135 for France - Nov 21 - Federal Kushiro (Mhl) at 0750 approx. and Ocean Castle (Mlt) (ex Federal Mattawa-16) at 0800 apporox - both eastbound

Hamilton - arrivals - Nov 20 - CSL Niagara at 1928 - Nov 21 - Algoma Spirit at 0907 and Ojibway at 1350 - docked - Nov 17 - Rt Hon Paul J Martin at 1337 - Nov 18 - Wigeon (Lbr) at 0510 - Nov 20 - Federal Cedar (Mhl) 0301 - departed - Nov 20 - Algoma Guardian at 1908 - Nov 21 - CSL Niagara at 0645 and Exeborg (Nld) at 1430 for Port Weller anchorage

Bronte - docked - Nov 19 - Rossi A Desgagnes at 2217 - departed - Nov 21 at 1457 for the Port Weller anchorage

Mississauga - arrival - Nov 20 - Hinch Spirit at 1333

Toronto - arrival - Nov 21 - Robert S Pierson at 1604 - docked - Nov 16 - Sunda (Lbr) (ex Emilie-15) at 1834

Oshawa - docked - Nov 19 - Maria G (Mlt) (ex Gadwall-17) at 0719

Rochester, NY – Tom Brewer
Departure: McKeil Spirit at 14:00 Tuesday afternoon in ballast for Picton, Ontario.

 

Enbridge completes rock sampling within Straits for Line 5 tunnel

11/22 - St. Ignace, MI - The construction of the tunnel that would house Enbridge's Line 5 oil pipeline within the Straits of Mackinac is advancing. According to the energy company, sampling of sediment and rock in the area, which is a key engineering component needed for the final design of the tunnel, has been completed.

The sampling program is a major part of Enbridge's $40 million investment in the project in 2019, said Enbridge spokesman Ryan Duffy. The specialized deep-water drilling vessel, Highland Eagle, successfully completed the last of the bedrock borings in the deep-water areas of the Straits earlier in the week.

Samples were collected from a total of 27 locations including on-shore, near-shore and deep-water locations, said Duffy.

Now, the rock samples will be studied by geologists and then the results of the study will be used to guide the design of the tunnel, as well as the tunnel boring machine. Enbridge said the machine will be custom-built to suit the characteristics of geology in the Straits. In 2018, Enbridge and former Michigan Republican Governor Rick Snyder agreed to run an oil pipe through the tunnel and shut down its twin Line 5 pipes. When new Michigan governor Gretchen Whitmer took office, she opposed the deal Enbridge made with Snyder.

Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel is working on appealing a court ruling that upheld legislation authorizing the agreement. A lawsuit to decommission the Line 5 pipeline has been filed.

WPBN/WGTU

 

Detroit tug owner facing child pornography charges

11/22 - Detroit, MI – The owner of a Detroit tugboat company who had sexual conversations with several young boys on Facebook is accused of inviting one over to his house to “clean his basement,” giving him alcohol and drugs and molesting him, according to court records. The boy said he developed an addiction to drugs after the incident.

A 21-year-old man came forward Oct. 31, 2018, to tell FBI agents he had been drugged and molested around seven years earlier by Wade Preston Streeter, 49, of Detroit. Streeter committed the alleged crimes at home and on his tugboat Cheyenne, according to authorities. The tug is owned by Streeter’s Detroit-based Open Lake Group LLC.

Streeter is facing charges of producing and attempting to produce child pornography, receiving child pornography and possessing child pornography, according to court records. He has been arrested and is being held in jail without bond.

Click on Detroit

 

Join ‘Decades’ author Roger LeLievre, Don Lee and others at Maritime Center Saturday

11/22 - Port Huron, MI – Join several Great Lakes authors, as well as photographers and others from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday for “Books & Boats” at the Great Lakes Maritime Center in Port Huron.

On hand will be Roger LeLievre (“Know Your Ships: Decades”), Roger P. Hulett (“A Lot More To Do: The Remarkable Life of Frank Mays”), photographer Mike Mishler and Pamela Cameron, author of the award-winning children’s book “Sport: Ship Dog of the Great Lakes.” In addition, Bob May from Lake Freighter Minis will have his paper lake vessel model kits for sale.

A special guest will be Great Lakes illustrator Don Lee, whose personalized Great Lakes caricatures are popular on Facebook and other sites. He will draw your likeness as your favorite boat (no charge but tips appreciated).

Great Lakes Maritime Center

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  November 22

In 1947, the Canadian tanker BRUCE HUDSON broke down shortly after departing Port Stanley, Ont. The U.S. tanker ROCKET, Captain R. B. Robbins, managed to get a line on the HUDSON and tow her 50 miles through high seas and a snow storm to shelter behind Point Pelee. Later, the tug ATOMIC arrived on scene and towed the Hudson to Toledo for repairs.

On 22 November 1860, WABASH VALLEY (wooden propeller, 592 tons, built in 1856, at Buffalo, New York) was caught in a blizzard and gale off Muskegon, Michigan, on Lake Michigan. Her skipper thought they were off Grand Haven and as he steamed to the harbor, visibility dropped to near zero. The vessel ran onto the beach. Her momentum and the large storm waves carried her well up onto the beach where she broke in two. Her machinery was salvaged and went into the new steamer SUNBEAM.

Scrapping of SPRUCEGLEN, a.) WILLIAM K. FIELD was completed on November 22, 1986, by Lakehead Scrap Metal Co. at Thunder Bay Ontario. SPRUCEGLEN was the last Canadian coal-fired bulker.

On 22 November 1869, CREAM CITY (3-mast wooden bark, 629 tons, built in 1862, at Sheboygan, Wisconsin) was carrying wheat in a gale when she lost her way and went ashore on Drummond Island. She appeared to be only slightly damaged, but several large pumps were unable to lower the water in her hull. She was finally abandoned as a total wreck on 8 December. She was built as a "steam bark" with an engine capable of pushing her at 5 or 6 mph. After two months of constant minor disasters, this was considered an unsuccessful experiment and the engine was removed.

CITY OF MILWAUKEE was chartered to the Ann Arbor Railroad Co. and started the Frankfort, Michigan-Kewaunee, Wisconsin service for them on November 22, 1978.

November 22, 1929 - CITY OF SAGINAW 31 went out on her sea trials.

On 22 November 1860, CIRCASSIAN (wooden schooner, 135 foot, 366 tons, built in 1856, at Irving, New York) was carrying grain in a gale and blizzard on Lake Michigan when she stranded on White Shoals near Beaver Island. She sank to her decks and then broke in two. Her crew was presumed lost, but actually made it to Hog Island in the blizzard and they were not rescued from there for two weeks.

A final note from the Big Gale of 1879. On 22 November 1879, The Port Huron Times reported, "The barge DALTON is still high and dry on the beach at Point Edward."

1878: The wooden passenger and freight steamer WAUBUNO was lost with all hands, 14 crew and 10 passengers, on Georgian Bay.

1898: ARTHUR ORR went aground on Isle Royale when the steering gear failed in a severe storm. It was later released and survived until scrapping at Hamilton in 1947-1948.

1898: S.S. CURRY was leaking badly after it struck a reef off Duck Island, Lake Huron.

1906: J.H. JONES, en route from Owen Sound to Lions Head, was lost with all hands. The wooden passenger and freight steamer went down in 60 mph winds.

1907: Fire broke out aboard the wooden freighter LIZZIE MADDEN shortly after clearing Bay City for Little Current. The crew was rescued by the LANGELL BOYS. The burning hull drifted ashore on Little Charity Island in Saginaw Bay and was a total loss.

1911: JOLIET sank in the St. Clair River following a collision with the HENRY PHIPPS. It had been anchored due to fog when hit and all on board were saved. The remains were dynamited as a hazard to navigation.

1919: The wooden steamer MYRON sank off Crisp Point, Lake Superior and 17 crew were lost.

1950: The former Canada Steamship Lines canaller MAPLETON was destroyed at the Port of Suez, Egypt as b) EASTERN MED when a fire broke out while loading oil drums. The remains of the ship were scrapped.

1975: PIERSON DAUGHTERS hit bottom off North Colban Island in the St. Lawrence and had to go to Port Weller Dry Docks for repairs after unloading the cargo of iron ore at Conneaut.

1988: The Dutch flag freighter POOLSTER first came through the Seaway in 1969. It suffered an engineroom fire off Kuwait as e) ATLANTIC REEFER while bound for Dubai on this date. The badly damaged ship was towed to Sharjah and then sold for scrap. It was renamed f) VOYAGER I for the trip to Gadani Beach, Pakistan, and the vessel arrived April 4, 1989, for dismantling.

1998: SPAR OPAL went aground inside the breakwall at Port Colborne due to high winds and was released by the tugs UNDAUNTED and WELLAND. The ship had also been a Seaway trader beginning in 1984 as a) LAKE SHIDAKA, in 1991 as b) CONSENSUS ATLANTIC, and in 1992 as c) FEDERAL MATANE (i). It began Great Lakes service as e) SPAR OPAL in 1997.

2000: PRINSES IRENE of the Oranje Lijn made 16 trips into the Great Lakes, with passengers and freight, from 1959 through 1963. The vessel was observed beached at Jakarta, Indonesia, as c) TANJUNG OSINA on this date and appeared to be badly rusted and burned out. The hull was later reported to have been broken up.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Russ Plumb, Steve Haverty and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Port Reports -  November 21

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day's news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known). Reporters needed for Lake Michigan ports, St. Marys River, Saginaw River and ports such as Johnstown, ON. If you would like to see your port represented, please consider becoming a news page volunteer and send us your information.

Two Harbors-Silver Bay, MN – Gary A. Putney
Edgar B. Speer departed Two Harbors on Nov. 20th at 14:43 for Conneaut. Her original destination was showing Gary. John G. Munson shifted from North of #1 to South of #2 where she loaded and departed at 18:19 with no new AIS destination. The Presque Isle arrived Two Harbors on Nov. 20th at 07:04 for North of #2 lay-by. She will be loading at South of #2. Due Two Harbors on Nov. 21st is the Roger Blough. She had been running checked down all day on the 20th. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay saw the Clyde S. VanEnkevort/Erie Trader depart on Nov. 19th at approx. 23:30 for Ironville. Arriving Silver Bay on Nov. 20th was the American Spirit at 04:48. Due Silver Bay on Nov. 21st is the Philip R. Clarke after unloading stone in the Twin Ports.

Thunder Bay, ON
Tuesday; 17:30 Kaministiqua departed for Sorel. Wednesday; 3:36 Algoma Sault arrived and went to anchor. 12:01 Federal Margaree departed for Quebec City. 12:28 Algoma Sault weighed anchor and proceeded to Thunder Bay Terminals to load. 13:13 Radcliffe R Latimer arrived at the Superior Elevator to load grain.

Northern Lake Huron ports
Meldrum Bay: Tuesday; 10:15 Kaye E Barker arrived to load dolomite and departed Wednesday at 13:01 for Marquette.

Port Dolomite: Wednesday; Mississagi arrived to load limestone.

Stoneport: Wednesday; 11:39 Manitowoc arrived to load limestone.

Calcite: Tuesday; 23:04 Arthur M Anderson departed for Buffington. Wednesday; 1:15 Sam Laud arrived to load.

Goderich, ON – Bruce Douglas
Robert S Pierson cleared 9.44 pm Tuesday with salt for Thessalon ON. Algoma Innovator arrived 9.49 pm Tuesday, loaded salt and cleared for Toronto. Algoma Buffalo arrived 1.22 am Tuesday to lod salt at Compass Minerals Dock.

Detroit/Rouge River – Raymond H
Wednesday Arrivals: Finnborg arrived at Nicholson's Detroit Terminal to unload general cargo. Calumet arrived at the Prairie Materials dock to unload stone. Hon. James L Oberstar arrived at AK Steel to unload ore. Samuel De Champlain/Innovation arrived at Lafarge to unload cement.

Cleveland, OH – Bill Kloss
Defiance/Ashtabula arrived 11/19 at 19:02 to load a shuttle for ArcelorMittal. Sea Eagle II arrived at 09:31 for St. Marys Cement. Cuyahoga arrived at 04:27 for Allied Road Products. John J. Boland departed at 00:18 for Sandusky, arriving at 06:33.

Welland Canal and vicinity vessel passages – Wednesday November 20 – Barry Andersen

Nanticoke - arrivals - Nov 20 - tug Michigan & Great Lakes at 0459 from the anchorage and CSL Tadoussac at 0622 - docked - Nov 14 - Sloman Hermes (Mlt) at 0149 - departed - Nov 20 - CSL Niagara at 0030 for the canal and Algoscotia at 0419 westbound and CSL Tadoussac at 1129 eastbound

Long Point Bay anchorage - anchored - departed - Nov 20 - tug Michigan & Great Lakes at 0425 for the dock

Buffalo - arrival - Nov 20 - NACC Argonaut at 0540

Welland Canal upbound Nov 19 - G3 Marquis at 1432, NACC Argonaut at 1744 and Baie Comeau at 2011 - Nov 20 - Algoma Compass at 0043, Algonorth at 0752, Algoma Hansa at 0920, CCGS Limnos at 1543, tug Spartan & Spartan II at 1931, Algoma Conveyor at 1902, Algoma Harvester eta 2025

Welland Canal downbound Nov 19 - Algoterra at 1726 - Nov 20 CSL Niagara at 0504, Algoma Enterprise at 0602, Algoscotia at 0743 and Atlantic Huron at 1924

Welland Canal docks Nov 18 - Federal Montreal (Mhl) arrived wharf 12 at 0400

Port Weller anchorage - arrivals - Nov 19 - Adfines Star (Mlt) (ex Osttank Sweden-11) at 2040 approx. from Mississauga dock and Ocean Castle (Mlt) (ex Federal Mattawa-16) at 2455 approx.

Hamilton - arrivals - Nov 20 - Federal Cedar (Mhl) 0301 - docked - Nov 16 - Ocean Castle (Mlt) (ex Federal Mattawa-16) at 0525 - Nov 17 - Rt Hon Paul J Martin at 1337 - Nov 18 - Wigeon (Lbr) at 0510 - Nov 19 - Algoma Guardian at 1737 - Nov 19 - Exeborg (Nld) - departed - Nov 20 Florence Spirit at 0252 eastbound

Bronte - docked Nov 19 - Rossi A Desgagnes eta 2300

Mississauga arrival Nov 20 - Hinch Spirit at 1333

Toronto docked -Nov 16 - Sunda (Lbr) (ex Emilie-15) at 1834 - departed - Nov 19 - Algoma Compass at 2300 for the canal

Oshawa docked Nov 19 - Maria G (Mlt) (ex Gadwall-17) at 0719

 

Join ‘Decades’ author Roger LeLievre, Don Lee and others at Maritime Center Saturday

11/21 - Port Huron, MI - Join several Great Lakes authors, as well as photographers and others from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday for “Books & Boats” at the Great Lakes Maritime Center in Port Huron.

On hand will be Roger LeLievre (“Know Your Ships: Decades”), Roger P. Hulett (“A Lot More To Do: The Remarkable Life of Frank Mays”), photographer Mike Mishler and Pamela Cameron, author of the award-winning children’s book “Sport: Ship Dog of the Great Lakes.” In addition, Bob May from Lake Freighter Minis will have his paper lake vessel model kits for sale.

A special guest will be Great Lakes illustrator Don Lee, whose personalized Great Lakes caricatures are popular on Facebook and other sites. He will draw your likeness as your favorite boat (no charge but tips appreciated).

Great Lakes Maritime Center

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  November 21

In 1934, the package freighter EDWARD L. LOOMIS, Captain Alex McKenzie, collided with the W. C. FRANZ, Captain Alex McIntyre, about 30 miles southeast of Thunder Bay Island, Lake Huron. Four crewmen on the FRANZ drowned when the lifeboat turned over while being lowered.

On 21 November 1861, ENTERPRISE (2-mast wooden scow-schooner, 64 foot, 56 tons, built in 1854, at Port Huron, Michigan) was driven ashore near Bark Shanty at the tip of Michigan's thumb on Lake Huron. The storm waves pounded her to pieces. Her outfit was salvaged a few days later.

On the evening of 21 November 1890, the scow MOLLIE (wooden scow-schooner, 83 foot, 83 gross tons, built in 1867, at Fairport, Ohio) left Ludington, Michigan, with a load of lumber. About 8:00 p.m., when she was just 25 miles off Ludington, she started to leak in heavy seas, quickly becoming waterlogged. Capt. Anderson and his two-man crew had just abandoned the vessel in the yawl when the steamer F & P M NO 4 showed up, shortly after midnight. The rough weather washed Capt. Anderson out of the yawl, but he made it back in. At last a line from the F & P M NO 4 was caught and made fast to the yawl and the crew made it to the steamer. The men had a narrow escape, for the MOLLIE was going to pieces rapidly, and there was little likelihood of the yawl surviving in the gale.

PATERSON (Hull#113) was launched November 21, 1953, at Port Arthur, Ontario, by Port Arthur Ship Building Co. Ltd.

In 1924, MERTON E. FARR slammed into the Interstate Bridge that linked Superior, Wisconsin, with Duluth, Minnesota, causing extensive damage to the bridge. The bridge span fell into the water but the FARR received only minor damage to her bow.

On 21 November 1869, the ALLIANCE (wooden passenger sidewheeler, 87 foot, 197 gross tons, built in 1857, at Buffalo, New York) slipped her moorings at Lower Black Rock in the Niagara River and went over the falls. She had been laid up since the spring of 1869.

November 21, 1906 - The PERE MARQUETTE 17 encountered one of the worst storms in many years while westbound for the Wisconsin Central slip in Manitowoc. Wisconsin. She made port safely, but the wind was so high that she could not hold her course up the river without assistance. The tug ARCTIC assisted, and as they were proceeding through the 10th Street Bridge, a gust of wind from the south drove the ferry and tug against the north pilings of the 10th Street Bridge. The ARCTIC, pinned between the ferry and the bridge, was not damaged, but she crushed the hull of a fishing tug moored there, sinking her, and inflicted damage of a few hundred dollars to the bridge.

November 21, 1923 - Arthur Stoops, the lookout on the ANN ARBOR NO 6, was drowned while stepping from the apron onto the knuckle to cast off the headline.

On the night of 21 November 1870, C.W. ARMSTRONG (wooden propeller steam tug, 57 foot, 33 tons, built in 1856, at Albany, New York) burned at her dock at Bay City, Michigan. No lives were lost.

More incidents from the Big Gale of 1879. On 21 November 1879, The Port Huron Times reported "The schooner MERCURY is ashore at Pentwater. The schooner LUCKY is high and dry at Manistee; the schooner WAUBASHENE is on the beach east of Port Colborne. The schooner SUMATRA is on the beach at Cleveland; the large river tug J P Clark capsized and sunk at Belle Isle in the Detroit River on Wednesday [19 Nov.] and sank in 15 minutes. One drowned. The schooner PINTO of Oakville, Ontario, stone laden, went down in 30 feet of water about one mile down from Oakville. At Sand beach the barge PRAIRIE STATE is rapidly going to pieces.

1883: The boiler exploded aboard the salvage tug ERIE BELLE while working to free the schooner J.N. CARTER in the Kincardine area of Lake Huron. The former was wrecked but the boiler is still on what has become known as “Old Boiler Beach”.

1902: BANNOCKBURN disappeared on Lake Superior without a trace. Its final resting place has never been found. 1906: The wooden steamer RESOLUTE anchored off the Eastern Gap at Toronto to ride out a storm but the wind switched battering the vessel until it sank. The hull was salvaged in October 1907 and rebuilt as the JOHN ROLPH.

1936: HIBOU was lost in Owen Sound Bay within two miles of the dock and seven perished. The hull was refloated in 1942.

1941: HENRY C. DARYAW, requisitioned for war and on its delivery voyage stranded on rocks in the Brockville Narrows, rolled over and slid off into deep water and sank. It was to have been used on the east coast as a tender for ocean ships. One life was lost.

1957: MONTFAUCON was built at Wyandotte, MI in 1920 and later operated on the Great Lakes as b) E.M. BUNCE. It was at Naples, Italy, as g) ANNA MARIA IEVOLI when an internal explosion caused damage that led to the ship being scrapped.

1959: MOSES GAY was built at Duluth in 1943. It was severely damaged as e) HEANGURA in a storm at Ostra Kvarken, Sweden, and went aground. While salvaged, the ship was tied up at Turku, Finland, and sold for scrap in January 1960.

1961: The British freighter RAPALLO was anchored at Istanbul, Turkey, when struck and damaged by two different freighters, both out of control due to high winds. The vessel was repaired and began Seaway trading in 1963 for the Ellerman Wilson Line.

1961: The former Paterson canaller GANANDOC left the Great Lakes as b) SUGARLAND in October 1961. It had a brief career in the south and went aground at Arcas Reef, Bay of Campeche, while inbound for Coatzacoalcos, Mexico with 2,877 tons of phosphoric rock from Tampa. The ship was abandoned on November 26 as a total loss.

1962: BRO, a Norwegian pre-Seaway visitor as early as 1953, was abandoned by the crew after taking a severe list en route from Seville, Spain, to Rotterdam, Netherlands. The ship was taken in tow, reached Lisbon, Portugal, and was repaired.

1982: CAPTAIN PANAGOS D.P. went aground at Farasan Island in the Red Sea en route from Trois Rivieres, QC to Bandar Abbas, Iran. Fire broke out in the engine room and the ship was gutted. The hull was refloated and was noted lying off Qatar “derelict” in December 1986 and finally scrapped at Gadani Beach, Pakistan, as c) JENNY in 1988. The vessel first came through the Seaway as PANAGOS D. PATERAS in 1977 and returned as CAPTAIN PANAGOS D.P. in 1980.

1994: The Russian freighter FASTOV, upbound for Green Bay with pulpwood on its first trip to the Great Lakes, lost power and struck the Shell dock at Corunna, ON, resulting in considerable damage to the structure. The vessel returned inland as d) EVANGELOS in 1999 and was scrapped at Aliaga, Turkey, as f) JONA in 2011.

2007: The engine aboard the Lake Erie passenger ship JIIMAAN became disabled after the vessel snagged a fish net off Kingsville and the vessel grounded briefly.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley, Steve Haverty and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Dispatchers and office staff on strike at Great Lakes Pilotage Authority

11/20 - Cornwall, ON – Unionized workers at an agency that helps foreign ships navigate the Great Lakes and the St. Lawrence Seaway have walked out of the job, but management says it will strive to ensure the impact on commercial navigation is minimal.

The Union of Canadian Transportation Employees says its 13 members — 10 dispatchers and three office staff — at the Great Lakes Pilotage Authority in Cornwall have been on a legal strike since 6 p.m. Monday. The union says the latest round of bargaining has been “extremely difficult,” and notes the parties have undergone conciliation as well as negotiating with the help of a mediator.

“Our members are vital to the waterway and its operation as a key shipping lane,” Martin Mika, the union’s vice-president for Ontario, said in a statement. “We are very close to achieving a fair deal and could resolve the situation quickly if the employer addresses our members issues to put an end to the strike.”

A strike vote held last month showed unanimous support for labor action, the union said. The agency, meanwhile, said it remains committed to providing safe and secure pilotage services to all its customers. As part of its contingency plan, the agency says management will take over all dispatch and financial responsibilities during the strike.

“We will endeavor to minimize the impact on commercial navigation,” its CEO Michele Bergevin said in a statement.

Edmonton Sun

 

Port Reports -  November 20

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day's news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known). Reporters needed for Lake Michigan ports, St. Marys River, Saginaw River and ports such as Johnstown, ON. If you would like to see your port represented, please consider becoming a news page volunteer and send us your information.

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
John G. Munson departed Duluth at 08:33 Tuesday morning light for Two Harbors after offloading limestone at Hallett #5, and James R. Barker arrived at 08:56 to load iron ore pellets at Canadian National. Also in port on Tuesday were American Mariner, loading grain at General Mills; Mandarin, at Riverland Ag taking on wheat; Iryda, loading wheat at CHS 1; and Eeborg, anchored outside the harbor. Both the Mariner and Iryda were tentatively expected to depart Tuesday night, while the Barker should leave early Wednesday. In Superior, Edwin H. Gott arrived at 04:19 Tuesday morning to load iron ore at BN. She was still tied up and loading Tuesday night even though she had had a departure time of 17:00 posted.

Two Harbors-Silver Bay, MN – Gary A. Putney
Joyce L. VanEnkevort/Great Lakes Trader arrived Two Harbors on Nov. 19th at 01:27 for South of #2. She departed Two Harbors on the 19th at 14:30 with no updated AIS. John G. Munson arrived Two Harbors on the 19th at 10:37 for North of #1 lay-by. The Edgar B. Speer arrived Two Harbors at 14:43 after being anchored off Port Wing, WI since early morning on the 19th. She got underway at approx. 10:00. Due Two Harbors on Nov. 20th is the Presque Isle and the Roger Blough. The Presque Isle has been running checked down all day because of the traffic at Two Harbors. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay saw the arrival of the Clyde S. VanEnkevort/Erie Trader at 05:39. As of 19:30 on the 19th she is still at the dock. Due Silver Bay on Nov. 20th is the American Spirit and possibly the Philip R. Clarke.

Thunder Bay, ON
Sunday: Tecumseh departed for Windsor 22:59 Federal Baltic arrived and went to anchor. Monday: Tim S Dool arrived at the Richardson Main Terminal to load grain. 19:34 The saltie Mamry departed for Montreal. Spruceglen shifted to Viterra A to finish loading. Tuesday: 11:19 Federal Margaree weighed anchor and proceeded to Thunder Bay Terminals to load potash. 17:10 Tim S Dool departed for Port Cartier.

Northern Lake Huron ports
Port Dolomite: Monday; 17:51 H Lee White arrived to load and departed on Tuesday at 8:49 for Bay City.

Stoneport: Sunday; American Courage departed for Cleveland. Dorothy Ann weighed anchor and proceeded to the loading dock. After loading she departed for Detroit. Calcite: Tuesday; 7:39 Arthur M Anderson arrived to load.

Goderich, ON – Bruce Douglas
Algoma Innovator cleared 11:20 pm Sunday with salt upbound for Parry Sound, ON. Robert S Pierson arrived 6:22 am Tuesday and was loading salt at Compass Minerals.

Marysville, MI – Dawn C. Roberts
Manitowoc arrived at the Bluewater Aggregates facility in late afternoon on Tuesday.

Detroit/Rouge River – Raymond H
Tuesday Arrivals: Olive L Moore/Menominee arrived at the Carmeuse Dock to unload stone. Leo A MacArthur/John J Carrick arrived at the Marathon Asphalt Terminal to load. Mississagi and Dorothy Ann/Pathfinder arrived at the St. Clair Aggregates dock to unload stone. Whitefish Bay arrived at St. Marys Cement dock to unload gypsum.

Cleveland, OH – Bill Kloss
John J. Boland arrived 11/18 at 23:50, lightered at the Bulk Terminal and went up the Cuyahoga to finish the offload at ArcelorMittal steel. Finnborg arrived 11/18 at 19:28 for the Port, Dock 24E. Wilf Seymour arrived at 06:56 for the Port, Dock 22E. Frontenac departed Lorain at 08:45 for Fairport Harbor, arriving at 14:08 to load at Morton Salt.

Welland Canal and vicinity vessel passages – Tuesday November 19, Barry Andersen
Nanticoke - arrivals - Nov 19 - Algoma Guardian at 1737 and CSL Niagara at 1800 - docked - Nov 14 - Sloman Hermes (Mlt) at 0149 - Nov 18 - Algoscotia at 1318, Cason J Callaway at 2124, CSL Assiniboine at 2351 - departed - Nov 19 - Cason J Calloway at 0441 and CSL Assiniboine at 1552 - all westbound

Long Point Bay anchorage - anchored - Nov 19 - tug Michigan & Great Lakes at 1452 - departed - Nov 18 - Dara Desgagnes at 2107 for the canal

Welland Canal upbound - Nov 17 - Federal Montreal (Mhl) at 2154 (from wharf 6 up to wharf 12) and Finnborg (Nld) at 2234 - Nov 18 - Whitefish Bay at 0018, Algoma Transport at 0430, Algosea at 0620 and Brant (Cyp) at 2050 - Nov 19 - tug Sea Eagle II & St Marys Cement II at 1045, G3 Marquis at 1432, NACC Argonaut at 1744 and Baie Comeau at 2011

Welland Canal downbound - Nov 18 - Federal Kimano (Mhl) at 1247, Algoma Compass at 1318, Federal Dart (Mhl) at 1807, Baie Comeau at 2034, Jana Desgagnes at 2235 and Dara Desgagnes at 2343 - Nov 19 - Algoma Guardian at 0436, CCGS Caribou Isle, Federal Kushiro (Mhl) at 1150, Algoterra at 1726

Welland Canal docks - docked - Nov 17 - Algoma Enterprise at 1259 - departed - Nov 17 - Federal Montreal (Mhl) at 2154 from wharf 6 to wharf 12 - Nov 18 - Federal Montreal (Mhl) arrived wharf 12 at 0400

Port Weller anchorage - arrival - Nov 19 - Federal Dart (Mhl) at 0610 and Adfines Star (Mlt) (ex Osttank Sweden-11) at2040 approx. from Mississauga dock - departed - Federal Dart (Mhl) at 0937 eastbound

Hamilton - arrival - Nov 19 - Algoma Guardian at 1737 - anchored - Nov 15 - Exeborg (Nld) at 1905 - docked - Nov 16 - Ocean Castle (Mlt) (ex Federal Mattawa-16) at 0525 - Nov 17 - Rt Hon Paul J Martin at 1337 - Nov 18 - Wigeon (Lbr) at 0510 - departed - Nov 19 - G3 Marquis at 1240 and Baie Comeau at 1817 - both westbound

Bronte - arrival - Nov 19 - Rossi A Desgagnes eta 2300

Mississauga - departed Nov 19 - Adfines Star (Mlt) (ex Osttank Sweden-11) at 1852 for Port Weller anchorage

Toronto - arrivals - Nov 19 - Algoma Compass at 0949 - docked - Nov 16 - Sunda (Lbr) (ex Emilie-15) at 1834 -departed - Nov 18 - tug Sea Eagle II & St Marys Cement II at 2313 - Nov 19 - tug Petite Forte & St Marys Cement at 1842 - both eastbound

Rochester, NY – Tom Brewer
Arrival: McKeil Spirit arrived about noon Tuesday at Lehigh Cement Dock.

 

Stelco offering retirement buyouts amid falling steel prices

11/20 - Hamilton, ON - Stelco is offering voluntary buyouts to retirement-eligible employees to try to save up to $20 million in annual costs amid new struggles for the company in a toughening steel marketplace.

The voluntary departure offer for non-union and union workers is in addition to $50 million in other cost-saving moves previously announced. Stelco CEO David Cheney said in a conference call for investors Thursday that after a "thorough evaluation ... we concluded we have room for improvement in this area."

"Accordingly, we have launched a voluntary retirement plan to those employees who are currently eligible to exercise their retirement options."

United Steelworkers union Local 1005 president Gary Howe said the buyout offer was unexpected and company management has not told the union how many jobs it is hoping to eliminate. He said he was not greatly concerned about the financial health of the steelmaker because "they seem to think they are in a better position than a lot of other steel companies."

Stelco's third-quarter result of no net profit was part of financial statements that were the bleakest so far since the company emerged from bankruptcy protection in June 2017.

That result compares to $125 million in net profit for the same quarter in 2018, with revenue falling by 23 per cent largely because of declining steel prices. The average selling price dropped to $704 per ton, from $980 per ton in the prior year, while shipping volumes grew to 654,000 tons, from 586,000 tons in 2018.

Stelco posted an adjusted net loss of $11 million compared with an adjusted net profit of $174 million in the prior year. Cheney said Stelco plans to improve the company's bottom line by diversifying to include pig iron production at Stelco's Lake Erie facility.

University of Toronto Steel analyst Peter Warrian says that appears to be a smart move because it will allow Stelco to more fully utilize its Nanticoke blast furnace.

The Hamilton Spectator

 

A warming climate should keep Great Lakes lake levels up

11/20 - Grand Rapids, MI – Great Lakes water levels remain unusually high and combined with large surf from fall storms -- coastal dunes and beaches have eroded away for several months now. The scientists tasked with measuring Great Lakes levels are the US Army Corps of Engineers. According to them, lake levels are unlikely to change much anytime soon.

Lake levels are at their highest since at least the mid 1980s and nearly 3 feet above normal. Several factors contribute to Great Lakes lake levels. One major factor is precipitation: the more rain and snow that falls, the higher the lake levels tend to be. As our climate has warmed, precipitation amounts across the Great Lakes have tended to increase. Over the last 50 years, precipitation amounts in West Michigan have been trending up.

The connection between climate change and lake levels is a complex subject. As our atmosphere warms it adds more moisture to the atmosphere, creating more clouds and rain and decreasing evaporation. The Army Corps of Engineers says it would take a fairly dry year to bring lake levels down. And with the way things are trending, that looks increasingly unlikely.

Bottom line: Great Lakes lake levels should remain unusually high for the foreseeable future.

View graphs at this link: https://www.wzzm13.com/article/news/local/lakeshore/climate-change-lake-levels/69-7e870826-014b-449e-b14c-ae09fa67f391

 

Cutter Mackinaw to mark 20th Chicago Christmas Ship anniversary

11/20 - Chicago, IL – The U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Mackinaw (WLBB-30) is scheduled to participate in the Chicago Christmas Ship program during a Chicago port visit in early December, marking the 20th anniversary of the program and the Coast Guard’s involvement.

During their annual fall run to remove seasonal Aids to Navigation on Lake Michigan, the Mackinaw crew will deliver 1,200 Christmas trees to brighten the holiday season for families in the nation’s third largest city.

The crew is continuing a tradition that began more than a century ago when brothers August and Herman Schuenemann sold and gave away Christmas trees from the Chicago waterfront.

Sailing on the Great Lakes during the cold, icy and windy late-season winter months was a risky endeavor in the 18thcentury and early 19thcentury. August Schuenemann and his crew were lost during a November storm on Lake Michigan in 1898.

In spite of the risk, Herman Schuenemann continued the family business of making late-season Christmas tree deliveries on his three-masted schooner Rouse Simmons. With a Christmas tree tied to her main mast and the deck loaded with trees, the Rouse Simmons drew large crowds to Chicago waterfront. In addition to selling them, Herman Schuenemann also gave away Christmas trees to deserving families. His nearly 30 years of generosity earned Schuememann the title of “Captain Santa” in news stories. He proudly carried those news clippings inside his wallet and kept them safe in a water-proof oilskin bag.

In November 1912, Herman Schuenemann and his crew set sail on their 44-year-old ship from Thompson’s Harbor, Michigan, carrying 5,500 spruces to Chicago. During the 300-mile journey, the ship ran into a massive winter storm with gale-force winds, waves and snow. When the ship was last seen on Nov. 23, 1912, by the Kewaunee Life Saving Station, its sails were tattered and it was riding low in the water. By the time the rescue boat arrived, the storm had claimed the ship and everyone on board. Remnants of Christmas trees washed ashore in Wisconsin for weeks after the storm. It would be days before Chicago residents would learn the fate of their beloved Christmas Ship.

https://compass.coastguard.blog/2019/11/19/cutter-mackinaw-to-mark-20th-chicago-christmas-ship-anniversary

 

Join ‘Decades’ author Roger LeLievre, Don Lee and others at Maritime Center Saturday

11/20 - Port Huron, MI – Join several Great Lakes authors, as well as photographers and others from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday for “Books & Boats” at the Great Lakes Maritime Center in Port Huron.

On hand will be Roger LeLievre (“Know Your Ships: Decades”), Roger P. Hulett (“A Lot More To Do: The Remarkable Life of Frank Mays”), photographer Mike Mishler and Pamela Cameron, author of the award-winning children’s book “Sport: Ship Dog of the Great Lakes.” In addition, Bob May from Lake Freighter Minis will have his paper lake vessel model kits for sale.

A special guest will be Great Lakes illustrator Don Lee, whose personalized Great Lakes caricatures are popular on Facebook and other sites. He will draw your likeness as your favorite boat (no charge but tips appreciated).

Great Lakes Maritime Center

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  November 20

In 1948, the ROBERT HOBSON was blown against the Duluth-Superior breakwall as she tried to enter the harbor during a 68-mph gale. Damage to the vessel was kept to a minimum when Captain John Mc Nellis ordered the seacocks opened to settle the HOBSON on a sandbar. Renamed b.) OUTARDE in 1975, she was scrapped at Port Colborne, Ontario in 1985.

On 20 November 1854, BURLINGTON (2-mast wooden brig, 80 foot, 117 tons, built in 1842, at Cleveland, Ohio) was driven hard aground near Port Bruce, Ontario, on Lake Huron while trying to assist the stranded Canadian bark GLOBE.

SAGINAW was christened at the Government Dock in Sarnia, Ontario, in 1999. Bonnie Bravener and Wendy Siddall broke the traditional bottle of champagne adding the second vessel to Lower Lakes Towing's fleet. The company then opened the vessel for tours to all those in the large crowd that had gathered to witness the event. She was built in 1953 as a.) JOHN J. BOLAND.

Hall Corporation of Canada's EAGLESCLIFFE HALL was launched in 1956, at Grangemouth, Scotland. Sold off the lakes, renamed b.) EAGLESCLIFFE in 1974, she sank two miles east of Galveston, Texas, on February 9, 1983.

The ferry WOLFE ISLANDER was christened on November 20, 1946, at Marysville, Wolfe Island. The new ferry was the unfinished OTTAWA MAYBROOK which was built to serve the war effort in the south Pacific Ocean. She replaced two landing barges which were pressed quickly into service following the condemned steamer WOLFE ISLANDER, a.) TOM FAWCETT of 1904, which had served the community for 42 years. Officially christened WOLFE ISLANDER by Mrs. Sarah Russell, it took five tries before the champagne bottle finally broke on her port side.

Pittsburgh Steamship's steamer RALPH H. WATSON (Hull#285) was launched in 1937, at River Rouge, Michigan, by Great Lakes Engineering Works.

On 20 November 1872, the side wheel steamer W. J .SPICER was finally laid up and the crew dismissed. She had served for many years as the Grand Trunk ferry at Fort Gratiot on the St. Clair River.

On 20 November 1880, BAY CITY (wooden barge, 199 foot, 480 tons, built in 1852, at Trenton, Michigan as the sidewheeler FOREST CITY) was carrying coal when she was cast adrift east of Erie, Pennsylvania by the steamer JAMES P. DONALDSON in a storm. She was driven ashore and wrecked. Her crew was saved by the U.S. Lifesaving Service using breeches' buoy. November 20, 1898. ANN ARBOR #3 left Cleveland, Ohio for Frankfort, Michigan, on her maiden voyage.

November 20, 1924 - Pere Marquette fleet engineer Finlay MacLaren died after 42 years with the railroad. He was succeeded by his brother Robert until Leland H. Kent was named fleet engineer in 1925.

On 20 Nov. 1871, the schooner E. B. ALLEN was sailing from Chicago to Buffalo with a load of corn when she crossed the bow of the bark NEWSBOY about six miles off the Thunder Bay Light on Lake Huron. The NEWSBOY slammed her bow deep into the schooner's hull amidships and the ALLEN sank in about 30 minutes. The crew escaped in the yawl. The NEWSBOY was badly damaged but did not sink.

On 20 Nov. 1999, the Bermuda-flag container ship CANMAR TRIUMPH went aground on the St. Lawrence River off Varennes about 15 kilometers downstream from Montreal. She was the third vessel to run aground in the St. Lawrence River that autumn. The Canadian Coast Guard reported that she was having engine problems and the CBC News reported that the vessel's rudder was damaged in the grounding.

On Saturday morning, 20 Nov. 1999, Marinette Marine Corporation of Marinette, Wisconsin, launched the 175-foot Coast Guard Cutter HENRY BLAKE. The BLAKE was one of the "Keeper" Class Coastal Class Buoy Tenders. Each ship in the "Keeper" class is named after a famous American lighthouse keeper. 1917: JOHAN MJELDE, built at Cleveland in 1916, was sailing as b) STORO when captured by the German submarine U-151 near the Azores and, after 22 tons of copper were removed, the ship was scuttled on November 26.

1920: J.H. SHEADLE ran aground on the rocks at Marquette when the steering failed while backing from the dock. The ship was badly damaged. It last sailed in 1979 as e) PIERSON INDEPENDENT.

1943: The former LAKE FINNEY, later a Pre-Seaway trader in the 1930s as SANTA EULALIA, was torpedoed and sunk by British forces as the enemy ship c) POLCEVERA off Carlovassi, Italy. 1966: The Liberty ship MOUNT EVANS made two trips through the Seaway in 1961. It stranded off Mapingil, Philippines as h) EASTERN ARGO on this date in 1966. The hull was refloated with damage and then towed to Taiwan for scrapping in 1967.

1990: GINA, a Lebanese freighter, began leaking at Varna, Bulgaria. The ship was later taken to Piraeus, Greece, and laid up. The superstructure was removed and installed on a fire damaged vessel while the hull was towed to Aliaga, Turkey, in October 1991 and dismantled. GINA had been a Great Lakes trader as a) MARCOSSA-I in 1972

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Brian Johnson, Dave Swayze, Russ Plumb, Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley, Steve Haverty and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Port Reports -  November 19

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day's news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known). Reporters needed for Lake Michigan ports, St. Marys River, Saginaw River and ports such as Johnstown, ON. If you would like to see your port represented, please consider becoming a news page volunteer and send us your information.

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
Michipicoten departed Duluth at 02:14 Monday morning with a load of iron ore pellets from Canadian National, and Great Lakes Trader was inbound at 11:32 to discharge limestone at Hallett #5. John G. Munson came in at 17:02, also with stone for Hallett #5, but tied up at the CN gravity dock to wait for Great Lakes Trader to finish unloading. American Mariner was inbound at 17:30 to load grain at General Mills. She was closely followed into port by Mandarin, which arrived at 17:45 and headed to Riverland Ag for a load of wheat. Great Lakes Trader was expected to depart at 21:00 for Two Harbors to load. Eeborg was due at 22:00 to load beet pulp pellets at Gavilon, but will likely go to anchor for inspections. Iryda was still in port on Monday loading wheat at CHS 1. The Burlington Northern dock in Superior was quiet on Monday, however Edwin H. Gott is due early Tuesday to load.

Two Harbors-Silver Bay, MN – Gary A. Putney
Algoma Spirit departed Two Harbors on Nov. 17th at 19:47 from South of #2 for Hamilton. Due Two Harbors on Nov. 18th are the Joyce L. VanEnkevort/Great Lakes Trader and the Edgar B. Speer. As of 19:30 on the 17th the Joyce L. VanEnkevort/Great Lakes Trader was still unloading at Hallett #5 in Duluth. The Edgar B. Speer should arrive on the 17th around 23:00. Due Two Harbors on Nov. 19th are the John G. Munson and the Presque Isle. The Munson on the 18th was unloading stone in the Twin Ports. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay saw the Herbert C. Jackson arrive on Nov. 18th at 03:30 after spending several days at Fraser. She departed Silver Bay on the 18th at approx. 10:55 for Cleveland. Due Silver Bay on Nov. 19th is the Clyde S. VanEnkevort/Erie Trader. An update on the John J. Boland: She is heading to Cleveland.

Kewaunee, WI – Mark Dillenburg
USACE tug Racine returned the COE Crane Barge Manitowoc home for the winter Monday at about 2:30 pm with tug Fischer Hayden assisting in delivering additional barges. Already in the COE basin were the large crane barge Harvey and a work barge pushed by the large tug Meredith Ashton.

Detroit-Rouge River – Raymond H
Monday Arrivals: Arthur M Anderson arrived at the Revere Dock to unload stone. Sarah Andrie and tank barge arrived at the Marathon Asphalt Terminal to load. Algocanada arrived at Nicholson's Detroit Terminal to wait for dock space at the Waterfront Petroleum Terminal.

Cleveland, OH – Bill Kloss
Manitowoc departed Cleveland at 05:42 on Monday for Marblehead, arriving there at 10:04. G tug Rhode Island arrived in Lorain at 12:08 to assist Frontenac (arrived at 13:27) to the Jonick dock.

Welland Canal and vicinity vessel passages – Monday November 18 – Barry Andersen
Nanticoke
- arrivals - Nov 18 - Algoscotia at 1318 - docked - Nov 14 - Sloman Hermes (Mlt) at 0149 -

departed - Nov 18 - Kitikmeot W at 0820, tug Wilf Seymour & Alouette Spirit at 1659, Long Point Bay anchorage - Nov 16 - Dara Desgagnes at 2133 - Nov 17 - Sarah Desgagnes at 2132 - departed - Nov 18 - Sarah Desgagnes at 2030 westbound

Welland Canal upbound - Nov 17 - Federal Montreal (Mhl) at 2154 (from wharf 6 up to wharf 12) and Finnborg (Nld) at 2234 - Nov 18 - Whitefish Bay at 0018, Algoma Transport at 0430, Algosea at 0620 and Brant (Cyp) at 2050

Welland Canal downbound - Nov 17 - Algoma Buffalo at 2104 - Nov 18 - tug Petite Forte & St Marys Cement at 0110, Algoma Discovery at 0605, tug Spartan & Spartan II at 0730, Ebroborg (Nld) at 0808, tug Calusa Coast & Delaware at 0829, Kitikmeot W at 1157, Federal Kimano (Mhl) at 1247, Algoma Compass at 1318, Federal Dart (Mhl) at 1807, Baie Comeau at 2034 and Jana Desgagnes eta 2210

Welland Canal docks - docked - Nov 17 - Algoma Enterprise at 1259 - departed - Nov 17 - Federal Montreal (Mhl) at 2154 from wharf 6 to wharf 12 - Nov 18 - Federal Montreal (Mhl) arrived wharf 12 at 0400

Port Weller anchorage - departed - Nov 17 - Adfines Star (Mlt) (ex Osttank Sweden-11) at 1340 for Mississauga

Hamilton - arrivals - Nov 18 - Wigeon (Lbr) at 0510 and G3 Marquis at 1406 - anchored - Nov 15 - Exeborg (Nld) at 1905 - docked - Nov 16 - Ocean Castle (Mlt) (ex Federal Mattawa-16) at 0525 - Nov 17 - Rt Hon Paul J Martin at 1337 - departed - Nov 18 - Algoma Equinox at 1338 and Florence Spirit at 1621 - both eastbound

Clarkson - Nov 17 - arrival - Algoma Transport at 0924 - departed Nov 18 at 0207 westbound

Mississauga - arrival - Adfines Star (Mlt) (ex Osttank Sweden-11) at 1516 from Port Weller anchorage

Toronto - arrivals - Nov 18 - none - docked - Nov 16 - Sunda (Lbr) (ex Emilie-15) at 1834 - Nov 18 - tug Petite Forte & St Marys Cement at 1412 - departed - Nov 17 Finnborg (Nld) at 2032 for Cleveland and tug Sea Eagle II & St Marys Cement II at 2313 eastbound

Oswego, NY – Ned Goebricher
On Monday, NACC Argonaut and McKeil Spirit unloaded cement.

 

Plotting her own course: Meet the captain navigating her way in a man's world

11/19 - It's late July and a massive ship is squeezing through the St. Lambert Lock in Montreal. The length of nearly four hockey rinks, the Tim S. Dool is a familiar sight in the St. Lawrence Seaway. The ship is built to navigate the Great Lakes, canals and a network of locks that gradually lift vessels like this more than 180 metres above sea level.

Once inside the lock on Montreal's South Shore, the doors are closed and 90 million litres of water is pumped in. Within minutes, the Dool rises 4½ metres, and slowly carries on to the next lock. It's a process repeated many times before the Dool reaches the Great Lakes, and the heart of North America.

It's an amazing feat of engineering, but it's so common around here that it barely elicits a second glance from passersby.

There's something unique about the Dool on this day, however. You have to look to the bridge, high inside the large white superstructure near the stern of the ship. From a distance, behind a row of windows, you can see a silhouette of a person, hair pulled into a ponytail. Meet Capt. Charlene Munden, senior officer on board the Dool. She's from a tiny Newfoundland outport and is making her way – quite literally – in a man's world.

"Right now we've got 20 on board. There are three women – the rest are men – [and] the other two are cooks," Munden says as she greets her two guests, a CBC News crew that will follow her for the next two days.

Her gender is not the only thing that sets her apart in this industry. Her crew calls her Cap, or ma'am, and since Oct. 6 she's added another title: mother. But more on that later.

Read more and view images and video at this link: https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/newfoundland-labrador/captain-great-lakes-1.5351286

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  November 19

On this day in 1939, in a 24-hour-period, there were 132 transits of the Soo Locks. There were 71 upbound passages and 61 downbound passages.

On this day in 1952, Mrs. Ernest T. Weir smashed a bottle of champagne against the hull of the largest freighter built on the Great Lakes and the 690-foot ERNEST T. WEIR slid down the ways at the Lorain yard of American Ship Building Company. The new vessel had a crew of 38 under the command of Captain W. Ross Maitland and Chief Engineer C. F. Hoffman.

On 19 November 1897, NAHANT (wooden propeller freighter, 213 foot, 1,204 gross tons, built in 1873, at Detroit, Michigan) caught fire while docked near Escanaba, Michigan. Firefighters were hampered by sub-zero temperatures, and she burned to a total loss. The fire jumped to the dock and did $300,000 worth of damage. Two of the crew were burned to death. The wreckage of the vessel was still visible from the Escanaba lighthouse 100 years later.

American Steamship's SAM LAUD (Hull#712) was launched on this date in 1974 at Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin.

The keel for JOHN T. HUTCHINSON (Hull#1010) was laid November 19, 1942, at Cleveland, Ohio for the U.S. Maritime Commission.

The Kinsman Transit Co.'s steamer MERLE M. McCURDY was laid up for the last time at Buffalo, New York, on November 19, 1985. She was scrapped at Port Colborne, Ontario, in 1988.

On 19 November 1842, the wooden schooner BRANDYWINE was carrying flour in a storm on Lake Erie when she capsized and then drifted to the beach near Barcelona, New York. One passenger's body was found in the cabin, but the entire crew of 6 was lost.

More incidents from the terrible storm swept the Lakes in mid-November 1886. On 18-19 November of that year, The Port Huron Times listed the vessels that were known to have foundered in that storm. Here is the list of vessels that foundered as it appeared on 19 November 1886. "The barge EMERALD near Kewaunee, 5 lost. The barge F M DICKINSON near Kewaunee, 3 lost. Two unknown schooners (one supposed to be the HELEN) near Port Sherman. One unknown schooner near Hog Island Reef. The barge NORTH STAR near East Tawas, the fate of the crew is unknown." The list then continues with vessels ashore. "The barge WALLACE and consort on Choclay Beach, east of Marquette. The schooner SOUTH HAVEN near Pt. Sherman. The schooner MARY near Blenheim, Ontario. The schooner PATHFINDER near Two Rivers, the cargo and vessel are a total loss. The schooner CUYAHOGA and two scows in North Bay. The schooner P S MARSH and an unknown schooner at St. Ignace. The schooner HARVEY BISSELL near Alpena. The propeller CITY OF NEW YORK near Cheboygan. The schooner KOLFAGE near Goderich, Ontario has broken up. The propeller NASHUA on Grass Island, Green Bay. The barge BISSELL near Kewaunee. The schooner GOLDEN below China Beach. The propeller BELLE CROSS and barges across from China Beach. The schooner FLORIDA on Marquette Beach is a total loss. And the barges BUCKOUT, MC DOUGALL, BAKER, GOLDEN HARVEST near East Tawas.

The schooner HATTIE JOHNSTON sailed from Milwaukee loaded with 26,000 bushels of wheat on the night of 19 November 1879, and then a severe gale swept Lake Michigan. After two weeks, she was presumed lost with all hands. Aboard were Capt. D. D. Prouty, his wife and 8 crewmen.

On 19 Nov 1886, the steamer MANISTIQUE was towing the schooner-barges MARINETTE and MENEKAUNEE, all loaded with lumber, in a NW gale on Lake Michigan. The gale lasted three days. The barges broke loose after a long fight against the elements and both were wrecked near Frankfort, Michigan. Six of the seven aboard the MARINETTE were lost including the woman cook and her 13-year old daughter. MENEKAUNEE broke up before the Lifesaving Service could get to her and all seven aboard died. When the Lifesaving Service arrived on the beach, they found a jumbled mass of lumber and gear and the ship's dog keeping watch over the dead bodies. The dog also died soon after the Lifesaving crew arrived.

EMPIRE MALDON (steel tanker, 343 foot, 3,734 gross tons) was launched on 19 November 1945, by Sir James Laing & Sons, Ltd., at Sunderland, United Kingdom for the British Ministry of War Transport She was sold to Imperial Oil Co. of Canada in 1946, and renamed IMPERIAL HALIFAX and served on the Maritime Provinces-East Coast trade. In 1969, she was purchased by Johnstone Shipping, Ltd., of Toronto and served on the Great Lakes. She lasted until 1977, when she was scrapped by United Metals, Ltd. in Hamilton, Ontario.

On Friday morning, 19 Nov 1999, shortly after leaving the ADM dock in Windsor, the salty AVDEEVKA lost power in the Fighting Island Channel of the Detroit River. The main engine on the vessel quit while she was abreast of Grassy Island and she began drifting downstream. The stern anchor was dropped and then the port side bow anchor. She began swinging towards the middle of the channel with her stern outside the channel when the main engine was restarted and she headed back upstream for the Belle Isle anchorage. Once in the anchorage a team from the U.S. Coast Guard boarded the vessel to investigate. She was released the next day. It is reported that the vessel lost power due to main fuel valve being left closed after routine maintenance during her stay at the ADM dock.

1904: PHILIP MINCH caught fire 8 miles off Marblehead, Ohio, and sank in the navigation channel. All on board got off safely and rowed to Sandusky in the lifeboat. The remains were dynamited in 1906.

1914: C.F. CURTIS foundered in Lake Superior, 7 miles east of Grand Marais, with the loss of 14 lives. The towing barges ANNIE PETERSON and SHELDON E. MARVIN also went down after the trio ran into high winds and snow.

1956: The year old West German freighter WOLFGANG RUSS was beached in the St. Lawrence near Ile d'Orleans after a collision with the Cunard Line vessel ASIA. The former was inbound for Sorel and had to lightered and taken to Lauzon for repairs to the large hole in the side of the hull. The vessel began Great Lakes visits with the opening of the Seaway in 1959 and made 28 inland trips to the end of 1967. It arrived off Gadani Beach, Pakistan, for scrapping as b) KOTRONAS BEACH on Feb. 4, 1980.

1977: The Canada Steamship Lines self-unloader FRONTENAC grounded off Grassy Island in the St. Lawrence and about 5,000 tons of ore had to be lightered to the SAGUENAY to float free.

1979: The Liberian freighter DANILA was damaged when it struck the west pier while inbound at Port Weller in fog. The vessel first visited the Seaway as a) MAERSK CAPTAIN in 1976 and was back as b) DANILA in 1979. The ship was scrapped at Alang, India, as d) JAY BHAVANI in 1991-1992.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Russ Plumb, Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley, Steve Haverty and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Former USCG cutter Bramble to be auctioned Dec. 4 in Alabama

11/18 - The former USCG cutter Bramble, which was for many years stationed at Port Huron and later served there as a museum, will be sold at public action Dec. 4. The auction will take place at noon local time in front of the United States District Court, Southern District of Alabama Courthouse, 155 St Joseph Street, Mobile Alabama 36602. Please call National Liquidators at (800) 633-7172 for more details.

Bramble, which made history at least twice in her Coast Guard career before being decommissioned in 2003, is caught up in an Alabama court case over unpaid debts. According to court documents, the case against M/Y Bramble, Bramble Historic Epic Companies, LLC and Orinoco Natural Resources, LLC was filed on Aug. 2 in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Alabama.

A new owner had talked about plans to renovate the Bramble and get the ship ready to retrace its historic 1957 Northwest Passage trip. During that trip, the Bramble was one of three U.S. Coast Guard vessels - along with its sister ship, the Spar, and the Storis, to motor along semi-charted waters on the northern shore of Canada from the Pacific to the Atlantic Ocean. To toughen up for that voyage through Arctic ice, the Bramble was outfitted with a stronger bow and a stainless steel propeller, reports show. The 4,500 nautical-mile journey took the three cutters 64 days, and made them the first American ships to circumnavigate North America.

The cutter was built by Zenith Dredge Company in Duluth and launched in 1943. She left her Great Lakes home in 1945, becoming a workhorse in California and Alaska. She had her first brush with history in Hawaii in 1947, when she was present for the first test of an atomic bomb’s effect on ships at Bikini Island, records show.

After her famed Northwest Passage journey, the Bramble returned to the Great Lakes, where she spent the next three decades on law enforcement, search and rescue and buoy-tending work. She was home-ported in both Detroit and Port Huron during those years.

The Bramble then did some work in the Caribbean before coming back to the Great Lakes for her final years in the fleet. She was decommissioned in 2003, replaced by the current cutter, the Hollyhock.

View the sale details at this link: https://www.yachtauctions.com/inventory/180-1944-zenith-dredge-company-uscg-180-cutter/11846

 

Port Reports -  November 18

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day's news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known). Reporters needed for Lake Michigan ports, St. Marys River, Saginaw River and ports such as Johnstown, ON. If you would like to see your port represented, please consider becoming a news page volunteer and send us your information.

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
Paul R. Tregurtha left Duluth at 15:58 Sunday afternoon with a cargo of iron ore pellets for Toledo, and Michipicoten was inbound at 16:49 to load at Canadian National. During the evening, Herbert C. Jackson was pulled from drydock at Fraser Shipyards after undergoing stern thruster repairs, and as of 20:00 she was outbound in the harbor and headed for Silver Bay to load. Iryda continued taking on wheat at CHS 1 on Sunday, while Mandarin remained at anchor outside the harbor. There was no traffic through the Superior entry on Sunday, with none expected until Tuesday when James R. Barker, Edwin H. Gott, and Burns Harbor are all tentatively due.

Two Harbors-Silver Bay, MN – Gary A. Putney
Indiana Harbor departed Two Harbors on Nov. 17th at 08:24 for Gary. The Algoma Spirit stopped off Two Harbors early on Nov. 17th and got underway at approx. 08:30 and arrived at 08:48 for South of #2. As of 19:30 she's still at the dock. Tentatively due Two Harbors on Nov.18th are the Joyce L. VanEnkevort/Great Lakes Trader that will first unload stone in Duluth, and the Edgar B. Speer. As I file this report at 19:30 on the 17th the Herbert C. Jackson is departing Fraser bound for Silver Bay. There is no other traffic due at Northshore Mining in Silver Bay on Nov. 18th. There is still no updated AIS on the John J. Boland, but she is currently downbound on Lake Huron.

Thunder Bay, ON
Saturday; 21:51 The saltie Mamry arrived at Viterra A to load grain. Sunday; 10:31 Kaministiqua arrived at the Richardson Main Terminal to load grain. 11:39 Spruceglen arrived at Viterra B to load grain. 13:18 The saltie Resko arrived at MobilEX to load potash.

Northern Lake Huron ports
Port Dolomite: Saturday; 20:24 Joyce L Vanenkevort departed for Duluth Superior. Sunday; 6:08 Kaye E Barker arrived to load and departed at 19:48 for Grand Haven.

Alpena: Sunday; 3:17 Calumet arrived to unload at the cement plant and departed at 9:47 for Stoneport

Stoneport: Saturday; 23:32 John G Munson departed for Duluth Superior. Sunday; 1:47 American Courage arrived to load. 11:53 Dorothy Ann arrived and went to anchor.

Calcite: 1:55 Arthur M Anderson departed for Detroit. 5:53 Olive L Moore arrived to load. 9:21 Highland Eagle arrived from working in the Straits of Mackinac and docked at the inner harbor. 19:15 Olive L Moore departed for Bay City.

Port Inland: Sunday; 0:11 Wilfred Sykes departed for Burns Harbor. Great Republic arrived to load and departed at 15:00 down bound on Lake Michigan.

Goderich, ON – Bruce Douglas
Algoma Compass cleared 10:14 am Sunday downbound with salt. Algoma Innovator arrived 10:57 am, loading salt at Compass Minerals.

Detroit-Rouge River – Raymond H
Sunday Arrivals: Leo A MacArthur/John J Carrick arrived at the Waterfront Petroleum Terminal. Cuyahoga arrived at the Prairie Materials dock to unload gravel. Iver Bright arrived at the Marathon Asphalt Terminal to load.

Cleveland, OH – Bill Kloss
Polsteam's Ida arrived at the Port, dock 24W at 04:02 Sunday. Manitowoc arrived at 17:29 with stone for Lafarge.

Welland Canal and vicinity vessel passages – Sunday November 17 – Barry Andersen

Nanticoke - arrival - Nov 17 - Kitikmeot W at 1053 - docked - Nov 14 - Sloman Hermes (Mlt) at 0149 - Nov 16 - tug Wilf Seymour & Alouette Spirit at 1559 - departed - Nov 16 - Dara Desgagnes at 2038 out to the anchorage

Long Point Bay anchorage - Nov 16 - Dara Desgagnes at 2123

Port Colborne anchorage - Nov 17 - anchored - Algoma Buffalo at 1437 - departed Nov 17 - Kitikmeot W departed at 0707 for Nanticoke and Algoma Buffalo at 2044

Welland Canal upbound - Nov 16 - Federal Montreal (Mhl) at 0134 from Port Weller anchorage stopping wharf 6, Isa (Cyp) at 0350, CSL Niagara at 1821 and Narie (Bhs) at 2354 - Nov 17 - Algoma Enterprise at 0036, Radcliffe R Latimer at 0331, Sarah Desgagnes at 0751 and Frontenac at 1352

Welland Canal downbound - Nov 16 - Federal Nagara (Mhl) at 1214, Andean (Cyp) at 1712, Algoma Transport at 1814, Osogovo (Mlt) at 1930, Rt Hon Paul J Martin, and Algoma Niagara at 2248 - Nov 17 - Damia Desgagnes at 0251, Bro Anna (Sgp) at 0802. Florence Spirit at 0939, Federal Champlain (Mhl) at 1131 and Algoma Buffalo at 2104 - Nov 18 - tug Petite Forte & St Marys Cement eta 0030

Welland Canal docks - Nov 16 - Federal Montreal (Mhl) stopped wharf 6 at 0934 approx with tug Vac assisting - docked Nov 15 - Rt Hon Paul J Martin stopped wharf 16 at 1849 - Nov 17 - Algoma Enterprise at 1259

Port Weller anchorage - Nov 15 - Adfines Star (Mlt) (ex Osttank Sweden-11) at 1501 and Sarah Desgagnes at 2240 - departed - Nov 17 - Sarah Desgagnes at 0725 for the canal

Hamilton - arrivals - Rt Hon Paul J Martin at 1337, Algoma Equinox at 1450 and Florence Spirit at 2041 - anchored - Nov 15 - Exeborg (Nld) at 1905 - docked - Nov 16 - Ocean Castle (Mlt) (ex Federal Mattawa-16) at 0525 - departed - Nov 17 - Frontenac at 1148 for the canal and CSL St Laurent at 1408 eastbound

Toronto - docked - Nov 15 - NACC Argonaut at 2009 - docked - Nov 16 - Sunda (Lbr) (ex Emilie-15) at 1834 and Finnborg (Nld) at 2212 - departed - Nov 16 - NACC Argonaut at 2257 eastbound - Nov 17 - Finnborg (Nld) at 2032 for Cleveland

 

Carl D. Bradley split in two, sank 61 years ago, causing heartache for Michigan town

11/18 - Rogers City, MI – The Carl D. Bradley may not have had a famous song penned about her demise, but when she broke in two and sank in northern Lake Michigan during gale-force winds on Nov. 18, 1958, it plunged an entire town into grief.

The wreck was a harsh blow to Rogers City, a busy port town on Lake Huron, just 40 miles north of Alpena. Of the 33 men who died in the Bradley’s wreck, 23 were from this town. When the Bradley went down, it left widows on nearly every street in Rogers City. Fifty-three children became fatherless that night.

Of the wreck’s two survivors, only Frank Mays, now 87, is still alive. In past years, he’s visited local memorial events to tell the tale of what happened when the ship known as “The Queen of the Lakes” saw her stern suddenly sag and split off, spelling doom for the 639-foot freighter.

After her launch in 1927, the Bradley spent more than 20 years as the biggest ship on the Great Lakes. The self-unloading freighter was the flagship of the Bradley Transportation fleet. She was built to haul limestone from the world's largest limestone quarry, near Rogers City. Because this was her home port, the Bradley's crew were mostly based there. Their schedule allowed them to be home every few days between runs.

On the eve of her demise, the Bradley was supposed to be on her final trip of the season. The ship has just passed a U.S. Coast Guard safety inspection two weeks before, and had gone to the southern end of Lake Michigan to deliver crushed stone to Gary, Ind.

The Bradley's crew had set a course partway up Lake Michigan and planned to leave the ship for its winter layup in Manitowoc, Wis. It was slated to receive a new cargo hold before it went back into service in the spring of 1959. But a few hours from that layup destination, Capt. Roland Bryan was told instead to bring the ship back to Rogers City. U.S. Steel wanted a last-minute run to another port.

At the time, two storm systems were on a path to converge over the Great Lakes. Storm conditions already had kicked in, and there was a gale forecast for winds up to 65 mph. Wanting to give the Bradley a bit of protection, Bryan had the ship hug the Wisconsin coast for the first part of the trip. They planned to make the turn for home near the Beaver Island archipelago, then go through the Straits of Mackinac, rounding the tip of the Mitten and heading for home.

The wreck happened abruptly about 5:30 p.m., when the Bradley was roughly 12 miles south of Gull Island. Witnesses described hearing a loud bang and feeling a big vibration. The crew saw the Bradley's stern suddenly sag. A mayday was sent out as they abandoned ship. Of the two lifeboats, one could not be launched and the other became tangled in cables, according to witness accounts. The Bradley's one life raft was thrown clear of the wreck as she sank. Initially, there were four survivors who were able to reach that raft.

Read more at this link: https://www.mlive.com/news/2018/11/last_survivor_of_michigans_car.html

 

Know Your Ships author visits Toledo museum for lecture, book signing

11/18 - Toledo, OH - "Know Your Ships" editor and publisher Roger LeLievre appear at the National Museum of the Great Lakes on Wednesday, November 20 at 7 p.m. to discuss the 60-year history of the popular annual vessel field guide up to the recent release of the new hardcover book "Know Your Ships: Decades" (an editors' choice highlighting the guide’s many outstanding images since its founding in 1959).

Books will be available for sale and signing at the gift shop. This event is FREE for GLHS/NMGL members and $11.00 for non-Museum Members. For additional details and to register visit: https://nmgl.org/event/fall-lecture-series-2019-2/

National Museum of the Great Lakes

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  November 18

On 18 November 1869, EQUATOR (wooden propeller package freighter, 184 foot, 621 tons, built in 1857, at Buffalo, New York) was trying to pull the schooner SOUTHWEST off a reef near North Manitou Island on Lake Michigan. A storm swept in and EQUATOR foundered in the relatively shallow water. She was thought to be unsalvageable but was re-floated in 1870. Her hull was extensively rebuilt and became the barge ELDORADO in 1871, while her engine was used in the tug BISMARCK.

The CARL D. BRADLEY was lost in a violent storm on Lake Michigan on November 18, 1958.

The CANADIAN OLYMPIC's sea trials were conducted on 18 November 1976. Her maiden voyage was on 28 November 1976, to load coal at Conneaut, Ohio for Nanticoke, Ontario. Her name honors the Olympic Games that were held at Montreal that year.

The bow and stern sections of the vessel that was to become the STEWART J. CORT were built by Ingalls Shipbuilding Division, Litton Systems, Inc., Pascagoula, MS, as hull 1173. That 182 foot vessel, known as "STUBBY" was launched on 18 Nov 1969. "STUBBY" sailed under its own power from the Gulf of Mexico through the St. Lawrence Seaway and Welland Canal to Erie, Pennsylvania where the sections were cut apart by Erie Marine, Inc. and the 818 foot mid section was added -- making the Lakes first thousand footer.

The ASHCROFT was launched November 18, 1924, as a) GLENIFFER.

On 18 November 1873, the tug CRUSADER was launched at 1:20 p.m. at the Leighton & Dunford yard in Port Huron, Michigan. Her dimensions were 138 foot overall, 125 foot keel, 23 foot beam, and 12 foot depth. She was built for Mr. G. E. Brockway of Port Huron.

On 18 November 1842, CHICAGO (wooden passenger & package freight sidewheeler, 105 foot, 166 tons, built in 1837, at St. Joseph, Michigan) was struck by a gale between Ashtabula and Conneaut in Lake Erie. She lost both of her stacks and became unmanageable when her fires went out. She was driven ashore about 3 miles east of Silver Creek, New York and was wrecked. About 60 persons were on board and amazingly no lives were lost.

On 18 November 1882, DROMEDARY (wooden propeller, 120 foot, 255 gross tons, built in 1868, at Port Dalhousie, Ontario) burned to a total loss at the dock at Hamilton, Ontario when her banked fires overheated. She was owned by Burroughs & Co. No lives were lost.

A terrible storm swept the Lakes in mid-November 1886. On 18-19 November of that year, The Port Huron Times listed the vessels that were known to have foundered in that storm. Here is the list as it appeared on 18 November 1886. "The barge CHARLES HINCKLEY is ashore near Alpena. The schooner P S MARCH is ashore at St. Ignace. She will probably go to pieces. The schooner THOMAS P. SHELDON is ashore about 10 miles north of Alpena. The crew was rescued by the tug HAND. The schooner NELLIE REDINGTON is reported going to pieces at Two Rivers. Three of her crew reached harbor all right, but the other 7 men on board are in danger of their lives. The coal barges F. M. DICKINSON and EMERALD were driven ashore at Kewaunee, Wisconsin Wednesday morning [17 Nov]. Three of the DICKINSON's crew were drowned, the other four floated ashore on a plank. The EMERALD's crew started ashore in the yawl, but 5 were drowned.

On 18 November 1881, the schooner JAMES PLATT left Bay City with a cargo of lumber for Chicago. However, she was wrecked on Lake Michigan during a terrible snowstorm during the first week of December and never made it to Chicago. The storm lasted two full days and six of the crew survived but the rest were lost.

The ANN ARBOR NO 4 ran aground on Green Isle, the island in Green Bay to the north of her course between Sturgeon Bay and Menominee on 18 Nov 1913. ANN ARBOR NO 3 pulled her off undamaged after about 2 hours work.

1911: TURRET CAPE stranded near Cove Island, Lake Huron and was not released until 1912. It last sailed as c) WALTER INKSTER and was scrapped at Port Dalhousie in 1959.

1926: The passenger and freight carrier MONTREAL was built at Toronto in 1902. It caught fire and burned near St. Joseph de Sorel in the St. Lawrence River while operating late season in a freight only capacity. The superstructure was destroyed and the vessel was beached. Five deckhands, believed trapped in the bow area, died.

1958: CARL D. BRADLEY sank in Lake Michigan with the loss of 33 lives.

1970: SILLERY, a Canadian freighter that operated on the St. Lawrence, was heavily damaged aft due to an engineroom fire while enroute from Sept-Iles to Montreal. The ship was a total loss. The bow was later removed and transplanted to sistership CACOUNA which received collision damage on July 6, 1971. The latter was later lost on Lake Michigan as c) JENNIFER on December 1, 1974.

2006: JOHN G. MUNSON hit the Shell Fuel Dock at Corunna and knocked about 200 feet of the structure into the St. Clair River.

Data from: Skip Gilham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Historical Collections of the Great Lakes, Max Hanley, Steve Haverty and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Iron Range ore used in steel for new Interlake vessel

11/17 - Construction of the first U.S.-flagged laker in more than 35 years is underway, and it's using steel produced from Minnesota iron ore. Commissioned by the Interlake Steamship Company, the future 639-foot freighter will be capable of carrying 28,000 gross tons of cargo and is being built by Fincantieri Bay Shipbuilding in Sturgeon Bay, WI.

ArcelorMittal Burns Harbor in East Chicago, IN, was the source of the steel used in a ceremonial first-cut-of-steel event back in August and is the main steel provider for the entire project, the company said in a news release this week. ArcelorMittal's Minorca mine in Virginia supplies Burns Harbor with iron ore pellets.

Use of the Iron Range's ore is welcomed news to Kelsey Johnson, president of the Iron Mining Association of Minnesota.

"You don't often see that the raw product that you're mining then becomes the product that you use to transport the product," Johnson said. "It's a really nice full-circle moment."

The new laker is Interlake's first new ship since the 1,013-foot Paul R. Tregurtha launched in 1981, and is believed to be the first Great Lakes laker made since 1983. Shipbuilding is expected to wrap up in mid-2020.

Gary Mohr, vice president of supply chain management at ArcelorMittal USA, said in a news release that it's fitting a vessel would be built using a product it will one day transport. "The expansion of Interlake’s fleet will further support water commerce and the movement of raw materials using the safest, most efficient and environmentally friendly method of transportation," Mohr said.

Mark Barker, president of Interlake, said relying on the Great Lakes regions' supply of steel and nearly 700 trade workers at Fincantieri Bay Shipbuilding helps the entire region. “We live and work in the Great Lakes region, and promoting growth and the positive economic impact of Great Lakes shipping is integral to our mission and vision as a leader in this industry,” Barker said.

That's common across much of the industry, Johnson said. "We try very hard to make sure that the source of those minerals is coming from a domestic source whenever possible so that we can kind of create our own demand on our system as well," Johnson said.

Duluth News Tribune

 

Port Reports -  November 17

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day's news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known). Reporters needed for Lake Michigan ports, St. Marys River, Saginaw River and ports such as Johnstown, ON. If you would like to see your port represented, please consider becoming a news page volunteer and send us your information.

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
Walter J. McCarthy Jr. arrived Duluth at 04:15 Saturday morning to load coal at SMET. Federal Kushiro was outbound at 10:57 with wheat from Riverland Ag, and the McCarthy left port at 17:16 for St. Clair. Paul R. Tregurtha was due at 20:00 to load iron ore pellets at CN. Herbert C. Jackson remained at Fraser Shipyards undergoing stern thruster work on Saturday, while Iryda continued loading wheat at CHS 1. Mandarin was anchored outside the harbor and is waiting to load wheat at Riverland. In Superior, Algoma Guardian departed at 01:26 Saturday morning with iron ore, and CSL Assiniboine arrived at 06:42 to load. She was still loading as of Saturday night with no departure time listed.

Two Harbors-Silver Bay, MN – Gary A. Putney
Indiana Harbor arrived Two Harbors for South of #2 on Nov.16th at 18:44. Due Two Harbors on Nov. 17th is the Algoma Spirit. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay saw the John J. Boland depart on Nov. 15th at 22:36. As of 19:40 on Nov. 16th she had no updated AIS but probably is headed for Cleveland. There is no traffic scheduled for Silver Bay on Nov. 17th.

Thunder Bay, ON
Friday; 19:18 Federal Kumano departed for Montreal. 20:36 Federal Dart departed for Montreal. Saturday; 11:59 Federal Margaree arrived and went to anchor. 15:52 Tecumseh arrived at the Richardson Current River Terminal.

Milwaukee, WI – Wisconsin Marine Historical Society
At Port Milwaukee Saturday (11/16): Samuel de Champlain/Innovation departed Friday evening (11/15) and headed for Muskegon after delivering cement to the Lafage terminal. Later Friday night, Federal Baltic cleared the harbor bound for Thunder Bay after unloading European steel. Polsteam's Irma arrived 07:14 Saturday with road salt from Brazil. She tied up at the bulk transfer dock on the outer harbor. This is Irma’s second trip to Milwaukee this season. She was the first seaway vessel to visit the city in 2019 when she brought steel from Europe back in April.

Northern Lake Huron ports
Thessalon: Friday; 18:27 Cuyahoga arrived to load gravel and departed Saturday at 1:28 down bound on Lake Huron.

Meldrum Bay: Friday; 17:43 Algoma Innovator departed for Sarnia. John G Munson weighed anchor and proceeded to the dock to take on a partial load. Saturday; 5:47 John G Munson departed for Stoneport.

Drummond Island: Saturday; 1:15 Michipicoten departed for Algoma Steel, Sault Ste Marie ON.

Port Dolomite: Friday; 21:26 After taking on a partial load Wilfred Sykes departed for Port Inland. 23:02 Joyce L VanEnkevort arrived to load.

Stoneport: Friday; Olive L Moore departed for Bay City. Saturday; 9:21 John G Munson arrived to finish loading.

Calcite: Saturday; 8:09 H Lee White departed for Green Bay.

Port Inland: Friday; 16:29 Manitowoc arrived to load limestone and departed Saturday at 3:56 for Cleveland. 4:36 Wilfred Sykes arrived to finish loading.

Goderich, ON – Bruce Douglas
Algoma Compass arrived at 4:56 pm Saturday to load salt.

Marysville, MI – Dawn C. Roberts
Friday morning, American Courage was discharging cargo at Bluewater Aggregates. She departed for Stoneport mid afternoon.

Welland Canal and vicinity vessel passages – Saturday November 16 – Barry Andersen
Nanticoke - arrival - Nov 16 - tug Wilf Seymour & Alouette Spirit at 1559 - docked - Nov 14 - Sloman Hermes (Mlt) at 0149 - Nov 15 - Algoma Transport at 1459 and Dara Desgagnes at 1625 - departed - Nov 16 - Edwin H Gott at 0841 and Algoma Transport at 1316 - both westbound

Port Colborne anchorage - Nov 16 - Kitikmeot W at 0006 awaiting dock at Nanticoke

Welland Canal upbound - Nov 15 - Industrial Strength (Lbr) at 0614, Kitikmeot W at 1252 and Baie Comeau at 1807 - Nov 16 - Evans Spirit at 0027, Federal Montreal (Mhl) at 0134 from Port Weller anchorage stopping wharf 6, Iver Bright (Nld) at 0237, Isa (Cyp) at 0350, CSL Niagara at 1821 and Narie (Bhs) eta 2145

Welland Canal downbound - Nov 15 - Rt Hon Paul J Martin at 1724 stopping wharf 16, John D Leitch at 1128, Algoma Hansa at 1216 and Ojibway at 2203 - Nov 16 - tug Sea Eagle II & St Marys Cement II at 0547, Federal Oshima (Mhl) at 0930, Fivelborg (Nld) at 1137, Federal Nagara (Mhl) at 1214, Andean (Cyp) at 1712, Algoma Transport at 1814, Osogovo (Mlt) at 1930 and Algoma Niagara eta 2210

Welland Canal docks arrivals - Nov 16 - Federal Montreal (Mhl) stopped wharf 6 at 0934 approx with tug Vac assisting - docked Nov 15 - Rt Hon Paul J Martin stopped wharf 16 at 1849

Port Weller anchorage - Nov 15 - Adfines Star (Mlt) (ex Osttank Sweden-11) at 1501 and Sarah Desgagnes at 2240 - departed - Nov 16 - Federal Montreal (Mhl) at 0105 for wharf 6 Thorold

Hamilton - arrivals - Nov 16 - CSL St Laurent at 0058 and Ocean Castle (Mlt) (ex Federal Mattawa-16) at 0525 from the anchorage - anchored - Nov 15 - Exeborg (Nld) at 1905 - docked - Nov 15 - Frontenac at 0943 - departed - Nov 16 - Isa (Cyp) at 0133 for Cleveland and Narie (Bhs) at 2004 for Superior

Toronto - arrival - Nov 16 - Sunda (Lbr) (ex Emilie-15) at 1834 and Finnborg (Nld) eta 2230 - docked - Nov 15 - NACC Argonaut at 2009 - departed - Nov 16 - McKeil Spirit at 0911 eastbound

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  November 17

On 17 November 1884, PHOENIX (wooden propeller wrecking tug, 173 gross tons, built in 1862, at Cleveland, Ohio) caught fire in one of her coal bunkers at 7 a.m. while she was tied up to the C. S. R. Railroad slip at Amherstburg, Ontario. Several vessels, including the Dunbar tug SHAUGHRAUN and the steam barge MARSH, tried to save her. The SHAUGHRAUN finally got a line on her and pulled her away from the dock and towed her near Norwell’s wharf where she burned and sank.

On 17 Nov 1969, the RIDGETOWN (steel propeller bulk freighter, 557 foot, 7,637 gross tons, built in 1905, at Chicago, Illinois as WILLIAM E. COREY) was laid up at Toronto for the last time with a load of grain. In the spring of 1970, Upper Lakes Shipping, Ltd. sold her to Canadian Dredge & Dock Co., Ltd. of Toronto. She was sunk at Nanticoke, Ontario, for use as a temporary breakwater during the construction of harbor facilities in the summer of 1970. Still later, she was raised and sunk again in the summer of 1974, as a breakwater to protect marina facilities at Port Credit, Ontario.

On November 17, 1984, the EUGENE P. THOMAS was towed by the TUG MALCOLM to Thunder Bay, Ontario, for scrapping by Shearmet.

In the morning of 17 November 1926, the PETER A.B. WIDENER (steel straight-deck bulk freighter, 580 foot, 7,053 gross tons, built in 1906, at Chicago, Illinois) was running up bound on Lake Superior in ballast when it encountered strong Northeasterly winds. About six miles Southwest of the Rock of Ages Light on Isle Royale, the captain gave orders to change course for Duluth, Minnesota. There was no response because the wheel chains had parted from the drum, thus disabling the rudder. Repairs cost $4,000.

On 15 Nov 1972, the MICHIPICOTEN (steel straight-deck bulk freighter, 549 foot, 6,490 gross tons, built in 1905, at W. Bay City, Michigan, as HENRY C. FRICK) departed Quebec in tow of Polish tug KORAL for scrapping in Spain. The tow encountered bad weather and the MICHIPICOTEN broke in two during a major fall storm on the Gulf of St. Lawrence. Her forward section sank on 17 November off Anticosti Island, and the after section sank the next day.

The propeller JOHN STUART burned about two miles from Sebawaing, Michigan, at 9:00 p.m., 17 November 1872. She had been aground there for some time.

On 17 November 1887, ARIZONA (wooden propeller package freighter, 189 foot, 962 gross tons, built in 1868, at Cleveland, Ohio) was carrying oils and acid used in mining operations when her dangerous cargo caught fire as she approached the harbor at Marquette, Michigan, in heavy seas. Poisonous fumes drove all of the crew topside, leaving the vessel unmanageable. She ran against the breakwater and the crew jumped off. The burning steamer "chased" the crew down the breakwater toward town with the poisonous fumes blowing ashore. She finally beached herself and burned herself out. She was later recovered and rebuilt.

On 17 November 1873, the wooden 2-mast schooner E.M. CARRINGTON sank in nine feet of water at Au Sable, Michigan. She had a load of 500 barrels of flour and 7,000 bushels of grain. She was recovered and lasted another seven years.

On 17 November 1880, GARIBALDI (2-mast wooden schooner, 124 foot, 209 tons, built in 1863, at Port Rowan, Ontario) was carrying coal in a storm on Lake Ontario. She anchored to ride out the storm, but after riding out the gale for 15 hours, her anchor cable parted and her crew was forced to try to bring her into Weller's Bay. She stranded on the bar. One of the crew froze solid in a standing position and his ghost is supposed to still haunt that area. The vessel was recovered and rebuilt. She lasted until at least 1898.

1902: The wooden steamer ROBERT WALLACE sank 13 miles out of Two Harbors while towing the barge ASHLAND.

1922: CITY OF DRESDEN was anchored off Long Point due to high winds and some of the cargo was thrown overboard. The ship beached on the west side of Long Point and broke up as a total loss. One sailor perished.

1922: MALTON went aground on Main Duck Island in Lake Ontario and was stuck until November 30.

1936: The steering cable of the SIDNEY E. SMITH gave way entering the harbor at Fairport, Ohio, and the ship stranded on the break wall. While released on November 22, the heavily damaged vessel was broken up for scrap the following year.

1939: VARDEFJELL, which inaugurated regular Great Lakes service for the Fjell Line in 1932, was torpedoed and sunk as b) KAUNAS 6.5 miles WNW of Noord Harbor, N. Hinder Light, River Schelde.

1996: SEADANIEL went aground at Duluth due to high winds after the anchors dragged. The ship was released, undamaged, by tugs. It last visited the Great Lakes in November 1998 and arrived at Alang, India, for scrapping on May 5, 1999.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Historical Collections of the Great Lakes, Max Hanley, and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Port Reports -  November 16

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day's news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known). Reporters needed for Lake Michigan ports, St. Marys River, Saginaw River and ports such as Johnstown, ON. If you would like to see your port represented, please consider becoming a news page volunteer and send us your information.

Two Harbors-Silver Bay, MN – Gary A. Putney
Roger Blough departed Two Harbors on Nov. 15th at 01:29 from South of #2. I believe she was waiting on weather. She is headed for Gary. Arriving Two Harbors on Nov. 15th at 06:25 for South of #2 was the Cason J. Callaway after unloading stone in the Twin Ports. Harbor Lookout had been showing her loading at BNSF, but there was a backlog of boats there. She departed Two Harbors on the 15th at 14:27 for Nanticoke. Due Two Harbors on Nov. 16th is the Indiana Harbor. She had been anchored in Whitefish waiting on weather. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay saw the arrival of the John J. Boland at 10:49 after she had been anchored off Duluth waiting on weather. As of 19:00 on the 15th she was still at the loading dock. There is no scheduled traffic for Silver Bay on Nov. 16th.

Thunder Bay, ON
Wednesday; 23:01 Federal Niagara departed for Sorel. Thursday; 15:59 Federal Champlain departed for Montreal. Friday; 15:24 Algoma discovery departed and is down bound on Lake Superior.

Northern Lake Huron ports
Meldrum Bay: Thursday; 16:35 Algoma Innovator arrived to load. Friday; 15:42 John G Munson arrived and went to anchor.

Drummond Island: Friday; 8:47 Michipicoten arrived to load.

Port Dolomite: Thursday; 11:11 Algoma Compass departed and is down bound on Lake Huron. Friday; 9:31 Wilfred Sykes arrived to load.

Stoneport: Thursday; 21:11 Olive L Moore arrived to load.

Calcite: Friday; 12:32 Philip R Clarke departed for Burns Harbor.12:33 Arthur M Anderson weighed anchor and proceeded to the dock to load.

Alpena: Friday; 7:55 GL Ostrander arrived to load cement products.

Port Inland: Thursday; 9:21 Kaye E Barker arrived to load limestone and departed Friday at 11:59 for Grand Haven.

Goderich, ON – Bruce Douglas
Algoma Niagara arrived Thursday 9:20 pm loaded salt and cleared 5:10 pm Friday downbound for Johnstown, ON.

Detroit-Rouge River – Raymond H
Friday Arrivals: Hon. James L Oberstar arrived at AK Steel to unload ore. Damia Desgagnes arrived at the Waterfront Petroleum Terminal. Florence Spirit arrived at Zug Island to load coke.

Cleveland, OH – Bill Kloss
Dorothy Ann/Pathfinder is running a second shuttle from the Bulk Terminal for ArcelorMittal Steel. Petite Forte is at St. Marys Cement.

Welland Canal and vicinity vessel passages – Friday November 15, 2019 - Barry Andersen

Nanticoke - arrival - Nov 14 - Sloman Hermes (Mlt) at 0149 - Nov 15 - Edwin H Gott at 1351 from the anchorage, Algoma Transport at 1459 and Dara Desgagnes at 1625 - departed - Nov 15 -

Long Point Bay anchorage - Nov 15 - tug Wilf Seymour & Alouette Spirit at 1110, departed - Nov 15 - Dara Desgagnes at 1531 back into the dock and Edwin H Gott at 1320 approx back into the dock

Port Colborne anchorage - Nov 15 - Rt Hon Paul J Martin at 0400 - departed Nov 15 at 1648 for the canal

Welland Canal upbound - Nov 14 - light tug Wyatt M at 1029 stopped at Heddle DD fitout berth, Tim S. Dool at 1404, Jana Desgagnes at 1535, Algoma Transport at 1730, Algoma Buffalo at 1858 - Nov 15 - Industrial Strength (Lbr) at 0614, Kitikmeot W at 1252 and Baie Comeau at 1807

Welland Canal downbound - Nov 14 - Algoma Harvester at 2215 - Nov 15 - Rt Hon Paul J Martin at 1724 stopping wharf 16, CSL Laurentien at 1000 approx. John D Leitch at 1128, Algoma Hansa at 1216, Rt Hon Paul J Martin at at 1724 and Ojibway eta 2140 - Nov 16 - Evans Spirit eta at 0015

Welland Canal docks - departed - Nov 15 - Atlantic Huron at 1801 westbound from wharf 16 and Robert S Pierson from wharf 12 west bound

Port Weller anchorage - Nov 14 - Maria Desgagnes at 0902 - Nov 15 - Federal Montreal at 0744 from Hamilton - maiden trip into the Lakes and Adfines Star (Mlt) (ex Osttank Sweden-11) at 1501 from Mississauga - Nov 14 - departed Maria Desgagnes at 2056 eastbound

Hamilton - arrivals - Nov 15 - Frontenac at 0943 - anchored - Nov 12 - Ocean Castle (Mlt) (ex Federal Mattawa-16) at 2315 - Nov 15 - Exeborg (Nld) at 1905 from the dock - docked - Nov 9 - Narie (Bhs) at 1207 - Nov 15 - Isa (Cyp) at 1045 from the anchorage - departed - Nov 15 - Federal Montreal (Mhl) at 1941 on maiden voyage and Rosaire A Desgagnes at 2011 eastbound

Bronte - anchored - docked - Nov 14 - Sarah Desgagnes 0935 - departed Nov 15 - 2042 eastbound

Mississauga - docked - Nov 10 - Adfines Star (Mlt) (ex Osttank Sweden-11) at 1401 - departed - Nov 15 at 1302 for Port Weller anchorage

Toronto - arrival - Nov 15 - NACC Argonaut at 2009 - docked - Nov 14 - McKeil Spirit at 1711

 

GLMI annual Marine Mart Saturday in St. Clair Shores

11/16 - The 39th Annual Marine Mart, sponsored by the Great Lakes Maritime Institute, will be held on Saturday, November 16, from 10:00 am - 2:00 p.m. The location is VFW 1146 Bruce Post 28404 Jefferson, St. Clair Shores, MI. (between 11 and 12 Mile)on Lake St. Clair. Admission is $7.00 (early bird admission 9:30-10.00 $10.00). Children under the age of 12 are free. Items include ship models, photos, artifacts, ship china, artwork, postcards, books and more. For more info: contact mcgrawka@sbcglobal.net

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  November 16

On 16 November 1870, BADGER STATE (3-mast wooden bark, 150 foot, 302 tons, built in 1853, at Milwaukee, Wisconsin) stranded and wrecked at Sleeping Bear Dune on Lake Michigan during a storm.

The tug portion of the PRESQUE ISLE (Hull#322) built by Halter Marine Services, New Orleans, Louisiana, was up bound in the Welland Canal on November 16,1973, en route to Erie, Pennsylvania, to join with the barge.

FRED R. WHITE JR (Hull#722) was launched in 1978, at Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin.

On 16 Nov 1909, the JAMES S. DUNHAM (steel propeller bulk freighter, 420 foot, 4,795 gross tons, built in 1906, at W. Bay City, Michigan) encountered heavy seas and began hitting bottom where charts indicated 35 feet of water, even though she was in ballast and only drawing 17 feet of water. Rather than risk tearing the bottom out of her, the captain decided to beach her at Marble Point, just east of the Bad River outlet. After the heavy snow showers cleared, a message in a bottle was floated ashore to an observer.

The steel bulk freighters SIR JAMES DUNN and GEORGIAN BAY in tow of the Panamanian tug MC THUNDER arrived at Aliaga, Turkey for scrapping on 16 Nov 1989, 129 days after departing Thunder Bay.

On 16 November 1887, PACIFIC (wooden propeller freighter, 187 foot, 766 gross tons, built in 1864, at Cleveland, Ohio) was loaded with lumber bound from Deer Park, Michigan, for Michigan City, Indiana. After leaving the dock, she grounded on a shoal due to low water levels. The nearby Lifesaving Service took her crew off and then returned for the captain's dog. She was broken up by a gale on 19 November.

In 1892, the ANN ARBOR NO 1 arrived at Frankfort, Michigan on her maiden trip.

November 16, 1990 - MWT ceased operations, ending more than a century of carferry service. The last run was made by the BADGER, with Capt. Bruce Masse in command.

In 1981, Interlake's JOHN SHERWIN entered lay-up in Superior, Wisconsin and has not seen service since.

On 16 November 1869, ADELL (2-mast wooden schooner, 48 foot, 25 gross tons, built in 1860, at Milwaukee, Wisconsin) was driven ashore during a storm about a half mile below Bay View Pier near Milwaukee. Her skipper had every penny he owned sunk into that vessel. He was able to salvage her rigging and spars and left them on the beach overnight. The next day he returned and found that all had been stolen during the night.

On 16 Nov 1883, MANISTEE (wooden side-wheeler, 184 foot, 677 tons, built in 1867, at Cleveland, Ohio) broke up in a gale west of the Keweenaw Peninsula off of Eagle Harbor, Michigan. This is one of Lake Superior's worst disasters. Estimates of the number who died range from 23 to 37.

1901: The wooden freighter ELFIN-MERE was damaged by fire at Green Bay after a lamp exploded in the engineroom. The crew got away safely although an engineer was burned. The vessel was rebuilt the following year and returned to service in 1903 as b) CHARLES B. PACKARD.

1908: PASCAL P. PRATT was carrying anthracite coal from Buffalo to Milwaukee when it caught fire in the engineroom off Long Point, Lake Erie. The blaze spread quickly and the wooden vessel was beached. All of the crew got away safely. The hull burned to the waterline and the remains sank.

1923: GLENSTRIVEN, loaded with 160,000 bushels of oats, was wrecked at Cove Island, Georgian Bay in wind and fog. The vessel was enroute to Midland and was salvaged December 5 by the Reid Wrecking Co. The damage was too severe to repair and the hull was scrapped at Collingwood in 1924.

1927: JOLLY INEZ stranded at Saddlebag Island in the False Detour Channel and was abandoned.

1964: THOMAS F. COLE and INVEREWE collided in heavy fog off the southern end of Pipe Island in the St. Marys River. Both ships were repaired but the latter was later lost as d) THEOKEETOR off Mexico following another collision on June 20, 1973.

1965: The LAWRENCECLIFFE HALL sank in the St. Lawrence after an early morning collision with the SUNEK off Ile d'Orleans. The former, a laker in the Halco fleet, rolled on its side but all on board were saved. The ship was refloated in March 1966, repaired and returned to service. It later sailed as DAVID K. GARDINER and CANADIAN VENTURE before scrapping at Alang, India, in 2005. SUNEK received bow damage but this was repaired and this ship was scrapped at Barcelona, Spain, as b) NOTOS in 1979.

1967: CALIFORNIA SUN, a Liberty ship, made one trip through the Seaway in 1966. It suffered an engineroom explosion off Nicobar Island on the Indian Ocean and was gutted. The abandoned ship was taken in tow by JALARAJAN, a familiar Seaway salty, and delivered to the Seychelles.

1978: MONT ST. MARTIN was battered by a storm on Lake Erie and escorted to Southeast Shoal area by the STEELTON.

1978: NYX visited the Great Lakes in 1958 and returned through the Seaway in 1959. It sustained severe fire damage at Sidon, Lebanon, as c) DOMINION TRADER. It was subsequently blown aground by strong winds November 30-December 1 and broke in two.

1979: ALDORA dragged anchor while off Port Weller and was blown aground, only to be freed the same day. This ship was scrapped at Vado, Italy, in 1985-1986.

1979: SARONIC SEA was also anchored off Port Weller when it dragged anchor and stranded at the foot of Geneva Street in St. Catharines. The hull was not refloated until December 6. The ship had first visited the Great Lakes as RAVNANGER in 1964 and was later a victim of the war between Iran and Iraq, being shelled with mortar fire at Basrah on September 25, 1980.

1986: CARINA, an SD-14, first came through the Seaway in 1969. It was abandoned by the crew as d) HYMETUS when the hull cracked in heavy weather 180 miles SSE of Hong Kong while enroute to Shanghai, with steel. The ship sank the next day in the South China Sea.

2009: CSL ASSINIBOINE went aground near Cardinal. It had to be lightered and was released on November 21.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley, Steve Haverty and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Lake Michigan shipwreck could be world’s ‘most intact wooden schooner’ ever found

11/15 - Lake Michigan – A shipwreck found almost by accident, sitting 300 feet deep in northern Lake Michigan, is being described as one of the “most intact wooden schooners” in the world.

The discovery of the cargo-hauling W.C. Kimball, lost in an 1891 gale with four people aboard, was announced this week with details, photos and videos being shared on social media. Shipwreck hunter and author Ross Richardson of Lake Ann made the initial find. This spring, he and diver Steven Wimer of Milwaukee joined a group of other wreck enthusiasts to document its position.

“The W.C. Kimball is a true representation of Great Lakes schooners,” Richardson says on the video. “She was built on Lake Michigan and spent her entire life on Lake Michigan.”

Despite its nearly pristine condition, there were no identifying marks on the schooner. Figuring out which shipwreck they’d discovered took a lot of maritime sleuthing. It meant poring over old records of lost ships, and trying to narrow it down by looking for clues that would tell them if their mystery ship had been built before the Civil War, - or afterward.

But the initial find itself was just a momentary reading on his boat’s sonar screen more than a year ago. Richardson was crossing northern Lake Michigan in September 2018, headed to South Manitou Island for a day of wreck-hunting, when he noticed a “small blip” on his sonar screen. It showed something that was resting in about 300 feet of water and rising 90 feet off the lake’s bottom.

Read more at this link: https://www.mlive.com/news/2019/11/lake-michigan-shipwreck-could-be-worlds-most-intact-wooden-schooner-ever-found.html

 

Port Reports -  November 15

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day's news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known). Reporters needed for Lake Michigan ports, St. Marys River, Saginaw River and ports such as Johnstown, ON. If you would like to see your port represented, please consider becoming a news page volunteer and send us your information.

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
After she finished unloading her limestone cargo at C. Reiss, John J. Boland departed Duluth at 04:17 Thursday morning and anchored outside the harbor for unknown reasons, as she was next scheduled to load in Silver Bay. Cason J. Callaway was inbound at 15:36 to unload limestone at Hallett #5, and Iryda arrived from anchor at 16:51 to load wheat at CHS 1. Also in port were Herbert C. Jackson, in drydock at Fraser Shipyards; Federal Kushiro, loading wheat at Riverland Ag; and Ebroborg, taking on beet pulp pellets at Gavilon. Ebroborg was expected to depart at some point Thursday evening, while the Boland remained anchored as of 19:00. In Superior, CSL Assiniboine loaded ore at BN throughout the day Thursday, and had a departure time of 23:00 posted. Algoma Guardian was anchored outside the harbor waiting for her turn at the dock.

Two Harbors-Silver Bay, MN – Gary A. Putney
Presque Isle departed Two Harbors on Nov. 13th at 20:12. When she departed she had a Indy 7H destination. On Nov. 14th her destination is now Gary Roger Blough arrived Two Harbors for South of #2 on Nov. 13th at 23:04. As of 19:15 on Nov. 14th she is still at the loading dock. I'm assuming she's waiting on weather. The CSL Tadoussac is due Two Harbors. Early to mid afternoon on Nov. 14th she went to anchor in Keweenaw Bay. As of 19:15 on the 14th she remains at anchor. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay had no traffic on Nov. 14th. After the John J. Boland completed her discharge at C. Reiss went to anchor off Duluth where she remains at 19:15 on the 14th. She is tentatively due Silver Bay. The Herbert C. Jackson remains at Fraser. She is also due Silver Bay to load.

Green Bay, WI
At 5:30pm the tug Michigan / barge Great Lakes arrived from Toledo with petroleum products for the U.S. Oil / Venture Terminal.

Detroit-Rouge River – Raymond H
Thursday Arrivals: Sarah Andrie and her tank barge shifted to the Marathon Asphalt Terminal to load. Sam Laud arrived at Zug Island to unload stone.

Cleveland, OH – Bill Kloss
American Courage arrived at 23:16 Thursdaywith stone from Marblehead for LaFarge. She departed at 13:59. Dorothy Ann/Pathfinder arrived at 12:06 to load for a shuttle at the Bulk Terminal. Sam Laud departed at 08:28

Welland Canal and vicinity vessel passages – Thursday November 14, 2019 ... Barry Andersen

Nanticoke - arrival - Nov 14 - Sloman Hermes (MLt) at 0149 - departed - Nov 14 - Algocanada at 0143 and tug Sharon M I & barge at 1224 - both westbound

Long Point Bay anchorage - departed - Nov 14 - Sloman Hermes (Mlt) at 0145 for the dock and tug Sharon M I & barge at 1215 for the dock

Welland Canal upbound - Nov 13 - Everlast & Norman McLeod at 1134, Mamry (Bhs) at 1255, Resko (Bhs) at 1410, Robert S Pierson at 2110 and Kaministiqua at 2334 - Nov 14 - Dara Desgagnes at 0813, Florence Spirit at 0846,

Welland Canal downbound - Nov 13 - NACC Argonaut at 1642, Algoma Buffalo at 1706 and Maria Desgagnes at 2004 - Nov 14 - Algonorth at 0750, light tug Wyatt M at 1029 stopped at Heddle DD fitout berth, light tug Evans Mckeil at 1042, Baie Comeau at 1501 and Algoma Harvester eta 2140

Welland Canal docks - docked - Nov 12 - Atlantic Huron arrived wharf 16 at 1349 - Nov 14 - Robert S Pierson arrived wharf 12 at 0725 approx. - departed - Nov 13 - Miedwie (Bhs) from wharf 2 at 1335 eastbound

Port Weller anchorage - Nov 14 - Maria Desgagnes at 0902 - departed at 2030 eastbound

Hamilton arrivals - none - anchored - Nov 11 - Isa (Cyp) at 0502 - Nov 12 - Ocean Castle (Mlt) (ex Federal Mattawa-16) at 2315 - docked - Nov 9 - Narie (Bhs) at 1207 and Exeborg (Nld) at 1925 - Nov 10 - Rosaire A Desgagnes at 1330 and Federal Montreal (Mhl) at 1941 on maiden voyage - departed - Nov 14 - Algoma Transport at 0204, Florence Spirit at 0649 - both for the canal and Chembulk Yokohama (Mhl) for Houston, TX

Bronte - anchored - departed - Nov 14 - Sarah Desgagnes 0934 for the dock - arrival at 0935 from the anchorage - departed - Nov 14 Paul A Desgagnes at 0922 eastbound

Mississauga - docked - Nov 10 - Adfines Star (Mlt) (ex Osstank Sweden-11) at 1401

Toronto - arrivals - Nov 14 - Algoma Buffalo at 0808 and McKeil Spirit at 1711 - departed - Algoma Buffalo at 1640 for the canal

 

Vessel shortage forces Canada to scrap key climate change research mission

11/15 - - Fisheries and Oceans Canada was forced this fall to cancel a core oceanographic survey to monitor climate change because it could not find a ship capable of handling ocean conditions in the North Atlantic. The scrapped mission is another example of fallout from Canada's aging fleet.

The 56-year-old Canadian coast guard science ship Hudson normally carries out offshore Atlantic Zone Monitoring Program (AZMP) surveys, but Hudson was unavailable this year because a refit aimed at extending the life of the vessel is taking longer than expected.

For 2019, Fisheries and Oceans Canada hired a private research vessel, Coriolis II, but the Rimouski, Que.-based vessel was deemed unable to carry out the Maritimes region survey and a replacement could not be found.

"Although the private vessel is a highly capable marine research platform, the conduct of the AZMP Maritimes region monitoring program in the spring of 2019 led us to conclude that the vessel might not be able to fulfil all fall monitoring program needs," Robin Jahn, spokesperson for Fisheries and Oceans Canada, said in an email to CBC News.

"The department was unsuccessful in its search for another available research vessel to fulfil the fall 2019 program when weather and ocean conditions are more variable." What the survey does

Since the 1990s, the Atlantic Zone Monitoring Program has sent scientists to sea twice a year to gather biological, chemical and physical data off Canada's East Coast.

The offshore cruises measure everything from temperatures throughout the water column to blooms of microscopic organisms at the base of the food chain.

This is the first time the Maritimes fall survey has been cancelled. With decades of survey data, the AZMP provides a baseline to measure changing ocean conditions. For example, a survey in 2012 documented record-high ocean temperatures in the Maritimes.

"One of the issues is to determine whether or not it's a long-term trend or just year-to-year variability," said Dave Hebert, a Fisheries and Oceans Canada research scientist.

"There could be, like, a decade of really warm weather and so the question is, is that continuing on or is it changing back to sort of what we call normal conditions? And so these programs help us do that."

As a physical oceanographer, Hebert said he's not in "as dire straits" as colleagues who monitor life forms in the ocean.

Remotely operated platforms like ocean gliders will provide some data this fall, but plankton sampling for half the year will be missed, hampering year-to-year analysis and making it more difficult to detect if anything unusual is going on.

"When there is a gap in long-term monitoring data, the department takes account of the increased scientific uncertainty when making related management decisions," said Jahn.

Hebert has been taking the cancellation in stride, and said they have to do the best they can with what's available. "We're just in a holding pattern, waiting to get a decision made about what the next plans are."

The Hudson is scheduled to be back in service by April 2020 and available for the spring Maritimes region survey. Fisheries and Oceans Canada is developing contingency plans in case the Hudson isn't available.

"These contingency plans include investigating options within the Canadian Coast Guard fleet, as well as other research vessel service providers," said Jahn. Other vessel woes

While this is the first time a fall Atlantic Zone Monitoring Program survey was scrapped, other Fisheries and Oceans Canada science missions have been impacted by fleet unreliability.

CBC

 

Fincantieri revamps Wisconsin yard to meet USN guided-missile frigate capacity needs

11/15 - To ensure its Wisconsin shipyard can meet the US Navy (USN) requirement to build two guided-missile frigates (FFG(X)) per year to compete for the contract to build the warship, Fincantieri Marinette Marine (FMM) has embarked on a programme to overhaul the yard and revamp some of its shipbuilding processes, FMM president Richard Hunt told Jane's .

The USN released the request for proposal (RFP) on 20 June for the proposed new FFG(X). The service plans to procure the first of 20 frigates in the coming fiscal year and then to start ship production to start in Fiscal Year (FY) 2022.

Only a few months ago, Hunt said, the FMM was uncertain if it could commit to producing the FFG(X) at the required two-per-year-production number, especially with the work on Littoral Combat Ships (LCSs) and the Multi-Mission Surface Combatants (MMSCs) being built for Saudi Arabia.

The FMM yard is the shipbuilding unit for the Lockheed Martin Freedom-variant LCS and MMSCs. Initially, Lockheed Martin had been competing for the FFG(X) lead contract, but the company opted against pursuing the frigate detail design and construction contract as a prime contractor, to instead focus on winning naval competitions for ship combat systems, anti-submarine warfare (ASW) processing, and advanced electronic warfare (EW) technology programmes.

The main remaining competitors, besides FMM, include Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII), Austal USA, and General Dynamics Bath Iron Works (BIW). Having submitted proposals, the companies have been in technical talks and related discussions with the USN.

In talking with USN leadership, Hunt acknowledged, he would say, "We are challenged to meet the two-per-year requirement. It's going to take a lot of effort.

Janes

 

GLMI annual Marine Mart Saturday in St. Clair Shores

11/15 - The 39th Annual Marine Mart, sponsored by the Great Lakes Maritime Institute, will be held on Saturday, November 16, from 10:00 am - 2:00 p.m. The location is VFW 1146 Bruce Post 28404 Jefferson, St. Clair Shores, MI. (between 11 and 12 Mile)on Lake St. Clair. Admission is $7.00 (early bird admission 9:30-10.00 $10.00). Children under the age of 12 are free. Items include ship models, photos, artifacts, ship china, artwork, postcards, books and more. For more info: contact mcgrawka@sbcglobal.net

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  November 15

On 16 November 1870, BADGER STATE (3-mast wooden bark, 150 foot, 302 tons, built in 1853, at Milwaukee, Wisconsin) stranded and wrecked at Sleeping Bear Dune on Lake Michigan during a storm.

The tug portion of the PRESQUE ISLE (Hull#322) built by Halter Marine Services, New Orleans, Louisiana, was up bound in the Welland Canal on November 16,1973, en route to Erie, Pennsylvania, to join with the barge.

FRED R. WHITE JR (Hull#722) was launched in 1978, at Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin.

On 16 Nov 1909, the JAMES S. DUNHAM (steel propeller bulk freighter, 420 foot, 4,795 gross tons, built in 1906, at W. Bay City, Michigan) encountered heavy seas and began hitting bottom where charts indicated 35 feet of water, even though she was in ballast and only drawing 17 feet of water. Rather than risk tearing the bottom out of her, the captain decided to beach her at Marble Point, just east of the Bad River outlet. After the heavy snow showers cleared, a message in a bottle was floated ashore to an observer.

The steel bulk freighters SIR JAMES DUNN and GEORGIAN BAY in tow of the Panamanian tug MC THUNDER arrived at Aliaga, Turkey for scrapping on 16 Nov 1989, 129 days after departing Thunder Bay.

On 16 November 1887, PACIFIC (wooden propeller freighter, 187 foot, 766 gross tons, built in 1864, at Cleveland, Ohio) was loaded with lumber bound from Deer Park, Michigan, for Michigan City, Indiana. After leaving the dock, she grounded on a shoal due to low water levels. The nearby Lifesaving Service took her crew off and then returned for the captain's dog. She was broken up by a gale on 19 November.

In 1892, the ANN ARBOR NO 1 arrived at Frankfort, Michigan on her maiden trip.

November 16, 1990 - MWT ceased operations, ending more than a century of carferry service. The last run was made by the BADGER, with Capt. Bruce Masse in command.

In 1981, Interlake's JOHN SHERWIN entered lay-up in Superior, Wisconsin and has not seen service since.

On 16 November 1869, ADELL (2-mast wooden schooner, 48 foot, 25 gross tons, built in 1860, at Milwaukee, Wisconsin) was driven ashore during a storm about a half mile below Bay View Pier near Milwaukee. Her skipper had every penny he owned sunk into that vessel. He was able to salvage her rigging and spars and left them on the beach overnight. The next day he returned and found that all had been stolen during the night.

On 16 Nov 1883, MANISTEE (wooden side-wheeler, 184 foot, 677 tons, built in 1867, at Cleveland, Ohio) broke up in a gale west of the Keweenaw Peninsula off of Eagle Harbor, Michigan. This is one of Lake Superior's worst disasters. Estimates of the number who died range from 23 to 37.

1901: The wooden freighter ELFIN-MERE was damaged by fire at Green Bay after a lamp exploded in the engineroom. The crew got away safely although an engineer was burned. The vessel was rebuilt the following year and returned to service in 1903 as b) CHARLES B. PACKARD.

1908: PASCAL P. PRATT was carrying anthracite coal from Buffalo to Milwaukee when it caught fire in the engineroom off Long Point, Lake Erie. The blaze spread quickly and the wooden vessel was beached. All of the crew got away safely. The hull burned to the waterline and the remains sank.

1923: GLENSTRIVEN, loaded with 160,000 bushels of oats, was wrecked at Cove Island, Georgian Bay in wind and fog. The vessel was enroute to Midland and was salvaged December 5 by the Reid Wrecking Co. The damage was too severe to repair and the hull was scrapped at Collingwood in 1924.

1927: JOLLY INEZ stranded at Saddlebag Island in the False Detour Channel and was abandoned.

1964: THOMAS F. COLE and INVEREWE collided in heavy fog off the southern end of Pipe Island in the St. Marys River. Both ships were repaired but the latter was later lost as d) THEOKEETOR off Mexico following another collision on June 20, 1973.

1965: The LAWRENCECLIFFE HALL sank in the St. Lawrence after an early morning collision with the SUNEK off Ile d'Orleans. The former, a laker in the Halco fleet, rolled on its side but all on board were saved. The ship was refloated in March 1966, repaired and returned to service. It later sailed as DAVID K. GARDINER and CANADIAN VENTURE before scrapping at Alang, India, in 2005. SUNEK received bow damage but this was repaired and this ship was scrapped at Barcelona, Spain, as b) NOTOS in 1979.

1967: CALIFORNIA SUN, a Liberty ship, made one trip through the Seaway in 1966. It suffered an engineroom explosion off Nicobar Island on the Indian Ocean and was gutted. The abandoned ship was taken in tow by JALARAJAN, a familiar Seaway salty, and delivered to the Seychelles.

1978: MONT ST. MARTIN was battered by a storm on Lake Erie and escorted to Southeast Shoal area by the STEELTON.

1978: NYX visited the Great Lakes in 1958 and returned through the Seaway in 1959. It sustained severe fire damage at Sidon, Lebanon, as c) DOMINION TRADER. It was subsequently blown aground by strong winds November 30-December 1 and broke in two.

1979: ALDORA dragged anchor while off Port Weller and was blown aground, only to be freed the same day. This ship was scrapped at Vado, Italy, in 1985-1986.

1979: SARONIC SEA was also anchored off Port Weller when it dragged anchor and stranded at the foot of Geneva Street in St. Catharines. The hull was not refloated until December 6. The ship had first visited the Great Lakes as RAVNANGER in 1964 and was later a victim of the war between Iran and Iraq, being shelled with mortar fire at Basrah on September 25, 1980.

1986: CARINA, an SD-14, first came through the Seaway in 1969. It was abandoned by the crew as d) HYMETUS when the hull cracked in heavy weather 180 miles SSE of Hong Kong while enroute to Shanghai, with steel. The ship sank the next day in the South China Sea.

2009: CSL ASSINIBOINE went aground near Cardinal. It had to be lightered and was released on November 21.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley, Steve Haverty and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

US steel mill capacity utilization dips to 80.5%

11/14 - US raw steel capacity utilization declined to 80.5% last week from 81.6% the previous week. Production fell 1.4% to 1.862 million st during the week that ended Saturday, down from 1.888 million st produced the previous week, according to data released Monday by the American Iron and Steel Institute.

Last week’s production was down 2.2% compared with the same week a year ago, when capability utilization was at 81.2% and production totaled 1.903 million st.

The AISI calculated adjusted year-to-date production at 83.5 million st, with a capability utilization rate of 80.3%. This is up 2.4% from the same period last year, when the utilization rate was 78.1% on 81.5 million st of output.

Last week’s production totaled 209,000 st in the Northeast; 670,000 st in the Great Lakes region; 178,000 st in the Midwest; 729,000 st in the Southern district and 76,000 st in the Western region.

The weekly raw steel production volume AISI provides is estimated. The figures are compiled from weekly production data provided by 50% of domestic producers combined with monthly production data for the remainder.

Hellenic Shipping News Worldwide

 

Port Reports -  November 14

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day's news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known). Reporters needed for Lake Michigan ports, St. Marys River, Saginaw River and ports such as Johnstown, ON. If you would like to see your port represented, please consider becoming a news page volunteer and send us your information.

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
Mesabi Miner departed Duluth at 03:55 Wednesday morning with a cargo of iron ore pellets for Indiana Harbor. Herbert C. Jackson was inbound at 08:56 and was placed in drydock at Fraser Shipyards for thruster repairs. CSL Assiniboine left port at 11:01 light after unloading salt at Hallett #8, and put her anchor down outside the Superior entry to wait for her turn to load at Burlington Northern. John J. Boland was inbound Duluth at 12:48 with limestone for to the C. Reiss dock in West Duluth. She should depart early Thursday morning to load in Silver Bay. Ebroborg continued loading beet pulp pellets at Gavilon on Wednesday and was due to depart at 21:00. Federal Kushiro was also in port taking on wheat at the Riverland elevator after shifting there early Wednesday from the CRH dock, where she had unloaded powdered cement. Iryda remained on the hook outside the harbor. In Superior, Stewart J. Cort loaded at BN during the day Wednesday, and had been expected to depart at 18:00 but was still loading as of 20:00. CSL Assiniboine was next in line for the dock, and Algoma Guardian is expected mid-morning Thursday.

Two Harbors-Silver Bay, MN – Gary A. Putney Presque Isle arrived Two Harbors on Nov. 12th at 20:42 for South of #2. As of 19:30 on Nov. 13th she was still at the loading dock. Due Two Harbors late on the 13th is the Roger Blough. Due Two Harbors late in the day on Nov. 14th is the CSL Tadoussac. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay had no traffic on Nov. 13th. Due Silver Bay on Nov. 14th is the John J. Boland. She unloaded eastern coal at the South dock at Graymont in Superior and will be finishing up by unloading stone at the North dock. The Herbert C. Jackson is currently at Fraser for repairs. After repairs are complete she will load in Silver Bay. When the Joyce L. VanEnevort/Great Lakes Trader departed Silver Bay on the 9th her AIS wasn't updated. She went to Toledo.

Thunder Bay, ON
Wednesday; 19:27 The saltie Osogovo departed for Gibraltar. 19:55 Algoma Discovery weighed anchor and proceeded to the Superior Elevator to load wheat.

Northern Lake Huron ports
Owen Sound: Tuesday; 21:41 Prentiss Brown departed for Charlevoix.

Meldrum Bay: Tuesday; 14:21 Cuyahoga arrived to load dolomite and departed Wednesday at 2:14 down bound on Lake Huron.

Bruce Mines; Tuesday; Saginaw arrived to load trap rock and departed Wednesday at 9:35 for Windsor.

Drummond Island: Wednesday; 5:21 Great Republic departed for Buffington. 5:49 Manitowoc weighed anchor and proceeded to the loading dock. 18:17 Manitowoc departed for Grand Haven.

Port Dolomite: Tuesday; 20:20 Algoma Compass arrived to load.

Calcite: Wednesday; 17:27 American Mariner departed for Ashtabula.

Alpena: Tuesday; 21:42 Undaunted arrived to unload at the cement plant and departed Wednesday at 7:36 for Sault Ste Marie.

Goderich, ON – Bruce Douglas Mississagi arrived 8.20 am Wednesday, loaded salt, cleared 6.17 pm downbound for Windsor.

Detroit-Rouge River – Raymond H
Wednesday Arrivals: Calusa Coast and Delaware arrived at the Marathon Asphalt Terminal to load. Sarah Andrie and tank barge arrived at the Buckeye Terminal to load/unload petroleum products. John G Munson arrived at the Revere Dock to unload stone.

Cleveland, OH – Bill Kloss
NACC Argonaut departed at 00:34 Wednesday empty for Bath. Algoma Buffalo departed at 02:38 for Toronto with salt. Indiana Harbor arrived with 65,000 tons of ore for the Bulk Terminal. She departed at 11:54 for Two Harbors. Sam Laud arrived empty from Lorain at 02:06 and waited at Lehigh Cement for a berth at the Bulk Terminal to load a shuttle.

Welland Canal and vicinity vessel passages – Wednesday November 13 – Barry Andersen

Nanticoke - arrival - Nov 13 - Algoterra - docked - Nov 12 - Algocanada at 1244, Maria Desgagnes at 1342, Frontenac at 1503 - departed - Nov 13 - Frontenac at 0724, Maria Desgagnes at 1219 eastboound

Long Point Bay anchorage - Nov 12 - Sloman Hermes (Mlt) at 0453 and tug Sharon M I & barge at 1739 - Nov 13 - departed - Petite Forte & St Marys Cement at 1007 westbound

Port Colborne anchorage - anchored - Nov 13 - Maria Desgagnes at 1535 - departed at 1927 for the canal

Welland Canal upbound - Nov 11 - Atlantic Huron at 1945 stopped wharf 16 - Nov 12 - Mandarin (Cyp) at 1813, Algoma Sault at 1910 and Algoterra at 2320 - Nov 13 - tug Leo A McArthur & John J Carrick at 0028, Irma (Cyp) at 0153, Spruceglen at 0641, Algoma Spirit at 0941, tug Everlast & Norman McLeod at 1134, Mamry (Bhs) at 1255, Resko (Bhs) at 1410 and Robert S Pierson eta 2215

Welland Canal downbound Nov 12 - Florence Spirit at 1106, Algoma Transport at 1729 and San (Lbr)at 2131 - Nov 13 - Algoma Strongfield at 1007, Algosea at 1024, Frontenac at 1244, NACC Argonaut at 1642, Algoma Buffalo at 1706 and Maria Desgagnes at 2004

Welland Canal docks - docked - Nov 12 - Atlantic Huron arrived wharf 16 at 1349 Port Weller anchorage - Nov 11 - Mamry (Bhs) at 1321, Resko (Bhs) at 1937 - departed - Nov 13 - Mamry (Bhs) at 1225 and Resko (Bhs) at 1320 - both for Thunder Bay Ocean Castle

Hamilton - arrivals - Nov 13 - Algoma Transport at 1047 - anchored - Nov 11 - Isa (Cyp) at 0502 - Nov 12 - Ocean Castle (Mlt) (ex Federal Mattawa-16) at 2315 - docked - Nov 9 - Narie (Bhs) at 1207 and Exeborg (Nld) at 1925 - Nov 10 - Rosaire A Desgagnes at 1330 and Federal Montreal (Mhl) at 1941 on maiden voyage - Nov 12 - Chembulk Yokohama (Mhl) at 2100 Florence Spirit at 2324 - departed - Nov 13 - Federal Sakura (Mhl) at 0157 for Hamburg and Algoma Spirit at 0755 for the canal

Bronte - arrival - Nov 13 - Paul A Desgagnes at 0253 - anchored - Nov 10 - Sarah Desgagnes off Bronte at 2321

Clarkson - arrival - Nov 13 - Robert S Pierson at 0116 - departed Nov 13 - at 1814 for the canal

Mississauga - docked - Nov 10 - Adfines Star (Mlt) (ex Osstank Sweden-11) at 1401

Oshawa - arrival - Nov 12 - NACC Quebec at 2215 - departed Nov 13 at 1940 eastbound

 

GLMI annual Marine Mart Saturday in St. Clair Shores

11/14 - The 39th Annual Marine Mart, sponsored by the Great Lakes Maritime Institute, will be held on Saturday, November 16, from 10:00 am - 2:00 p.m. The location is VFW 1146 Bruce Post 28404 Jefferson, St. Clair Shores, MI. (between 11 and 12 Mile) on Lake St. Clair. Admission is $7.00 (early bird admission 9:30-10.00 $10.00). Children under the age of 12 are free. Items include ship models, photos, artifacts, ship china, artwork, postcards, books and more. For more info: contact mcgrawka@sbcglobal.net

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  November 14

ALGOBAY (steel propeller bulk freighter, 719 foot, 22,466 gross tons, built at Collingwood, Ontario in 1978) departed Sept Iles, Quebec on 14 Nov 1978, with an iron ore pellet cargo for Sydney, Nova Scotia when she collided with the 90,000 ton Italian-flag ore carrier CIELO BIANCO. The Collingwood-built tug POINTE MARGUERITE, which was towing the big salty, was unfortunately crushed between the two vessels and sank, killing two crewmembers.

On November 14, 1934, the WILLIAM A. REISS grounded off Sheboygan and was declared a constructive total loss. Built as the a.) FRANK H. PEAVEY in 1901, renamed b.) WILLIAM A. REISS in 1916. She was scrapped at Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin in 1935.

Cracks across the ENDERS M. VOORHEES' spar deck were first noticed in a storm on Lake Superior November 14, 1942. Her fleetmate NORMAN B. REAM came to her assistance by releasing storm oil which helped calm the seas so the crew of the VOORHEES could run cables the length of her deck and winch them tight to arrest the cracking. She proceeded to the Soo escorted by the REAM and later sailed to the Great Lake Engineering Works for repairs.

The THOMAS WILSON (Hull#826) was launched November 14, 1942, at Lorain, Ohio, for the U.S. Maritime Commission.

The U.S. Coast Guard buoy tender MESQUITE (Hull#76) was launched November 14, 1942, at a cost of $894,000, by Marine Iron & Shipbuilding Co. at Duluth, Minnesota. MESQUITE ran aground off Keweenaw Point on December 4, 1989, and was declared a total loss. MESQUITE was scuttled off Keweenaw Point on July 14, 1990.

On November 14, 1952, the SPARROWS POINT, b.) BUCKEYE entered service for Bethlehem Steel Corp. Reduced to a barge at Erie, Pennsylvania, and renamed c.) LEWIS J KUBER in 2006.

On 14 November 1879, C G BREED (2 mast wooden schooner, 140 foot, 385 tons, built in 1862, at Milwaukee, Wisconsin) was carrying 24,000 bushels of wheat from Detroit to Buffalo when she capsized and sank in a sudden squall near Ashtabula, Ohio in Lake Erie. 5 lives were lost, but 3 were saved. The three survivors were rescued by three different vessels.

In 1940, following the Armistice Day Storm, The CITY OF FLINT 32 was freed by the tug JOHN F. CUSHING assisted by the PERE MARQUETTE 21.

In 1990, Glen Bowden (of MWT) announced that he would suspend cross-Lake Michigan ferry service indefinitely. On 14 November 1886, the steamer BELLE WILSON was crossing Lake Ontario with a load of 11,800 bushels of oats when a severe gale and snowstorm blew in. The vessel lost her rudder and the crew rigged sails, but these were blown away. Then they rigged a drag made of 600 feet of line and a log to help maneuver the vessel and they headed for Oswego, New York. This lasted for 12 hours, but the chain parted at 3:00 a.m. and the vessel was driven ashore at Ford's Shoals, 4 miles east of Oswego harbor. No lives were lost.

On 14 November 1892, the 2-mast, 95 foot wooden schooner MINNIE DAVIS was rammed on a dark night by the 2-mast, 117 foot wooden schooner HUNTER SAVIDGE near Amherstburg, Ontario. The DAVIS sank, but no lives were lost. The wreckage was removed in May 1893.

1922: The composite hulled freighter JOS. L. SIMPSON was upbound on Lake Ontario from Ogdensburg to Milwaukee when it stranded at Tibbett's Point. The repair bill was close to $12,000 but the vessel returned to service and last operated in 1957 as YANKCANUCK (i).

1933: The wheat laden D.E. CALLENDAR stranded in Lake Erie off Long Point and was a total loss. The hull was salvaged in 1934 and laid up at Toledo. It was taken to New Orleans during World War Two for reconstruction as a barge but the change was never registered and the hull was likely scrapped.

1933: The wooden tug FLORENCE sank off False Duck Island in a storm that brought snow, high winds and waves on Lake Ontario. All 7 on board were saved and taken aboard the barge PETER G. CAMPBELL.

1943: RIVERTON stranded at Lottie Wolf Shoal, Georgian Bay and declared a total loss. Later salvaged and repaired, it returned to service as MOHAWK DEER.

1960: ISLAND KING II was destroyed by a fire while laid up for the winter at Lachine, QC. The vessel had been built as DALHOUSIE CITY and operated across western Lake Ontario between Toronto and St. Catharines from 1911 until the end of the 1949 season before being sold and moving to Montreal.

1966: The Liberian freighter FREIDA went aground at Poe's Reef, Lake Huron, and had to be lightered by MAITLAND NO. 1. The ocean ship began Great Lakes terading as c) SEAWAY STAR in 1960 and returned as d) DEALMOUTH in 1962 and as e) FREIDA earlier in 1966.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley, Jody Aho and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Port Reports -  November 13

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day's news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known). Reporters needed for Lake Michigan ports, St. Marys River, Saginaw River and ports such as Johnstown, ON.

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
Ebroborg arrived Duluth from anchor at 12:38 Tuesday to load beet pulp pellets at Gavilon. In the harbor, she passed her outbound fleetmate Fivelborg, which departed at 13:56 from Gavilon carrying the same cargo. CSL Assiniboine came in at 15:15 with salt to unload at Hallett #8. Also in port were Mesabi Miner, taking on iron ore pellets at CN; Andean, loading wheat at Riverland Ag; Federal Kushiro, discharging cement at CRH; and Iryda, on the hook outside the harbor waiting to load wheat at CHS 1. Andean was tentatively expected to depart around 21:00 Tuesday night, while Mesabi Miner had no departure time listed even though she has been tied up at CN for more than 24 hours. At the Superior entry, Burns Harbor was outbound at 05:10 Tuesday with a load of iron ore pellets from Burlington Northern. Stewart J. Cort was expected at 23:00 to load.

Two Harbors-Silver Bay, MN – Gary A. Putney
Edgar B. Speer got underway off Duluth on Nov. 11th at approx. 19:15 and arrived Two Harbors on the 11th at 21:24. She departed from South of #2 on Nov. 12th at 15:00 for Conneaut. Due Two Harbors on Nov. 12th is the Presque Isle. As of 19:30 on the 12th she was just NE of Two Harbors. Due Two Harbors later in the day on Nov. 13th is the Roger Blough. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay saw the arrival on Nov. 11th of the Clyde S. VanEnkevort/Erie Trader at 23:32. She departed Silver Bay on Nov. 12th at 18:06 for Toledo. The Herbert C. Jackson is due the Twin Ports on Nov. 13th for Fraser Shipyards. This is according to Harbor Lookout. She will then load in Silver Bay.

Thunder Bay, ON
Monday; 22:44 CSL Laurentien departed for Baie Comeau. Tuesday; 3:11 Algoma Harvester departed for Trois Riviere. 7:37 The saltie Osogovo weighed anchor and proceeded to the Superior Elevator to load grain. 12:15 Federal Kumano arrived at the G3 elevator to load grain. 14:19 Ojibway departed for Sorel. 14:36 Federal Champlain weighed anchor and proceeded to the Richardson Main Terminal to load grain. 16:32 Federal Dart weighed anchor and proceeded to Viterra A to load grain. 18:19 Algoma Discovery arrived and went to anchor south of the Welcome Islands.

Green Bay, WI
Departures: Algoma Compass departed for Cedarville in the morning. Kaye E. Barker departed at 7:30 pm for Port Inland, MI.

Milwaukee, WI – Wisconsin Marine Historical Society
At Port Milwaukee Monday (11/11): Federal Baltic was still at the Federal Marine Terminals dock on the outer harbor. After delivering 141 coils and two plates of Canadian steel at the heavy lift dock, Anglian Lady and Ironmaster departed Monday evening. Algoma Innovator arrived 11:02 with salt. She dropped almost 8,000 tons in the salt domes and approximately 10,000 tons on the Compass Minerals pad.

Northern Lake Huron ports
Owen Sound: Tuesday; 13:53 Prentiss Brown arrived to unload cement.

Meldrum Bay: Tuesday; 14:21 Cuyahoga arrived to load dolomite.

Thessalon: Monday; 22:26 Michipicoten arrived to load stone and departed on Tuesday at 16:02.

Drummond Island: Tuesday; 2:17 Manitowoc arrived and went to anchor in the St Marys River. 10:11 Great Republic arrived to load lime stone. Calcite: Monday: 12:51 Arthur M Anderson departed for Buffington. 19:04 Dorothy Ann arrived to load and departed Monday at 2:59 for Cleveland. 3:19 Cason J Callaway arrived to load. 18:19 Olive L Moore departed for Bay City. 18:43 American Mariner arrived to load.

Alpena: Tuesday; 18:04 Samuel De Champlain departed for Milwaukee. 18:38 The cement carrier Alpena arrived to load.

Goderich, ON – Bruce Douglas
Saltie San cleared downbound 5:42 pm Monday for Montreal.

Detroit-Rouge River – Raymond H
Tuesday Arrivals: Indiana Harbor arrived at Zug Island to unload ore. Evans McKeil and barge arrived at Nicholson's Ecorse Terminal to load equipment for the DTE St. Clair Power Plant. Capt. Keith arrived at Nicholson's Ecorse Terminal to unload general cargo.

Cleveland, OH – Bill Kloss
No report submitted.

Welland Canal and vicinity vessel passages – Tuesday November 12, 2019 ... Barry Andersen

Nanticoke - arrivals - Algocanada at 1244, Frontenac at 1503 and tug Sharon M I & barge at 1739

Long Point Bay anchorage - Nov 12 - Sloman Hermes (Mlt) at 0453 and tug Petite Forte & St Marys Cement at 1659

Welland Canal upbound - Nov 11 - Sloman Hermes (Mlt) at 1347, Maria Desgagnes at 1845, Atlantic Huron at 1945 - Nov 12 - tug Wilf Seymour & Alouette Spirit at 0916, Mandarin (Cyp) at 1813, Algoma Sault at1813 delayed and Algoterra eta 2310

Welland Canal downbound - Nov 11 - CSL Welland at 1457, Iver Bright (Nld) at 2220 and Thunder Bay at 2238 - Cape (Lbr) (ex Heloise-15) at 0151, Algoma Enterprise at 0707, Florence Spirit at 1106, Algoma Transport at 1729 and San (Lbr) eta 2050

Welland Canal docks - Nov 11 - Frontenac departed 19-E at 2131 - arrived wharf 16 at 2200 - Nov 12 - departed wharf 16 at 0740 westbound

Port Weller anchorage - Nov 11 - Mamry (Bhs) at 1321, Resko (Bhs) at 1937

Anchored off Hamilton - Nov 11 - Algoma Spirit at 1700 off Hamilton

Hamilton - arrivals - Nov 12 - tug Leo A McArthur & John J Carrick at 0400, Algoma Spirit at 0540 and Chembulk Yokohama (Mhl) at 2100 - anchored - Nov 11 - Isa (Cyp) at 0502 in Burlington Bay - docked - Oct 31 - Federal Sakura (Mhl) at 1138 - Nov 9 - Narie (Bhs) at 1207 and Exeborg (Nld) at 1925 - Nov 10 - Ocean Castle (Mlt) (ex Federal Mattawa-16) at 1054, Rosaire A Desgagnes at 1446 and Federal Montreal (Mhl) at 1941 on maiden voyage - departed - Nov 12 - Algoma Sault at 1210 and tug Leo A McArthur & John J Carrick at 2110 eastbound

Bronte - Nov 10 - Sarah Desgagnes anchored off Bronte at 2321

Clarkson - arrival - Nov 11 - Robert S Pierson at 1144 - departed Nov 11 - at 2028 eastbound

Mississauga - docked - Nov 10 - Adfines Star (Mlt) (ex Osstank Sweden-11) at 1401 from Port Weller anchorage

Toronto - departed Nov 12 - Mandarin (Cyp) at 1601 for Port Weller

Oshawa - arrival - Nov 11 - tug Leo A McArthur & John J Carrick at 1123 - departed Nov 11 at 2111 westbound

 

Updates

11/13 - The saltie gallery has been updated with the following images: BBC Edge, BBC Hudson, BBC Maine, BBC Orinoco, Cape Dawson, Carolus Magnus, Ebroborg, Federal Montreal, Federal St Laurent, Federal Yukon, Happy Ranger, Harbour Pioneer, Humbergracht, Iryda, Labrador, Nordic Ace, Onego Merchant, Pia, Rodopi, San, San, Straum and Vectis Eagle. Matt Miner

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  November 13

In 1952, the 626-foot SPARROWS POINT successfully completed her sea trials and departed Chicago on her maiden trip. The new Bethlehem boat, the largest boat to enter the lakes via the Mississippi River Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal, was under the command of Captain Wilfred Couture and Chief Engineer James Meinke. She was lengthened to 682 feet in 1958, converted to a self-unloader in 1980, renamed b.) BUCKEYE in 1991, converted to a barge in 2006, renamed c.) LEWIS J. KUBER.

ARAB (2-mast wooden schooner, 100 foot, 158 tons, built in 1854, at Buffalo, New York) beached on 01 November 1883, near St. Joseph, Michigan, during a storm, but quick work by salvagers got her free. However on 13 November 1883, while being towed to Racine, Wisconsin, she capsized and sank well off of Arcadia, Michigan. One man lost his life, an engineer who was desperately trying to start her pumps when she rolled.

On November 13, 1976, the TEMPLE BAR (later LAKE WABUSH and ALGONORTH) arrived at Singapore, where she was lengthened 202 feet.

CONDARRELL was laid up for the last time on November 13, 1981. Built in 1953 as a.) D. C. EVEREST, she was renamed b.) CONDARRELL in 1982.

GEORGE HINDMAN was in collision with the British salty MANCHESTER EXPLORER on Lake St. Louis, above the Lachine Lock in 1956. Built in 1921, as a.) GLENCLOVA, renamed b.) ANTICOSTI in 1927, c.) RISACUA in 1946, d.) GEORGE HINDMAN in 1955, and e.) ELIZABETH HINDMAN in 1962. Scrapped at Duluth, Minnesota, in 1971.

J. P. MORGAN JR (Hull#373) was launched November 13, 1909, at Lorain, Ohio, for the Pittsburgh Steamship Co.

HOMER D. WILLIAMS was involved in a collision with the steamer OTTO M. REISS at Duluth November 13, 1917.

In 1984, HOMER D. WILLIAMS was towed to Thunder Bay, Ontario, by the tug MALCOLM for dismantling.

On 13 November 1870, the schooner E. FITZGERALD left Port Huron on her maiden voyage to load lumber at Au Sable, Michigan, for Chicago. She was commanded by Capt. A. McTavish.

On 13 November 1883, H. C. AKELEY (wooden propeller bulk freighter, 240 foot, 1,187 tons, built in 1881, at Grand Haven, Michigan) was carrying corn from Chicago to Buffalo when she encountered a heavy storm off Holland, Michigan. She took the disabled tug PROTECTOR in tow but let her go when her own rudder broke off. AKELEY anchored but started to sink when she fell into the troughs of the waves. The disabled schooner DRIVER managed to save 12 of the crew who had taken to AKELEY's yawl before she went down. 6 lives were lost.

Captain W. H. Van Dyke was born at Escanaba, Michigan, on November 13, 1871, and spent most of his life on the Great Lakes (he joined the crew of a schooner at the age of 15). He first captained the Pere Marquette Line Steamer PERE MARQUETTE 8 then, in 1916, he joined the Pere Marquette carferry fleet. His first command was the str. PERE MARQUETTE 15. Then for 10 years he served as master of the PERE MARQUETTE 17, and after the launch of the CITY OF FLINT 32 in 1929, he served as master of the PERE MARQUETTE 22.

On 13 November 1865, CLARA PARKER (3-mast wooden schooner, 175 foot, 425 gross tons, built in 1865, at Detroit, Michigan) was fighting a losing battle with storm induced leaks, so she was beached 400 yards off shore near the mouth of the Pigeon River, south of Grand Haven, Michigan. The local Lifesaving Service plucked all 9 of the crew from the rigging by breeches buoy after the vessel had gone down to her decks and was breaking up.

On 13 November 1888, LELAND (wooden steam barge, 148 foot, 366 gross tons, built in 1873, at New Jerusalem, Ohio) burned at Huron, Ohio. She was valued at $20,000 and insured for $15,000. She was rebuilt and lasted until 1910.

JAMES DAVIDSON (steel propeller bulk freighter, 587 foot, 8,349 gross tons, built at Wyandotte, Michigan, in 1920) entered service on 13 Nov 1920, for the Globe Steamship Co. (G. A. Tomlinson, mgr.) when she loaded 439,000 bushels of wheat at Duluth, Minnesota, for delivery to Buffalo, New York. She was the last ship built at Wyandotte, Michigan.

An unnamed salty (formerly RANGUINI) arrived at Milwaukee's heavy lift dock on Saturday night, 13 Nov 1999, to load a large desalinization filtration system built in Milwaukee for Korea. The vessel entered the Seaway in ballast for Milwaukee on 09 Nov 1999. The following day, the crew rigged scaffolding over the side so the new name BBC GERMANY could be painted on the ship.

The Toledo Blade published the following vessel passages for Detroit on this date in 1903: -Up- VOLUNTEER, AMAZON, HARLOW, 12:30 Friday morning; ROCKEFELLER, 4:20; MARISKA, 4:40; FRENCH, 5:20; CONEMAUGH, 6; S M STEPHENSON, FAUSTIN, barges, 7:30; OLIVER, MITCHELL, (sailed), 7:50; AVERILL, 8.

1909: The steamers CHARLES WESTON and WARD AMES collided in lower Whitefish Bay. The former, which had been at anchor waiting to head downbound through the Soo Locks, ran for shore but settled on the bottom. The ship was saved, repaired and last sailed as c) SAUCON for Bethlehem Transportation before being scrapped at Hamilton, ON in 1950.

1909: JAMES H. HOYT went aground on a reef about two miles off the northeast corner of Outer Island after the engine was disabled in a snowstorm. The vessel was refloated November 29 and later became the BRICOLDOC.

1929: BRITON was wrecked in Lake Erie off Point Abino. The stranded vessel was battered for two days before being abandoned as a total loss.

1934: WILLIAM A. REISS (i) stranded off Sheboygan while inbound with 7025 tons of coal from Toledo. The ship was refloated November 17 with heavy damage and considered a total loss.

1942: H.M. PELLATT, a former Great Lakes canal freighter, was sailing as f) SCILLIN under the flag of Italy, when it was hit by gunfire from the British submarine H.M.S. PROTEUS while 9 miles off Kuriat, Tunisia, and sank.

1956: The downbound and grain-laden GEORGE HINDMAN and the upbound MANCHESTER EXPLORER collided in fog on the St. Lawrence above Lachine and both ships were damaged.

1958: LUNAN, a Pre-Seaway trader on the Great Lakes, sustained major bottom damage in a grounding on the St. Lawrence near Murray Bay. The ship was refloated, towed to Lauzon for repairs and it returned to service as b) MARIDAN C. in 1959.

1967: SANTA REGINA, the first American saltwater vessel to use the St. Lawrence Seaway, put into San Francisco with boiler problems and machinery damage while headed from Los Angeles to Saigon, South Vietnam as f) NORBERTO CAPAY. The vessel was sold at auction and towed to Kaohsiung, Taiwan, for scrapping in 1969.

1971: The small St. Lawrence freighter C. DE BAILLON, better known as a) DONNACONA NO. 2 and b) MIRON C., went aground at Mont Louis and was a total loss.

1975: There was a boiler explosion on the Egyptian freighter CLEOPATRA after leaving Hartlepool, England, for Alexandria, Egypt, and 8 crewmen were severely injured with at least one fatality. The former Victory Ship first traveled through the Seaway in 1963. It was scrapped at Gadani Beach, Pakistan, in 1981.

1976: OCEAN SOVEREIGN lost steering at Sault Ste. Marie and was wedged into the wall at the Soo Locks. The rudder was damaged and the Greek saltie had to be towed to Lauzon, Quebec, for repairs. The vessel initially traded inland as a) BOLNES in 1970 and returned as b) OCEAN SOVEREIGN for the first time in 1973. It was scrapped at Ulsan, South Korea, as d) MARIA JOSE after being blown aground from the anchorage during Typhoon Vera on September 27, 1986.

1979: A steering failure put VANDOC aground at Harvey Island in the Brockville Narrows. The vessel spent time at Port Weller Dry Docks after being released.

1996: JOLLITY reported it was taking water in the engine room (Pos: 17.47 N / 119.20 E). The ship was was taken in tow two days later and reached Hong Kong on November 18. The vessel was scrapped at Chittagong, Bangladesh, in 1999.

1997: ARCADIA BERLIN visited the Great Lakes in 1971 when it was a year old. The ship was carrying bagged cement and sailing as f) ALLISSA when it collided with and sank the Ukrainian vessel SMENA off Yangon, Myanmar. The former was apparently laid up with collision damage and scrapped at Alang, India, in 1998.

2002: WILFRED SYKES was inbound with a cargo of limestone when it went aground in Muskegon Lake. Some of the cargo was lightered to PERE MARQUETTE 41 and the stranded ship was pulled free.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Russ Plumb, Father Dowling Collection, Historical Collections of the Great Lakes, Max Hanley and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Port Reports -  November 12

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day's news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known).

Reporters needed for Lake Michigan ports, St. Marys River, Saginaw River and ports such as Johnstown, ON.

Two Harbors-Silver Bay, MN – Gary A. Putney
James R. Barker departed Two Harbors on Nov. 11th at 03:46 for Indiana Harbor. Arriving Two Harbors on Nov. 11th at 04:48 was the John B. Leitch for South of #2. She departed Two Harbors on Nov. 11th at 16:56 for Quebec City. The Edgar B. Speer is due Two Harbors, but as of 19:00 on the 11th she was still anchored off Duluth. Due Two Harbors on Nov. 12th is the Presque Isle. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay had no traffic on Nov. 11th. Due Silver Bay early on Nov. 12th is the Clyde S. VanEnkevort/Erie Trader that will be arriving after unloading stone in Marquette. No new AIS on the Joyce L. VanEnkevort/Great Lakes Trader.

Thunder Bay, ON
Thunder Bay On, Sunday; Correction CSL Laurentien is loading at the Superior Elevator. Monday; 0:04 Ojibway arrived at the Richardson Current River Terminal to load grain. 14:47 Ojibway shifted to the Richardson Main Terminal to finish loading. 15:00 Federal Niagara weighed anchor and proceeded to the Richardson Current River Terminal to load grain.

Milwaukee, WI – Wisconsin Marine Historical Society
At Port Milwaukee Monday (11/11): Federal Baltic remained at the Federal Marine Terminals dock on the outer harbor. She brought 8,850 metric tons of European steel. Tug Anglian Lady with barge PML Ironmaster arrived Sunday night just before midnight. Ironmaster can carry 10,000 metric tons. On this trip, she brought just over 3,000 tons of Canadian steel for the city. Algoma Innovator is expected in Tuesday morning with salt from Compass Minerals.

Northern Lake Huron ports
Meldrum Bay: Sunday; 23:09 Algoma Compass departed for Green Bay.

Drummond Island: Monday; Dorothy Ann arrived to load limestone and departed at 15:43 for Calcite to finish loading.

Calcite: Sunday; 17:56 Arthur M Anderson arrived to load. Monday; 1:21 American Mariner departed for Bay City. 8:47 Olive L Moore arrived to load.

Stoneport: Monday; 3:48 Herbert C Jackson arrived and went to anchor to wait out weather. 12:59 Sam Laud departed for Lorain. Herbert C Jackson weighed anchor and departed for Duluth Superior.

Alpena: Sunday; G L Ostrander arrived to load cement products and departed on Monday at 1:46 for Detroit.

Port Inland: Sunday; 21:47 H Lee White arrived and went to anchor to wait out weather. Monday; 6:15 John G Munson departed and is down bound on Lake Huron. 17:23 H Lee White weighed anchor and departed for Gary.

Goderich, ON – Bruce Douglas Saltie San arrived 8:.13 am Thursday to load at the grain elevators. CSL Assiniboine arrived Friday 6 pm to load salt. Algoma Innovator' arrived Sunday 7:06 am, loaded salt for Milwaukee, cleared 11:44 pm Sunday. Algoma Niagara arrived 2:46 am Monday and cleared up bound 4:48 pm Monday for an unknown port.

Detroit-Rouge River – Raymond H Monday Arrivals: Alpena arrived at Lafarge to unload cement. Lee A Tregurtha arrived at AK Steel to unload ore. Federal Margaree arrived at Nicholson's Detroit Terminal to unload general cargo. CSL Tadoussac arrived at St. Mary's Cement to unload clinker. GL Ostrander/Integrity arrived at Lafarge to unload cement.

Cleveland, OH – Bill Kloss
NACC Argonaut arrived at 23:02 on 11/10 to unload at LaFarge. Se Eagle II arrived at 07:01 for St. Marys Cement. Algoma Buffalo arrived at 07:42 to load salt at Cargill for Toronto. Mississagi departed for Marblehead at 06:30.

Welland Canal and vicinity vessel passages – Monday November 11 – Barry Andersen

Nanticoke - departed - Nov 11 - Algoma Hansa at 1221 westbound

Welland Canal upbound - Nov 11 - Algoma Guardian at 0238, Baie Comeau at 1230, Sloman Hermes (Mlt) at 1347, Maria Desgagnes at 1845, Atlantic Huron at ____,

Welland Canal downbound - Nov 10 - Frontenac at 1204 stopping wharf 19-E, tug Leo A McArthur & John J Carrick at 2014 and Algoma Sault at 2302 - Nov 11 - Miedwie (Bhs) at 0154, Algoma Spirit at 0515, CSL Welland at 1457, Iver Bright (Nld) eta 2115, Thunder Bay at eta 2200, and Cape (Lbr) (ex Heloise-15) eta 2300

Welland Canal docks - Nov 10 - Frontenac stopped wharf 19E at 1312

Port Weller anchorage - Nov 11 - Mamry (Bhs) at 1321, Resko (Bhs) at 1937

Anchored off Hamilton - Nov 11 - Algoma Spirit at 1700 off Hamilton

Hamilton - arrivals - Nov 11 - Baie Comeau at 0146, Algoma Sault at 1141 - anchored - Nov 11 - Isa (Cyp) at 0502 in Burlington Bay - docked - Oct 31 - Federal Sakura (Mhl) at 1138 - Nov 7 - Florence Spirit at 1211 - Oct 8 - Resko (Bhs) at 0404 - Nov 9 - Narie (Bhs) at 1207 and Exeborg (Nld) at 1925 - Nov 10 - Ocean Castle (Mlt) (ex Federal Mattawa-16) at 1054, Rosaire A Desgagnes at 1446 and Federal Montreal (Mhl) at 1941 on maiden voyage - departed - Nov 11 - Algoma Guardian at 0031, Baie Comeau at 1022 and Resko (Bhs) at 1745 for Thunder Bay - all westbound

Bronte - docked - Nov 10 - Sarah Desgagnes at 2240 - departed dock at 2312 - Nov 10 - Sarah Desgagnes anchored off Burlington at 2321

Clarkson - arrival - Nov 11 - Robert S Pierson at 1144

Mississauga - arrival - Nov 10 - Adfines Star (Mlt) (ex Osstank Sweden-11) at 1401 from Port Weller anchorage - departed

Toronto - arrival - docked - Nov 6 - Mamry (Bhs) at 1521 - Nov 7 - Mandarin (Cyp) at 1343 - departed Nov 11 - Mamry (Bhs) at 1006 for Port Weller anchorage

 

Annual ceremony remembers mariners lost on the Great Lakes

11/12 - Detroit, MI - Moments after a pair of bugle players finished their salutes, a wreath of red-and-white roses was passed to the waiting hands of two guardsmen on a U.S. Coast Guard boat.

As the wreath drifted farther from the Dossin Great Lakes Museum in the Detroit River — each rose representing the 29 lives lost on the Edmund Fitzgerald as well as those lost on the water during the Great Storm of 1844 in Buffalo, New York. In addition, members of the honor guard tossed red roses into the river to honor the mariners. Later, many of those attending the event threw roses into the water.

The Lost Mariners Remembrance event has been held every year since 1999 to remember mariner lives lost on the Great Lakes. The program is held annually on the anniversary of the Edmund Fitzgerald sinking on Nov. 10, 1975.

Ron LaPlante, 78, said his rose was for his brother, boat captain George LaPlante Jr., who died in the past decade. He said the event wasn't just about honoring those who had lost their lives on the Great Lakes, but about preventing more from dying on the waters of the Great Lakes.

"All the guys that went before me, doing the same thing. We're all in this to make boating a safer place," said LaPlante, also a boat captain from Harrison Township.

The Detroit News

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  November 12

In 1920, FRANCIS WIDLAR stranded on Pancake Shoal in Lake Superior and was written off as a total constructive loss of $327,700. The wreck was purchased by Mathews Steamship Company in 1921 and placed back in service as BAYTON. The BAYTON sailed until 1966, and the hull was later used as a temporary breakwall during construction at Burns Harbor, Indiana.

On 12 November 1878, JAMES R. BENTLEY (3-mast wooden schooner, 170 foot, 575 tons, built in 1867, at Fairport, Ohio) was carrying grain when she struck a shoal in heavy weather and foundered off 40 Mile Point on Lake Huron. Her crew was rescued in the rough seas by the bark ERASTUS CORNING.

On 12 Nov 1964, THOMAS F. COLE (steel propeller bulk freighter, 580 foot, 7,268 gross tons, built in 1907, at Ecorse, Michigan) collided with the British motor vessel INVEREWE off the south end of Pipe Island on the lower St. Marys River in foggy conditions. The COLE suffered severe damage to the port bow and was taken to Lorain for repairs.

On 12 Nov 1980, ALVA C. DINKEY (steel propeller bulk freighter, 580 foot, 7,514 gross tons, built in 1909, at Lorain, Ohio) and GOVERNOR MILLER (steel propeller bulk freighter, 593 foot, 8,240 gross tons, built in 1938, at Lorain, Ohio) arrived near El Ferrol del Caudillo, Spain for scrapping in tow of the FedNav tug CATHY B. Demolition by Miguel Partins began on 28 Nov 1980, at Vigo, Spain.

On November 12, 1919, PANAY, upbound on Lake Superior for Duluth, Minnesota, in rough weather, was one of the last vessels to see the down bound JOHN OWEN which, apparently later the same day, disappeared with all hands. Renamed b.) WILLIAM NELSON in 1928, and c.) BEN E. TATE in 1936. Scrapped at Bilbao, Spain in 1969.

On 12 November 1881, BRUNSWICK (iron propeller bulk freighter, 248 foot, built in 1881, at Wyandotte, Michigan) was carrying 1,500 tons of hard coal in a night of fitful squalls in Lake Erie. CARLINGFORD (wooden schooner, 155 foot, built in 1869, at Port Huron, Michigan) was also sailing there, loaded with 26,000 bushels of wheat. They collided. After the skipper of BRUNSWICK made sure that the sinking schooner's crew were in their lifeboats, he ran for shore with his sinking vessel, but sank a few miles off Dunkirk, New York. A total of 4 lives were lost.

On 12 November 1835, the small wooden schooner ROBERT BRUCE was sailing from Kingston, Ontario to Howell, New York when she was wrecked west of Henderson, New York. Her crew of 4, plus one passenger, were all lost.

On 12 Nov 1886, the tug WM L. PROCTOR (wooden tug, 104 foot, 117 gross tons, built in 1883, at Buffalo, New York) left Oswego, New York with the schooner-barges BOLIVIA and E.C. BUCK in tow before a big storm struck. During the snowstorm, the tug got lost and the towline broke. Alone, the PROCTOR finally made it to Charlotte, New York, badly iced up, but there was no word on the barges. They were presumed lost with all onboard.

1881: BRUNSWICK sank in Lake Erie after a collision with the CARLINGFORD. The wooden hulled, coal-laden steamer, made a run for the American shore but the effort fell short. Three lives were lost.

1914: The wooden steamer COLONIAL began to leak on Lake Erie and was beached in Rondeau Bay only to be pounded to pieces by gale force winds. All on board were rescued.

1967: The Swedish freighter TORSHOLM began visiting the Great Lakes as early as 1953. The ship was enroute from the Seaway to Stockholm when it ran aground near Uto, Sweden, and became a total loss.

1968: CLARA CLAUSEN, a Danish freighter, ran aground at Les Escoumins on the St. Lawrence and was abandoned. After being salvaged, the vessel came to the Great Lakes in 1970 and was rebuilt at Kingston as ATLANTEAN.

1974: BELVOIR (ii), enroute from Puerto Cortes, Honduras, to Corpus Christi, Texas, with a load of ore concentrates, struck a submerged object in the Gulf of Honduras and sank. Only 4 crew members are rescued while the other 21 were presumed lost.

1980: The former Lake Michigan rail car ferry PERE MARQUETTE 21 left the Great Lakes in 1974. It was lost on this date as the barge d) CONSOLIDATOR. It was hit by Hurricane Jean off the coast of Honduras while carrying a load of truck trailers.

2005: SPAN TERZA, an Italian freighter, first came through the Seaway in 1977 and returned as b) ANANGEL HORIZON in 1983. It was damaged on this date as d) SALAM 4 in a collision near Dondra Head, Sri Lanka, with SHANGHAI PRIDE and had to go to Colombo for assessment. The ship was repaired and eventually scrapped as e) ALINA at Xinhui, China, in 2009.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Russ Plumb, Father Dowling Collection, Historical Collections of the Great Lakes, Max Hanley and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Busy month at Port of Thunder Bay

11/11 - Thunder Bay, ON – The Port of Thunder Bay is reporting above-average cargo tonnage as of October 31. Port terminals have handled 6.9 million metric tonnes of cargo so far this season. This figure is 10% higher than last year and 5% higher than the 5-year average.

The month of October was notable for strong coal and potash movement. Both commodities are mined on the Prairies and shipped in bulk from Thunder Bay to other Great Lakes / Seaway ports as well as international ports. Coal and potash shipments for the month of October were twice- and three-times the normal levels, respectively.

Grain volumes held steady in October, maintaining a seasonal increase over last year mostly due to higher shipments of Manitoba canola to international ports. At just under half a million metric tonnes, direct exports of canola from Thunder Bay by foreign-flagged saltie vessels are at an all-time high.

The first week of November has remained busy, particularly for salties departing the Port with grain.

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada has been projecting a strong fall harvest, however there is some uncertainty for the final two months of the shipping season as poor weather has led to harvesting delays and some crop downgrading on the Prairies.

Lake Superior News

 

Edward L. Ryerson returns to Cumming Slip

11/11 - Duluth, MN – One of the Twin Ports' most iconic ships has returned to its former berth, and no, it's not the William A. Irvin. Crews spent about three hours last Tuesday moving the Edward L. Ryerson, an idle lake freighter, a short distance from Tower Slip to Cumming Slip, where it had sat since 2013.

The Ryerson had to be moved from its home of the last six years near Barko Hydraulics in Superior in order for the state of Wisconsin to conduct soil testing where the ship was moored. The ship returned to Fraser Shipyards, where it was laid-up in 2009, until Fraser needed to do soil testing in 2013.

Tom Wiater, the president of Central Marine Logistics, which operates the Ryerson, came in from Indiana for the move. Two Heritage Marine tugs and a Fraser tug helped orchestrate the move a short distance in Howards Bay. With a crew of seven on deck, Wiater oversaw the move from the vantage point of the ship's pilot house.

"It was a dead ship without any ballast, with a brisk wind," Wiater said. "So we had some challenging conditions, but the tugs worked very good."

Unlike what you would expect from a ship that has sat idle for the past decade, Wiater said the Ryerson is in surprisingly "good shape" with generators that worked when he started them on Tuesday. "I was very impressed with how well the winches worked and how well the boat handled.”

Wiater said. "I'm sure she will sail again. When you get a more robust steel economy, I have no doubt you'll see that boat sail again." Until then, Wiater likes the idea of the ship staying at Fraser.

Duluth News Tribune

 

Port Reports -  November 11

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day's news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known). Reporters needed for Lake Michigan ports and posts such as Saginaw River and Johnstown, ON.

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
The only traffic through the Duluth entry on Sunday was American Integrity, which arrived at 05:10 to load coal at Midwest Energy. She had been expected to depart at 17:30 but was still at the dock as of 19:30. Also in port were Federal Kushiro, offloading cement at CRH, and Fivelborg, taking on beet pulp pellets at Gavilon. Ebroborg and Andean were both anchored outside the harbor waiting for docks. In Superior, Edwin H. Gott spent Sunday at Burlington Northern loading, and had a tentative departure time of 02:00 Monday listed. Burns Harbor was anchored offshore and will arrive once the Gott finishes loading.

Two Harbors-Silver Bay, MN – Gary A. Putney
As of 19:40 on Nov. 10th the James R. Barker was still at the loading dock in Two Harbors. There have been issues with frozen pellets. The John D. Leitch continues to be anchored SW of the Two Harbors breakwall. Edgar B. Speer anchored off Duluth between 00:10 and 01:00 on the 10th waiting on the Two Harbors dock. Also due Two Harbors on Nov. 10th is the American Century. There is no other inbound traffic due Two Harbors on Nov. 11th. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay saw the departure of the Joyce L. VanEnkevort/Great Lakes Trader on Nov. 10th at 16:19. She had arrived on Nov. 9th at approx. 21:00. She has no updated AIS. Silver Bay has no inbound traffic scheduled on Nov. 11th.

Thunder Bay, ON
Thunder Bay On, Friday; 22:19 Algoma Strongfield shifted to the Richardson Mail Terminal to finish loading. 11:49 CSL St Laurent arrived at the Superior Elevator to load. 13:31 Algoma Harvester arrived at the G3 elevator to load. 15:17 Federal Niagara arrived and went to anchor. 18:13 Algoma Strongfield departed downbound on Lake Superior.

Milwaukee, WI – Wisconsin Marine Historical Society
At Port Milwaukee Sunday (11/10: Federal Baltic remained at the Federal Marine Terminals dock on the outer harbor. Joining her in slip one was the Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin. She arrived 04:45 and tied up at the open dock to unload salt. She departed 15:19. Prentiss Brown/St. Marys Challenger cleared the harbor at 04:08 after delivering cement to the Kinnickinnic River terminal. Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin was launched in 1973 at Collingwood, Ontario, as the H.M Griffith. She was 730 feet long by 75 feet wide. In December 1999, the Griffith entered Port Weller Dry Docks where she received new bow and cargo sections. When she emerged in March 2000, she was 740 feet long by 75 feet wide, and would be renamed Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin. A former president of Canada Steamship Lines, Martin was Canada’s Minister of Finance and would later be elected Prime Minister. kCarrying a load of iron ore, the Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin ran aground in the St. Lawrence River October 6, 2019. After 5,000 metric tons of cargo was removed, five tugs were finally able to pull her free October 12.

Northern Lake Huron ports
Meldrum Bay: Sunday; 8:36 Algoma Compass arrived to load dolomite.

Calcite: Saturday; 23:26 American Mariner arrived to load.

Stoneport: Sunday; 16:00 Sam Laud arrived to load.

Alpena: Sunday 18:55 Samuel De Champlain arrived to load cement products.

Port Inland: Sunday; 1:21 Manitowoc departed for Ludington. 13:32 John G Munson arrived to load limestone.

Detroit-Rouge River – Raymond H
Sunday Arrivals: Florence Spirit arrived at Zug Island to load coke. Calusa Coast and Delaware arrived at the Marathon Asphalt Terminal to load.

Welland Canal and vicinity vessel passages - Sunday November 10 – Barry Andersen

Nanticoke - arrival - Nov 10 - Algoma Hansa at 1713

Long Point Bay anchorage - anchored - Nov 9 - Algoma Hansa at 1906 - departed Nov 10 at 1728 for the dock

Port Colborne anchorage - anchored - Nov 9 - Jana Desgagnes at 1945 - departed at 2212 for the canal

Welland Canal upbound - tug Petite Forte & St Marys Cement at 0853, Algoma Discovery at 1233 and NACC Argonaut at 2352 - Nov 10 - Eeborg (Nld) at 0506, CSL Tadoussac at 0716 and Algoma Buffalo from wharf 6

Welland Canal downbound - Nov 9 - Jana Desgagnes at 2232 and Algoma Buffalo at 2330 stopping wharf 6 - Nov 10 - Algoma Equinox at 0746, Baie Comeau at 1151, Frontenac at 1204 stopping wharf 19-E, tug Leo A McArthur & John J Carrick at 2014 and Algoma Sault eta 2230

Port Weller anchorage - Nov 10 - Happy River (Nld) at 0240 - departed Nov 10 - Happy River (Nld) at 1640 approx. eastbound and Adfines Star (Mlt) (ex Osttank Sweden-11) at 1200 for Mississauga

Hamilton - arrivals - Nov 10 - Algoma Guardian at 0403, Ocean Castle (Mlt) (ex Federal Mattawa-16) at 1054, Rosaire A Desgagnes at 1446 from the anchorage and Federal Montreal (Mhl) at 1941 on maiden voyage - docked - Oct 31 - Federal Sakura (Mhl) at 1138 - Nov 7 - Florence Spirit at 1211 - Oct 8 - Resko (Bhs) at 0404 - Nov 9 - Narie (Bhs) at 1207 and Exeborg (Nld) at 1925 - departed Nov 8 - Federal Margaree (Mhl) at 2153 - Nov 10 - Eeborg (Nld) at 0250 for Chicago

Bronte - Nov 10 - Sarah Desgagnes at 1130 - departed at 1602 for Bronte dock - docked - Nov 10 at 1116

Mississauga - arrival - Nov 10 - Adfines Star (Mlt) (ex Osstank Sweden-11) at 1401 from Port Weller anchorage

Toronto - arrival - docked - Nov 6 - Mamry (Bhs) at 1521 - Nov 7 - Mandarin (Cyp) at 1343

 

Michigan man remembers helping to remove bell from Edmund Fitzgerald

11/11 - Cadillac, MI - Seeing the bell of the Edmund Fitzgerald crest the surface after 20 years residing more than 500 feet beneath the crashing waves of Lake Superior, Ron Scott had to remind himself this was really happening. "It was kind of an unbelievable thing," said Scott, an 84-year-old former underwater demolition expert and rescue diver who now lives in Cadillac.

Scott was with a team of Americans and Canadians who in 1995 traveled to the site of the Edmund Fitzgerald's watery grave. Their mission was simple: collect the bell on top of the pilot's house, replace it with a replica that featured the engraved names of the 29 crewmen who perished in the shipwreck, and bring the old bell to the surface to be displayed as a memorial at Whitefish Point.

Sunday, Nov. 10 marks the 44th anniversary of the Edmund Fitzgerald's sinking, and Scott's memories of retrieving the bell more than two decades ago are as fresh as they've ever been.

Scott is a bit of connoisseur when it comes to famous shipwrecks and his basement is a testament to this interest: it is covered in pictures and memorabilia related to the Titanic, Edmund Fitzgerald and other vessels. One of Scott's most interesting items is a piece of rope that was reportedly taken from the lifeboat of the Edmund Fitzgerald, which was recovered after the ship went down.

The Edmund Fitzgerald was an iron ore-hauling vessel that had a route that started in Superior, Wisconsin and took it across Lake Superior and through Lake Huron. Its final destination was Detroit, where the ore was removed. When it was built in the 1950s, the Edmund Fitzgerald was the largest vessel to travel in the Great Lakes.

That night in 1975, Scott said a severe and unexpected storm forced the Edmund Fitzgerald and other vessels to adjust their travel route through Lake Superior.

There are a number of theories as to how the ship sank. One is that the crew forgot to shut the ore hatches, allowing water into the ship, eventually causing it to become overburdened and sink. Another is that two huge waves at the bow and stern lifted the boat and caused it to snap in two. Scott has spoken at length with Gary Cooper, captain of an ore hauling vessel that was following behind the Edmund Fitzgerald that night; his theory is that the underside of the boat was damaged when it scrapped across some uncharted shoals in an area they didn't normally travel but were forced to because of the storm.

However it happened, the sinking of the Edmund Fitzgerald has become a cultural fascination, inspiring a number of tributes — including a popular song by Gordon Lightfoot — and some controversy, when family members objected to the cottage industry rapidly growing around the wreck's commercialization.

One of the organizers of the 1995 expedition to retrieve the bell was Tom Farnquist, who knew Scott and asked him to be involved in the project. "I taught him how to dive," Scott said in reference to how he knew Farnquist.

Scott's role in the project would be as an aid to Farnquist. Scott had a number of governmental contacts with both American and Canadian agencies through his work as a SCUBA diver and with the U.S. Forest Service.

One of the Canadians donned what was referred to as a "Newt Suit," which was new technology that allowed divers to swim deeper and return to the surface within hours instead of having to spend days inside a decompression chamber to prevent the bends. Once at the site of the wreck, the diver in the Newt Suit used an underwater blow torch to remove the bell, which was hauled to the surface using a crane.

When he found out he'd be involved in the project, Scott contacted Four Winns in Cadillac, which donated several of their boats to ferry family members of the deceased crewmen to the site. "I think it really brought some closure for a lot of families," Scott said.

Shortly after the expedition, organizers held a commemorative gathering at Whitefish Point to display the bell. Scott remembers the weather was cold and stormy — unusual for July but similar to how it looked that November day in 1975. "It was like the good Lord was telling us something," Scott said.

Today, the Edmund Fitzgerald's bell can be seen at the Great Lakes Shipwreck Museum.

Read more and view images at this link: https://www.cadillacnews.com/news/cadillac-man-remembers-helping-to-remove-bell-from-edmund-fitzgerald/article_5aa8ce49-ada1-53f2-8a96-aa6eb658d47b.html

 

GLMI annual Marine Mart coming Saturday in St. Clair Shores

11/11 - The 39th Annual Marine Mart, sponsored by the Great Lakes Maritime Institute, will be held on Saturday, November 16, from 10:00 am - 2:00 p.m. The location is VFW 1146 Bruce Post 28404 Jefferson, St. Clair Shores, MI (between 11 and 12 Mile)on Lake St. Clair. Admission is $7.00 (early bird admission 9:30-10.00 $10.00). Children under the age of 12 are free. Items include ship models, photos, artifacts, ship china, artwork, postcards, books and more.

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  November 11

The Port of Huron, Ohio received its first grain boat in seven years when Westdale Shipping's AVONDALE arrived at the Pillsbury Elevator on November 11, 1971, to load 200,000 bushels of soybeans for Toronto, Ontario.

On 11 November 1883, NEMESIS (2-mast wooden schooner, 74 foot, 82 gross tons, built in 1868, at Goderich, Ontario) was wrecked in a terrific storm that some called a hurricane. She went ashore near Bayfield, Ontario, on Lake Huron. She may have been recovered since her registration was not closed until 1907. In 1876, this little schooner rescued all but one of the crew from the sinking freighter NEW YORK.

The Armistice Day Storm of November 11, 1940, was one of the worst storms in the recorded history of Lake Michigan. In all, the storm claimed 5 vessels, and 66 lives. The storm hit late Monday afternoon, November 11th, with winds of hurricane proportions. The winds struck suddenly from the southwest at about 2:30 p.m. and were accompanied by drenching rain, which later changed to snow. The winds reached peak velocities of 75 miles per hour, the highest in local maritime history.

Some of the vessels affected were: CITY OF FLINT 32: Beached at Ludington, no damage. Jens Vevang, relief captain, in command. Her regular captain, Charles Robertson, was on shore leave. Also: PERE MARQUETTE 21: Blown into a piling at Ludington, no damage, captained by Arthur Altschwager. She had 5 passengers aboard. CITY OF SAGINAW 31: Arrived Milwaukee 6 hours late with over a foot of water in her hull. The wireless aerial was missing and her seagate was smashed by the waves. She was captained by Ed Cronberg. Ann Arbor carferry WABASH: A railcar broke loose from its moorings on her car deck and rolled over, nearly crushing a crewman. The steamer NOVADOC: Ran aground at Juniper Beach, South of Pentwater, Michigan. Two crewman (cooks) drowned when the ship broke in half. Seventeen crewman, found huddled in the pilothouse, were rescued by Captain Clyde Cross and his 2 crewman, Gustave Fisher and Joe Fontane of the fishing tug THREE BROTHERS. CONNEAUT of 1916, ran hard aground on Lansing Shoal near Manistique, Michigan, on Lake Michigan. She reportedly had lost her propeller and rudder. Two days later she was pulled off. The SINALOA had taken on a load of sand near Green Island and was heading for Chicago through Death's Door on Wisconsin's Door Peninsula when the November 11th Armistice Day storm of 1940, struck in upper Lake Michigan. During the storm the SINALOA lost her rudder. The anchor was dropped but her anchor cable parted. In this helpless condition she ran aground at Sac Bay on Michigan's Garden Peninsula. Fortunately the stricken vessel was close to shore where the Coast Guard was able to rescue the entire crew. Declared a constructive total loss, her owner collected the insurance and forfeited the vessel to the Roen Salvage Co.

ANNA C MINCH: Sank South of Pentwater with a loss of 24 lives.

WILLIAM B DAVOCK: of the Interlake fleet, Capt. Charles W. Allen, sank in 215 of water off Pentwater, Michigan. There were no survivors among the crew of 33.

The fishing tugs INDIAN and RICHARD H: Lost with all hands off South Haven, Michigan.

On 11 November 1872, the schooner WILLIS collided with the bark ELIZABETH JONES on Lake Erie and sank in a few minutes. The crew was saved.

On 11 November 1936, J. OSWALD BOYD (steel propeller fuel tanker, 244 foot, 1,806 gross tons, built in 1913, in Scotland) was carrying 900,000 gallons of gasoline when she stranded on Simmons Reef on the north side of Beaver Island. The U.S. Coast Guard from Beaver Island rescued the entire crew of 20.

On 11 November 1890, BRUNO (wooden propeller bulk freighter, 136 foot. 475 gross tons, built in 1863, at Montreal) was carrying coal to Cleveland with the schooner LOUISA in tow when she struck Magnetic Reef, south of Cockburn Island in Georgian Bay and sank in rough weather. No lives were lost.

On 11 November 1835, the 2-mast wooden schooner COMET was carrying iron and ashes on Lake Erie when she foundered in a gale, one mile northwest of Dunkirk, New York. Just her topmasts protruded from the water. All seven on board lost their lives, including a passenger who was a college student bound for Vermont.

In a storm on the night of 11 November 1874, The schooner LA PETITE (3-mast wooden schooner, 119 foot, 172 gross tons, built 1866, J. Ketchum, Huron, Ohio) was on Lake Michigan carrying a cargo of wheat and corn from Chicago when she sprang a bad leak and tried first to reach Ludington, then Manistee. Before reaching safety, she grounded off Big Point au Sable, eight miles from land, in eight feet of water. Previous to striking, the vessel had lost her bowsprit and foremast. After she struck, her main and mizzenmasts went by the board, and the schooner began to break up rapidly. The crew clung to the forecastle deck, and when that washed away, four men were drowned. Captain O. B. Wood had his arms broken by the falling off a square-sail yard. When he fell into the water, the ship's dog jumped in and kept him afloat until they were rescued by the crew of the steam barge CHARLES REITZ. Of the 10 crewmen, six were saved. The LA PETITE was salvaged and repaired and lasted until 1903, when she was lost in another storm.

On 11 Nov 1999, the Maltese flag bulk carrier ALCOR was examined by personnel from Transport Canada, the Canadian Coast Guard, a salvage company and the vessel's owners in hopes of forming a plan to save the vessel. She ran aground on a sand bar off the eastern tip of d'Orleans Island on the St. Lawrence River two days earlier. This vessel did not visit Great Lakes ports under the name ALCOR, but she did so under her two previous names, firstly as PATRICIA V and then as the Soviet flag MEKHANIK DREN. The Groupe Desgagnes finally refloated the ALCOR on 05 Dec 1999, after part of the cargo of clinker had been removed. The ship was then towed to Quebec City. Later, it was reported that Groupe Desgagnes purchased the ALCOR from its Greek owners.

Below is a first hand account of the Storm of 1913, from the journal of John Mc Laughlin transcribed by his great grandson Hugh McNichol. John was working on an unknown vessel during the Storm of 1913. The boat was captained by John McAlpine and Harry Roberts as Chief Engineer. The boat was loading iron ore in Escanaba when the storm started on November 8th.

Tuesday, November 11, 1913: I got up at 12 a.m. and went on watch. We were above Presque Isle. It is still blowing hard and quite a sea running. Presque Isle at 1:45 a.m., Thunder Bay Island at 4:30 a.m., Harbor Beach at 1:00 p.m., we are about in the River at 7:05 p.m. It is fine tonight, wind gone down.

1940: The famous Armistice Day storm claims the ANNA C. MINCH, WILLIAM B. DAVOCK and NOVADOC (ii), on Lake Michigan and leaves CITY OF FLINT 32 and SINALOA aground and damaged.

1946: The former Canada Steamship lines bulk canaller LANARK was scuttled off the coast of Ireland with a load of World War Two bombs.

1977: The 380-foot, 8-inch long West German freighter GLORIA made 4 visits to the Great Lakes in 1959-1960. It went aground on the Adriatic at Sestrice Island as d) ARISTOTELES. While the 25-year old hull was refloated, it was declared a total loss and towed to Split, Yugoslavia, for scrapping.

1980: The DINIE S. suffered an engineroom fire at Palermo, Italy and became a total loss. The ship had visited the Seaway as a) CATHERINE SARTORI (1959-1967) and b) CURSA (1967) and was sailing under a seventh name. It was scrapped at Palermo in 1985

1980: CITY OF LICHFIELD stranded near Antalya, Turkey, while leaving the anchorage in heavy weather as c) CITY OF LEEDS. The ship was refloated but never sailed again and was eventually scrapped at Aliaga, Turkey, in 1984. The ship had visited the Great Lakes in 1964.

1995: JAMES NORRIS was loading stone at Colborne, ON when the wind changed leaving the hull exposed to the gale. The ship was repeatedly pounded against the dock until it settled on the bottom. Subsequent hull repairs at Port Weller Dry Docks resulted in the port side being all welded while the starboard remained riveted.

1995: The Cuban freighter AREITO had a mechanical problem in the St. Lambert Lock and had to be towed back to Montreal for repairs. This SD-14 class vessel was scrapped at Alang, India, as e) DUNLIN in 2001.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Russ Plumb, Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Edmund Fitzgerald’s doomed journey

11/10 - It was 44 years ago Saturday that the Edmund Fitzgerald was being loaded with 26,000 tons of iron ore, prepped for what would become her doomed final voyage. Once the largest ship on the Great Lakes, the 728-foot Fitzgerald left Superior, Wis. at 2:15 p.m. on Nov. 9, 1975. Her crew planned to cross Lake Superior to deliver the load at Detroit's Zug Island.

But a day later, she was gone, broken in two and lying on the lake's bottom in 530 feet of water, all 29 souls aboard lost. Gordon Lightfoot's poignant song "The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald" helps keep alive the memory of what's become the Great Lakes' most famous shipwreck.

But her captain and crew were also sons, brothers, husbands and fathers. They hailed from Michigan, Ohio, Wisconsin, Minnesota and beyond.

As we remember them, here are the highlights of the Fitzgerald’s final trip and the fierce, hurricane-like storm that sank her.

Investigators would later say that in the big freighter’s last hour, she battled sustained winds of 60 mph, and waves higher than 25 feet. She may have even encountered “The Three Sisters” - a trio of rapidly-hitting waves that are higher than the others around them.

One thing the marine experts agree on: The Fitzgerald was in the “worst possible place” as she tried to make for the shelter of Michigan’s Whitefish Bay.

Read more and view images at this link: https://www.mlive.com/news/2018/11/edmund_fitzgeralds_doomed_jour.html

 

ArcelorMittal to idle Blast Furnace No. 3 at Indiana Harbor West in East Chicago

11/10 - East Chicago, IL – ArcelorMittal plans to idle a blast furnace at ArcelorMittal Indiana Harbor West in East Chicago, the second major blast furnace idling this year along Northwest Indiana's Lake Michigan shore as the domestic steel industry continues to struggle.

The Luxembourg-based multinational steel giant follows U.S. Steel, which idled Blast Furnace No. 8 at Gary Works as well as East Chicago Tin earlier this year.

Later this month, ArcelorMittal plans to idle Blast Furnace No. 3 at the former LTV steel mill in East Chicago's lakefront Indiana Harbor neighborhood rather than undergo the major expense of relining it — essentially a total rebuild that's required every few decades to keep a blast furnace operational over the long term. The steelmaker said it is a temporary idling.

"Blast Furnace No. 3 at ArcelorMittal Indiana Harbor has reached the end of its current campaign and requires significant capital investment for continued operation," ArcelorMittal spokesman Bill Steers said. "The furnace will be taken down in a safe and orderly fashion and preserved to maintain our capacity for when customer demand merits the necessary capital investments for a new campaign."

Blast furnaces — which can burn hotter than lava — turn raw materials like limestone, iron ore and coke into pig iron, which in turn is made into steel at integrated mills like those on the south shore of Lake Michigan. Blast Furnace #3 had a capacity of 4,500 tons of pig iron per day, according to the trade publication Steel Market Update.

The idling leaves the sprawling 3,100-acre Indiana Harbor campus with just two remaining blast furnaces: Blast Furnace No. 7 at the former Inland Steel mill that's now known as ArcelorMittal Indiana Harbor East, and Blast Furnace No. 4 at the Indiana Harbor West mill that previously belonged to Youngstown Sheet and Tube, J&L, LTV Steel and ISG before being acquired by ArcelorMittal in the early 2000s.

ArcelorMittal operated four blast furnaces at Indiana Harbor as recently as 2013, but the U.S. steel industry has been roughed up by a number of factors, including cheap imports, stagnant demand and depressed prices.

"This will not impact ArcelorMittal USA’s ability to meet current customer demand," Steers said. "The 35 employees currently employed at Blast Furnace No. 3 operations will be reassigned to other operations at Indiana Harbor, and no layoffs are expected as a result of this action."

Blast Furnace No. 3 has suffered issues in recent years and had to be shut down for weeks last year after a large bell dropped into the furnace during a charge. It was down for months in 2015 for planned maintenance.

NW Indiana Times

 

Port Reports -  November 10

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day's news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known). Reporters needed for Lake Michigan ports and posts such as Saginaw River and Johnstown, ON.

Two Harbors-Silver Bay, MN – Gary A. Putney
James R. Barker arrived Two Harbors on Nov. 8th at 19:31 for South of #2. As of 19:30 on Nov. 9th she was still at the loading dock. The John D. Leitch went to anchor SW of Two Harbors around mid-morning on Nov. 9th. Due Two Harbors late on Nov. 9th is the Edgar B. Speer. Due Two Harbors on Nov. 10th is the American Century. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay saw the departure on the Indiana Harbor on Nov. 9th at 15:25 for Cleveland. Due Silver Bay on Nov. 9th is the Joyce L. VanEnkevort/Great Lakes Trader. As of 19:30 on the 9th she was off Castle Danger. She had unloaded stone at Hallett #5 in Duluth.

Thunder Bay, ON
Friday correction: Tecumseh arrived at the Superior Elevator to load grain. 16:46 CSL Welland departed for Montreal. Saturday; 9:36 The saltie Osogovo arrived and went to anchor. 10:25 Algoma Strongfield arrived at theG3 elevator to load wheat. 19:27 Tecumseh departed for Windsor.

St. Marys River
An injured crewman was removed from the downbound Algoma Spirit Saturday around 7:30 a.m. and taken to the War Memorial Hospital. No other details are available.

Milwaukee, WI – Wisconsin Marine Historical Society
At Port Milwaukee Saturday morning (11/9): Federal Baltic replaced Polsteam’s Iryda at the Federal Marine Terminals dock on the outer harbor. After delivering 12,000 metric tons of steel, Iryda departed Friday evening and headed for Duluth Superior. Federal Baltic arrived at 06:16 with 8,850 metric tons of European steel. G.L. Ostrander/Integrity was at the Lafarge terminal on the inner harbor. The integrated tug/barge arrived Friday evening from Calumet Harbor. The tug John Marshall was tied up on the west side of the mooring basin. She brought two barges of boulders down from Manitowoc Friday. USACE tug Racine with crane barge Manitowoc was on the east side of the mooring basin. The Corps is performing breakwall maintenance.

Northern Lake Huron ports
Meldrum Bay: Friday; 23:41 Mississagi arrived to load limestone and departed Saturday at 10:17 for Cleveland.

Drummond Island: Saturday; 1:17 Olive L Moore departed and is down bound on Lake Huron. 3:56 Saginaw arrived to load and departed at 15:10 up bound on the St Marys River.

Stoneport: Friday; 16:20 Kaye E Barker departed for Detroit. 16:29 Clyde S Vanenkevort weighed anchor and proceeded to the dock to load. Saturday; 9:19 Clyde S Vanenkevort departed for Marquette.

Alpena: Friday; 23:38 The cement carrier Alpena departed for Bay City.

Port Inland: Saturday; 2:21 Wilfred Sykes departed for Burns Harbor. 6:21 Manitowoc arrived and went to anchor. 12:56 Manitowoc weighed anchor and proceeded to the dock to load.

Detroit-Rouge River – Raymond H
Saturday Arrivals: Candace Elise arrived at Nicholson's Ecorse Terminal to unload general cargo. Kaye E Barker arrived at AK Steel to unload ore.

Welland Canal and vicinity vessel passages - Saturday November 9 – Barry Andersen

Buffalo (Tonawanda) - departed -Nov 7 - NACC Argonaut at 2220 eastbound

Nanticoke - arrival - departed - Nov 8 - Rosy (Bds) (ex SCT Stockhorn-17, MCT Stockhorn-16, HLL Caspian-08) at 2201 and tug Michigan & Great Lakes at 2233 westbound

Long Point Bay anchorage - anchored - Nov 9 - Algoma Hansa at 1906

Welland Canal upbound - Nov 8 - tug Sea Eagle II & St Marys Cement II at 0656 and Algoma Enterprise at 1449 - Nov 9 - Federal Margaree (Mhl) at 0022, Florence Spirit at 0137, Algoma Hansa at 0318, Cuyahoga at 0459, Algonorth at 0612, Algoma Niagara at - 0840, tug Petite Forte & St Marys Cement at 0853, Federal Kumano (Mhl) at 1146, Algoma Discovery at 1233, Algoma Transport at 1415 and NACC Argonaut eta 2320

Welland Canal downbound - Nov 8 - CSL Niagara at 11143, McKeil Spirit at 1246, Whitefish Bay at 1300, Algoma Conveyor at 1344, Jamno (Bhs) at 1943 and G3 Marquis at 2102 - Nov 9 Rosy (Bds) (ex SCT Stockhorn-17, MCT Stockhorn-16, HLL Caspian-08) at 0106, Happy River (Nld) at 1633, Federal Welland at 1144 and Jana Desgagnes at 2130

Port Weller anchorage - Oct 8 - Federal Kumano (Mhl) at 0329, Algoma Discovery at 0519, Algoma Transport at 0838 - delayed for traffic

Hamilton - arrivals - Nov 9 - Narie (Bhs) at 1207 and Exeborg (Nld) at 1925 - anchored - Nov 4 - Rosaire A Desgagnes at 1848 - docked - Oct 31 - Federal Sakura (Mhl) at 1138 - Nov 6 - Federal Margaree (Mhl) at 2105 - Nov 7 - Florence Spirit at 1211 - Oct 8 - Resko (Bhs) at 0404, Algoma Transport at 1737, Eeborg (Nld) at 2211

Clarkson - arrival - Nov 8 - Algoma Niagara at 0814 and Robert S Pierson at 1235 - departed - Nov 9 - Algoma Niagara at 0008 for the canal and Robert S Pierson at 0955 eastbound

Toronto arrival - docked - Nov 6 - Mamry (Bhs) at 1521 - Nov 7 - Mandarin (Cyp) at 1343 - departed (registry correction) Nov 8 - NACC Capri (Mlt) at 2354

Seaway – Rene Beauchamp
Rossi A. Desgagnes arrived in Montreal for the first time during the night since she arrived in Quebec in May or June. I think she will shift to another dock to load before heading for the Seaway. Destination Oakville. Federal Montreal entered the Seaway during the night for Hamilton.

 

GLMI annual Marine Mart Nov. 16 in St. Clair Shores

11/10 - The 39th Annual Marine Mart, sponsored by the Great Lakes Maritime Institute, will be held on Saturday, November 16, from 10:00 am - 2:00 p.m. The location is VFW 1146 Bruce Post 28404 Jefferson, St. Clair Shores, MI (between 11 and 12 Mile)on Lake St. Clair. Admission is $7.00 (early bird admission 9:30-10.00 $10.00). Children under the age of 12 are free. Items include ship models, photos, artifacts, ship china, artwork, postcards, books and more. For more info: contact mcgrawka@sbcglobal.net

 

National Museum offers 51st holiday card in series

11/10 - Toledo, OH – The National Museum of the Great Lakes has revealed its 2019 Holiday Card for purchase. For the past 51 years, Director Emeritus Alexander B. Cook has painted a watercolor that is used exclusively by the organization to create the holiday card that is sold to the public to benefit the museum. The museum estimates that the sale of holiday cards featuring Alex Cook’s watercolor has raised over $100,000 for the organization over the past 50 years.

“At age 95, Alex Cook is like the energizer bunny of marine artists,” said Christopher Gillcrist, executive director of the museum. “His paint brushes are never more than a few feet away from him at all times.”

This year’s image features two Great Lakes Towing Company tugs in the foreground with an Interlake Steamship freighter in the lock. “I have loved tugboats since my earliest days in St. Joseph, Michigan, and I thought this year I would include two Great Lakes Towing Tugs because of the company’s wonderful gift of the Tug Ohio to the museum,” Cook said.

Gillcrist noted that the cards have become somewhat of a collector’s piece over the years with dozens of people ordering cards year after year. Cards can be ordered online at nmglstore.org or by calling 419-214-5000 extension 200. The cards are shipped in packs of ten cards and envelopes for $16.95 plus shipping and handling.

National Museum of the Great Lakes

 

20th Annual Lost Mariners Remembrance

11/10 - The evening begins with a concert by Lee Murdock. This year’s Lost Mariners Remembrance program is apropos to the season’s high water, with a slightly different approach than in past years. Our offerings generally focus on disasters which claimed the lives of mariners far from land. This year will examine a catastrophe that was particularly terrestrial.

In 1844—175 years ago—the winds and waters of Lake Erie created a seiche event that sent a wall of water 22 feet high through the streets of Buffalo, New York. It left dozens of Erie Canal boats high and dry and drowned over 50 residents. Out on the lake, at least 40 vessels were damaged or destroyed, and another 25 people drowned – 17 of them professional mariners.

This catastrophe is seldom mentioned with other historic weather events on the Great Lakes. Our 2019 Lost Mariners Remembrance presentation by Detroit Historical Society senior curator Joel Stone will address that oversight. This program is offered in partnership with the Great Lakes Maritime Institute, and support from over twenty maritime organizations on both sides of the Detroit River.

The event will be streamed on Facebook here: https://www.facebook.com/boatnerd

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  November 10

On this day in 1892, whaleback barge 102 loaded 2,073 tons of iron ore at Superior consigned to Cleveland. This was the first shipment of Mesabi Range iron ore carried by Oglebay Norton.

On 10 November 1901, the ROBERT A. PACKER (wooden freighter, 209 foot, 921 tons, built in 1882, at Milwaukee, Wisconsin) was found by the wrecking tug RUMBLE eleven miles north of off De Tour, Michigan, ablaze and abandoned by her crew. Captain Isaac Zess of the RUMBLE fought the flames for four hours and then was helped by the THOMAS W. PALMER. The fire was speedily extinguished with both vessels pouring water on the flames and the PACKER was tied up at the dock in DeTour, Michigan.

On 10 November 1887, A. BOODY (wooden schooner, 137 foot, 287 gross tons, built in 1863, at Toledo, Ohio) struck the Port Austin reef on Lake Huron and was declared a total loss. However, after ten days of hard work, the BOODY was finally pulled off the reef.

The EDMUND FITZGERALD foundered on Lake Superior during a severe storm November 10, 1975, at approximately 7:10 p.m. about 17 miles north-northwest of Whitefish Point, Michigan, at position 47 0'N by 85 7'W in Canadian waters.

IMPERIAL ST CLAIR (Hull#57) was launched November 10, 1973 , by Port Weller Drydocks at St. Catharines, Ontario. Renamed b.) ALGOSAR in 1998, sold off the lakes, renamed c.) GENESIS EXPLORER in 2005.

The STEELTON sailed on her maiden voyage for Bethlehem Steel Corp. on November 10, 1943.

The ROBERT C. STANLEY, in her first season of operation, on November 10, 1943 during a Lake Superior storm, developed a significant crack across her spar deck and 12 to 14 feet down both sides of her hull. As the hull worked in the heavy seas, the crack widened to as much as three to four inches. The crew ran cables between the fore and aft winches that maintained a force sufficient to hold the hull together.

November 10, 1972, in the vicinity of the entrance to the East Outer Channel near Amherstburg, Ontario, the UNITED STATES GYPSUM collided with her towing tug MAINE and as a result her bow was punctured. The GYPSUM was beached to prevent sinking.

Pittsburgh Steamship's WILLIAM A. IRVIN (Hull#811) was launched November 10, 1937, at Lorain, Ohio. The IRVIN serves as a museum ship in Duluth, Minnesota since 1986.

November 10, 1892, the carferry ANN ARBOR NO 1 left the shipyard in Toledo, Ohio, bound for Frankfort on her maiden voyage. In 1895, the first major accident caused by cars coming free on the car deck of a rail ferry happened when the ANN ARBOR NO 1, was on an eastbound voyage. Approaching Frankfort in a northwest gale, she rolled so violently that many of the car fastenings broke and the cargo began to move about on the car deck. None of the early rear-loading car ferries were equipped with a sea gate to protect the stern from the seas, and seven cars of flour and butter went off the deck of the NO 1 into the lake. Captain Charles Moody resigned from the Ann Arbor as a result of this incident and returned to the Pere Marquette and Goodrich lines.

ATLANTIC (formerly MANITOULIN, wooden propeller passenger/package freight, 147 foot, 683 gross tons, built in 1880, at Owen Sound, Ontario) was bound for Byng Inlet with lumber camp supplies when she was caught in a storm and grounded in the lee of Pancake Island in Georgian Bay. Her cargo and aft cabin were thrown overboard to lighten her, but she caught fire and was destroyed. Her passengers and crew took to her boats and survived.

On 10 November 1856, ST JOSEPH (wooden propeller steam barge, 170 foot, 460 tons, built in 1846, at Buffalo, New York) stranded and was wrecked near Fairport, Ohio. No lives were lost.

November 10, 1911 - The ANN ARBOR NO 4 was back in service after damaging several plates in October. The tanker MARIA DESGAGNES struck bottom in the St. Lawrence Seaway on 10 November 1999. After temporary repairs were made, the vessel was cleared to proceed to Hamilton, Ontario, to discharge its cargo of jet fuel. A survey of the seaway was completed with no indications as to what caused the vessel to ground.

On 10 November 1887, BLAZING STAR (wooden schooner, 137 foot, 265 tons, built in 1873, at Manitowoc, Wisconsin) was sailing on Lake Michigan in fine weather with a load of lumber. However, she grounded on Fisherman Shoal near Washington Island, Wisconsin even though the wreck of the steamer I N FOSTER was in full view on that reef. The captain was unable to locate a tug to pull the BLAZING STAR off and later she broke up in heavy weather. No lives were lost.

Below is a first hand account of the Storm of 1913, from the journal of John Mc Laughlin transcribed by his great grandson Hugh Mc Nichol. John was working on an unknown vessel during the Storm of 1913. The boat was captained by John Mc Alpine and Harry Roberts as Chief Engineer. The boat was loading iron ore in Escanaba when the storm started on November 8th.

Monday, November 10, 1913: I got up at 12 a.m. and went on watch. We were laying at anchor. It was blowing a living gale and kept it up. They hove up the anchor near 10 o'clock but monkeyed around until after dinner. We got under way. We passed the Light Ship about 3, and White Shoal at 5:15.

More entries from the Storm of 1913 tomorrow.

1900: The iron package freighter ARABIAN went aground 8 miles west of Whitefish Point, Lake Superior due to heavy weather. The ship was salvaged with only minor damage. It was later part of the Canada Steamship Lines fleet and was broken up about 1939.

1903: The passenger and freight steamer ATLANTIC was destroyed by a fire on Georgian Bay enroute to Parry Sound. The blaze apparently started in the cargo of hay that had become soaked with coal oil while riding out a late fall storm off Spruce Island west of its destination.

1922: Fleetmates GLENMAVIS and GLENCLOVA were in a collision at Montreal. Both were repaired and remained as part of the Great Lakes fleet for years as ACADIAN and GEORGE HINDMAN (ii) respectively. 1936: SIR WILLIAM FAIRBAIRN was upbound in Lake Huron and ran into a fall storm that damaged 62 automobiles as part of the deckload of new Packard & Chrysler cars.

1968: MANTADOC and FRANCOIS L.D. collided in heavy fog on the Seaway and sustained considerable bow damage. Both were repaired and the former still sails as d) MANITOBA while the latter was scrapped at Alang, India, as b) CINTA in 1987.

1989: ELPIS, Freedom Class deep sea freighter, first came through the Seaway in 1978. It raised considerable ire after stranding on a coral reef off Key Largo, FL while carrying sugar to Mexico. When it was refloated on November 12, the ship was seized by U.S. Marshals until assessment of the damage to the delicate coral reef could be made. The ship was later released and survived further trading until being scrapped at Alang, India, as c) CITY OF HOUSTON, in 2001.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Jody Aho, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Russ Plumb, Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

U.S. Steel lays off multiple non-union workers at Keetac, Minntac

11/9 - U.S. Steel has eliminated a number of non-union positions at its Iron Range mines and taconite plants. U.S. Steel spokesperson Amanda Malkowski confirmed the layoffs at both of its Minnesota ore operations — Keetac in Keewatin and Minntac in Mountain Iron. Malkowski would not say how many positions were eliminated but said all were non-union. WDIO-TV reported that approximately 30 people had been laid off.

In an emailed statement, Malkowski said the cuts were part of the companies "new operating structure" announced on Oct. 8.

That includes reducing $200 million from its annual fixed costs by 2022, the company has said. Meanwhile, low steel prices are also hurting the steelmaker.

U.S. Steel lost $84 million in the third quarter of 2019, according to financial results released last week.

"At the same time, we’ve been battling challenging market conditions, which means we need to truly become a leaner, more efficient organization faster," Malkowski said. "As part of this process, we are taking the difficult step to eliminate a number of non-represented positions in the United States, including at our Minntac and Keetac facilities."

The layoffs come just weeks after U.S. Steel idled one of its production lines at Minntac. At the time, the company cited "changing market conditions" and said no layoffs were expected.

Layoffs of non-union U.S. Steel employees were reported across the company Friday.

"We are in a difficult market environment right now. This is not lost on anyone here," U.S. Steel CEO David Burritt said during a Nov. 1 call with investors.

Keetac and Minntac mine and process taconite into iron ore pellets for U. S. Steel’s steelmaking facilities. Minntac produces approximately 16 million net tons of pellets per year, while Keetac produces approximately six million net tons of pellets per year.

Duluth News Tribune

 

Port Reports -  November 9

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day's news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known). Reporters needed for Lake Michigan ports and posts such as Saginaw River and Johnstown, ON.

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
Walter J. McCarthy Jr. arrived Duluth at 12:23 Friday afternoon to load coal at Midwest Energy, and Philip R. Clarke was inbound with limestone for C. Reiss at 14:06. Joseph L. Block arrived at 18:00 to unload stone at Graymont. Cape topped off her holds at CHS 1 and left the dock at 19:30 Friday night, and as of 19:45 was making her way through the harbor for departure. The McCarthy is expected to depart from SMET early Saturday morning. Also in port on Friday were Paul R. Tregurtha, which was still loading at Canadian National and had no departure time listed; Federal Kushiro, unloading cement at CRH; Fivelborg, taking on beet pulp pellets at Gavilon; and Ebroborg, on the hook outside the harbor. At the Superior entry on Friday, Algoma Spirit departed at 02:21 with a load of iron ore pellets for Hamilton, and American Spirit was inbound at 15:43 to load at Burlington Northern.

Two Harbors-Silver Bay, MN – Gary A. Putney
Due Two Harbors on Nov. 8th is the James R. Barker. As I file this report on the 8th at 19:00 the Barker is approx. 7 miles NE of Two Harbors. Due Two Harbors on Nov. 9th are the John D. Leitch and the Edgar B. Speer. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay saw the arrival of the Indiana Harbor on Nov. 8th at 09:20. Tentatively due Silver Bay on Nov. 9th is the Joyce L. VanEnkevort/Great Lakes Trader. She'll be arriving after unloading stone in Duluth.

Thunder Bay, ON
Thursday; 22:02 Frontenac departed for Port Colborne. Friday; 13:08 Tecumseh arrived at the G3 elevator to load grain.

Northern Lake Huron ports
Drummond Island: Friday; 11:27 Olive L Moore arrived to load limestone.

Stoneport: Friday; Clyde S Vanenkevort arrived and went to anchor.

Alpena: Friday; 16:30 The cement carrier Alpena arrived to load.

Parry Sound: Friday; 6:59 Algoma Innovator departed and is down bound on Lake Huron.

Port Inland: Friday; 3:51 Arthur M Anderson departed for Windsor.10:56 Wilfred Sykes arrived to load.

Detroit-Rouge River – Raymond H
American Century unloaded ore at Zug Island on Friday.

Lorain, ON – Drew Leonard
Algoma Conveyor departed Jonick Dock & Terminal at around 12:00 a.m. Friday with a load of coke breeze.

Cleveland, OH – Bill Kloss
American Courage is on the shuttles. Dorothy Ann/Pathfinder departed at 0814 Friday for Marblehead. Algoma Buffalo arrived at 11:46 for salt at Cargill. The ferry Put-In-Bay arrived Thursday for work at the Great Lakes Shipyard. Herbert C. Jackson was arriving Friday from Calcite.

Welland Canal and vicinity vessel passages - Friday November 8 – Barry Andersen

Buffalo (Tonawanda) - docked - Nov 7 -NACC Argonaut at 0024 and tug Calusa Coast & Delaware at 0834 - (Tonawanda) - Nov 7 - Calusa Coast & Delaware at 1220 - departed (Tonawanda) Nov 8 at 0400 approx. westbound

Nanticoke - docked - Nov 7 - Rosy (Bds) (ex SCT Stockhorn-17, MCT Stockhorn-16, HLL Caspian-08) at 1000 and tug Michigan & Great Lakes at 2007

Welland Canal upbound - Nov 7 - Baie Comeau at 1552 - Nov 8 - Algosea at 0600, tug Sea Eagle II & St Marys Cement II at 0656 and Algoma Enterprise at 1449

Welland Canal downbound - Nov 7 - Algoma Niagara at 1713, tug Petite Forte & St Marys Cement at 1849 and CSL Tadoussac at 2321 - Nov 8 - NACC Argonaut at 0117, Labrador (Cyp) at 205, light tugs Wyatt M at 0217 and Jarrett M at 0224, Algoma Transport at 0318, Evans Spirit at 0811, CSL Niagara at 11143, McKeil Spirit at 1246, Whitefish Bay at 1300, Algoma Conveyor at 1344, Jamno (Bhs) at 1943 and G3 Marquis at 2102

Hamilton - arrivals - Oct 8 - Resko (Bhs) at 0404, Algoma Transport at 1737, Eeborg (Nld) eta 2225 - anchored - Nov 4 - Rosaire A Desgagnes at 1848 - docked - Oct 31 - Federal Sakura (Mhl) at 1138 - Nov 6 - Federal Margaree (Mhl) at 2105 - Nov 7 - Florence Spirit at 1211 - departed - Nov 8 - Wicky Spirit at 0051 eastbound, Manitoulin at 1923 and CSL St Laurent at 1920

Clarkson - arrival - Nov 8 - Algoma Niagara at 0814 and Robert S Pierson at 1235 Toronto - arrival - docked - Nov 6 - Mamry (Bhs) at 1521 - Nov 7 - Mandarin (Cyp) at 1343 and NACC Capri (Deu) at 1907

 

Great Lakes water levels have swung from record lows to record highs. Here’s why

11/9 - The Great Lakes water levels broke records this past July and August, with some basins experiencing the highest levels ever recorded since 1918. Unusually high water has plagued their shores this year, causing beach erosion and disappearing waterfronts. Even as we head into the winter months, water levels “remain well above average and near record highs levels,” according to the Great Lakes Water Level Outlook, released this week by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

Water levels have not always been this high, however, with record low levels observed on lakes Michigan and Huron in 2013, part of an erratic pattern that could become normalized with our changing climate.

It’s important to examine the drivers behind the fluctuating lake levels and how the warming climate fits in.

Lakes Superior, Erie and Ontario saw their highest levels on record for the months of June and July. Lake St. Clair, which connects Lakes Huron and Erie, also set its highest level on record for those two months. In August, Lake Superior tied its record high, while lakes St. Clair and Erie set records. Although water levels on Lake Michigan were also abnormally high, it just missed setting records over the summer. Lake St. Clair’s July level of 577.56 feet set a record high for any month, compared with the average lake level of 574.8 feet. This may seem like a small difference, but this increase spread over an entire basin increases incidents of coastal flooding.

The height of each lake is determined by Net Basin Supply (NBS), which is evaporation subtracted from the sum of precipitation and runoff into the lakes. When the inflow (precipitation and runoff) is greater than evaporation, you get rising lakes. If the evaporation exceeds the inflow, lakes drop.

The record-breaking water levels this summer can be attributed to tremendous amounts of precipitation and excess runoff during the spring and summer. The Great Lakes region saw above-average rain for the three consecutive months from April to June, contributing to the overflowing basins.

The heavy spring and summer rains are part of a longer-term trend. The United States saw a 4 percent increase in precipitation between 1901 and 2015, with the Great Lakes region alone seeing a 10 percent rise.

“We’re seeing some of the highest water levels in recorded history on the Great Lakes, and that’s the result of very wet weather experienced over the last several years,” said Keith Kompoltowicz, chief of watershed hydrology for the Detroit district of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

This trend toward increased precipitation is expected to continue as the atmosphere warms because of climate change. A warmer atmosphere can hold more moisture, which can condense and turn into precipitation. A marked increase in heavy precipitation events has been observed across the United States during the past several decades, a trend linked to climate change and observed in the Great Lakes region.

But a warmer atmosphere also means water can more readily evaporate, which brings in the third part in our lake level equation. As temperature increases, the energy in a water particle increases, and the molecules can “escape” into the surrounding air. As we head into the colder months of late fall and early winter, evaporation increases because of the greater temperature difference between the chilly air above the water, and the comparatively mild lake surface waters. This competes with increased precipitation amounts to determine lake levels.

In other words, during dry spells, because of the warming climate, water levels can drop more quickly, leading to unusually low levels — which is what was seen in 2013.

So if the lake levels can be high, and also low, what’s the big deal? Over short time scales (a few years), intensified precipitation one season could spur high water levels and associated flooding. Likewise, hotter summers and increased evaporation could result in lower water levels the next season.

Over long time scales, the water levels usually reach equilibrium, as all basins are interconnected via channels such as the St. Marys River. However, with climate change, inconsistent lake level extremes across the Great Lakes are expected. Retreating beaches, water-covered bridges and even flooded basements and dysfunctional septic fields are all consequences of high water levels, while low water harms commercial shipping on the lakes, reducing the amount cargo ships can carry.

A 2019 climate change assessment for the Great Lakes conducted by the Environmental Law and Policy Center found that the most recent research shows both the potential for drops and rises in lake levels into the future.

The erratic seesaw of highs and lows year to year may be the new norm, and residents of the Great Lakes will need to prepare for a future with unstable water levels.

Read more and view images at this link: https://www.washingtonpost.com/weather/2019/11/08/great-lakes-water-levels-have-swung-record-lows-record-highs-heres-why

 

Bascule Brewery gets namesake's old control panel

11/9 - Lorain, OH – About year-and-a-half in the making, the Charles Berry Bascule Bridge's old control panel found a new, albeit unlikely, home.

"It was just one of those things where you kind of put that out into the universe that you kind of hope that one day that's going to happen," said Chris Kambouris, owner of Bascule Brewery and Public House -- the control panel's new station.

The Bascule Bridge, connecting the west and east sides of the city across the Black River, was built in the late 1930s. It is the world's second largest bascule bridge, opening at the center to allow boats to pass through. After about 48 years of use and extensive rehabilitation, the bridge officially was dedicated on Veterans Day 1988 and renamed in honor of Marine Cpl. Charles Berry, a Lorain native who was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor after he saved his fellow soldiers by diving on top of a live grenade that landed in their foxhole during the Battle of Iwo Jima.

Kambouris said the process to get the panel started when he took a walk on the bridge and met with one of the operators, who let him take a peek at the control room and said an upcoming overhaul was going to include the panel's replacement.

"My eyes just became as big as saucers," Kambouris said. "There was a shot, there was a chance. It all started with that, there was a possibility, and if there's anything this whole venture has taught me is all you can do is take those opportunities and hope for the best."

After months of checking in and updates from crews working on the bridge, and the panel being turned down by the Lorain Historical Society due to space issues, it finally landed in its namesake's east side brewery.

Kambouris said the plan is to rewire the circa-1950s board and have a hands-on display of one of the "gateways" to Lorain's industrial past. He plans to include history of the bridge, Berry and commemorate the men and women who worked on the bridge.

A ceremony is in the works, for either just before or just after the holiday season, he said, with plans to invite those "bridge raisers" who helped make the brewery, and bascule bridge, possible.

Much like the rest of the decor that dots the taproom, the control panel was a donation, Kambouris said. It will join church pews, couches and homey kitchen tables, local artwork and volunteers' nameplates as what Kambouris considers a testament to the trust Lorain has instilled in the space.

"Now that it's in our possession we definitely want to treat it with all the dignity that it deserves," he said. "Not just because of what it would do here in our brewery but because of what it represents to our city and what it represents to all the people that have worked on it, have passed through the bridge, anybody who's worked on the ships, it means a lot to them as well. this is a testimony to a bygone era and there's a lot of history, I would venture to say just as much emotional importance attached as there is a historical importance."

Those who worked on the bridge or have photos or information to share about it are asked to contact Kambouris by calling the brewery at (440) 317-0944 or message its Facebook page.

The taproom is at 1397 Colorado Ave. and is open 4 to 10 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday.

The Chronicle-Telegram

 

Port Huron Museum exhibit refreshes look at Storm of 1913 artifacts

11/9 - - Wayne Brusate said he never tried it, but some of the whiskey discovered in a shipwreck at the bottom of Lake Huron three decades ago was sealed well enough to drink.

Walking around the Port Huron Museum's latest exhibit Wednesday, the veteran commercial diver also recalled hearing bottles of champagne pop as cargo was retrieved from the site, suddenly relieved of the pressure from decades beneath 80 feet of water.

The small details were a call back to a happenstance discovery of the SS Regina, a well-known vessel that sank during the Great Lakes Storm of 1913. Brusate and a small group famously discovered the wreck “right in the shipping channel” between Lexington and Port Sanilac, while in search of another boat.

Plenty of the artifacts from the 250-foot package steamship freighter have since made their way to museums across the region, including a previous exhibit in Port Huron a century after the storm. Now, some of them are returning for a new exhibit at the museum’s Carnegie Center this week.

But this time, much of the focus is on divers and how those discoveries were made.

“There’s a lot of false narratives in some of the sinkings and the disasters. The diver does it out of love, love for the sport,” said Jim Leslie, a local scuba diver who’s also contributing artifacts to the museum’s latest exhibit. “The diver has brought into the history books more of the ships, how they were built. We know they were lost in the storm, but it gives it more perspective (to) what actually happened.”

Andrew Kercher, the museum's community engagement manager, said the exhibit will be available to the public through general museum admission for about six months.

“We talk about the storm. There are some artifacts from the shipwrecks, but there’s a lot of emphasis on the equipment used and how much that’s changed over time,” Kercher said. “You’ve got the hard-hat suits, which (are) the kind you see in the intro to ‘Scooby Doo’ — everyone recognizes that. It’s the big brass helmet, heavy weights and you would have like a pump attached to the head, you don’t have a tank.”

Read more and view images at this link: https://www.thetimesherald.com/story/news/2019/11/06/port-huron-museum-exhibit-refreshes-look-great-lakes-storm-1913-artifacts-divers-view/4176392002/

 

Life Aboard a Great Lakes cargo ship

11/9 - How do Canadian sailors spend a typical Saturday night on a cargo ship? Watching NHL hockey and having a barbecue, of course. It was all part of the experience as Donna Symonds and her husband John Low got a glimpse into life as a mariner this past month after travelling aboard the CSL Welland from the Welland Canal to the Port of Montreal.

https://www.marinedelivers.com/2019/10/life-aboard-a-great-lakes-cargo-ship

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  November 9

The NIMROD (3-mast wooden schooner, 184 foot, 559 tons, built in 1873, at Toledo, Ohio) was carrying 37,000 bushels of corn from Chicago to Buffalo. On 08 November 1874, she encountered thick fog on Lake Erie and the large double decked schooner MICHIGAN collided with her. The MICHIGAN continued on her course while the NIMROD filled with water and sank in 70 feet of water off Port Burwell-Port Stanley, Ontario. The crew escaped in the yawl and were picked up by the schooner GRANTHAM. The wreck was discovered in 1978, when Capt. Robert Hamilton, a commercial fisherman, snagged his nets on it.

COLUMBIA STAR (steel propeller bulk freighter, 1000 foot, 35,923 gross tons) was launched November 8, 1980, at Bay Shipbuilding Co., Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin (Hull#726) . She was part of the Oglebay Norton fleet. Renamed b.) AMERICAN CENTURY in 2006.

BENJAMIN F. FAIRLESS and IRVING S. OLDS arrived on November 8, 1988, at Kaohsiung, Taiwan for scrapping by Sing Cheng Yung Iron & Steel Co. Ltd.

The Great Lakes Engineering Works built steamer STADACONA of 1909, renamed b.) W. H. McGEAN in 1920, was renamed c.) ROBERT S. McNAMARA by its new owner Ford Motor Company's Marine Division on November 8, 1962. The McNAMARA was rescued from potential scrapping when Ford purchased her for $80,000 and spent $15,000 for renovation at AmShip's Toledo yard. J. P. MORGAN JR. arrived in Spain on November 8, 1980, for scrapping.

PETER A. B. WIDENER passed down the Welland Canal November 8, 1986, towed by the tugs TUSKER and GLENADA en route to Lauzon, Quebec. From there she was towed overseas for scrapping. When built, the PETER A. B. WIDENER and fleet mates J. PIERPONT MORGAN, NORMAN B. REAM and HENRY H. ROGERS were the first 600-footers built for the Pittsburgh Steamship Co. as "The Class of 1906."

On 08 Nov 1986, B. F. AFFLECK (steel propeller freighter, 588 foot, 7,964 gross tons, built in 1927, at Toledo, Ohio), under tow of the tug THUNDER CAPE, went adrift on Lake Superior in a storm after the tug lost power. The tug AVENGER IV was dispatched to pick up the AFFLECK, which was headed for scrap, and the tanker EASTERN SHELL towed the THUNDER CAPE to Thunder Bay for repairs.

BEN HUR, a wooden schooner-barge wrecker, 314 tons, built in 1874, at Dunville, Ontario, had been purchased for the job of salvaging the schooner M. E. TREMBLE. On 8 November 1890, she was at the job near Port Huron in the St. Clair River when she was rammed and sunk by the schooner-barge SUPERIOR which was being towed by the steamer PASSAIC. BEN HUR settled on top of the schooner she was attempting to salvage and a lighter-scow she was using also went down with her.

On 8 November 1877, the bark GREAT WEST was carrying 262,000 feet of lumber from Caseville to Chicago. Much of it was piled topside. In a big storm on Lake Michigan, she lost her deck load. She then became waterlogged and finally went ashore near Hyde Park, Illinois on 10 November. The crew were all saved.

On 8 November 1877, KATE L. BRUCE (3-mast wooden schooner, 307 tons, built in 1872, at Manitowoc, Wisconsin) was carrying wheat in tow of the tug JOHNSON when she was let go in heavy weather. She disappeared with all eight of her crew off Alpena, Michigan. A bureau containing her papers washed ashore in August 1878. The sunken wreck was discovered in 6 fathoms of water in Thunder Bay during the Autumn of 1879.

The forebody of the former CANADIAN EXPLORER arrived in Prescott on 05 Nov 2000, under tow of the Trois Rivieres tug DUGA. It remained there for three days. The previous March, it was reported that the hull was undergoing conversion to a 498-foot grain storage barge for Les Elevateurs des Trois Rivieres, Quebec. (The engine room portion of the former CANADIAN EXPLORER was mated to the forward section of the HAMILTON TRANSFER in 1998, and is now the CANADIAN TRANSFER.)

1981: EMERALD, the former LACHINEDOC, sank in the Persian Gulf during heavy weather while carrying steel mesh and aggregates. Nine members of the crew were missing while another three were rescued.

2007: SPIRIT OF NANTUCKET, the former NANTUCKET CLIPPER, struck an uncharted object in the Intercoastal Waterway and had to be beached. The ship was repaired at Norfolk, VA and resumed its journey to the Pacific for a new career as an Alaska cruise ship after earlier Great Lakes, St. Lawrence and East Coast service.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Business Beyond Borders event gives update on Soo Locks Expansion Project

11/8 - Sault Ste. Marie, MI – There was an update on the Soo Locks Expansion Project in Sault Ste. Marie on Wednesday. It’s an update that was part of the Business Beyond Borders event held at Kewadin Casino.

Several speakers talked about how to bridge the gap between the two Soos. Topics ranged from foreign trade to border discussion and the super lock construction. Phase one of the project will include deepening of the channel for just over a mile northwest of the locks.

There’s a lot of work ahead to coordinate. “Our goal with the new office being set up here is to manage construction. The other project is to make everybody aware of the progress, make sure all stakeholders are aware and to be transparent so when anything comes up, so it doesn’t catch anybody by surprise,” said U.S. Army Corps Engineers Mick Aubry.

The Corps continues to stress the tremendous impact on the nation if the Poe Lock was to be shut down for an extended period of time.

9 & 10 News

 

Port Reports -  November 8

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day's news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known).

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
Algoma Sault departed Duluth at 01:31 Thursday morning after spending a few hours tied up at Hallett #5, and headed directly for the Superior entry to load at Burlington Northern. Cason J. Callaway departed from Canadian National at 04:11 after taking on an iron ore load for Gary. Fivelborg was inbound at 15:48 to pick up beet pulp pellets at Gavilon, and Paul R. Tregurtha arrived at 16:16 for a load of iron ore pellets from Canadian National. Miedwie spent Thursday loading grain at Riverland Ag, and was outbound at 18:45. Also in port were Federal Kushiro, offloading cement at CRH; Cape, taking on wheat at CHS 1; and Ebroborg, anchored outside the harbor waiting to load grain at Gavilon after Fivelborg. In Superior, Algoma Sault arrived from Duluth at 02:41 Thursday morning, loaded ore at Burlington Northern, and was outbound for Hamilton at 16:20. Her fleetmate Algoma Spirit then arrived from anchor at 16:39 to load, and is expected to depart early Friday morning.

Two Harbors-Silver Bay, MN – Gary A. Putney
Roger Blough arrived Two Harbors on Nov. 7th at 09:09 for South of #2. As of 19:40 on Nov. 7th she was still at the dock. Tentatively due Two Harbors on Nov. 8th is the James R. Barker. There's a good chance she'll arrive early on Nov. 9th. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay had no traffic on Nov. 7th. Due Silver Bay on the 8th is the Indiana Harbor.

Thunder Bay, ON
Wednesday: 17:40 Federal Welland departed for Montreal. 17:50 Frontenac arrived at the G3 elevator to load wheat. Thursday; CSL Welland was loading grain at Viterra A. Federal Champlain and Federal Dart were at anchor in the main anchorage.

Northern Lake Huron ports
Spragge: Thursday; 13:40 After unloading slag John D Leitch departed for Two Harbors.

Stoneport: Thursday; 5:00 Kaye E Barker arrived to load limestone.

Parry Sound: Thursday 15:28 Algoma Innovator arrived to unload road salt.

Port Inland: Thursday; 8:36 Arthur M Anderson arrived to load.

Detroit-Rouge River – Raymond H
Thursday Arrivals: Leo A MacCarthur/John J Carrick arrived at the Marathon Asphalt Terminal to load. Samuel De Champlain/Innovation arrived at Lafarge to unload cement. CSL Laurentien arrived at St. Marys Cement to unload clinker.

Welland Canal and vicinity vessel passages - Thursday November 7, Barry Andersen

Buffalo (Tonawanda) - arrivals - NACC Argonaut at 0024 and tug Calusa Coast & Delaware at 0834 - (Tonawanda) - Nov 7 - Calusa Coast & Delaware at 1220

Nanticoke - arrival - Nov 7 - Rosy (Bds) (ex SCT Stockhorn-17, MCT Stockhorn-16, HLL Caspian-08) at 1000 and tug Michigan & Great Lakes at 2007 - docked - departed - Nov 6 - CSL Laurentien at 2352 - Nov 7 - Algoscotia at 1011 and tug Albert (ex Craig Eric Reinauer-18, El Bronco Grande-06, Hercules-81 at 1219- all westbound

Welland Canal upbound - Nov 6 - Algoma Buffalo at 1831, CSL Assiniboine at 1940 and Thunder Bay eta 2312 - Nov 7 - Ojibway at 0849, tug Jarrett M & Miss Libby at 0935 stopped at Heddle DD (PWDD) to make up tow with WYATT M - departed fitout wall at 1315 approx., Algoma Harvester at 1054, NACC Argonaut at 1142,

Welland Canal downbound - Nov 6 - Tim S Dool at 1626 - Nov 7 - light tug Wyatt M at 0443 (to assist Jarrett M with MIss Libby), Algoma Niagara at 1713, tug Petite Forte & St Marys Cement at 1849 and CSL Tadoussac eta 2300

Port Weller anchorage - departed - correction Nov 6 - Mamry (Bhs) at 1300 for Toronto and Kitikmeot W at 1121 eastbound - Nov 7 - Mandarin (Cyp) at 1305 for Toronto

Hamilton - arrivals - Nov 7 - Manitoulin at 0549, CSL St Laurent at 0750, Florence Spirit at 1211 and Wicky Spirit at 1331 - anchored - Nov 4 - Rosaire A Desgagnes at 1848 - docked - Oct 31 - Federal Sakura (Mhl) at 1138 - Nov 6 - Algoma Harvester at 0000 and Federal Margaree (Mhl) at 2105 - departed - Nov 7 - Straum (Nor) at 0837 eastbound

Clarkson - arrival - Nov 7 - Robert S Pierson at 0217 - departed Nov 7 at 1205 eastbound

Mississauga - docked - Nov 2 - Wicky Spirit at 0652 - departed Nov 7 at 1205 westbound

Toronto - arrival - Nov 7 - Mandarin (Cyp) at 1343 - docked - Nov 6 - Mamry (Bhs) at 1521 - departed - Nov 7 - Manitoulin at 0350 eastbound and Florence Spirit at 1008 westbound

 

Northern Michigan in Focus: Remembering sailors lost on Great Lakes

11/8 - Paradise, MI – Every November 10, the Great Lakes Shipwreck Historical Society holds a memorial ceremony to remember those lost on the Edmund Fitzgerald and all the sailors lost on the Great Lakes.

For this week’s Northern Michigan in Focus, Corey Adkins introduces you to a woman who’s worked at the museum for decades and shows you why she thinks it’s important to remember. “

I look at the lake and it’s awesome. It’s calming to sit there and look at that lake,” said Bev Purcell. It’s the time of the year when fall starts to meet winter and Lake Superior shows its might. Purcell has lived in the Paradise area for decades. For more than 20 years she’s worked in the light keeper’s quarters at Whitefish Point.

“I greet people and take care of the oldest lighthouse on Lake Superior, the oldest building. It was built for the keeper of the light. It was built in 1861 when our President Lincoln just took office,” explained Purcell.

No one will ever know what happened, but what’s important is to remember.

“Every November 10th we have that ceremony. The bell is taken out of its protective cover and still some family members are able to come and ring it. Each man’s name is read and somebody comes up and rings that bell in somebody’s honor, and the 30th ring is for all the people that lost their lives on the Great Lakes. It’s done with deep respect for these men who lost their lives and it means a lot to their families,” explained Purcell.

“It still has a hurt that they never ever get over. And I think it’s good to keep that memory alive for their loved ones and for us to always remember what it was many years ago, and how many men braved that lake and did their job.”

View the interview at this link: https://www.9and10news.com/2019/11/06/northern-michigan-in-focus-remembering-sailors-lost-on-the-great-lakes

 

Putzfrau, the boat that cleaned up polluted Cuyahoga River, returns with new mission

11/8 - Cleveland, Ohio – A boat that played a critical role in cleaning up the polluted Cuyahoga River after it caught fire in 1969 went back on the very river it cleaned for the first time since it dry docked decades ago.

The aptly named Putzfrau, which means “cleaning lady” in German, was designed by a local family, the Samsels. The vessel was one of the first to help to remove oil and debris from the river, using vacuum tubes to suck up hazardous liquids into tanks below deck and a crane to scoop up litter.

Eighty-nine-year-old Frank Samsel, who built the Putzfrau, sat in the captain's seat during the boat's first time on the water.

A partnership between PHASTAR Corporation and West Creek Conservancy, both northeast Ohio nonprofits, brought the boat, which shares a past with the Crooked River, back to life. The 56-foot, 46-ton steel boat took manpower and money to get it back onto the Cuyahoga River—$3,500 just to get it back in the water from the dock where it stood for years.

At the time of renovation, the Putzfrau was a bit dusty and needed a fresh coat of paint, but the people behind her revival hopes she can take on a new mission.

“People see the Cuyahoga River, they see Cleveland, they see the burning river,” said Peter Bode, Cleveland Project Manager for the West Creek Conservancy. “And it’s a tired narrative. It’s something that really needs to be re-looked at and reformatted a bit.”

While the mechanics and engines of the boat are in working order, Bode said community partners are working to restore the crane hydraulics and vacuum system. "We want to get it to the point where it can go back to its original purpose, which is cleaning the river," Bode said.

Now that the boat is up and running, it doesn't stop there. Future plans include creating an on-board convertible processing wet lab for water quality testing that would be tied to river and lake research efforts conducted by regional agencies.

The West Creek Conservancy is working to secure funding for painting the vessel with marine paint.

See photos at this link: https://www.news5cleveland.com/news/local-news/oh-cuyahoga/putzfrau-the-boat-that-cleaned-up-the-polluted-cuyahoga-river-returns-to-the-water-with-a-new-mission

 

Three contaminated sites in Duluth Harbor to undergo cleanup

11/8 - Duluth, MN - Legacy contaminants have been in and around the Duluth Harbor for years, but now there is a new effort to address them. Three sites in the Duluth Harbor are now set to undergo cleanup plans. This work is part of a larger effort to address legacy contaminants in the St. Louis River Estuary and Duluth Harbor.

"Waste management disposal practices for industry have changed hugely since the historic times," said Duluth Seaway Port Authority Executive Director Deb DeLuca. There are legacy contaminants in the AGP/Northland Pier Slip, AZCON/Duluth Seaway Port Authority Slip, and The Ponds behind Erie Pier.

There are legacy contaminants in the AGP/Northland Pier Slip, AZCON/Duluth Seaway Port Authority Slip, and The Ponds behind Erie Pier. But the effects of the old waste management practices are still being felt in the Duluth Harbor.

There are legacy contaminants in the 8.4-acre AGP/Northland Pier Slip, 6.4-acre AZCON/Duluth Seaway Port Authority Slip, and The Ponds behind Erie Pier.

"These contaminated sediments... pose a risk to the benthic habitat, those critters that live down there in the sediment, as well as the fish, and then extending up to human health, so it's really important for us to remove that risk from the system," said Minnesota Pollution Control Agency Contaminated Sediment Coordinator LaRae Lehto.

Cleanup plans in the two slips include removing highly contaminated sediments, and installing caps of clean material and armor stone. The Ponds behind Erie Pier will be dredged and contaminated sediment will be removed and disposed of in a landfill.

"By removing or eliminating exposure to the contaminated sediments... hopefully the fish become healthier, hopefully the whole waterway becomes healthier, and we remove those limitations on how we can use the area," said Lehto.

The two slip projects, estimated to cost $6.2 million are expected to begin next summer. The Ponds behind Erie Pier project, estimated to cost $15.8 million is expected to start the summer of 2021.

The projects will partially be funded with state bonding funds and matched by the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative. The MPCA is also working to secure funding from the U.S. EPA Great Lakes Legacy Act.

The three cleanup sites are part of the St. Louis River Area of Concern, one of 43 Great Lakes locations in the United States and Canada where shoreline alterations and industrial contamination have degraded water quality and threatened wildlife habitat and aquatic life.

Primary partners in the cleanup efforts include the Fond du Lac band of Lake Superior Chippewa, the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, MPCA, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. EPA, and the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

WDIO

 

Mississagi brings cargo of stone; vessel may be ending career soon

11/8 - Grand Haven, MI – Grand Haven saw one freighter visit this past week, and that was the motor vessel Mississagi of Lower Lakes Towing. The Canadian vessel called on the Verplank dock Tuesday afternoon with a split cargo of stone grades from Meldrum Bay and Bruce Mines, Ontario. Before midnight, the Mississagi was outbound for Lake Michigan.

Built in 1943, the Mississagi is the oldest operating Canadian-flagged vessel in service on the Great Lakes. It was built by Great Lakes Engineering Works of Ecorse as the Hill Annex and was one of 16 Maritime-class ships. Maritime-class vessels were built by the U.S. Maritime Commission to assist shipping companies in fleet renewal. The Hill Annex and two other Maritimers were sold to the U.S. Steel Corp. and, in exchange, the steel company retired six vessels that were older and smaller.

The Hill Annex was rechristened George A. Sloan by the steelmaker, and it joined the large fleet of “tin stackers” plying the inland seas. The nickname comes from the silver smokestacks that U.S. Steel vessels have. George A. Sloan was a prominent citizen of New York and a director of U.S. Steel at the time.

The Sloan was transferred over to the Michigan Limestone-owned Bradley Transportation Co. in 1966. Michigan Limestone was a division of U.S. Steel. The Sloan would now work specifically in the stone trade and was converted to a self-unloader over the 1965-66 winter. U.S. Steel absorbed the Bradley fleet in 1967. The arrival of 1,000-foot vessels to the steelmaker’s fleet idled many smaller ships to scrap.

The Sloan’s self-unloading conversion gave the vessel more versatility and is likely why it avoided getting scrapped when so many of its U.S. Steel fleetmates were sent to the breakers. In 2000, Great Lakes Fleet (the remains of the company that was once U.S. Steel) sold the Sloan to Lower Lakes Towing Ltd. (LLT). The vessel was renamed Mississagi and reflagged Canadian. Its namesake is the Mississagi Strait located in Lake Huron.

Two other GLF ships were sold to LLT’s U.S. affiliate, Grand River Navigation. Those ships, the Myron C. Taylor (renamed Calumet) and Calcite II (renamed Maumee), served GRN for several seasons before they were scrapped in 2009 and 2011, respectively. The names Calumet and Maumee are both in use on active ships in the fleet today.

The Mississagi continues to be a valuable asset for Lower Lakes Towing, working to serve customers in small ports and constricting rivers. Despite this, the Mississagi is on borrowed time. Earlier this week, Rand Logistics, the parent company of LLT, announced the purchase of the former American Valor, a 767-foot steamship that has been idle for more than 10 years. While not confirmed, it is likely that Lower Lakes will repower the vessel and place it back in service.

With another vessel entering the LLT fleet, boatwatchers are concerned about the Mississagi’s future. It has outlived a lot of vessels, but its age makes it a prime candidate for scrapping, possibly as soon as the shipping season is over. The Mississagi has been a common sight in Grand Haven during its career, so catch the freighter while you still can.

Samuel Hankinson / Grand Haven Tribune

 

Know Your Ships author visits museum for lecture and book signing

11/8 - Toledo, OH – "Know Your Ships" editor and publisher Roger LeLievre will join us at the National Museum of the Great Lakes on Wednesday, November 20 at 7 p.m. to discuss the 60-year history of the popular annual vessel field guide up to the recent release of the new hardcover book "Know Your Ships: Decades" (an editors' choice highlighting the guide’s many outstanding images since its founding in 1959).

Books will be available for sale and signing at the gift shop. This event is FREE for GLHS/NMGL Members and $11.00 for non-Museum Members. For additional details and to register visit: https://nmgl.org/event/fall-lecture-series-2019-2/

National Museum of the Great Lakes

 

National Museum offers 51st holiday card in series

11/8 - Toledo, OH – The National Museum of the Great Lakes has revealed its 2019 Holiday Card for purchase. For the past 51 years, Director Emeritus Alexander B. Cook has painted a watercolor that is used exclusively by the organization to create the holiday card that is sold to the public to benefit the museum. The museum estimates that the sale of holiday cards featuring Alex Cook’s watercolor has raised over $100,000 for the organization over the past 50 years.

“At age 95, Alex Cook is like the energizer bunny of marine artists,” said Christopher Gillcrist, executive director of the museum. “His paint brushes are never more than a few feet away from him at all times.”

This year’s image features two Great Lakes Towing Company tugs in the foreground with an Interlake Steamship freighter in the lock. “I have loved tugboats since my earliest days in St. Joseph, Michigan, and I thought this year I would include two Great Lakes Towing Tugs because of the company’s wonderful gift of the Tug Ohio to the museum,” Cook said.

Gillcrist noted that the cards have become somewhat of a collector’s piece over the years with dozens of people ordering cards year after year. Cards can be ordered online at nmglstore.org or by calling 419-214-5000 extension 200. The cards are shipped in packs of ten cards and envelopes for $16.95 plus shipping and handling.

National Museum of the Great Lakes

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  November 8

The NIMROD (3-mast wooden schooner, 184 foot, 559 tons, built in 1873, at Toledo, Ohio) was carrying 37,000 bushels of corn from Chicago to Buffalo. On 08 November 1874, she encountered thick fog on Lake Erie and the large double decked schooner MICHIGAN collided with her. The MICHIGAN continued on her course while the NIMROD filled with water and sank in 70 feet of water off Port Burwell-Port Stanley, Ontario. The crew escaped in the yawl and were picked up by the schooner GRANTHAM. The wreck was discovered in 1978, when Capt. Robert Hamilton, a commercial fisherman, snagged his nets on it.

COLUMBIA STAR (steel propeller bulk freighter, 1000 foot, 35,923 gross tons) was launched November 8, 1980, at Bay Shipbuilding Co., Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin (Hull#726) . She was part of the Oglebay Norton fleet. Renamed b.) AMERICAN CENTURY in 2006.

BENJAMIN F. FAIRLESS and IRVING S. OLDS arrived on November 8, 1988, at Kaohsiung, Taiwan for scrapping by Sing Cheng Yung Iron & Steel Co. Ltd.

The Great Lakes Engineering Works built steamer STADACONA of 1909, renamed b.) W. H. McGEAN in 1920, was renamed c.) ROBERT S. McNAMARA by its new owner Ford Motor Company's Marine Division on November 8, 1962. The McNAMARA was rescued from potential scrapping when Ford purchased her for $80,000 and spent $15,000 for renovation at AmShip's Toledo yard. J. P. MORGAN JR. arrived in Spain on November 8, 1980, for scrapping.

PETER A. B. WIDENER passed down the Welland Canal November 8, 1986, towed by the tugs TUSKER and GLENADA en route to Lauzon, Quebec. From there she was towed overseas for scrapping. When built, the PETER A. B. WIDENER and fleet mates J. PIERPONT MORGAN, NORMAN B. REAM and HENRY H. ROGERS were the first 600-footers built for the Pittsburgh Steamship Co. as "The Class of 1906."

On 08 Nov 1986, B. F. AFFLECK (steel propeller freighter, 588 foot, 7,964 gross tons, built in 1927, at Toledo, Ohio), under tow of the tug THUNDER CAPE, went adrift on Lake Superior in a storm after the tug lost power. The tug AVENGER IV was dispatched to pick up the AFFLECK, which was headed for scrap, and the tanker EASTERN SHELL towed the THUNDER CAPE to Thunder Bay for repairs.

BEN HUR, a wooden schooner-barge wrecker, 314 tons, built in 1874, at Dunville, Ontario, had been purchased for the job of salvaging the schooner M. E. TREMBLE. On 8 November 1890, she was at the job near Port Huron in the St. Clair River when she was rammed and sunk by the schooner-barge SUPERIOR which was being towed by the steamer PASSAIC. BEN HUR settled on top of the schooner she was attempting to salvage and a lighter-scow she was using also went down with her.

On 8 November 1877, the bark GREAT WEST was carrying 262,000 feet of lumber from Caseville to Chicago. Much of it was piled topside. In a big storm on Lake Michigan, she lost her deck load. She then became waterlogged and finally went ashore near Hyde Park, Illinois on 10 November. The crew were all saved.

On 8 November 1877, KATE L. BRUCE (3-mast wooden schooner, 307 tons, built in 1872, at Manitowoc, Wisconsin) was carrying wheat in tow of the tug JOHNSON when she was let go in heavy weather. She disappeared with all eight of her crew off Alpena, Michigan. A bureau containing her papers washed ashore in August 1878. The sunken wreck was discovered in 6 fathoms of water in Thunder Bay during the Autumn of 1879.

The forebody of the former CANADIAN EXPLORER arrived in Prescott on 05 Nov 2000, under tow of the Trois Rivieres tug DUGA. It remained there for three days. The previous March, it was reported that the hull was undergoing conversion to a 498-foot grain storage barge for Les Elevateurs des Trois Rivieres, Quebec. (The engine room portion of the former CANADIAN EXPLORER was mated to the forward section of the HAMILTON TRANSFER in 1998, and is now the CANADIAN TRANSFER.)

1981: EMERALD, the former LACHINEDOC, sank in the Persian Gulf during heavy weather while carrying steel mesh and aggregates. Nine members of the crew were missing while another three were rescued.

2007: SPIRIT OF NANTUCKET, the former NANTUCKET CLIPPER, struck an uncharted object in the Intercoastal Waterway and had to be beached. The ship was repaired at Norfolk, VA and resumed its journey to the Pacific for a new career as an Alaska cruise ship after earlier Great Lakes, St. Lawrence and East Coast service.

During the 24 hour period ending on midnight, November 8, 1886 a total of 113 vessels entered Chicago harbor.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Jody Aho, Russ Plumb, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Old Iron Scow attracts worldwide attention

11/7 - Niagara Falls, ON – A rusty century-old barge appears to have captured the attention of the world. The boat known as the Iron Scow had been lodged in the rocks of the upper Niagara River, around 600 metres from the Horseshoe Falls, since 1918. That was until Halloween, when a fierce windstorm flipped the vessel over and moved it about 50 metres closer to the brink.

"The poor old thing, what's left of it, has spun around and tipped over," said Jim Hill, superintendent of heritage at Niagara Parks. "It really wasn't so much as a boat anymore than it was a wall," he explained. "It had been facing Canada, so we had this great view of what looked like a relatively intact boat but it was really more like a metal façade of a boat."

Since last Thursday, media agencies from around the world have reported on the incident, and the scow's dramatic history. The story has been featured in the New York Times, The Daily Mail in the UK, CBC and CNN both reported on it and it has earned a mention on Wikipedia.

The scow appears to have grounded itself once again and Niagara Parks officials are monitoring situation, but officials say there's no way to predict if the vessel will, if ever, be on the move again. "We've had our engineers look at it and it's really hard to say what will happen next," Hill said.

On Aug. 6, 1918, the scow, used for dredging and dumping, broke loose from a towing tug about 1.6 kilometres up river. As it drifted towards the edge of the falls, the two men on board opened the bottom dumping doors to flood the compartments and slow down its approach to the falls. It worked, as the scow got wedged in rocks in the shallow rapids, but it left the men marooned in the torturous upper rapids. What followed was a dramatic 17-hour rescue of the two men by legendary Niagara river man William 'Red' Hill Sr.

A lifeline cannon, rushed to the scene by the U.S. Coast Guard, shot a line from the roof of a nearby powerhouse out to the stranded men. Later, a breeches buoy — a canvas sling suspended from a pulley — was put in place on the heavy rope. Part way out, the breeches buoy stopped due to a tangle in the ropes.

Hill Sr., who had recently returned to Niagara after having been wounded in France while serving in the First World War, volunteered to fix the problem. With the beam of a search light following him, Hill made two trips out to untangle the lines.

The company that owned the scow, the Great Lakes Dredge and Dock Company, still exists. "Even immediately after the incident they realized they weren't interested in recovering their sand barge," Hill said. "It just wasn't worth risking peoples' lives to try to get it out of the rushing water." To commemorate the 100th anniversary of the rescue, several new interpretive panels overlooking the site were unveiled in August.

Niagara Falls Review

Wisconsin university receives $10 million donation for new Great Lakes research vessel

11/7 - Milwaukee, WI – The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee has received a $10 million donation toward construction of a new research vessel intended to help advance the scientific understanding of water and the Great Lakes. The money from anonymous donors, and given through the Greater Milwaukee Foundation, equals the largest gifts ever received by the school, officials said.

The research vessel, to be called the Maggi Sue at the request of the donors, will cost an estimated $15 million. A capital campaign for the ship includes an additional $5 million for operational costs. The donation is a major step toward construction of a ship that will expand UWM’s research capabilities on the Great Lakes and provide students more opportunities for onboard study.

The Maggi Sue would replace UWM’s Neeskay, a 66-year-old Army boat that was purchased by the university in 1970. University officials have wanted to replace the aging Neeskay for more than a decade. “I’ll miss her, but nothing lasts forever,” said Val Klump, dean of the School of Freshwater Sciences.

A construction start date for the ship has not yet been determined, but university officials said they have received other donations not yet disclosed.

Klump said early donations have allowed the school to hire a naval architect, Seacraft Design of Sturgeon Bay, to design the ship. While a builder has not yet been identified, Klump said the Maggi Sue will be constructed by a Wisconsin boat builder.

Replacing the aging Neeskay will give UWM a much larger ship and greater flexibility for Great Lakes research, according to school officials. According to shipbuildinghistory.com, the former Army ship was built in 1953 in New Orleans.

The Neeskay is 71 feet long, has 350 feet square feet of deck space and 120-square feet of lab space and can accommodate 10 students. The Maggi Sue would be 120 feet, have 2,100 square feet of deck space, 800 square feet of wet and dry labs and could accommodate 24 students.

"The opportunities for education and training are going to greatly increase," Klump said.

The ship is designed to use interchangeable laboratory pods on the deck to meet different needs of scientists and classes. It will also include a dive locker for underwater research, sensors that can collect data in real time and a navigation system to keep the ship in one place, regardless of weather conditions. Having a larger ship and other amenities, including sleeping accommodations for a crew of 18, will allow for extended stays and expand research into Lake Huron and Lake Erie, Klump said.

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

 

Port Reports -  November 7

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day's news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known).

Two Harbors-Silver Bay, MN – Gary A. Putney
Two Harbors saw no traffic on Nov. 6th. Due Two Harbors on Nov. 7th is the Roger Blough. John D. Leitch is due Saturday. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay saw the departure of the Presque Isle at 06:30 on the 6th with a destination of "Ohio". Probably either Cleveland or Ashtabula. There is no traffic scheduled for Silver Bay on Nov. 7th.

Marysville, MI – Dawn C. Roberts
Sam Laud was discharging cargo at Bluewater Aggregates, in Marysville, at daybreak Wednesday, November 6.

Detroit-Rouge River – Raymond H
Wednesday Arrivals: H Lee White arrived at Zug Island to unload coal. Iver Bright-arrived at the Marathon Asphalt Terminal to load. Olive L Moore/Menominee arrived at the Carmeuse Dock to unload stone. Tecumseh, James R Barker arrived at the Waterfront Petroleum Terminal to fuel.

Cleveland, OH – Bill Kloss
Clyde S. VanEnkevort/Erie Trader arrived at 07:30 Wednesday with 38,000 tons of ore for the Bulk Terminal. McKeil Spirit arrived at Lehigh Cement at 10:47 and Petite Forte departed at 16:44. Happy River remained at the Port docks.

Welland Canal and vicinity vessel passages - Wednesday Nov. 6 – Barry Andersen
Nanticoke - arrival - Oct 6 - Algoscotia at 0844 - docked - Nov 5 - tug Albert (ex Craig Eric Reinauer-18, El Bronco Grande-06, Hercules-81 at 1101 and CSL Laurentien at 1832 - departed - Nov 5 - Kitikmeot W at 2315 eastbound

Long Point Bay anchorage - Oct 5 - Algoscotia at 1238 - departed Oct 6 at 0843 for the dock

Welland Canal
Upbound - Nov 4 - Mamry (Bhs) at 0758 to Port Weller anchorage - Nov 5 - McKeil Spirit at 1346 and Evans Spirit at 1528 - Nov 6 - Osogovo (Mlt) at 0014 from wharf 2, Algoma Strongfield at 0427,Algoma Equinox at 1021, NACC Argonaut at 1142, Algoma Buffalo at 1831, CSL Assiniboine at 1940 and Thunder Bay eta 2300

Downbound - Nov 5 - NACC Capri (Deu) at 1418 - Nov 6 - Kitikmeot W at 0214, Manitoulin at 0632, tug Everlast & Norman McLeod at 0953, Kaministiqua at 1045 and Tim S Dool at 1626

Welland Canal docks - docked - Nov 3 - Osogovo (Mlt) stopped at wharf 2 to discharge at 1103 - departed Oct 6 at 0014 for Thunder Bay

Port Weller anchorage - anchored - Oct 30 - Mandarin (Cyp) at 1521 awaiting dock in Toronto - departed - Oct 6 - Mamry (Bhs) at 1300 approx. for Toronto - Oct 6 - Kitikmeot W at 1121

Hamilton - arrivals - Oct 6 - Algoma Harvester at 0000 and Federal Margaree (Mhl) at 2051 - anchored - Nov 4 - Rosaire A Desgagnes at 1848 - docked - Oct 31 - Federal Sakura (Mhl) at 1138 - Nov 5 - Straum (Nor) at 1847 - departed - Nov 6 - Algoma Equinox at 0801 westbound, Federal Danube (Mhl) at 1438, Lake Ontario (Atg) (ex Federal Manitou-11, completed as Lake Ontario) at 1518 and Wolf Islander III at 1640 - all eastbound

Clarkson - arrival - Nov 5 - Robert S Pierson at 1605 - departed Nov 6 at 0141 eastbound

Mississauga - docked - Nov 2 - Wicky Spirit at 0652

Toronto - arrival - Nov 6 - Mamry (Bhs) at 1521 from Port Weller anchorage and Manitoulin at 1903 - docked - Nov 5 - Florence Spirit at 2155 - departed - Nov 6 tug Sea Eagle II & St Marys Cement II at 1842 eastbound

 

November storms, Fitzgerald sinking topic of remembrances

11/7 - Two Harbors, MN - Two Harbors and nearby Split Rock Lighthouse will host back-to-back remembrances about how the Gales of November can create life-taking storms. On Saturday (1 p.m., Nov. 9) Thom Holden, maritime historian and former director of the Lake Superior Maritime Visitor Center, will speak about November Shipwrecks at the Lake County Historical Society's Depot Museum. He brings a broad range of research and storytelling to his presentation.

On Sunday, Split Rock Lighthouse unfurls its annual tribute to the 29 crew members who died in the wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald on Nov. 10, 1975. Part of the ceremony includes the lighting of the lighthouse beacon, its original Fresnel lens, and a ringing of a memorial bell, once for each of the crew and a 30th for all mariners lost on the Great Lakes. The lighthouse is open 11 a.m.-6 p.m., and the ceremony is at 4:30 p.m., with people permitted into the tower afterward with the beacon still lit.

 

44 years after sinking, last communications from Edmund Fitzgerald still haunt

11/7 - The song starts with whining chords and an eerie first verse
“The legend lives on from the Chippewa on down
of the big lake they called ‘Gitche Gumee.’
The lake, it is said, never gives up her dead
when the skies of November turn gloomy.”

"The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald" by Gordon Lightfoot introduced most of the world to the tragedy 44 years ago this Sunday, Nov. 10, but it remains a vivid memory for many in the Great Lakes region of northern Minnesota.

The S.S. Edmund Fitzgerald was christened on June 8, 1958, and named after Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Company's newly elected chairman of the board. The company had contracted an engineering firm the year before to make the ship the largest ship on the Great Lakes.

Over the next 17 years, the Fitzgerald started breaking records for the largest loads of freight carried on the lakes. Not without its troubles, the ship suffered damages in the late '60s and early '70s but remained an important player in Great Lakes transportation.

Around 8:30 a.m. on November 9, 1975, the ship was loaded with 26,000 tons of taconite pellets and departed Superior, Wis. en route to Zug Island on the Detroit River. By that afternoon, the National Weather Service issued gale warnings for the area that the Fitzgerald was sailing.

Another ship, the Arthur M. Anderson, was about 15 miles behind the Fitzgerald and was the ship most in touch with the doomed freighter throughout the next 24 harrowing hours.

By the early morning hours of November 10, the Edmund Fitzgerald reported winds up to 60 miles-per-hour and 10-foot high waves.

Read more about the last communications from the Edmund Fitzgerald and other ships on Lake Superior at this link: https://www.mitchellrepublic.com/community/history/4756855-44-years-after-sinking-last-communications-from-Edmund-Fitzgerald-still-haunt

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  November 7

On 07 November 1871, M COURTRIGHT (wooden schooner, 276 tons, built in 1856, at Erie, Pennsylvania) was carrying lumber in a storm on Lake Michigan. She struck bottom after her anchor dragged. She then became waterlogged. The crew abandoned in the yawl. The vessel went ashore several miles south of Kenosha, Wisconsin. The revenue cutter ANDREW JOHNSON tried in vain to pull her free but couldn't. The COURTRIGHT broke up a few days later.

On 7 November 1852, ST LOUIS (wooden side-wheeler, 190 foot, 618 tons, built in 1844, at Perrysburg, Ohio) was carrying railroad cars when she capsized and sank in a gale off Kelley's Island on Lake Erie. She was owned by Beer & Samuel Ward.

On 07 Nov 1906, the Grand Trunk carferry GRAND HAVEN (steel carferry, 306 foot, 2,320 gross tons built in 1903, at Toledo, Ohio) was put up for sale at a receiver's auction when the Grand Trunk Car Ferry Line defaulted on its bonds. It was purchased by a new Grand Trunk subsidiary, the Grand Trunk Milwaukee Car Ferry Company. This vessel had a long career both on the Lakes and in the Caribbean. She was finally scrapped at Hamilton, Ontario in 1970.

The T-2 converted laker HILDA MARJANNE's 1961, German-built hull forward of the engine room, minus her pilot house, was towed by the tugs G W ROGERS and BAGOTVILLE to Port Weller Dry Docks arriving there on November 7, 1983. This section was to become part of the CANADIAN RANGER.

On November 7, 1989, the SAMUEL MATHER, a.) HENRY FORD II, was moved to Toledo's C & O Frog Pond on her way to the cutter's torch.

ARTHUR B HOMER (Hull#303) was launched November 7, 1959, for the Bethlehem Steel Corp., Cleveland, Ohio. She was the last ship built by Great Lakes Engineering at River Rouge, Michigan.

In 1902, BRANSFORD rammed and sank the tug RECORD with a loss of a tug crewman in the Portage Lake Ship Canal in Michigan's Keweenaw Peninsula. Renamed b.) JOHN H MC GEAN in 1916, and c.) CLIFFORD F. HOOD in 1943, the HOOD was scrapped in Bilbao, Spain in 1974.

On November 7, 1913, the storm responsible for sinking or damaging more vessels than any other began a six-day assault on the Great Lakes. The "Big Blow" of 1913, struck Lake Superior on November 7 and reached Lake Michigan by November 8, where the Pittsburgh Steamship Company vessel CLARENCE A. BLACK was severely damaged by the waves at the dock in Gary, Indiana.

On 7 November 1893, ALBANY (steel propeller package freighter, 267 foot, 1,918 gross tons, built in 1884, at Wyandotte, Michigan) collided with the iron freighter PHILADELPHIA in a thick fog. PHILADELPHIA took ALBANY in tow to try to save her, but she sank a few miles off Pointe aux Barques, Michigan. Her crew transferred to PHILADELPHIA, but they soon had to abandon her too since she also sank. Eight lives were lost, presumably when one of the lifeboats was run down by the still running, but abandoned, PHILADELPHIA.

On 7 November 1865, LILY DANCEY (2-mast wooden schooner, 92 foot, 132 gross tons built in 1856, at Goderich, Ontario) was carrying grain in a gale on Lake Huron when she was driven ashore near Port Elgin or Kincardine, Ontario. Her cargo was later recovered, but the schooner broke up by 27 November of that year.

CITY OF FLINT 32 ran aground at Manitowoc, Wisconsin in 1947.

1885: ALGOMA hit Greenstone Rock off Isle Royale, Lake Superior and became a total loss. There were 46 casualties and only 16 on board were saved.

1887: OSCEOLA ran aground on Flat Rock Reef, Saginaw Bay, and all on board were rescued. The ship was abandoned as a total loss in December but refloated in the spring of 1888 and rebuilt.

1910: WASAGA caught fire and burned off Copper Harbor while seeking shelter in a storm, but all on board survived.

1921: ARAGON stranded off Salmon Point, Lake Ontario. It was released the following year but declared a total loss. The hull was sold and rebuilt and last sailed as BAYANNA in 1962.

1921: The wooden schooner barge MARY E. McLAUCHLAN sank in a storm on Nipigon Bay, Lake Superior.

1947: WILLIAM C. WARREN ran aground near Presque Isle Point, Lake Huron, while downbound with grain and had to be abandoned to the underwriters. It was not released until the following year.

1969: The Norwegian tanker CATE BROVIG hit the wall while upbound at the Eisenhower Lock and had a hole punched in the hull. The vessel was headed for Duluth. The ship first came inland in 1959 and was scrapped at Split, Yugoslavia as c) STAVROS T. in 1976.

1974: IRIS had come to the Great Lakes in 1969 and 1971. It sank as d) EUROPEAN PERSISTENCE while 510 miles southeast of Bermuda after developing leaks while enroute from Tampa to Venice. All on board were rescued.

1991: The former Swedish freighter FALKON, a first time Seaway trader in 1984, sank as c) APPOLONIA FAITH off the southwest coast of Sardinia while traveling from Valencia, Spain, to Piraeus, Greece. Two lives were lost.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Historical Collections of the Great Lakes, Jody Aho, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Edward L. Ryerson moved for soil testing

11/6 - Superior, WI – The much-loved but long-idle laker Edward L. Ryerson was moved Tuesday from the Tower Bay slip to nearby Fraser Shipyards in Howards Pocket by the Heritage Marine tugs Helen H and Edward H.

The move was made so that core samples can be taken from the slip where she has been sitting and has nothing to do with a possible return to service. When the testing is done she will be returned to the lay-up dock. The Ryerson has been inactive since May 2009.

 

Duluth achieves wind energy cargo record

11/6 - Duluth, MN – The final inbound wind energy cargo vessel of 2019 off-loaded at Duluth’s Clure Public Marine Terminal recently, and her cargo helped set a record. In total, the Port of Duluth welcomed 306,000 freight tons of wind energy cargo in 2019, a single-season record. This hefty haul eclipsed the previous high of 302,000 freight tons set in 2008.

Duluth Cargo Connect, recently honored as worldwide Port/Terminal Operator of the Year by Heavy Lift and Project Forwarding International, managed the unloading, storage and dispatch of the wind energy cargo to sites throughout the Midwest.

“This has been a banner year for wind energy cargo and also for the Clure Public Marine Terminal and Duluth Cargo Connect,” said Deb DeLuca, executive director of the Duluth Seaway Port Authority. “And it’s no accident. We’ve made more than $25 million in strategic investments to the terminal over the past four years, enhancements that help support the excellent work Duluth Cargo Connect does in handling these oversize wind cargos.”

As the Great Lakes’ top tonnage port and inland North America’s premier world port, Duluth emerged as a primary destination for wind energy cargo beginning in 2006.

“Wind energy has been an important part of our cargo portfolio, dating back to our first shipments more than a decade ago," said Jonathan Lamb, president of Duluth Cargo Connect. “As the farthest inland port in North America, we’re geographically well-situated to support wind farm installations in the Upper Midwest and central Canada. We pride ourselves in providing a seamless connection between modes of transportation for our wind energy customers."

Duluth Seaway Port Authority

 

Port Reports -  November 6

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day's news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known).

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
Federal Kushiro arrived Duluth at 06:02 Tuesday morning to unload powdered cement at CRH. Miedwie raised anchor and came into port at 06:32 to take on a load of grain from the Riverland Ag elevator, and Mesabi Miner was inbound at 07:35 to load coal at SMET. American Mariner was outbound at 10:48 carrying iron ore pellets for Indiana Harbor, and John G. Munson departed at 16:16 with sinter feed she had loaded at Hallett #5. The Miner was outbound for St. Clair at 18:44. There was no traffic through the Superior entry on Tuesday, however both Stewart J. Cort and Algoma Sault are expected before noon on Wednesday to load at Burlington Northern. Also in the Twin Ports on Tuesday, the long-inactive Edward L. Ryerson was moved from her mooring at the Barko Dock across from CHS 1 into Fraser Shipyards for continued layup. The move was initiated in order for core sampling work to take place in the slip where she has sat for quite a few years.

Two Harbors-Silver Bay, MN – Gary A. Putney
American Century arrived Two Harbors on Nov. 4th at 21:44 for South of #2. She departed on Nov. 5th at 14:31 for Zug Island. There is no inbound traffic scheduled for Two Harbors on Nov. 6th. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay saw the arrival of the Presque Isle on Nov. 5th at 00:15. As of 19:15 on the 5th she was still at the dock. There is no inbound traffic scheduled for Silver Bay on Nov. 6th.

Detroit-Rouge River – Raymond H
Tuesday Arrivals: Sarah Andrie and tank barge arrived at the Waterfront Petroleum Terminal, then shifted to the Marathon Asphalt Terminal to load. Manitoulin arrived at the Motor City Materials dock to unload stone. Kaye E Barkerarrived at AK Steel to unload ore. CSL Tadoussac arrived at St. Marys Cement to unload clinker.

Cleveland, OH – Bill Kloss
Indiana Harbor arrived at 0245 Tuesday with 66,000 tons of ore for the Bulk Terminal and departed at 1300. Federal Baltic departed at 1738 Monday night for Burns Harbor.

Welland Canal and vicinity vessel passages - Tuesday November 5, 2019 - Barry Andersen

Nanticoke - arrivals - Nov 5 - Nov 5 - James R Baker at 0804, tug Albert (ex Craig Eric Reinauer-18, El Bronco Grande-06, Hercules-81 at 1101, CSL Laurentien at 1832 - docked - Nov 3- Kitikmeot W at 2329 - departed - Oct 5 - James R Barker at 2038 westbound

Long Point Bay anchorage - anchored Oct 3 - James R Barker at 0929 - departed Nov 5 at 0737 for the dock

Welland Canal
Upbound - Nov 4 - Mamry (Bhs) at 0758 to Port Weller anchorage, Algoma Transport at 1920 and Algoscotia at 2053 - Nov 5 - CSL Laurentien at 0013, Tecumseh at 0329, Rt Hon Paul J Martin at 0415, Rosy (Bds) (ex SCT Stockhorn-17, MCT Stockhorn-16, HLL Caspian-08) at 0932, McKeil Spirit at 1346 and Evans Spirit at 1528

Downbound Nov 4 - Spruceglen at 1653 - Nov 5 - Baie Comeau at 0158, Juno (Bhs) at 0827, Torrent (Cyp) at 0921, Federal Caribou (Mhl) at 1150 and NACC Capri (Deu) at 1418

Welland Canal docks - docked - Nov 3 - Osogovo (Mlt) stopped at wharf 2 to discharge at 1103

Port Weller anchorage - anchored - Oct 30 - Mandarin (Cyp) at 1521 awaiting dock in Toronto - Oct 4 - Mamry (Bhs) at 1544 approx.

Hamilton - arrivals - Nov 5 - Algoma Equinox at 0850 and Straum (Nor) at 1847 - anchored - Nov 4 - Rosaire A Desgagnes at 1848 - docked - Oct 31 - Federal Sakura (Mhl) at 1138, Lake Ontario (Atg) (ex Federal Manitou-11, completed as Lake Ontario) at 1629 - Nov 1 - Federal Danube (Mhl) at 1306 - departure - Nov 4 - Algoma Enterprise at 2207 eastbound - Nov 5 - Stella Polaris (Nld) at 0143 for Belgium

Mississauga - docked - Nov 2 - Hinch Spirit at 0603 and Wicky Spirit at 0652 - Departed - Oct 5 - Hinch Spirit at 0017 eastbound

Toronto - docked -Nov 4 - tug Sea Eagle II & St Marys Cement II at 0529

 

Lake Superior missed all-time water level record by 1.1 inches

11/6 - Duluth, MN – After setting new monthly high water level records all summer and into September, Lake Superior missed its all-time record high level by just 1.1 inches in October. The monthly mean water level for October was 603.30 feet, averaged for each day from seven water level monitoring stations across the lake. The lake’s highest-ever level across a full month occurred in October 1985 at 603.38 feet.

The lake held its level nearly steady even throughout October, a month the lake usually drops an inch or more, thanks to continued wet weather. That left Lake Superior 15 inches above its average Nov. 1 level and 4 inches higher than this time one year ago, according to the International Lake Superior Board of Control.

The Nov. 1 level tied its highest start to the month, also set in 1985. Even if Superior starts its annual, seasonal decline in November, which is expected, the lake remains unusually high heading into winter. That means heavy winter snow and/or heavy spring rains could push the lake back into record territory in 2020, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers hydrologists have said. The near-record high water also means shoreline around the lake remains vulnerable to damage during storms.

“There will continue to be a significantly increased risk of shoreline erosion, lakeshore flooding and coastal damages through the remainder of the fall and potentially into early winter,” the board said in its monthly report. Army Corps hydrologists advise “all those that may be affected to prepare for potentially severe coastal impacts, especially during periods of strong winds and high waves.”

Lake Superior generally drops from November to April when new moisture is tied up in snow and ice, and then generally rises from April to October.

Meanwhiles lakes Michigan and Huron were 35 inches above average on Nov. 1 and 17 inches above the Nov. 1, 2018 level.

Duluth News Tribune

 

Casualties or Demolition

11/6 - P Vessels with Great Lakes / Seaway connection reported as a casualty or sold for demolition taken from November 2019 issue of Marine News - Journal of the World Ship Society:

Casualties: none reported:

Demolitions: HAJARA (9019779; unknown) (Khadija-15, Sidsel Knutsen-12 - 1st trip into the Seaway 1993) - 15,806 / 1993. Products tanker - By Ascent Enterprises Ltd, Virgin Islands, British, to Renotecs Ltd. Sisdel Knutsen was the vessel involved with the sinking of the Detroit River mailboat J.W. Westcott II in 2001 during a pilot change with the loss of two lives.

Report prepared by Barry Andersen and René Beauchamp

 

How taconite became a viable commercial product

11/6 - Though taconite was identified as an iron-bearing rock on the Iron Ranges of northern Minnesota long before the 1950s, it wasn’t until then that it was profitably extracted, processed, and shipped to steel mills on the Great Lakes. As natural ore reserves were diminished, taconite became an alternative source of iron that allowed the Iron Range to continue mining operations in a changing global economy.

The word taconite is derived from the Taconic Mountains of New England, with “taconic” coming from an Eastern Algonquian language — probably Mohican or Lenape. Newton Horace Winchell, Minnesota’s state geologist, created the name in 1892 after he noticed that the rocks in New England looked like the rocks plentiful throughout the Iron Range in Minnesota. The geological structure of taconite, however, is different from the rocks of the Taconics. Taconite has a very low iron content — at best, only 32.5 percent of the rock is iron ore. Since there were many accessible deposits of natural ore with iron contents closer to 60 percent of the rock, taconite was at first passed over in favor of ore that could be shipped directly to smelters without processing.

Taconite was officially documented on the Mesabi Iron Range years before mineable natural ore was found near Mountain Iron. In 1870, prospectors Christian Wieland and Peter Mitchell traveled to the Mesabi Range and found a massive deposit of taconite near current-day Babbitt. They bought the land and incorporated the Mesaba Iron Company in 1882. After the Merritt brothers began mining natural ore on other parts of the Mesabi, Mesaba Iron faded into obscurity until the Mesabi Syndicate was formed in 1915.

A key member of the Mesabi Syndicate was Edward W. Davis—a researcher at the University of Minnesota’s Mines Experiment Station, which was founded in 1914. Researchers at the Minnesota Experiment Station found that the iron in taconite can be accessed by grinding the rock into fine particles and then running them through magnets to separate the iron from the waste rock. Using this information, Davis and the Mesabi Syndicate made an existing camp, the Sulphur Camp, as their headquarters.

The syndicate mined the taconite and tested it to see if it could consolidate the iron into pieces suitable for smelting. The first product they created was called sinter, which was a rock-like product that had higher iron content than raw taconite. This research led to the incorporation of the Mesabi Iron Company in 1919, which opened the first commercial taconite facility on the Iron Range.

The Mesabi Iron Company was largely unsuccessful. The sinter product couldn’t compete with the natural ore mined elsewhere on the Mesabi Range. In 1924, only two years after shipping its first load of sinter, the Mesabi Iron Company suspended mining. The cost of processing the ore was too high and their main customer — the Ford Motor Company — was dissatisfied with the low-iron product.

In the years that followed, heightened production for the war effort depleted natural ore reserves. The Mines Experiment Station continued to refine the process for taconite production, introducing methods that reduced lost iron in waste rock. As taconite became a viable replacement for natural ore mining, advocates throughout the state pushed for favorable taxation for taconite mining. In 1964, the Minnesota Legislature passed a bill and a statewide referendum was approved, placing the taconite amendment into the Minnesota Constitution.

Read more at this link: https://www.minnpost.com/mnopedia/2019/11/how-taconite-became-a-viable-commercial-product

 

National Museum opens more spots for Fitzgerald Experience

11/6 - Toledo, OH – The National Museum of the Great Lakes announced today the opening of more spots in its special docent led tour of the Col. James M. Schoonmaker to explore the history and loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald this coming weekend. "The response to our Fitzgerald Experience Program has been tremendous" Christopher Gillcrist, Executive Director, stated. "We originally planned for 120 timed tickets but we are now adding 60 more tickets because of the incredible demand."

The Fitzgerald Experience allows visitors to see close up the issues related to the famous loss by exploring the museum ship Schoonmaker. "We have all heard the terms hatch clamps, fence rails, vent covers but the average person can't appreciate the mystery without seeing these things first hand. Our Fitzgerald Experience allows the participant to walk through the Schoonmaker and see comparisons which will make the mystery much more understandable."

The Fitzgerald Experience is Saturday and Sunday, November 9 and 10, at the National Museum of the Great Lakes in Toledo, Ohio. Tickets are $20 for museum members and $25 for non-members. Your ticket includes price of admission to the museum and complimentary viewing of the museum's documentary, "A Good Ship and Crew Well Seasoned: The Fitzgerald and Her Legacy." Go to www.nmgl.org or call 419-214-5000 extension 200 for more information or to purchase tickets.

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  November 6

On 06 November 1880, the W. R. HANNA (2-mast scow-schooner, 86 foot, 103 gross tons, built in 1857), carrying 1,600 tamarack railroad ties to Toledo, sank in Lake Huron in a snowstorm. She sprang a leak off Pointe aux Barques and filled so fast that the pump was of no use. She broached to and rolled over when about 5 miles north of Sand Beach, Michigan, (now Harbor Beach). s the sun set the snow storm turned into a blizzard. The icy waves swept over the hull while the crew clung on as best they could. Four hours later, they drifted past Sand Beach, not 500 feet from the breakwater. They shouted for help, saw lights moving here and there on the breakwater, but no help came. When the wind shifted and started to blow the vessel out into the lake, the skipper cut away the weather lanyards and the vessel righted herself and they dropped the anchor. The weather was freezing cold; and there was no dry place left. The cabin was gone and the only spot out of water was on one side forward - a space about four feet wide by ten feet long. The waves kept washing over the waterlogged vessel, drenching the crew. The crew survived through the night. Heavy snow kept falling, cutting visibility to almost zero. Finally, at 10 a.m., the following morning, the storm broke and the propeller H. LUELLA WORTHINGTON (wooden propeller freighter, 148 foot, 375 gross tons, built in 1880, at Lorain, Ohio), which was in the harbor, saw the wreck and rescued the crew. The skipper of the WORTHINGTON stated that he had heard the cries of the crew throughout the night, but couldn't navigate in the blinding snowstorm. He was awake all night waiting for the storm to break so he could rescue the crew.

On 06 November 1867, ALBEMARLE (3-mast wooden schooner, 154 foot, 413 gross tons, built in 1867, at Buffalo, New York) was carrying iron ore from Escanaba, Michigan, to Cleveland, Ohio in a storm when she stranded and wrecked near Point Nipigon in the Straits of Mackinac. This was her first year of operation. She had been put into service just the previous July.

The US266029, a.) WILLIAM CLAY FORD was towed from Nicholson's River Rouge dock November 6, 1986, by tugs TUSKER and GLENADA to Port Maitland, Ontario for scrapping.

On November 6, 1913, the J. H. SHEADLE left Fort William, Ontario bound for Erie, Pennsylvania, with grain and encountered fog, gale winds and a snow blizzard in one of the fiercest storms of the century.

On November 6, 1925, the Northern Navigation passenger steamer HAMONIC lost her propeller 20 miles west of Caribou Island in Lake Superior and was wallowing in gale force winds with gusts to 80 m.p.h. She was towed to safety by Pittsburgh Steamship Co.’s RICHARD TRIMBLE.

On 06 Nov 1985, Desguaces Heme began scrapping the LEON FALK, JR. in Gijon, Spain. This vessel was built in Chester, Pennsylvania, in 1945, as the tanker a.) WINTER HILL, (504 foot, 10,534 gross tons) and then was converted to a 710 foot, 12,501 gross ton bulk freighter in Baltimore, Maryland, in 1960-61.

On 6 November 1872, the wooden propeller tug MILDRED, while towing a vessel out of Alpena, Michigan, had her engine fail. Soon she was in trouble and sank. The crew was saved.

On 6 November 1827, ANN (wooden schooner, 53 foot, 58 tons, built in 1819, or 1821, at Black River, Ohio) was carrying salt, general merchandise and passengers when she was driven ashore on Long Point almost opposite Erie, Pennsylvania. 7 Lives were lost, including 5 passengers. 6 survived.

In 1912, the Pere Marquette Railroad announced plans to build a new roundhouse at Ludington, Michigan. It still stands today.

On 6 November 1874, The Port Huron Times listed the following vessels lost in the month of October and in the first week of November of that year: Propellers - BROOKLYN, FRANKFORT, NEW YORK; tug DOUGLAS; schooners - CITY OF PAINSVILLE, WANDERER, PREBLE, THOS S MOTT; and barges - CLIFTON and SHERMAN.

On 6 November 1883, GUIDING STAR (3-mast wooden schooner, 139 foot, 324 tons, built in 1869, at Oswego, New York) was carrying coal to Milwaukee in fog when she went ashore 12 miles north of Milwaukee. Four of the crew made it to shore in the yawl, but it was wrecked in the process. The rest of the crew was finally rescued by the Milwaukee Lifesavers.

Crews began painting the hull of the SAGINAW (formerly JOHN J. BOLAND) in the colors of Lower Lakes Towing Ltd. (gray) on 06 Nov 1999, at Sarnia, Ontario. The vessel had recently been purchased from American Steamship Co. Inside the vessel, crews were gutting the living quarters to remove asbestos and add fireproof walls and new flooring. The engine room equipment and the unloading gear were also refurbished.

On November 6, 1897, the Minnesota Steamship boat MARIPOSA (steel, 348', 2898 gross tons, built in 1892, Globe Iron Works, Cleveland, Ohio) under the command of Capt. Frank Root, rescued the two remaining survivors of the wreck of the package freighter IDAHO (wooden package freighter, 220', 915 gross tons, built in 1863, Peck & Masters, Cleveland, Ohio.) off Long Point, Ontario on Lake Erie. The MARIPOSA'S first mate, Capt. Myron K. Chamberlain, had sighted the two Idaho survivors clinging to the 100' spar of the sunken IDAHO. Gale winds and seas of 12'-15' overtook the IDAHO taking with it to their deaths 19 crewmen including Captain Alexander Gillies. "In what is considered one of the greatest accomplishments of ship handling and rescue by a major Great Lakes vessel,” Capt. Root and his crewmen were able to turn the MARIPOSA around ("rolling her rails under") three times in the midst of a gale, bringing their vessel right up to the spar where IDAHO Second Mate Louis LaForce Jr. and Deckhand William Gill were pulled "half dead" on board the MARIPOSA by the officers and deck crew. Both LaForce & Gill recovered. An appreciative City of Buffalo, (hometown to most of the IDAHO crew), and the Minnesota Steamship Company awarded Capt. Root a gold watch, and instructed him to award his first mate and chief engineer each an extra month's pay, and the MARIPOSA crew each an extra half month's pay for a job well done.

At 10 p.m. on November 6, 1975 the newly refurbished sidewheel ferry TRILLIUM was towed from the drydock at Ramey's Bend, Ontario, down the Welland Canal by the Canada Dredge & Dock tugs G. W. Rogers and BAGOTVILLE, arriving at Toronto on early on a foggy November 7.

1918: CHESTER A. CONGDON cleared Fort William with grain and stranded on Canoe Rock, Isle Royale in rough weather and poor visibility. The crew was rescued but the ship broke up and was listed as the first $1 million dollar loss in Great Lakes’ history.

1928: A.W. THOMPSON served as a Great Lakes consort barge before going to the Atlantic in 1918. The vessel foundered 60 miles south of Brunswick, GA, enroute from Wilmington, DE to a Gulf of Mexico port.

1968: OAK HILL visited the Great Lakes for seven trips in 1961-1962. It arrived at Singapore under tow as c) AGENOR on this date with leaking in the engine room while on a delivery trip to Chinese shipbreakers at Whampoa. The vessel was resold for scrapping in Singapore.

1969: REINHART LORENZ RUSS made 22 trips through the Seaway from 1960 through 1966. It sank as b) NAIS one mile off Raffles Light, Singapore, after a collision with the Norwegian tanker BERGEBRAGD (68/80,003) and one life was lost.

1981: LA LOMA, an early and frequent Seaway trader, arrived at Cape Town, South Africa, with hull damage as e) AEGEAN SUN. The ship was traveling from China to Abidjan, Ivory Coast. It was assessed as beyond economical repair and laid up at Mombasa. The vessel was eventually sold to Pakistani shipbreakers and arrived at Gadani Beach under tow on April 18, 1985, for dismantling.

1983: EVA MARIA C., a Seaway caller in 1976, developed leaks as c) LAGADA BEACH and sank about 200 miles northeast of Aden. The vessel was enroute to Bandar Abbas, Iran, with iron and steel products.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Historical Collections of the Great Lakes, Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Lake Superior ends five straight months of new or tied high-water marks

11/5 - Thunder Bay, ON – For the first time since May, the largest of the Great Lakes has finished a month without breaking or tying its all-time record for water levels. Jacob Bruxer, Canadian representative on the International Lake Superior Board of Control, says Superior's mean level in October was 183.88 metres above sea level, just three centimetres below the record mean level for the month, established in 1985.

That's despite the fact there was significant rainfall over parts of the Lake Superior basin last month. Environment Canada reports that Thunder Bay received 92 mm of precipitation, nearly 70 per cent greater than the long-term average.

Bruxer told Tbnewswatch regulatory authorities expect that Superior "will finally begin its seasonal decline" this month. He cautioned, however, that "if wet conditions continue, record-high levels are still possible."

It's noteworthy that the lake's level to start November is tied with the the all-time record-high for the beginning of the month. The level is currently 37 centimetres above the average for this time of year, spanning a period of 100 years.

High water levels have caused significant erosion and damage to shoreline infrastructure along the Lake Superior shoreline this year. On Oct. 21, waves caused by a strong easterly wind devastated the boardwalk and shore at the Mission Island Marsh Conservation Area in Thunder Bay.

Tbnewswatch

 

Port Reports -  November 5

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day's news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known).

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
John G. Munson arrived Duluth at 02:13 Monday morning to unload limestone at Hallett #8, and Great Republic was outbound at 04:23 for Manistee with a load of petroleum coke from Midwest Energy. The Munson finished offloading and shifted over to Hallett #5 during the evening to load sinter feed. American Mariner was due at 22:45 Monday night to pick up iron ore pellets at CN. Miedwie spent the day at anchor outside the harbor waiting to load grain at Riverland Ag and currently has no ETA. The only traffic through the Superior entry on Monday was Burns Harbor, which departed at 02:48 with a cargo of iron ore for her namesake port. No further traffic is expected at BN until Wednesday, when both Algoma Sault and Stewart J. Cort are due to load.

Two Harbors-Silver Bay, MN – Gary A. Putney
Great Republic arrived Two Harbors on Nov. 4th at approx. 06:15 and departed on the 4th at 08:57 from South of #2 after fueling. She then continued on down the lake with an AIS destination of Manistee. Due Two Harbors on Nov. 4th between 21:00 and 22:00 is the American Century. There is no scheduled traffic for Two Harbors on Nov. 5th. Tentatively due Northshore Mining in Silver Bay on Nov. 5th is the Presque Isle.

Alpena, MI – Ben & Chanda McClain
Monday was a busy day with three vessels in port. The tug Samuel de Champlain along with the barge Innovation arrived at Lafarge early in the morning to load cement. Once the pair left port they anchored out in the bay before heading to Whitefish, ON. The Alpena came in around noon and tied up at the dock to wait for product to be available to load. After nightfall, the tug Defiance and barge Ashtabula tied up at the coal dock to unload.

Cleveland, OH – Bill Kloss
Herbert C. Jackson arrived at 07:30 Monday with stone from Drummond Island. NACC Capri was at LaFarge, arriving at 20:57 Sunday night.

Welland Canal and vicinity vessel passages - Monday November 4 – Barry Andersen Nanticoke - arrivals - Nov 2 - Algocanada at 0555 and Algoma Compass at 2032 - Nov 3- Kitikmeot W at 2329 - departed - Nov 3 - Algocanada at 0244 and Algoma Compass at 2242 - both westbound

Long Point Bay anchorage - anchored Oct 3 - James R Barker at 0929

Welland Canal
upbound - Nov 3 - Bro Anna (Sgp) at 2121 - Nov 4 - Mamry (Bhs) at 0758 to Port Weller anchorage, CSL Tadoussac at 1604, Algoma Transport at 1920 and Algoscotia eta 2045

downbound - Nov 3 - tug Sea Eagle II & St Marys Cement II at 1634, Algoma Transport at 1424 and Algosea at 2003 - Nov 4 - Algoma Enterprise at 0402, Federal Saguenay (Bds) at 1433 and Spruceglen at 1653

Welland Canal docks - docked - Nov 3 - Osogovo (Mlt) stopped at wharf 2 to discharge at 1103 - departed Nov 3 - tug Petite Forte & St Marys Cement from wharf 16 at 2140 westbound

Port Weller anchorage - anchored - Oct 30 Mandarin (Cyp) at 1521 awaiting dock in Toronto - Nov 3 - Osogovo (Mlt) departed anchorage at 0844 for wharf 2 at Port Weller - Oct 4 - Mamry (Bhs) at 1544 approx.

Hamilton - arrivals - Nov 4 - Algoma Transport at 0553 - anchored - Nov 4 -Algoma Enterprise at 1648 - anchored off Hamilton for fuel and Rosaire A Desgagnes at 1848 - docked - Oct 30 - Stella Polaris (Nld) at 1810 - Oct 31 - Federal Sakura (Mhl) at 1138, Lake Ontario (Atg) (ex Federal Manitou-11, completed as Lake Ontario) at 1629 - Nov 1 - Federal Danube (Mhl) at 1306 - departure - Nov 4 - Algoma Transport at 1644 for the canal

Mississauga - Nov 2 - Hinch Spirit at 0603 and Wicky Spirit at 0652

Toronto - arrived -Nov 4 - tug Sea Eagle II & St Marys Cement II at 0529

Oswego, NY – Ned Goebricher
On Monday, NACC Argonaut unloaded cement.

 

'Ore Dock BotEco Center' project gets funding through Northern Michigan University

11/5 - Marquette, MI - Art and Design students at Northern Michigan University have completed a scale-model of the Ore Dock BotEco Center. On the model, one-sixteenth of an inch equals 12 inches.

The model, which is on display at Travel Marquette, was made possible due to funding from NMU’s PRIME Fund. From start to finish, the model took around six months to complete.

"It was a matter of transcribing all of the scale models to a smaller scale and making sure we're capturing all the details without being over-obsessive about them,” said NMU Human-Centered Design Professor, Peter Pless.

The BotEco Center will re-purpose the downtown Marquette Ore Dock, turning it into a shared public space that includes year-round botanical gardens and performance spaces.

"The nearest year-round gardens are in Milwaukee, and so in February it would be a real treat to have some green space right here, without having to drive so far,” said Friends of Ore Dock BotEco Center Board President, Gisele Duehring. The Friends of Ore Dock BotEco Center is the non-profit organization behind the project.

Also included in the PRIME Fund award is funding for a business plan and an economic impact analysis. These, along with the scale model, will be presented to possible donors that may want to invest in the project and construction. "We're not using tax dollars. We're going out for grants and other donations,” Duehring added.

Also included in the plans are a focus on historical preservation and education about the Ore Dock. Duehring added that the center will be a welcoming place during the long U.P. winters. "The snow, whether it's dreary and bleary, or it's sparkly and refreshing, it's still good to have some contact with the green plants and the blossoms and just the smell of the soil,” she said.

The actual construction of the space is composed of three phases: building a connector from the shoreline to the Ore Dock and a promenade around the Ore Dock, enclosing portions of the dock, and finally, gaining access to the "upper deck” which will be on top of the Ore Dock.

Duehring added that due to different zoning requirements involving the city, state, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the approval process for plans and different phases will be time consuming. She added that she hopes to have the BotEco Center up and running in about 10 years.

View a video at this link: https://www.uppermichiganssource.com/content/news/Ore-Dock-BotEco-Center-project-receives-funding-through-Northern-Michigan-University-564377801.html

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  November 5

At 2 a.m. 05 November 1884, the steamer GRACE GRUMMOND (iron side-wheel excursion steamer, 138 foot, 250 tons, built in 1856, at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, as the survey steamer JEFFERSON DAVIS, specifically for the survey of the Great Lakes) burned at Grand Haven, Michigan. Her cargo of apples, pears and potatoes was also destroyed. No lives were lost. After the fire she was towed to Chicago to lay up until it was decided what to do with her. It is not known if she ever operated as a steamer again, but in 1887, she was rebuilt as a schooner at Milwaukee. She was one of the only sizable iron-hulled schooners ever used on the lakes. In 1904, as a tow-barge, she was sold Canadian and renamed BALTIC (C.116760). She was later used as a breakwater at Clear Creek, Ontario and was finally scrapped in 1939.

On 05 November 1852, BUCKEYE STATE (3-mast wooden bark, 132 foot, 310 tons, built in 1852, at Black River, Ohio) stranded off S. Milwaukee Point on Lake Michigan in a storm and was then broken up by waves. This was her first year of operation and she had been in service less than three months.

LOUIS R. DESMARAIS cleared Owen Sound, Ontario on her maiden voyage November 5, 1977, bound for Thunder Bay, Ontario, to load 27,117 gross tons of iron ore for Stelco at Hamilton, Ontario. Her forward end was replaced at Port Weller in 2001, and renamed b.) CSL LAURENTIEN.

On her final trip, the IRVIN L. CLYMER passed up bound at the Soo on November 5, 1990, and arrived at Duluth two days later to unload limestone at the Hallet Dock #5, after which she moved to her final lay-up berth at Fraser Shipyard and tied up, blowing one last three long and two short salute from her whistle. In 1993, she was sold to Azcon Corp. of Duluth, Minnesota for scrapping.

GRAND HAVEN was raised on November 5, 1969, from the Old River Bed, where she sank on September 19, 1969. She was raised for scrapping.

Mr. J. W. Isherwood visited the Great Lakes Engineering Works shipyard on November 5, 1910, and personally inspected the hull which was being built according to his patented design. This vessel, the WILLIAM P. PALMER, was the first vessel on the Great Lakes built to the Isherwood system of longitudinal framing.

On 05 Nov 1917, a foggy and rainy day, the JAMES S. DUNHAM (steel propeller bulk freighter, 420 foot, 4,795 gross tons, built in 1906, at W. Bay City, Michigan) sank in a collision with the steamer ROBERT FULTON (steel propeller bulk freighter, 424 foot, 4,219 gross tons, built 1896, at Wyandotte, Michigan) just below Grassy Island on the Detroit River. Repairs for both vessels totaled $125,000.

On 5 November 1896, ACADIA (iron-framed wooden propeller, 176 foot, built in 1867, at Hamilton, Ontario) was driven ashore and broke up in a gale near the mouth of the Michipicoten River in Lake Superior. Her crew made it to shore and five of them spent more than a week trying to make it to the Soo.

The Port Huron Times of 5 November 1878: "The schooner J. P. MARCH is reported lost with all on board. She was lost at Little Traverse Bay on the northern shore of Lake Michigan. The MARCH was a three-masted schooner and was owned by Benton & Pierce of Chicago."

On 5 November 1838, TOLEDO (2-mast wooden schooner, 98 foot, 215 tons, built in 1836, at Buffalo) was carrying dry goods valued at more than $100,000 up-bound on Lake Erie when she was driven ashore by a gale a half mile east of the mouth of the Grand River. She broke in two. No lives were lost.

On 5 November 1869, TITAN (wooden schooner, 132 foot, 361 gross tons, built in 1856, at Oswego, New York) was carrying 17,500 bushels of wheat on Lake Michigan in a terrific gale. She was driven toward shore. Her anchors were dropped as she came close in and they held for about an hour. However, the ship finally dragged ashore, losing both of her masts and breaking up as she struck. Of the nine on board, only one survived and that one was found crawling along the beach in a dazed state. When she was new, TITAN broke the record by completing the trip from Chicago to Oswego in only 8 days and 4 hours. Her record only lasted one day since the schooner SURPRISE broke it by 6 hours the following day.

In the summer of 1875, the propeller EAST ran down and sank the tug JOE MAC, not even pausing to save her crew from drowning. The following winter Messrs. Seymour & Co., owners of the JOE MAC, obtained a judgment in a U.S. Court against the owners of the EAST. Since the EAST was a Canadian vessel, they were unable to seize her because the judgment could only be effected in American waters. On Sunday morning, 05 Nov 1876, the steam tug SEYMOUR, with a United States Marshal and posse on board, proceeded up to Allen's (presumably at Ogdensburg, New York), and there lay in wait for the EAST, which went up by the Crossover light channel into American waters. The SEYMOUR ran out and captured the vessel and brought her to Averell's wharf in U.S. waters to await justice.

CALCITE II arrived in Sarnia at 6 a.m. on Sunday, 05 Nov. 2000, for lay-up. After leaving Cleveland the previous day, she anchored in Western Lake Erie, so she could arrive at the North Slip in Sarnia when shoreside personnel would be on-hand to assist. A chartered bus from Rogers City left about noon to take many of the crew home. Around 4:10 p.m., the downbound MYRON C. TAYLOR passed her fleetmate CALCITE II, perhaps for the last time in USS Great Lakes Fleet colors, and she blew her sister an extended 3 long and 2 short master salute. The TAYLOR was bound for Cleveland with a load of stone.

1885: The Canadian Pacific passenger and freight steamer ALGOMA cleared Owen Sound on its final trip with 11 passengers and headed for the Canadian Lakehead.

1897: IDAHO departed Buffalo and was caught in a wild storm on Lake Erie. The wooden passenger and freight carrier fell into the trough and only two survived. They had climbed the mast and were plucked from the crow's nest the next morning in a heroic effort by the crew of the MARIPOSA.

1940: SPARTA was wrecked near the Pictured Rocks after stranding on a reef in a heavy gale. The hull was abandoned on November 11 but salvaged in 1941 and never repaired.

1957: The Finnish freighter KORSO struck a drifting World War Two mine off Cape Mondjego, Portugal, and sank as a belated casualty of the conflict. The vessel had been built at Kingston, ON in 1942 as H.M.C.S. IRONBOUND and converted for mercantile use in 1948.

1962: EDWIN REITH, a West German salty, grounded near Tibbetts Point, Lake Ontario, and had to be lightered to P.S. BARGE NO. 1. It was released and came to Toronto to unload on November 14.

1967: The Canadian laker MOHAWK DEER, enroute to La Spezia, Italy, for scrapping, ran aground in the Gulf of Genoa near Portofino, Italy, and sank the next day.

1987: CATHARINA WIARDS sank in the Red Sea as d) TRADER after the engine room flooded during a voyage from Augusta, Italy, to China. The vessel was a year old when it came through the Seaway for the first time in 1970.

1991: OLYMPIC PEACE, a Seaway trader for the first time in 1976, arrived at Piraeus, Greece, with damage to the main engine cooling system as c) FREE PEACE. It was later seized by Banco-Hellenique and sold at auction. The ship was scrapped in China during 1994 as e) PATMOS I.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Rand Logistics acquires former American Valor from Algoma Central

11/4 - Jersey City, NJ – Rand Logistics Inc. has acquired the Canadian-flagged self-unloading vessel Valo from Algoma Central Corp. Built by American Shipbuilding Company in Lorain. Ohio, for the Oglebay Norton Co. as Armco, the Valo is 767 feet long with a 25,500-ton capacity. She last sailed in 2008 as American Valor for the American Steamship Co.

Rand is evaluating options for repowering the vessel and returning it to service for the 2021 sailing season. "The Valo will be a great addition to our fleet and we look forward to working with our customers to integrate its capabilities into their supply chains." said Aaron Degodny, president of Rand Logistics.

"The acquisition of the Valo Is an important step in the renewal of our fleet,” added Peter Coxon, CEO of Rand Logistics. “It provides us an excellent opportunity to develop the vessel into a highly productive asset for the Great Lakes marketplace."

Rand Logistics

 

Navibulgar orders six Great Lakes bulkers at Yangzijiang

11/4 - Navibulgar, Bulgaria’s largest shipping company, has placed newbuilding orders at China’s Yangzijiang Shipbuilding for the construction of up to six 31,800 dwt great lake bulk carriers. The contracts include firm orders for four ships and options for another two. The ships, which will meet the IMO’s NOx tier 3 regulations and 2020 regulations on sulphur emissions, are scheduled in 2021 and 2022.

“The Great Lakes bulk carriers are a relatively recent addition to our dry bulker portfolio, as a result of our continuous R&D efforts and introduction of new products. Navibulgar is a repeat customer who has taken delivery of a 45,000 dwt dry bulk carrier built by Yangzijiang and has given very positive feedback on the vessel, the construction process and the professionalism of our team. We will dedicate ourselves, as always, in building high-quality vessels, in return to our customers’ continued trust and support in Yangzijiang,” said Ren Letian, CEO of Yangzijiang.

Navibulgar currently has another five bulkers under construction at Yangzijiang Shipbuilding.

 

Port Reports -  November 4

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day's news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known).

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
Great Republic arrived Duluth at 04:08 Sunday morning carrying a load of limestone for the Graymont dock, and American Integrity was inbound at 06:56 to load coal at Midwest Energy. The Republic finished unloading and left the dock at 18:30 Sunday evening, moving into position behind SMET to prepare to load petroleum coke there once the Integrity cleared. Miedwie was due a little after 20:30 to load grain at Riverland Ag. American Integrity had a departure time of 20:00 listed, but was still moored at that time. Burns Harbor spent Sunday loading iron ore pellets at the Burlington Northern dock in Superior, and was expected to depart at some point Sunday night.

Two Harbors-Silver Bay, MN – Gary A. Putney
Edwin H. Gott departed Two Harbors on Nov. 3rd at 11:55 for Gary. The American Integrity had been showing an AIS of Two Harbors, but was switched to SMET. Due Two Harbors on Nov. 4th is the American Century. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay saw the departure of the Clyde S. VanEnkevort/Erie Trader at 10:27 on Nov. 3rd for Cleveland. There is no scheduled traffic for Silver Bay on Nov. 4th.

Thunder Bay, ON
Sunday; 15:16 Kaministiqua departed and was downbound on Lake Superior.

Munising, MI
American Mariner arrived at about 6 p.m. to unload.

St. Marys River
Upbound traffic on a pleasant fall Sunday included American Mariner, CSL Welland, Algoma Conveyor (to Algoma Export dock), G3 Marquis and, after dark, American Century, Federal Dart and Mesabi Miner. Downbounders included Torrent, Mississagi, Federal Caribou, Edgar B. Speer and Algoma Sault (to Algoma).

Milwaukee, WI – Wisconsin Marine Historical Society
At Port Milwaukee Sunday (11/3), Polsteam’s Iryda replaced Federal Dart at the Federal Marine Terminals dock on the outer harbor. After delivering 8,500 metric tons of tinplate, Federal Dart departed late Saturday and headed for Thunder Bay to load grain. Iryda arrived at 05:56 with 12,000 metric tons of tinplate and coil steel. Prentiss Brown with St. Marys Challenger arrived from Charlevoix at 09:15 with cement for the St. Marys Kinnickinnic River terminal. G.L. Ostrander with Integrity arrived at 19:40 from Alpena with cement for the Lafarge terminal on Jones Island.

Despite a 25 percent tariff on European steel, it looks as if 2019 might be a good year for imported steel at Port Milwaukee. In September 2019, the Wall Street Journal reported that, after the Trump administration implemented its tariff on foreign metal, domestic producers raised prices to match the cost of imported tinplate plus the tariff fee. The move backfired. Imported steel remained strong while U.S. Steel idled its East Chicago tinplate facility and ArcelorMittal laid off tin workers in West Virginia.

Southern Lake Michigan ports
Stewart J. Cort was unloading at Burns Harbor Sunday evening. Algoma Niagara was arriving at Gary. Indiana Harbor was hosting John D. Leitch and Paul R. Tregurtha. Fivelborg was docked on the Calumet River.

Northern Lake Huron ports
Spragge: Sunday; 5:08 Manitoulin arrived to unload limestone and departed at 12:37 for Bruce Mines.

Bruce Mines: Sunday; 17:11 Manitoulin arrived and went to anchor.

Cheboygan: Saturday; 17:21 The tug Michigan and tank barge Great Lakes departed for Green Bay.

Calcite: Saturday; 21:34 Wilfred Sykes departed for Indiana Harbor. Sunday; 2:03 Herbert C Jackson departed for Cleveland. 2:16 H Lee White arrived to load lime stone and departed at 14:12, down bound on Lake Huron.

Port Inland: Saturday 16:15 Manitoulin departed for Spragge. 16:56 Joseph L Block arrived to load and on Sunday at 6:46 departed down bound on Lake Michigan.

Goderich, ON – Bruce Douglas
Algoma Innovator cleared Goderich ON at 10:21 am Sunday with salt for Lorain Ohio. Labrador remained loading at Goderich Elevators for the eighth day

Detroit-Rouge River – Raymond H
Sunday Arrivals: Sharon M I and barge Huron Spirit-arrived at Nicholson's Ecorse Terminal to unload steel coils. Manitowoc-arrived at the Motor City Materials dock to unload stone. Hon. James L Oberstar-arrived at AK Steel to unload ore. Sam Laud-arrived at the Waterfront Petroleum Terminal to fuel.

Cleveland, OH – Bill Koss
Happy River and Federal Baltic were still at the Port on Sunday. NACC Capri was at LaFarge around 20:30. American Courage departed for Marblehead.

Welland Canal and vicinity vessel passages - Sunday November 3 – Barry Andersen Nanticoke - arrival - Nov 2 - Algocanada at 0555 and Algoma Compass at 2032 Long Point Bay anchorage - anchored Oct 2 - tug Sea Eagle II & St Marys Cement II at 1325 - departed Oct 13 at 1316 for the canal

Welland Canal - upbound - Oct 30 - tug Petite Forte & St Marys Cement at 2255 stopped wharf 12 - Nov 3 - Osogovo (Mlt) at 1016 stopping at wharf 2, NACC Capri (Atg) at 1615 and Andean (Cyp) at 1843 - Nov 3 - Kitikmeot W at 1006, tug Leo A McArthur & John J Carrick at 1127, Algoma Spirit at 1250 and Bro Anna (Sgp) at 2121

downbound - Nov 2 - Harbour Feature (Por) at 1628, tug Sea Eagle II & St Marys Cement II at 1634 and Volgaborg (Nld) at 1849 - Nov 3 - Humbergracht (Nld) at 0431, Algoma Buffalo at 0549, Algonorth at 0922, Algoma Transport at 1424 and Algosea at 1847

Welland Canal docks - docked - Nov 3 - tug Petite Forte & St Marys Cement docked wharf 16 at 2020 from wharf 12

Port Weller anchorage - anchored - Oct 30 Mandarin (Cyp) at 1521 awaiting dock in Toronto - Nov 3 - Osogovo (Mlt) departed anchorage at 0844 for wharf 2 at Port Weller

Hamilton - arrivals - Nov 3 - none - docked - Oct 30 - Stella Polaris (Nld) at 1810 - Oct 31 - Federal Sakura (Mhl) at 1138, Lake Ontario (Atg) (ex Federal Manitou-11, completed as Lake Ontario) at 1629 - Nov 1 - CSL Laurentien at 1150 , Federal Danube (Mhl) at 1306, and Baie Comeau at 1401 - departure - correction Nov 2 - Baie Comeau at 0058 Gaia Desgagnes at 2132 - Nov 3 - CSL Laurentien at 0958 - both eastbound

Clarkson - docked - Nov 3 - Robert S Pierson at 0610 - departed Nov 3 - at 1918 eastbound

Mississauga - Nov 2 - Hinch Spirit at 0603 and Wicky Spirit at 0652

Toronto - docked - Nov 1 - McKeil Spirit at 2039 - departed - Nov 3 at 1340 eastbound

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  November 4

The Great Lakes Steamship Company steamer NORWAY passed downbound through the Soo Locks with 6,609 tons of rye. This cargo increased the total tonnage transiting the locks in 1953 to 120,206,088 tons – a new one-season tonnage record. Renamed b.) RUTH HINDMAN in 1964, she was scrapped at Thunder Bay, Ontario in 1978.

On 04 November 1883, MAYFLOWER (wooden propeller freighter “steam barge,” 185 foot, 623 gross tons, built in 1852, at Buffalo, New York) was carrying lumber when she stranded in a gale off Point Abino near Buffalo, New York where the waves pounded her to pieces. The crew made it to shore in the yawl. She was built as a very fine passenger steamer for the Western Transportation Line then in 1868, she was rebuilt as a “steam barge.”

On 4 November 1875, SWAN (wooden propeller tug, 11 gross tons, built in 1862, at Buffalo, New York) caught fire while lying out in the Saginaw River near East Saginaw. She was abandoned by the crew and burned to the water’s edge.

JOSEPH G. BUTLER JR (steel bulk freighter, 525 foot, 6,588 gross tons) was launched on 04 Nov 1905, at Lorain, Ohio for the Tonopah Steamship Co. (Hutchinson & Co., mgr.). She lasted until 1971, when she was stripped of her cabins and scuttled, along with HENRY R. PLATT JR., at Steel Co. of Canada plant, Burlington Bay, Hamilton, Ontario, as breakwater and fill.

CARTIERCLIFFE HALL was registered at Toronto, Ontario, on 04 Nov 1977, but didn't enter service until the spring of 1978 because of mechanical difficulties during her sea trials.

On 04 Nov, 1986, TEXACO CHIEF was renamed A.G. FARQUHARSON. She was renamed c.) ALGONOVA (i) in 1998.

CALCITE II departed Cleveland at 5:30 a.m. Saturday, 04 Nov 2000, on her last trip for USS Great Lakes Fleet. She sailed upbound for Sarnia, Ontario, where she spent the winter in lay-up. Grand River Transportation had entered into a sale agreement with USS Great Lakes Fleet, Inc. for the purchase of the CALCITE II, GEORGE A. SLOAN and MYRON C. TAYLOR. Built as the WILLIAM G. CLYDE in 1929, CALCITE II is awaiting scrapping as c.) MAUMEE.

HERON BAY proceeded under her own power to Lauzon, Quebec, for her final lay-up on November 4, 1978.

CSL's NIPIGON BAY was launched November 4, 1950.

CHARLES L. HUTCHINSON developed a sizable leak and almost sank November 4, 1925, during her tow to Superior after she struck a reef a few nights before.

ROBERT C. STANLEY's keel was laid November 4, 1942.

UNITED STATES GYPSUM of 1910 grounded at Toledo, Ohio, on November 4, 1972, resulting in damage totaling $125,000. Her propeller was removed and the rudder shaft was locked in position to finish the season as a manned barge on the coal run from Toledo to Detroit, Michigan.

JOSEPH H. THOMPSON became not only the largest vessel on the Great Lakes but also the longest dry bulk cargo vessel in the world when it entered service on November 4, 1952, departing Chicago on its first trip.

Setting the stage for the fateful storm that followed less than a week later that sank the EDMUND FITZGERALD, many locations in Minnesota and Wisconsin were setting all-time record high temperatures for the month of November during the period of November 4-6, 1975. Grand Marais, Minnesota, reached 67 degrees on November 5 and Superior reached 74 degrees on November 6, both all-time records for the month. Many other notable Great Lakes storms, including the Armistice Day storm of 1940, and the storm that sank the HENRY STEINBRENNER in 1953, were proceeded by record-setting warm weather.

On 4 November 1877, MARY BOOTH (wooden scow-schooner, 132 tons, built in 1857, at Buffalo, New York) was carrying maple lumber in a storm in Lake Michigan. She became waterlogged but her crew doggedly clung to her until she appeared ready to turn turtle. Then her crew abandoned her and she rolled over. She drifted in the lake for several days. The crew landed at White Lake, Michigan and they were near death.

The Port Huron Times of 4 November 1878: "The propeller CITY OF MONTREAL is believed to have gone down on Lake Michigan on Friday [1 NOV 1878]. The schooner LIVELY, laden with coal for Bay City, is reported ashore 6 miles above Sand Beach, having gone on at 12 o'clock Sunday night [3 NOV 1878]. The schooner WOODRUFF, ashore at Whitehall, is a total loss. Two men were drowned, one died from injuries received, and Capt. Lingham was saved. The tugs E M PECK and MYSTIC, which went from the Sault to the assistance of the propeller QUEBEC, were wrecked near where she lies, one being on the beach and the other sunk below her decks. Both crews were rescued and were taken to St. Joseph Island."

On 4 November 1856, J W BROOKS (wooden propeller, 136 foot, 322 tons, built in 1851, at Detroit) was carrying provisions and copper ingots to Ogdensburg, New York in a storm when she foundered on Lake Ontario, 8 miles northeast of False Ducks Light. Estimates of the loss of lives range from 22 to 50. In July 1857, she was partially raised and some of her cargo was recovered. She only had a five year career, but besides this final incident, she had her share of disasters. In July 1855, she had a boiler explosion and in May of that same year, she sank in Canadian waters.

In 1980 the tug LAUREN CASTLE sank while towing the AMOCO WISCONSIN near Lee Point in Traverse Bay. Engineer William Stephan was lost.

1891: The iron freighter NORTH, which had become the first ocean ship to be cut in two and brought to the Great Lakes, arrived at Collingwood to be rebuilt as b) CAMPANA for the passenger & freight trades on the upper lakes.

1898: The wooden passenger and freight steamer PACIFIC burned at the Grand Trunk Railway dock in Collingwood along with the freight sheds and their contents. The blaze had begun the previous evening and roared for hours. The vessel was valued at $65,000.

1959: WESTRIVER arrived at Halifax for repairs after an earlier engine room explosion on Lake Superior had left the ship with significant damage.

1967: PEARL LIGHT, a World War II Empire ship, came through the Seaway for one trip in 1965. It was wrecked off Vietnam as g) HABIB MARIKAR while enroute from Dalian, China, to Chittagong, Bangladesh, with bagged cement. One life was lost.

1972: INLAND TRANSPORT went aground off Garden Island Bank, near Little Current, Manitoulin Island, and received major hull damage that led to the retirement of that Halco tanker after one more trip.

1991: CARLI METZ struck the wall below Lock 2 of the Welland Canal and the vessel had to go to Port Weller Dry Docks for repairs. It had been inbound for the first time earlier in the year and returned in 1992. It was scrapped at Chittagong, Bangladesh, as d) METZ ITALIA in 2001.

1993: ZIEMIA ZAMOJSKA, while under tow, struck the raised 106th Street Bridge on the Calumet River at Chicago resulting in damage to the structure and traffic problems. The corn-laden vessel received a hole in the port bow, which was repaired at Montreal.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Jody Aho, Russ Plumb, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Lake Superior tied with water level record set in 1985

11/3 - Thunder Bay, ON – Wet weather continued in October, causing Lake Superior water levels to remain relatively stable over the course of the month, while on average the water level declines 3 cm (1.2 in) in October. The monthly mean level in October of 183.88 m (603.30 ft) is 3 cm below the record set in 1985, and at the beginning of November, Lake Superior is tied with the record high beginning of month level set in 1985. The level is currently 37 cm (15 in) above average (1918 – 2018), and 9 cm (4 in) above its level of a year ago.

Lake Michigan-Huron also remained relatively stable over the course of October, while on average the water level declines 7 cm (3 in) in October. Lake Michigan-Huron is currently 17 cm (7 in) below the record high beginning of month level set in 1986. The level is 90 cm (35 in) above average, and 42 cm (17 in) above last year’s beginning of November level.

Lake Superior and Lake Michigan-Huron are expected to resume their seasonal declines in November but will remain near record-highs for this time of year. As a result, there will continue to be a significantly increased risk of shoreline erosion, lakeshore flooding, and coastal damages through the remainder of the fall and potentially into early winter. The International Lake Superior Board of Control (Board) advises all those that may be affected to prepare for potentially severe coastal impacts, especially during periods of strong winds and high waves.

The Board expects the total outflow from Lake Superior to be 2,820 cms (99.6 tcfs) in November, which is as prescribed by Lake Superior Regulation Plan 2012. Actual outflows may vary depending on hydrologic conditions, as well as maintenance activities at the hydropower plants on the St. Marys River. The gate setting at the Compensating Works will be maintained at the equivalent of six gates fully open to start the month. The gate setting will then be lowered in stages beginning in late November to allow for a gradual reduction in St. Marys Rapids flows and water levels prior to winter.

The average St. Marys Rapids flow in November is expected to be approximately 937 cms (33.1 tcfs). Anglers and other users of the St. Marys Rapids need to be cautious of the high flows and water levels that will continue to be experienced in the rapids in November. Furthermore, some flooding of low-lying areas of Whitefish Island is expected to continue at these high flows. As a result, some recreational trails and features in these areas will likely be inundated and may sustain damage. Users are encouraged to use extreme caution.

 

Port Reports -  November 3

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day's news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known).

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
The Duluth harbor was quiet on Saturday, with the only traffic being the departure of the saltie Torrent at 04:26 with a load of bentonite from Hallett #5. There was no traffic through the Superior entry during the day, but Burns Harbor was due at 22:00 Saturday night to load ore at Burlington Northern.

Two Harbors-Silver Bay, MN – Gary A. Putney
Edgar B. Speer arrived Two Harbors on Nov. 1st at 20:54 for South of #2. She departed on Nov. 2nd at 15:26 for Conneaut. Arriving Two Harbors on Nov. 2nd was the Edwin H. Gott. The Gott had gone past Two Harbors and stopped off Duluth early in the afternoon on Nov. 2nd. She got underway off Duluth around 16:20 and arrived Two Harbors on Nov. 2nd at 19:05 for South of #2. Due Two Harbors on Nov. 3rd is the American Integrity. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay saw the Indiana Harbor depart on Nov. 2nd at 04:58 for Cleveland. Arriving Silver Bay on Nov. 2nd at 15:07 was the Clyde S. VanEnkevort/Erie Trader. There is no inbound traffic scheduled for Silver Bay on Nov. 3rd. When the Joyce L. VanEnkevort/Great Lakes Trader departed Two Harbors on Nov. 1st she had no destination AIS. She is headed for Conneaut.

Thunder Bay, ON
Friday; 19:54 Federal Saguenay departed for Montreal. 23:48 Tim S Dool arrived at the G3 elevator to load wheat. Saturday; 1:34 Whitefish Bay arrived at Viterra A to load grain. 11:52 Federal Welland arrived and went to anchor. 12:47 The saltie Jamno weighed anchor and proceeded to the Richardson Main Terminal to load grain. 17:40 Federal Caribou departed for Quebec City.

Green Bay, WI
The tug Samuel deChamplain / barge Innovation arrived from Alpena, MI, Saturday with cargo of slag for the Lafarge Terminal.

Milwaukee, WI – Wisconsin Marine Historical Society
In port Saturday (11/02) were: tug Sarah Andrie with barge A-390 unloading asphalt at the Construction Resources Management dock on the inner harbor. She arrived from Indiana Harbor (BP’s Whiting Refinery) Friday evening at 19:59. Barge A-390 is 310 feet long and can carry 39,000 barrels (about 7,000 tons) of asphalt. She cleared the harbor at 14:26 bound for Detroit. Federal Dart was still at the Federal Marine Terminals dock on the outer harbor unloading European steel. USACE Tug Racine and Crane Barge Manitowoc were just north of the breakwater light placing stone to protect Milwaukee’s break wall. Tug Leona B slipped under the Hoan Bridge just before 09:00 pushing two barges headed for a project in Kenosha.

Northern Lake Huron ports
Drummond Island: Saturday; 5:58 Herbert C Jackson arrived to take on a partial load and at 10:12 departed for Calcite.

Cheboygan: Saturday; The tug Michigan and tank barge Great Lakes arrived to unload petroleum products

Calcite: Saturday; 8:33 Wilfred Sykes arrived to load. 13:52 Herbert C Jackson arrived and went to anchor. 15:50 John G Munson departed for Duluth Superior. 16:02 Herbert C Jackson weighed anchor and proceeded to the dock to finish loading.

Stoneport: Saturday; 3:45 Olive L Moore departed and is down bound on Lake Huron. 9:00 Kaye E Barker arrived to load and departed at 16:36 for Marquette.

Alpena: Saturday; G L Ostrander arrived to load cement products. 4:58 Undaunted departed for Manitowoc. 13:47 GL Ostrander departed for Milwaukee.

Port Inland: Friday; 21:54 Manitoulin arrived to load limestone.

Detroit-Rouge River – Raymond H
Saturday Arrivals: Cason J Callaway arrived at the Revere Dock to unload stone. Alpena arrived at Lafarge to unload cement.

Cleveland, OH – Bill Koss
Federal Baltic and Happy River were both at the Port docks Saturday. American Courage was still on the shuttle run. Dorothy Ann/Pathfinder had stone from Marblehead.

Welland Canal and vicinity vessel passages - Saturday November 2 – Barry Andersen

Nanticoke - arrival - Nov 2 - Algocanada at 0555 and Algoma Compass at 2032

Long Point Bay anchorage - departed - Nov 2 - Harbour Feature (Por) at 0801 for the canal

Port Colborne anchorage - Nov 2 - Harbour Feature (Por) at 1028 - departed Nov 2 at 1625 for the canal

Welland Canal upbound - Oct 30 - tug Petite Forte & St Marys Cement at 2255 stopped wharf 12 - Oct 31 - Osogovo (Mlt) eta 2140 delayed - Nov 1 - Federal Kushiro (Mhl) at 1522 from Port Weller anchorage - Oct 2 - Algoma Compass at 0049, Cape (Lbr) (ex Heloise-15) at 0134, Baie Comeau at 0255, NACC Capri (Atg) at 1615 and Andean (Cyp) at 1843

Welland Canal downbound - Nov 1 - Carolus Magnus (Bds) (ex SCT Breihorn-17, MCT Breithorn-09, HHL Celtic-07) at 1622 for Amsterdam, Damia Desgagnes at 1907 and Saginaw at 2303 for wharf 6 - Nov 2 - tug Ocean A Gauthier with USS Indianapolis LCU 17 - (Littoral Combat Unit) at 0320 on her maiden trip, Ojibway at 0320, CSL Tadoussac at 0528, Algoma Discovery at 0736, Salarium at 0911, Whitstler (Lbr) at 1125, Cuyahoga at 1413, Harbour Feature (Por) at 1628 and Volgaborg (Nld) at 1849

Welland Canal docks - docked - Oct 31 - tug Petite Forte & St Marys Cement stopped wharf 12 at 2020 - departed - Nov 1 - light tug Ocean A Gauthier from wharf 6 at 1017 - arrived West Street wharf - awaiting arrival of USS Indianapolis on her maiden voyage - Nov 2 - light tug Ocean A Gauthier at 0225 approx to meet warship and CCGS Pierre Radisson at 1437 eastbound

Port Weller anchorage - anchored - Oct 30 Mandarin (Cyp) at 1521 awaiting dock in Toronto - Oct 31 - Federal Kushiro (Mhl) at 2000 and Osogovo (Mlt) at 2250 - departed - Nov 1 - Federal Kushiro (Mhl) at 1501 for Duluth - Nov 2 - Tasing Swan (Den) (ex Erria Mie-12, Hamza Efe Bey-08) at 0700 eastbound

Hamilton - arrivals - Nov 2 - none - docked - Oct 30 - Stella Polaris (Nld) at 1810 - Oct 31 - Federal Sakura (Mhl) at 1138, Lake Ontario (Atg) (ex Federal Manitou-11, completed as Lake Ontario) at 1629 - Nov 1 - Gaia Desgagnes at 1945, Algoma Compass at 1137, CSL Laurentien at 1150 from the Burlington Bay anchorage, Federal Danube (Mhl) at 1306, and Baie Comeau at 1401 - departure - Nov 1 - Algoma Compass at 2337 - Oct 2 - Baie Comeau at 0058 - both westbound

Clarkson - docked - Nov 1 - Robert S Pierson at 1937 - departed Nov 2 - at 0537 eastbound

Mississauga - Nov 2 - Hinch Spirit at 0603 and Wicky Spirit at 0652

Toronto - docked - Nov 1 - McKeil Spirit at 2039 - departed - Nov 1 - Cape (Lbr) (ex Heloise-15) at 2337 for Detroit - Oct 2 - NACC Argonaut at 0252 eastbound

Oshawa - departed - Nov 1 - tug Wilf Seymour & Alouette Spirit at 1618 eastbound

Seaway – René Beauchamp
Federal Montreal is expected at Sorel-Tracy on Tuesday. She is the first ship in the Fednav fleet to honor the name of a city, according to a Fednav release.

 

Storm moves barge trapped above Horseshoe Falls for 101 years closer to the edge

11/3 - Niagara Falls - Strong winds and rains during Thursday night's storm have moved the historic iron scow at the top of Canada's Horseshoe Falls, which had been stuck in the same place for more than 100 years — and now, it's closer to the edge.

In a press release, Niagara Parks said that the deteriorated dumping scow, which is similar to a barge, used to be lodged in the upper rapids above the falls, but has shifted down river. CEO David Adames said that staff believe the scow isn't in danger of going over the Falls and is now resting in a new site. But that doesn't mean it will stay where it is for another 100 years, especially considering its rusted state.

"It looks secure at the moment; however, if there's severe weather that comes along, it may shift it some more," he said in an interview.

The scow is an iconic part of any visit to the Falls. In 1918, it was the site of a heroic rescue of the two crewmen stranded on board the day it cut adrift and was marooned there. Over the past century, the scow has become incredibly rusted. The side facing the Canadian side was the only one intact, Adames said.

The CEO said that the weather was severe enough to roll the scow and send it northwest from its original resting place. Though he can't say exactly how far the boat has moved — Niagara Parks will geo-locate it later on to determine the distance — he agreed that the distance is sizeable.

Staff are monitoring the situation and will issue updates if needed. They are also photographing the change and constantly watching the boat via security camera. If it does seem like the scow will go over the Falls, Adames said authorities will be notified so that precautions for tourism can be taken.

Niagara Parks celebrated the 100-year-anniversary of the scow in August 2018 and unveiled some panels that told its story.

Read more and view photos at this link: https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/hamilton/iron-scow-horseshoe-falls-1.5344845

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  November 3

On 03 November 1907, tug ESCORT (wooden propeller, 45 foot, 40 gross tons, built in 1894, at Port Colborne, Ontario) tried to pass the barge BENJ HARRISON at the mouth of the Niagara River. In a navigational error, the tug sheared under the barge’s bow, was run over and sunk. Three lives were lost.

B. A. PEERLESS sailed on her maiden voyage November 3, 1952, bound for Superior, Wisconsin, where 110,291 barrels of crude oil were loaded destined for British-American's refinery at Clarkson, Ontario. The PEERLESS was built for the express purpose of transporting crude oil from the Interprovincial / Lakehead Pipeline terminus at Superior to B / A's Clarkson refinery. The vessel lasted until 1991, when she was broken up.

On 3 November 1898, PACIFIC (wooden propeller passenger/package freighter, 179 foot, 918 gross tons, built in 1883, at Owen Sound, Ontario) caught fire at the Grand Trunk dock at Collingwood, Ontario. She burned to a shell despite a concerted effort to save her. She was later towed out into Georgian Bay and scuttled.

On 3 November 1855, DELAWARE (wooden propeller, 173 foot, 368 tons, built in 1846, at Black River, Ohio) was carrying general merchandise from Chicago to Buffalo with a stop at Milwaukee. She was driven ashore by a gale eight miles south of Sheboygan, Wisconsin and sank. Ten or 11 of the 18 on board lost their lives. Within a few days, only her arches were visible above the water.

Dismantling of the H. C. HEIMBECKER began on 03 Nov 1981, by Triad Salvage Company at Ashtabula, Ohio, and was completed the following year. This vessel was originally named GEORGE W. PERKINS (steel bulk freighter, 556 foot, 6,553 gross tons, built in 1905, at Superior, Wisconsin.)

1928: CANADIAN TRADER was Hull 39 of the Port Arthur shipyard. Following a sale to Japanese interests, the ship departed Seattle on this date in 1928 on its delivery voyage, still as c) GUILDA SCUDERI, and was never seen again.

1953: The tug J.A. CORNETT went hard aground about seven miles north of Clayton, NY and was leaking badly. The vessel was eventually refloated and survived at Port Dover, ON at least as recently as 2011. It has been laid up there since 1992 and is now in derelict condition.

1965: The tug MISEFORD was towing the barge CHARLES W. JOHNSON when they were caught in a storm on the St. Marys River. The tug was pulled over on her side and rested on the bottom. MISEFORD was salvaged in the spring of 1966 and remains in service in 2012 as a harbor tug at Thunder Bay, Ont.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

‘We’re not out of the woods yet:' Beach erosion threat may continue into 2020

11/2 - Grand Haven, MI – Lakeshore homeowners hoping for relief from high-water storms swallowing their property lines will have to wait a while longer, experts say, maybe even a year or more. “The narrative right now is it’s not looking very good heading into 2020,” said Brandon Hoving, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Grand Rapids. “This isn’t a problem that’s going away anytime soon for the coastal properties, unfortunately.”

Hoving said Lake Michigan water levels in 2020 could possibly reach their highest-ever in the roughly 100 years of reliable measurement data.

The current all-time record high, set in October 1986, was 582.35 feet. Peak lake levels this month came within inches of surpassing that at 581.74 feet, Hoving said. The possibility of 2020 as a record-setting year hinges on continued wet seasons, something that is an ongoing long-term trend in Michigan, according to Hoving.

Crashing waves atop high Great Lakes water levels have eroded dozens of feet of duneland so far this October, leaving some homes dangerously close to bluffs. Lake Michigan erosion threatens beach properties.

"We’re doing what we can to protect the sand dune while we’re waiting for the permanent wall, and we’re praying," one resident said. The Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes and Energy has vowed to expedite waterline work permits so homeowners can halt the duneland loss by installing seawalls and riprap, or piles of rock.

While the agency’s permitting process normally takes 60 to 90 days, officials say they now can turn the permits around within days “in cases where homes or infrastructure are at risk.”

Property owners typically need approval as well from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers if they plan to work in the water or along the waterline. County emergency management teams in Muskegon and Ottawa counties continue to monitor endangered properties and keep local first responders in the loop.

Nick Bonstell, director of Ottawa County Emergency Management, says no lakeshore homes are currently in danger of falling off eroded bluffs. But, he said, they’re monitoring about three to four properties in the county that could get to that point after a few more large storm systems.

“November and December are the biggest months for the biggest gales and the biggest winds,” Bonstell said. “We’re just getting through October and we still have November and December ahead of us.”

Storms could continue over the winter if the shoreline waters don’t freeze, said Hoving.

Read more and view images at this link: https://www.mlive.com/news/grand-rapids/2019/10/were-not-out-of-the-woods-yet-beach-erosion-threat-may-continue-into-2020.html

 

Port Reports -  November 2

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day's news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known).

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
The only vessel to arrive Duluth on Friday was Walter J. McCarthy Jr., which entered port at 04:16 to take on coal at Midwest Energy. She departed at 17:11 for St. Clair. No further traffic is expected in the harbor until Sunday, however Torrent and Juno were both still in port Friday, the former loading bentonite at Hallett #5 and the latter taking on wheat at Gavilon. There was also no traffic in Superior on Friday, with none expected until late Saturday when Burns Harbor is due to load at BN.

Two Harbors-Silver Bay, MN – Gary A. Putney
American Spirit departed Two Harbors on Nov. 1st at 02:30 for Indiana Harbor. The Joyce L. VanEnkevort/Great Lakes Trader shifted over to South of #2 and departed on Nov. 1st at 15:48. As of 19:30 on the 1st her AIS hadn't been updated. Due Two Harbors on Nov. 1st between 20:00 and 20:30 is the Edgar B. Speer. Due Two Harbors on Nov. 2nd is the Edwin H. Gott. As of 19:30 on Nov. 1st the Indiana Harbor continued to load at Northshore Mining in Silver Bay. Due Northshore Mining on Nov. 2nd is the Clyde S. VanEnkevort/Erie Trader.

Thunder Bay, ON
Friday; 14:18 Kaministiqua arrived at the Richardson Current River Terminal to load grain. 19:06 Spruceglen departed for Montreal.

Northern Lake Huron ports
Port Dolomite: Friday; 9:00 Calumet arrived to load and departed at 19:55 for Cleveland.

Stoneport: Friday; 13:48 Olive L Moore arrived to load.

Calcite: Friday; 10:57 Cason J Callaway departed for Detroit. 21:00 John G Munson arrived to load.

Port Inland: Thursday; 16:17 Clyde S Vanenkevort departed for Silver Bay. 16:59 Great Republic arrived to load and departed Friday at 6:41 for Duluth Superior.

Alpena: Friday; Undaunted arrived to unload ash at the cement plant.

Goderich, ON – Bruce Douglas
Algoma Niagara cleared 12:13 pm Friday upbound with salt for Chicago. Labrador remained loading grain at Elevators. The saltie San is expected next.

Detroit-Rouge River – Raymond H
Friday Arrivals: Iver Bright arrived at the Waterfront Petroleum Terminal. Federal Oshima arrived at Nicholson's Detroit Terminal to unload general cargo.

Cleveland, OH – Bill Koss
Winds and waves have subsided on Lake Erie and traffic is moving again. Dorothy Ann/Pathfinder has departed for Marblehead. American Courage has moved to deliver at ArcelorMittal Steel. Manitowoc is still at Ontario Stone but will be departing for Fairport Harbor. Sam Laud arrived at 15:01 and is holding at Lehigh Cement. Federal Baltic arrived at the Port, Dock 24W at 13:23. Algoma Buffalo has left her anchorage off of Huron and is heading to Cleveland. Also leaving anchorage is Algoma Innovator and has an ETA of 20:00 to Amcor in Lorain with potash.

Welland Canal and vicinity vessel passages - Friday November 1 – Barry Andersen Traffic stopped about 2000 Thursday evening -for weather and resumed late Friday morning.

Nanticoke - departed - Oct 31 - Sloman Hera (Atg) at 0902 eastbound for NY

Long Point Bay anchorage - anchored - Oct 30 - Harbour Feature (Por) at 0840 - Oct 31 - Damia Desgagnes at 0643 - departed - Nov 1 - Damia Desgagnes at 1549 eastbound Port Colborne anchorage - Nov 1 - Carolus Magnus (Bds) (ex SCT Breihorn-17, MCT Breithorn-09, HHL Celtic-07) at 1225 - departed at 1601 for the canal

Welland Canal - upbound - Oct 30 - tug Petite Forte & St Marys Cement at 2255 stopped wharf 12 - Oct 31 - CSL Welland at 0738 stopped wharf 12, light tug Ocean A Gauthier at 1747 - stopped wharf 6 at 1031, Algoma Enterprise delayed at lock 8, G3 Marquis at 1825 delayed in lock 1, Federal Kushiro (Mhl) eta 1945 (delayed) and Osogovo (Mlt) eta 2140 - Nov 1 - Algoma Enterprise departed lock 8, CSL Welland departed wharf 12, light tug Ocean A Gauthier at 1017 stopped West Street and G3 Marquis from lock 1 at 1220 downbound - Algoma Enterprise at 2000 stopping wharf 6 in Thorold - Oct 31 - CSL Laurentien at 0219, Algoma Compass at 0544 and Baie Comeau at 0900 and Sloman Hera (Atg) at 1245 - delayed in lock 2 at 1920 - Nov 1 - Sloman Hera (Atg) departed lock 2 at 1225, Carolus Magnus (Bds) (ex SCT Breihorn-17, MCT Breithorn-09, HHL Celtic-07) at 1622 for Amsterdam and Damia Desgagnes at 1907 eastbound

Welland Canal docks - docked - Jun 7 - CCGS Pierre Radisson at 0925 into Heddle Dry Dock at Port Weller -Oct 31 - tug Petite Forte & St Marys Cement stopped wharf 12 at 2020 departed - Nov 1 - light tug Ocean A Gauthier from wharf 6 at 1017 - arrived West Street wharf - awaiting arrival of USS Indianapolis on her maiden voyage

Port Weller anchorage - anchored - Oct 29 - Tasing Swan (Den) (ex Erria Mie-12, Hamza Efe Bey-08) at 2025 - Oct 30 Mandarin (Cyp) at 1521 awaiting dock in Toronto - Oct 31 - Federal Kushiro (Mhl) at 2000 and Osogovo (Mlt) at 2250 - departed - Nov 1 - Federal Kushiro (Mhl) at 1501 for Duluth

Hamilton - arrivals - Nov 1 - Algoma Compass at 1137, CSL Laurrentien at 1150 from the Burlington Bay anchorage, Federal Danube (Mhl) at 1306, and Baie Comeau at 1401 - anchored - Nov 1 - Gaia Desgagnes at 0925 - docked - Oct 30 - Stella Polaris (Nld) at 1810 - Oct 31 - Federal Sakura (Mhl) at 1138, Lake Ontario (Atg) (ex Federal Manitou-11, completed as Lake Ontario) at 1629

anchored off Hamilton - Oct 31 - McKeil Spirit at 1206, Algoma Compass at 2015, Baie Comeau at 2207, Robert S Pierson at 2247 from Clarkson - departed - Nov 1 - Robert S Pierson at 1833 for Clarkson, McKeil Spirit at 1850 for Toronto, Algoma Compass and Baie Comeau - both for Hamilton

Clarkson - arrival - Nov 1 - Robert S Pierson at 1937 from the anchorage off of Hamilton

Toronto - arrival - Nov 1 - McKeil Spirit at 2039 from the Hamilton anchorage - docked - Oct 29 - Cape (Lbr) (ex Heloise-15) at 1611 and Oct 31 - NACC Argonaut at 1452

Oshawa - departed - Nov 1 - tug Wilf Seymour & Alouette Spirit at 1618 eastbound

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  November 2

On 02 November 1924, TURRET CROWN (steel propeller "turret ship,” 253 foot, 1,827 tons, built in 1895, in England) was driven ashore in a gale on Meldrum Point on the north side of Manitoulin Island on Lake Huron. Her hull was wrecked during the storms that winter. She was cut up and removed for scrap the following year.

On November 2, 1984, the tugs ATOMIC and ELMORE M. MISNER towed the ERINDALE, a.) W.F. WHITE, to the International Marine Salvage scrap dock at Port Colborne, Ontario, where demolition began that month.

H.C. HEIMBECKER proceeded under her own power to Ashtabula, Ohio, for scrapping, arriving there November 2, 1981.

On November 2, 1948, FRANK ARMSTRONG collided head-on with the c.) JOHN J. BOLAND of 1905, a.) STEPHEN B. CLEMENT, in a heavy fog on Lake Erie near Colchester, Ontario. Both vessels were badly damaged and resulted in one fatality on the BOLAND. The ARMSTRONG was towed to Toledo, Ohio, for repairs.

In 1972, the A. E. NETTLETON's towline parted from the OLIVE L. MOORE during a snowstorm with gale force winds 17 miles west of the Keweenaw Peninsula on Lake Superior. The barge developed a 15-degree list when her load of grain shifted. Three of her five-member crew were air lifted by a U.S.C.G. helicopter to the MOORE to assist in re-rigging the towline. The NETTLETON was towed the next day into the Lily Pond on the Keweenaw Waterway to trim her cargo.

The WILLIAM C. MORELAND was abandoned to the underwriters on November 2, 1910, as a constructive total loss, amounting to $445,000. She had stranded on Sawtooth Reef off Eagle Harbor, Michigan, on Lake Superior in mid October.

The keel of the new section, identified as Hull #28, was laid down on November 2, 1959. A new forward pilothouse and a hatch crane were installed and her steam turbine engine and water tube boilers were reconditioned. The vessel was named c.) RED WING after the Detroit Red Wing hockey team, honoring a long association with Upper Lakes Shipping and James Norris, the founder of ULS, and his two sons, James D. and Bruce, owners of the National Hockey League team.

In 1971, the Lake Michigan carferry BADGER was laid up due to a coal strike.

On 2 November 1889, FRANCIS PALMS (wooden schooner, 173 foot, 560 tons, built in 1868, at Marine City, Michigan, as a bark) was sailing from Escanaba to Detroit with a load of iron ore when she was driven ashore near Beaver Island in Lake Michigan. Her entire crew was taken off by the tug GLADIATOR that also pulled in vain while trying to free the PALMS. The PALMS was pounded to pieces by the storm waves. November was a bad month for the PALMS since she had previously been wrecked on Long Point in Lake Erie in November 1874, and again at Duluth in November 1872.

During the first week of November 1878, The Port Huron Times reported wrecks and mishaps that occurred during a severe storm that swept over the Lakes on Friday and Saturday, 1-3 November. The information was reported on 2, 4 & 5 November as the reports came in. The same reports will appear here starting today: The Port Huron Times of 2 November 1878: "The schooner L. C. WOODRUFF of Cleveland is ashore at the mouth of the White River with her foremast gone. She is loaded with corn. Three schooners went ashore at Grand Haven Friday morning, the AMERICA, MONTPELIER, and AUSTRALIAN. One man was drowned off the AUSTRALIAN. The schooner WORTS is ashore and full of water on Beaver Island. Her cargo consists of pork for Collingwood. The tug LEVIATHAN has gone to her aid. The schooner LAKE FOREST is ashore at Hammond's Bay, Lake Huron, and is full of water. She has a cargo of corn aboard. The tug A J SMITH has gone to her rescue. The barge S. C. WOODRUFF has gone down in 13 feet of water off Whitehall and her crew is clinging to the rigging at last accounts. A lifeboat has been sent to her relief. The barge RUTTER is in 25 feet of water and all the crew are now safe."

On 2 November 1874, PREBLE (2-mast wooden schooner, 98 foot, 166 tons, built in 1842, at Buffalo, New York as a brig) was lost in a storm off Long Point on Lake Erie and broke up in the waves. The steamer ST PAUL rescued her crew.

On 02 Nov 1862, BAY STATE (wooden propeller, 137 foot, 372 tons, built in 1852, at Buffalo, New York) was bound for Lake Erie ports from Oswego, New York when she broke up offshore in a terrific gale in the vicinity of Oswego. All 22 onboard, including six passengers, lost their lives. The shoreline was strewn with her wreckage for miles.

PAUL H. CARNAHAN was christened at the foot of West Grand Boulevard in Detroit, Michigan on 02 Nov 1961. She had been converted from the tanker b.) ATLANTIC DEALER to a dry bulk cargo carrier by American Ship Building Co. at Lorain, Ohio and came out on her maiden bulk freighter voyage just two weeks before this christening ceremony.

1912: JUNO, which had lost the barge P.B. LOCKE the previous day on Lake Ontario, arrived safely at Cobourg and then sank at the dock.

1923: The wooden steamer WESEE caught fire in Lake Erie off Middle Bass Island and burned as a total loss. The crew took to the yawl boats and all were saved.

1956: The former schooner J.T. WING, which had operated as a museum at Belle Isle in Detroit until condemned due to rotting timbers, was burned.

1981: FROSSO K., an SD 14 ocean freighter, suffered an engine room fire enroute from Vancouver to Japan. The ship was towed back to Vancouver November 15 and repaired. It first came through the Seaway in 1974 and arrived at Cartagena, Columbia, under tow, for scrapping on February 15, 1995, as e) MAMER.

1981: The West German freighter POSEIDON first came through the Seaway in 1962 and became a regular inland trader. It was abandoned, in leaking condition on this date, as e) VIKI K. in the Red Sea. There was some suspicion that the vessel was scuttled as part of an insurance fraud. 1988: PETER MISENER struck a shoal while upbound in the Saguenay River for Port Alfred with coke. There was major damage and the ship went to Montreal for repairs.

2001: AUDACIOUS stranded at Keleman Island, Indonesia, but was refloated two days later. The damage was severe and the vessel was laid up at Singapore and then sold to shipbreakers. The ship arrived at Alang, India, to be broken up, on April 27, 2002. The ship visited the Great Lakes as a) WELSH VOYAGER in 1977, and returned as b) LONDON VOYAGER in 1982 and c) OLYMPIC LEADER in 1983. It made its first inland voyage as d) AUDACIOUS in 1996 and its final call in 2000.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

60 mph wind gusts mean a drop of 30 degrees and Lake Erie waves up to 20 feet

11/1 - Cleveland, OH – Just in time for trick-or-treat: Winds were expected to gust up to 60 miles an hour Thursday night as temperatures dropped 30 degrees and waves on Lake Erie hit 20 feet, according to the National Weather Service.

“It’s going to be nasty,” said meteorologist Mike Griffin. “For a six-hour window it’s going to be howling.” The wind will strengthen rapidly, to sustained winds of 40-45 mph, Griffin said.

On the lake, the winds will be 50-60 mph, with hurricane-force gusts up to 75 mph. That means huge waves. “Any mariners, they gotta get off the lake by (Thursday) afternoon,” Griffin said. “It’s not going to be safe.”

The wind will push water from the west to east, flooding lakeshore areas near Buffalo in a phenomenon called a seiche. Waves could also bring flooding in Northeast Ohio. On Friday, when the winds subside, the water will slosh back and forth, like in a bathtub, for six to eight hours. “It’s a very complex and very rapidly changing situation,” Griffin said.

Cleveland.com

 

Port Reports -  November 1

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day's news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known).

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
Great Lakes Trader/tug Joyce L. VanEnkevort arrived Duluth at 04:50 Thursday morning to discharge limestone at Hallett #5, and Paul R. Tregurtha was inbound at 05:02 to pick up iron ore pellets from CN, a rare load for the vessel. John J. Boland departed at 08:17 after loading petroleum coke at Midwest Energy, and Great Lakes Trader left port light at 15:07 for Two Harbors. Torrent weighed anchor and arrived at 16:33 to load bentonite at Hallett #5. Also in port was Juno, loading wheat at Gavilon. She was tentatively expected to depart late Thursday night, while the Tregurtha has a departure time of 06:00 Friday posted. The only traffic through the Superior entry on Thursday was James R. Barker, which departed at 04:47 fully loaded with iron ore pellets and bound for Nanticoke. No further traffic is expected at Burlington Northern until Saturday evening.

Two Harbors-Silver Bay, MN – Gary A. Putney
The Philip R. Clarke shifted from North of #1 to South of #2 between 20:25 and 20:50 on Nov. 30th. She departed Two Harbors on Oct. 31st at 04:41 for Gary. The American Spirit arrived Two Harbors on Oct. 31st at 05:22 for South of #2. As of 19:30 on the 31st she is still at the loading dock. Arriving Two Harbors on Oct. 31st at 17:31 was the Joyce L. VanEnkevort/Great Lakes Trader for North of #2 lay-by. She had unloaded stone at Hallett #5 in Duluth. Due Two Harbors on Nov. 1st is the Edgar B. Speer. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay saw the arrival of the Indiana Harbor on Oct. 31st at 17:09. Silver Bay has no inbound traffic scheduled on Nov. 1st.

Thunder Bay, ON
Thursday; 17:02 Spruceglen arrived at Viterra A to load grain.

Northern Lake Huron ports
Meldrum Bay:
No traffic

Port Dolomite: No traffic

Stoneport: Thursday; 0:19 Laura L Vanenkevort arrived to load and departed at 13:36.

Calcite: Cason J Callaway arrived to load.

Port Inland: Wednesday 23:51 H Lee White departed and went to anchor. CSL Niagara and the tug Spartan also went to anchor off of Port Inland to wait out weather. Thursday; 0:19 Clyde S VanEnkevort weighed anchor. 12:31 Spartan weighed anchor and departed for Ludington but is sailing south along the west shore. 17:21 H Lee White weighed anchor and is down bound on Lake Michigan. 18:04 CSL Niagara weighed anchor and departed for Burns Harbor.

Goderich, ON – Bruce Douglas
Algoma Niagara arrived 1:21 am Thursday, loading salt at Compass Minerals. Labrador arrived Saturday 7:54 am and remains loading at the elevators.

Detroit-Rouge River – Raymond H
Thursday Arrivals: Michigan/Great Lakes arrived at the Waterfront Petroleum Terminal. Herbert C Jackson arrived at Zug Island to unload coal. American Integrity arrived at the Waterfront Petroleum Terminal to fuel. GL Ostrander/Integrity arrived at Lafarge to unload cement.

Cleveland, OH – Bill Koss
Windy conditions had traffic at a standstill Thursday. American Courage was waiting at West 3rd St., as were Dorothy Ann/Pathfinder to unload at ArcelorMittal. Manitowoc unloaded at Ontario Stone and was holding at the dock. At anchor in Lake Erie were Algoma Buffalo waiting to come to Cleveland and Algoma Innovator waiting to go to Arcelor in Lorain.

Welland Canal and vicinity vessel passages - Thursday October 31 – Barry Andersen Winds gusting up to 40 knots reported off Port Weller Thursday.

Nanticoke - departed - Oct 31 - Sloman Hera (Atg) at 0902 eastbound for NY

Long Point Bay anchorage - anchored - Oct 30 - Harbour Feature (Por) at 0840 from the Nanticoke dock - Oct 31 - Damia Desgagnes at 0643

Welland Canal upbound - Oct 30 - Mandarin (Cyp) at 1440 to Port Weller anchorage, Algoma Sault at 1525, Algoma Innovator at 1701, Miedwie (Bhs) at 1900 and tug Petite Forte & St Marys Cement at 2255 - Oct 31 - Federal Oshima (Mhl) at 0329, CSL Welland at 0738, Federal Baltic (Mhl) at 0814, Algoma Enterprise at 1650 from wharf 6, G3 Marquis at 1825, Federal Kushiro (Mhl) eta 1945 (delayed) and Osogovo (Mlt) eta 2140

Welland Canal downbound - Oct 30 - Algoma Enterprise at 2000 stopping wharf 6 in Thorold - Oct 31 - CSL Laurentien at 0219, Algoma Compass at 0544 and Baie Comeau at 0900

Welland Canal docks - docked - Jun 7 - CCGS Pierre Radisson at 0925 into Heddle Dry Dock at Port Weller - Oct 30 - Algoma Enterprise stopped wharf 6 at 2320 - departed Oct 31 at 1650 approx. up bound

Port Weller anchorage - anchored - Oct 29 - Tasing Swan (Den) (ex Erria Mie-12, Hamza Efe Bey-08) at 2025 - Oct 30 Mandarin (Cyp) at 1521 awaiting dock in Toronto

Hamilton - arrivals - Oct 31 - Federal Sakura (Mhl) at 1138, Lake Ontario (Atg) (ex Federal Manitou-11, completed as Lake Ontario) at 1629, Federal Danube (Mhl) anchored off of Hamilton, Algoma Compass anchored of Hamilton and CSL Laurentien anchored in Burlington Bay at 1930 - docked - Oct 30 - Stella Polaris (Nld) at 1810 - departed - Oct 31 - Algoma Guardian at 0121 eastbound and Harbour Pioneer (Por) at 0347 for Trinidad

Clarkson - departed - Oct 30 - Robert S Pierson at 2132 eastbound

Toronto - anchored - Oct 31 - McKeil Spirit at 1031 anchored off Hamilton awaiting weather - arrival - Oct 31 - NACC Argonaut at 1452 - docked - Oct 29 - Cape (Lbr) (ex Heloise-15) at 1611

Oshawa - arrival - Oct 31 - tug Wilf Seymour & Alouette Spirit - docked - departed - Oct 31 - NACC Capri (Atg) at 1018 eastbound and Lake Ontario (Atg) (ex Federal Manitou-11, completed as Lake Ontario) at 1233 westbound

 

Mariners’ Church to Celebrate Great Lakes Memorial Service

11/1 - Detroit, MI - Like any other city, Detroit has its share of traditions, things that happen regularly and that Detroiters accept and expect to return again and again – the Thanksgiving Parade, octopus on the ice at Red Wings games, Noel Night in Midtown...

But there’s a more serious tradition that started November 11, 1975, is commemorated in an internationally recognized ballad, and is memorialized annually by a solemn and meaningful ceremony at the heart of downtown, the annual Mariners’ Church of Detroit Great Lakes Memorial Service.

On November 10, 1975, the S. S. Edmund Fitzgerald, making its way from Superior, Wisconsin, to Zug Island with a 26,000-ton cargo of taconite, sank during a storm in the rough seas of Lake Superior. Twenty-nine sailors died in the incident, the worst in Great Lakes history.

Upon learning of the wreck, Rev. Richard Ingalls, then pastor of Mariners’ Church of Detroit, went to his church in the pre-dawn hours and rang its “Brotherhood Bell” 29 times, an act that was soon immortalized in Gordon Lightfoot’s ballad (which he refers to as a folksong), “The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald.”

The tradition of that somber bell ringing continues today as part of the annual Mariners’ Church Great Lakes Memorial service which will take place this year at 11 a.m. Sunday, November 10, the 44th anniversary of the disaster. While the service specifically commemorates the Fitzgerald sinking, it also honors the memories of the more than 6,000 Great Lakes shipwrecks and the more than 10,000 sailors who lost their lives in them.

“When we look at Lake Superior, or any of the Great Lakes, what we see is their awesome natural beauty, which is a good thing,” says Fr. Jeff Hubbard, pastor of Mariners Church. “But they also have immense natural power as they showed on the night of the Fitzgerald sinking. Our service pays tribute to the souls lost on the Great Lakes over the years. It’s something we don’t often think about but it’s very real and deserves our attention and prayer.”

Mariners’ Great Lakes Memorial service will feature the church’s celebrated professional choir accompanied by its recently rebuilt 78-rank pipe organ. An Honor Guard of Great Lakes-related maritime and military personnel, dressed in uniform, will conduct the solemn bell ringing with a prayer that all those who have perished in the Great Lakes are truly resting in peace.

 

Fitzgerald: National Museum offers Schoonmaker tour to make sense of mystery

11/1 - Toledo, OH – The Edmund Fitzgerald is the Great Lakes’ most famous shipwreck. And to try to understand the mysterious loss, the National Museum of the Great Lakes is hosting tours of its freighter, the Col. James M. Schoonmaker, highlighting similarities between the two ships and explaining theories on its sinking.

The Mighty Fitz disappeared from Lake Superior in a gale on Nov. 10, 1975, and none of the 29-member crew survived. The life raft was automatically inflated and was found floating about the wreckage, with no one on board. No bodies were ever found, and no one can definitely say what happened.

The tragedy changed Great Lakes shipping regulations. And it fascinated the nation, in part because of the ballad “The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald” by Gordon Lightfoot. In Toledo, the interest was personal.

Toledo was one of the Fitzgerald’s primary ports, and the ship was often referred to as the Toledo Express because so many crew members were from the city, said Ellen Kennedy, the museum’s Director of Education and Visitor Experience. “Locally, Toledo was one of the vessel’s primary ports.

“The S.S. Edmund Fitzgerald captured the attention and saddened thousands across the nation,” Kennedy said.

The 10,500-square-foot museum on the banks of the Maumee River opened in 2014, replacing a smaller version that operated in Vermilion through 2011. About 25,000 people each year visit its artifacts, from a ship’s bell to the Fitzgerald’s life raft.

The museum’s program on Nov. 9-10 starts with the 75-minute tour of the Schoonmaker, the last tour of the 2019 season, followed by the museum’s documentary, “A Good Ship and Crew Well Seasoned: The Fitzgerald and Her Legacy.”

Read more and view images at this link: https://www.cleveland.com/news/2019/10/wreck-of-the-edmund-fitzgerald-national-museum-of-the-great-lakes-offers-schoonmaker-freighter-tour-to-make-sense-of-mystery.html

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  November 1

The LEHIGH, Captain Edward P. Fitch in command, cleared the Great Lakes Engineering Works yard at River Rouge, Michigan, to begin her maiden trip on this day in 1943. The LEHIGH was one of two Maritimers (the other was the STEELTON) acquired by Bethlehem Steel Corp. as part of a government program to upgrade and increase the capacity of the Great Lakes fleet during World War II. Bethlehem exchanged three older vessels, the JOHNSTOWN of 1905, the SAUCON, and the CORNWALL, plus cash for the two Maritimers.

On 01 November 1880, NINA BAILEY (wooden schooner, 30 tons, built in 1873, at Ludington, Michigan) filled with water and went out of control in a storm on Lake Michigan. She struck the North Pier at St. Joseph, Michigan and capsized. Her crew climbed up on her keel and was rescued by the Lifesaving Service. The vessel later broke up in the waves.

The Grand Trunk Western Railway was granted permission by the Interstate Commerce Commission on November 1, 1978, to discontinue its Lake Michigan service between Muskegon, Michigan and Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

MAITLAND NO 1 made her maiden voyage on November 1, 1916, from Ashtabula, Ohio to Port Maitland, Ontario, transporting rail cars with coal for the steel mills at Hamilton, Ontario.

SCOTT MISENER of 1954 returned to service in the grain trade on November 1, 1986, after a 3-year lay-up.

On 1 November 1917, ALVA B (wooden steam tug, 74 foot, 84 gross tons, built in 1890, at Buffalo, New York) apparently mistook amusement park lights for the harbor markers at Avon Lake, Ohio during a storm. She struck bottom in the shallows and was destroyed by waves.

On 1 November 1862, BLACK HAWK (wooden brig, 138 foot, 385 tons, built in 1854, at Ohio City, Ohio) was carrying 19,000 bushels of corn and some stained glass when a gale drove her ashore and wrecked her near Point Betsie. In 1858, this vessel had sailed from Detroit, Michigan to Liverpool, England and back.

On 1 Nov 1862, CHIEF JUSTICE MARSHALL (2-mast wooden schooner, 105 foot, 182 tons, built in 1830, at Cape Vincent, New York) was driven aground between Dunkirk and Barcelona, New York during a storm. All hands were lost and the vessel was a total loss.

The Mackinac Bridge was opened to traffic on 01 November 1957.

The CITY OF MILWAUKEE (steel propeller carferry, 347 foot, 2,988 gross tons, built in 1931, at Manitowoc, Wisconsin) made her last run for Grand Trunk's rail car ferry service on 01 November 1978. In the fall of 1978, after termination of Grand Trunk's carferry service, she was then chartered to Ann Arbor Railroad. She is currently a museum ship at Manistee, Michigan.

Port Maitland Shipbreaking Ltd. began scrapping P & H Shipping's f.) ELMGLEN on 01 November 1984. She had a long career, being built in 1909, at Ecorse, Michigan as the a.) SHENANGO (steel propeller bulk freighter, 580 foot. 8,047 gross tons).

1907: WILLIAM E. REIS settled on the bottom of the St. Clair River following a collision with the MONROE C. SMITH. It was finally refloated for good on December 7 after several earlier efforts were short lived. The former last sailed as SASKADOC in 1966.

1908: TELEGRAM, a wooden passenger and freight carrier, stranded at Horse Island, Rattlesnake Harbour, Georgian Bay. The ship caught fire when the stove upset and the vessel was a total loss. All on board were rescued.

1912: The barge P.B. LOCKE, under tow of the JUNO, was lost in a storm on Lake Ontario enroute from Pointe Anne to Toronto.

1921: The Canadian wooden freighter CANOBIE, a) IRON KING received major storm damage on Lake Erie and arrived at Erie, Pa., in a leaking condition. The ship was stripped of valuable parts and abandoned. It later caught fire and subsequently scuttled about 2 miles offshore.

1924: GLENLYON stranded at Menagerie Island, Siskiwit Bay, Lake Superior while enroute to Port Colborne with 150,000 bushels of wheat. It had been seeking shelter in a storm but grounded as a total loss and then sank over the winter. All on board were saved.

1929: KEYSTATE and the schooner MAGGIE L. collided in the St. Lawrence near Clayton, NY, and the latter was lost.

1956: JAMES B. EADS and fleetmate GREY BEAVER were in a collision in western Lake Ontario and both received bow damage.

1965: High winds blew the Taiwanese freighter KALLY aground on a mud bank at Essexville, MI while inbound to load a cargo of scrap. The ship was released the next day.

2000: The Panamanian freighter OXFORD was only two years old when it came through the Seaway in November 1984. It got caught in typhoon Xangsene, as d) MANILA SPIRIT, on this date in 2000. The ship, still flagged in Panama, was driven aground and then sank off Hualien, Taiwan. One crewman was apparently able to swim to shore but the other 23 sailors were missing and presumed lost.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Jody Aho, Russ Plumb, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.


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