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Cheyenne wins Detroit-Windsor Tugboat Race for second time

6/25 - Detroit, MI – With the roar of diesel engines and the air filled with smoke, the 43rd Annual Detroit-Windsor Tugboat Race was run Saturday at 1 p.m. When the air cleared, the Detroit-based tug Cheyenne had earned top honors for the second year in a row.

The race has its roots dating back to 1949, when a group of American and Canadian commercial tug operators got together to create the event. Tugs were hauled out and cleaned, different propellers installed just for the race, and lots of tinkering was done to the engines. Wakes were legendary, with manhole covers being blown six feet high from water rushing into storm drains on the U.S. side. Races were held throughout the 1950s and 1960s, though not annually. After a period of time, just after the huge bicentennial celebrations, they were revived in 1977 and have been an annual event ever since.

While commercial participation isn’t as active as it used to be, a mix of Canadian and U.S. tugs, both commercial and pleasure, gathered for the race. Sponsors included Port of Windsor, Summerfest, Cummins, Williams family, George Gradel Company, Hotte Marine, Sindbad’s Restaurant, and J. W. Westcott Company.

The winners were:
Overall: Cheyenne
Runner up: Sindbad

Class 1: Cheyenne
Runner up: Pioneer

Class 2: Josephine
Runner up: Sheila Kaye

Class 3: Sindbad
Runner up: J. W. Westcott

Class 4: Joseph Hogan
Runner up: Dyker Lass
Judge’s pick: Sheila Kaye
Best Dressed: Josephine

 

Port Reports -  June 25

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day’s news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known).

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
Mesabi Miner arrived Duluth at 11:00 Monday morning to load coal at Midwest Energy, and the Federal Churchill came in from anchor at 17:23 for a load of grain from CHS 1. Also in port were CSL Laurentien, discharging salt at Compass Minerals; James R. Barker, loading iron ore pellets at CN; Joseph L. Block, undergoing maintenance work at Fraser Shipyards; and Edgar B. Speer, waiting her turn to load at Burlington Northern in Superior. Algoma Enterprise was anchored outside the harbor, and is waiting to load petroleum coke at SMET after Mesabi Miner. The Miner and Block were both expected to depart late Monday night, with the latter heading for Two Harbors to load. The Laurentien is now expected to shift over to CN to load once the Barker clears, as she had originally been scheduled in Two Harbors. In Superior, Algoma Compass was outbound at 04:00 Monday morning with a load of ore for Hamilton, and Algoma Innovator arrived at 04:43 to load at Burlington Northern. She was still at the dock Monday night with no departure time listed. Once she clears, the Speer will shift down to BN and begin loading.

Two Harbors-Silver Bay, MN – Gary A. Putney
The CSL Niagara arrived Two Harbors on June 23rd at 22:12 for South of #2. She departed on the 24th at 08:24 for Quebec City. Arriving Two Harbors on the 24th at 08:44 for South of #2 was the American Spirit. She departed Two Harbors on the 24th at 18:03. As of 19:30 she had no updated AIS. Also arriving Two Harbors on June 24th was the Joyce L. VanEnkevort/Great Lakes Trader at 13:36 for North of #2 lay-by. She shifted to South of #2 between 18:03 and 18:23. The Joseph L. Block is due Two Harbors, but after she completed her unload at Graymont she went to Fraser Shipyards. This was on the 24th. Also due Two Harbors is the CSL Laurentien, but as of 19:30 on the 24th she is still at Compass Minerals in Duluth. Due Two Harbors on June 25th is the Edwin H. Gott. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay saw the departure of the Burns Harbors at 17:49 on the 24th. As of 19:30 she doesn't have an updated AIS. The Mesabi Miner was due Silver Bay, but after running checked down on the North Shore on the morning of June 24th she was sent to the Twin Ports to load coal at SMET in Superior. There is no scheduled traffic for Silver Bay on June 25th.

Thunder Bay, ON
Monday June 24: 13:36 Ojibway arrived at G3 to load grain. Expected for Tuesday: Federal Elbe.

Milwaukee, WI – Paul Erspamer
Baie Comeau arrived from Detroit during the noon hour Monday, backing into a berth at Slip 1 in the outer harbor (the bulk transfer dock). G.L. Ostander & barge Integrity were expected in Milwaukee with cement from Alpena Monday evening.

Detroit-Rouge River – Raymond H
Monday Arrivals: Herbert C Jackson arrived at AK Steel to unload ore. Joseph H Thompson Jr./Joseph H Thompson arrived at the Waterfront Petroleum Terminal to fuel. Tug Duluth arrived at the G-Tug dock.

Northeast Ohio ports – Bill Kloss
6/24 arrivals: American Courage to Ashtabula. In Cleveland: Samuel deChamplain/Innovation to LaFarge Cement and Algoma Buffalo to Allied Road Products.

Buffalo, NY – Craig E Speers
Two inbound ships in the Port of Buffalo Monday: Algoma Sault and Hon. Paul J. Martin. Very active year so far in this port.

Welland Canal and vicinity vessel report for Monday Jun 24 - Barry Andersen

Nanticoke:
arrivals - Jun 23 - Algoterra at 0631 and tug Sharon M I & Niagara Spirit at 1125 - Jun 24 - tug Michigan & Great Lakes at 0718

Buffalo:
arrival - docked - Jun 24 - Algoma Sault at 0412 and American Mariner at 1354 - departed - Jun 24 - Rt Hon Paul J Martin at 0334

Welland Canal:
upbound - Jun 23 - Pearl Mist (Mhl) cruise ship at 1613 from Toronto - Jun 24 - Algoma Transport at 0335, Algoma Discovery at 0523, tug Everlast & Norman McLeod at 1731, Spruceglen at 1917 and Damia Desgagnes eta 2044

downbound - Jun 23 - tug Sea Eagle II & St Marys Cement II at 1538, Egelantiersgracht (Nld) at 2031 - Jun 24 - Rt Hon Paul J Martin at 0509, Happy River ( Nld) at 0738, Thunder Bay at 1011, Tecumseh at 1059, Algoma Guardian at 1441, Sten Baltic (Nor) at 1813, brig Niagara (Ame) at 1938 (stopping at wharf 16) and Algoma Conveyor eta 2100

Welland Canal docks:
docked - docked - Jun 7 - CCGS Pierre Radisson at 0925 into Heddle Dry Dock at Port Weller - Jun 24 - brig Niagara (Ame) arrived wharf 16 at 0847

Port Weller anchorage:
arrivals - Jun 24 - Egelantiersgracht (Nld) at 0500 and Happy River (NLd) at 1655 - anchored - Jun 23 - Gardno (Bhs) at 2239 - departures - Jun 23 - Federal Leda (Mhl) at 2207 - Jun 24 - Mitiq (Nld) at 0711, Industrial Skipper (Por) at 1002 - all eastbound

Hamilton:
arrival - Jun 24 - Rt Hon Paul J Martin at 1734 - docked - Jun 21 - Federal Margaree ( Mhl) at 1914 - Jun 23 - Whistler (Lbr) at 2145 - Jun 23 - Cape (Lbr) (ex Heloise-15) at 1826 - departure - Jun 24 - Algoma Discovery at 0322 for the canal

Bronte:
docked - Mia Desgagnes at 0942 - departed Jun 24 at 0627 eastbound

Clarkson:
arrival - docked - Jun 24 - Robert S Pierson at 0139 - departed - Jun 24 - Algoma Transport at 0108 and Robert S Pierson at 1346 eastbound

Report for Sunday Jun 23

Nanticoke:
arrivals - Jun 21 - Rt Hon Hon Paul J Martin at 2119 - Jun 23 - Algoterra at 0631 and tug Sharon M I & Niagara Spirit at 1125 - departed - Jun 22 - Rt Hon Paul J Martin at 0525 eastbound

Buffalo:
docked - Jun 22 - Rt Hon Paul J Martin at 1019

Port Colborne anchorage:
anchored - Jun 22 - Industrial Song (Por) at 1903 - departed Jun 23 at 0659 for Thunder Bay

Welland Canal:
upbound - Jun 22 - Federal Elbe (Mhl) at 0253, Industrial Song (Por) at 0953 - Jun 23 - tug Leonard M & Niagara Spirit at 0345 (stopped wharf 2), tug Calusa Coast & Delaware at 0351 and Pearl Mist (Mhl) cruise ship at 1613 from Toronto

downbound - Jun 22 - CSL Welland at 1450 and Algoma Discovery at 1522 - Jun 23 - tug Petite Forte & St Marys Cement at 0034, Kaministiqua at 0804, Gardno (Bhs) at 1203, tug Sea Eagle II & St Marys Cement II at 1538, Egelantiersgracht (Nld) at

Welland Canal docks:
docked - docked - Jun 7 - CCGS Pierre Radisson at 0925 into Heddle Dry Dock at Port Weller - Jun 23 - tug Leonard M & Niagara Spirit stopped wharf 2 at 0410 - departed at 1955 eastbound

Port Weller anchorage:
arrivals - Jun 23 - Mitiq (Nld) at 0711, Industrial Skipper (Por) at 1318 and Federal Leda (Mhl) at 0930 - departures - Jun 22 - Emanuele S (Bds) (ex SCT Monte Rosa-17, MCT Monte Rosa-15) at 1902 eastbound - Jun 23 - Federal Leda (Mhl) at 2200 approx.

Hamilton:
arrivals - Jun 23 - Algoma Discovery at 0742 and Cape (Lbr) (ex Heloise-15) at 1826 - docked - Jun 21 - Federal Margaree ( Mhl) at 1914 - anchored - Jun 21 - Whistler (Lbr) at 2115 - docked - Jun 23 at 2115 approx. - departures - Jun 21 - Federal Elbe (Mhl) at 1850 - Jun 23 - Federal Rhine (Bds) at 0221, Rosy (Bds) (ex SCT Stockhorn-17, MCT Stockhorn-16, HHL Caspian-08) at 0550, Lubie (Bhs) at 1534 -

Bronte:
docked - Mia Desgagnes at 0942

Clarkson:
arrival - Jun 23 - Algoma Transport at 0842 - docked - Jun 22 - Robert S Pierson at 0826 - departed the dock at 1805 out to the anchorage - anchored at 1840

Toronto:
arrival - departed - Jun 21 - Whistler (Lbr) at 1710 approx for Hamilton

Rochester, NY – Tom Brewer
McKeil Spirit departed Lehigh Cement Dock Monday afternoon at about 12:30.

Oswego, NY – Ned Goebricher
Monday NACC Argonaut was unloading cement.

 

Invasive mussels challenge commercial whitefish fishing in the Great Lakes

6/25 - Denise Purvis’ family began fishing the waters of northern Lake Huron off Manitoulin Island in 1882. Over the years their operation came to expect the unpredictability of a livelihood dependent on the ability to capture wild fish.

Purvis came back to the family business in the mid-1990s after college. Her return home coincided with the arrival of zebra and quagga mussels into the Great Lakes.

The mussels have since become synonymous with the problem of invasive species in the Great Lakes. They’ve colonized the lakes and negatively impacted their ecology.

For Purvis and the dwindling number of Great Lakes commercial whitefish fishers, the fishery has fallen on hard times. Whitefish have been in decline across much of lakes Michigan and Huron, and many scientists and fishers suspect part of the reason is linked to the effects the mussels have had on the lake’s food web.

“The health of our fishery in northern Lake Huron is not healthy whatsoever,” Purvis said.

Dave Caroffino is a fisheries biologist in Charlevoix, working in the tribal coordination unit in the fisheries division of the Michigan Department of Natural Resources.

Since 1985, the MDNR has been collecting data on whitefish in lakes Michigan, Huron and Superior as part of a legal settlement between the state of Michigan, the federal government and tribal governments.

“The vast majority of the monitoring data starting in 1985 comes from agency staff collecting biological samples from the fish caught by commercial fishers,” Caroffino said. “That data wasn’t used for a lot of stuff. It was kind of general patterns, general trends.”

But now, this decades-long effort is showing clear declines in whitefish; a decline that coincided with the expansion of invasive mussels in the lakes.

MDNR estimates of total whitefish biomass in northern Lake Huron dropped 45% from their peak in 1997, when the mussels began to widely colonize the lakes, through 2017, when quagga mussels had succeeded in covering much of the lake bottom.

Read more and view graphs at this link: http://news.jrn.msu.edu/2019/05/invasive-mussels-challenge-commercial-whitefish-fishing-in-the-great-lakes

 

Last week to pre-order new ‘Know Your Ships: Decades’ book

6/25 - To mark the 60th anniversary of ‘Know Your Ships,’ a new book, ‘Know Your Ships: Decades,’ will be released this fall. The 240-page book will be hardcover and in a larger format (11” x 8.5”) than the regular Know Your Ships.

‘Know Your Ships: Decades’ represents an editors' choice of the best of the many outstanding images that have appeared in the annual Know Your Ships since its founding in 1959. The book also includes a year-by-year timeline of important events on the shipping scene from 60-year Seaway era as well as the major fleet stack markings and house flags. In making this book, nearly 2,000 photographs were considered, and the ones selected were re-scanned to yield the highest quality possible.

Pre-ordered books will be autographed and will include a free commemorative reprint of the original, 44-page 1959 Know Your Ships. The pre-order runs to June 30. Books will ship in mid-September. Price is $49.95 plus shipping and tax.

Hardcover, high-quality books such as this one are expensive to print. Pre-orders will help determine how many will be printed. There will not be a reprint - once they are gone they are gone.

Order at this link: http://knowyourships.com/kysdecades.html

 

Engineers Day Soo Freighter Chasing Cruise this Friday

6/25 - The Soo Locks Freighter-Chasing Cruise will be Friday, June 28. Reservations ($45) may be made at the Soo Boatnerd Picnic. The cut off time is noon Thursday, June 27, as we must let the boat tours know how many will be on board so they can order the right amount of food for dinner. For details, see www.boatnerd.com/gathering

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  June 25

The whaleback steamer WASHBURN (steel propeller freighter, 320 foot, 2,234 gross tons) was launched by the American Steel Barge Co. (Hull #124) at W. Superior, Wisconsin on 25 June 1892. She lasted until 1936, when she was scrapped at Cleveland, Ohio.

On this day in June 25, 1892, the American Steel Barge Company, West Superior Wisconsin, Captain Alexander Mc Dougall manager, held the first triple launching on the Great Lakes, which included the whalebacks PILLSBURY, WASHBURN and the small tug ISLAY. A crowd in excess of 10,000 people witnessed the event. Only the tug ISLAY remains.

On 25 June 1892, the PILLSBURY (steel propeller whaleback bulk freighter, 320 foot, 2,234 gross tons) was launched by the American Steel Barge Co., at West Superior, Wisconsin. She was rebuilt at Conneaut, Ohio in the winter of 1918-1919 (315.75 feet x 42.25 feet x 24.16 feet; 2,394 gross tons- 1,465 net tons) when she received straight sides and a flattened deck. In 1927, she was converted to crane vessel, with two cranes on deck. In November 1934, she stranded on the north pier at Muskegon, Michigan in a storm and then broke in half. She was scrapped the following year. In 1927, the B. F. AFFLECK (Hull#178) was launched at Toledo, Ohio by Toledo Shipbuilding Co., for the Pittsburgh Steamship Co.

On June 25, 1938, the WILLIAM A. IRVIN began her maiden voyage for the Pittsburgh Steamship Co., leaving Lorain, Ohio for Duluth to load iron ore. INDIANA HARBOR set a record cargo on June 25, 1993, loading 71,369 tons of western low sulfur coal at Superior's Midwest Energy Terminal and transporting it 50 miles to Silver Bay, Minnesota.

At 1:00 a.m. on 25 June 1878, the 161 foot, 3-mast wooden schooner PESHTIGO and the 143 foot, 3-mast wooden schooner ST ANDREW collided and sank near Cheboygan, Michigan and the Straits of Mackinac. Newspapers of the time claimed that forest fire smoke hampered visibility. Both vessels sank quickly. Two of the crew of PESHTIGO were lost, but the rest were rescued by the schooner S V R WATSON. The entire crew of ST ANDREW was rescued by the Canadian propeller OCEAN.

On the afternoon of 25 June 1885, the tug NIAGARA had the schooner MOUNT BLANC in tow while coming rounding to pick up the schooner REINDEER near Stag Island on the St. Clair River. The MOUNT BLANC struck the wreck of the tug B.B. JONES. The JONES had exploded in Port Huron on 25 May 1871, and the wreck was towed to the head of Stag Island where it was abandoned. After striking the wreck of the JONES, the ore laden MOUNT BLANC sank. She was later recovered and repaired and lasted until 1901.

1903 – JOHN CRAIG was seriously damaged in a grounding on Simmons Rock in the Straits of Mackinac. Once refloated, the wooden steamer was taken to St. Ignace and declared a total loss. It was subsequently rebuilt as PANAMA only to be lost in a storm on November 1, 1906.

1950 – Five lives were lost and another 12 passengers injured aboard the passenger ship CITY OF CLEVELAND III when it was in a collision with the Norwegian freighter RAVNEFJELL in fog on Lake Huron. The former was a total loss while the latter was repaired and returned to service. It became b) RINGSTEIN in 1955 and visited the Great Lakes through 1958. It was wrecked near Achona Point, Ghana, on September 11, 1966.

1959 – The Liberian registered MONROVIA became the first saltwater vessel of the Seaway era to sink on the Great Lakes. It went down in heavy fog on Lake Huron after going off course and colliding with the downbound ROYALTON off Thunder Bay Island. The vessel landed upright on the bottom and some of the cargo of steel was salvaged in the 1970s.

1980 – MONTREALAIS of Upper Lakes Shipping and ALGOBAY of Algoma Central collided head-on in heavy fog on the St. Clair River and both suffered massive bow damage. These vessels were repaired and today both sail in the Algoma fleet with the former as ALGOMA MONTREALAIS and the latter, later rebuilt with a new forebody in China, as RADCLIFFE R. LATIMER.

1980 – JEAN LYKES collided with and sank an 18-foot fishing boat in the St. Clair River, 2 miles north of St. Clair, MI. The American flag saltwater vessel was later beached at Alang, India, for scrapping as b) VELMA LYKES on July 9, 1994

1994 – While departing Bay City, McKEE SONS was swept crossways in the Saginaw River and went aground. Four tugs pulled the ship free without damage save for some shoreline erosion.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Jody Aho, Max Hanley, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Mike Nicholls, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series. Marine Historical Society of Detroit.

 

Port Reports -  June 24

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day’s news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known).

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
Edgar B. Speer arrived Duluth at 11:19 Sunday morning, and moored at Port Terminal to wait for her turn to load at Burlington Northern in Superior. James R. Barker was inbound at 17:35 to load iron ore pellets at CN, and Joseph L. Block came in at 19:36 with limestone for Graymont Superior. CSL Laurentien remained in port Sunday discharging salt at Compass Minerals, and Federal Churchill was on the hook offshore. At the Superior entry, the tank barge Spartan II and tug Spartan arrived at 10:30 with a load of calcium chloride for Hallett #8. CSL Assiniboine departed at 11:18 with iron ore pellets for Nanticoke, and Algoma Compass arrived from anchor at 11:34 to load at BN. Both she and the Spartan had an estimated departure time of 21:00. Algoma Innovator was anchored outside the Superior entry waiting to load.

Two Harbors-Silver Bay, MN – Gary A. Putney
Roger Blough arrived Two Harbors on June 22nd at 20:10 for South of #2. She departed on June 23rd at 05:53 for Gary. Due Two Harbors on the 23rd is the CSL Niagara. As of 18:00 she was approx. 2 to 3 hours east of Two Harbors. The CSL Laurentien, as of 18:00 on the 23rd, was still at the salt dock in Duluth. Still no ETD from Duluth or ETA for Two Harbors. Due Two Harbors on June 24th are the Joseph L. Block after unloading stone in Duluth. Also due Two Harbors are the American Spirit and the Joyce L. VanEnkevort/Great Lakes Trader. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay saw the Burns Harbor arrive on June 23rd at 06:36. Due Silver Bay after the Burns Harbor departs will be the Mesabi Miner. The Miner has been running checked down all day on June 23rd.

Thunder Bay, ON
Friday June 21: 23:14 Algoma Spirit arrived at Richardson Main Terminal to load grain. 23:21 Whitefish Bay departed G3 for Midland. Saturday June 22: 7:13 research vessel Kiyi departed the Coast Guard base for Grand Marais, Minn. 18:46 Federal Columbia departed Superior Elevator for Montreal. 21:21 Algoma Spirit departed Richardson Main Terminal for Port Cartier. Sunday June 23: There were no ship movements at the port. Expected for Monday: Ojibway.

St. Marys River
Upbound traffic on a slow Sunday included Algoma Enterprise, Great Lakes Trader, Lee A. Tregurtha and Ojibway. Downbounders included Federal Columbia, Walter J. McCarthy Jr. and Algoma Spirit. Green Bay, WI
Cason J. Callaway arrived Sunday with a cargo of limestone to Graymont Terminal from Port inland.

Northern Lake Huron ports

Bruce Mines:
Sunday; 16:25 Manitoulin arrived to load trap rock.

Little Current:
Sunday; The cruise ship Victory I arrived for shore excursions and departed at 17:40 for Sault Ste Marie Ontario.

Midland:
Sunday; 17:21 Whitefish Bay arrived to unload wheat from Thunder Bay at ADM.

Alpena:
Sunday; 13:33 G L Ostrander departed for Milwaukee.

Stoneport:
Saturday; 21:26 Olive L Moore arrived to load and departed on Sunday at 10:55 for Fairport. 11:30 Philip R Clarke arrived to load.

Calcite:
Sunday; 7:01 Great Republic arrived to load limestone.

Brevort:
Sunday; 4:36 Calumet arrived to load and departed at 13:17 for Cleveland.

Port Inland: Saturday; 21:54 Cason J Callaway arrived to load and departed Sunday at 6:25 for Green Bay. 9:45 John G Munson arrived to load and departed at 20:51 down bound on Lake Michigan.

Goderich, ON – Bruce Douglas
Algoma Conveyor cleared late Sunday downbound for Hamilton loaded with salt.

Detroit-Rouge River – Raymond H
Sunday Arrivals: Kaye E Barker arrived at AK Steel to unload ore. Samuel De Champlain/Innovation arrived at Lafarge to unload cement. Leo A MacCarthur/John J Carrick arrived at the Marathon Asphalt Terminal to load. CSL Tadoussac arrived at St. Marys Cement to unload clinker.

Oswego, NY – Ned Goebricher
On Sunday, the motor vessel Strandja was loading grain.

 

Woman falls to her death in Chi-Cheemaun ferry tragedy

6/24 - South Baymouth, ON – On June 21, officers from the Manitoulin and Grey Bruce Ontario Provincial Police (OPP) detachments responded to a report of a female falling overboard from a ferry travelling from South Baymouth to Tobermory in Lake Huron.

With the assistance of the Canadian Coast Guard and the Manitoulin OPP Marine unit, the female was located deceased. The Manitoulin OPP is continuing the investigation, and the death is not being considered suspicious.

In a statement, Susan Schrempf, president and CEO of the Owen Sound Transportation Company, which runs the Chi-Cheemaun, said "We extend our deepest sympathy to the family and friends of this passenger in this time of tragic loss. "Out of respect to those who have lost their dear friend and family member, we will not be making any further public statements."

Manitoulin Expositor

 

Celebrating 50 years since the fire on the Cuyahoga River and the changes it sparked

6/24 - Cleveland, OH – Saturday marks 50 years since the Cuyahoga River last caught fire and in doing so, captured the attention of a nation. Well truth be told, it wasn't the June 22, 1969 fire that caught the eye of America but rather one 17 years earlier in 1952. That was the fire TIME Magazine ran photos of with the story in their August 1, 1969 edition that showed a much bigger fire engulfing a tugboat.

The issue was a hot seller with Sen. Ted Kennedy on the cover in the wake of Chappaquiddick and additional coverage of the moon landing as well.

The fire in 1969 was clearly not the first on the Cuyahoga and by no means the worst, but it just happened to come at a time when the mood was changing in the country about the condition of U.S. rivers and lakes with the Cuyahoga River set to become the poster child.

Cleveland Mayor Carl Stokes and his newly elected Congressman brother Louis would go to Capitol Hill demanding action. That action would come in the form of the Clean Water Act, the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, which on it's web page states the Cuyahoga River fire was one of the events that led to the creation of the agency.

The cleanup of the Cuyahoga River and Lake Erie that it feeds is still ongoing Sen. Rob Portman said. "It's a constant struggle."

The Great Lakes Restoration Initiative which helps to monitor and protect the health of the Great Lakes has seen its funding drastically cut in each of the last three years only to be restored by a bi-partisan push back in Congress from those in the House and Senate representing the Great Lakes states.

"It helps to not just stop pollution," Portman said "but ensure we're keeping the invasive species out and stop some of the algal blooms that have come in some summers."

In addition Portman has been involved with a years long battle with the Army Corps of Engineers over the corps' wish to dump the spoils of the dredging from the Cuyahoga River back into the lake itself rather than somewhere on land.

"The problem with the dredging is you're dredging up some pollutants and then you're dumping them. We want those dredging remains to go to land where they can be contained and controlled," he said. "We've had some success there just in the last couple of years, we've won court cases and been able to win on that and right now the corps has backed off."

Sen. Sherrod Brown agrees there is a constant need to stay vigilant. "I'm old enough to remember what it was when I was a little kid," Brown said of the mess that was the river. "We made huge progress now we see a Federal Government that's turned its back and we fight back."

"We've got to be vigilant about keeping this lake clean and its too bad for our public health and for our fishing industry and for tourism and just people's, just safety," Brown said.

View a video at this link: https://www.news5cleveland.com/news/originals/celebrating-50-years-since-the-last-fire-on-the-cuyahoga-river-and-the-changes-it-sparked

 

Last week to pre-order new ‘Know Your Ships: Decades’ book

6/24 - To mark the 60th anniversary of ‘Know Your Ships,’ a new book, ‘Know Your Ships: Decades,’ will be released this fall. The 240-page book will be hardcover and in a larger format (11” x 8.5”) than the regular Know Your Ships.

‘Know Your Ships: Decades’ represents an editors' choice of the best of the many outstanding images that have appeared in the annual Know Your Ships since its founding in 1959. The book also includes a year-by-year timeline of important events on the shipping scene from 60-year Seaway era as well as the major fleet stack markings and house flags. In making this book, nearly 2,000 photographs were considered, and the ones selected were re-scanned to yield the highest quality possible.

Pre-ordered books will be autographed and will include a free commemorative reprint of the original, 44-page 1959 Know Your Ships. The pre-order runs to June 30. Books will ship in mid-September. Price is $49.95 plus shipping and tax.

Hardcover, high-quality books such as this one are expensive to print. Pre-orders will help determine how many will be printed. There will not be a reprint - once they are gone they are gone.

Order at this link: http://knowyourships.com/kysdecades.html

 

Deadline near for Engineers Day Soo Freighter Chasing Cruise

6/24 - The Soo Locks Freighter-Chasing Cruise will be Friday, June 28. Reservations ($45) may be made at the Soo Boatnerd Picnic. The cut off time is noon Thursday, June 27, as we must let the boat tours know how many will be on board so they can order the right amount of food for dinner. For details, see www.boatnerd.com/gathering

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  June 24

The whaleback steamer WASHBURN (steel propeller freighter, 320 foot, 2,234 gross tons) was launched by the American Steel Barge Co. (Hull #124) at W. Superior, Wisconsin on 25 June 1892. She lasted until 1936, when she was scrapped at Cleveland, Ohio.

On this day in June 25, 1892, the American Steel Barge Company, West Superior Wisconsin, Captain Alexander Mc Dougall manager, held the first triple launching on the Great Lakes, which included the whalebacks PILLSBURY, WASHBURN and the small tug ISLAY. A crowd in excess of 10,000 people witnessed the event. Only the tug ISLAY remains.

On 25 June 1892, the PILLSBURY (steel propeller whaleback bulk freighter, 320 foot, 2,234 gross tons) was launched by the American Steel Barge Co., at West Superior, Wisconsin. She was rebuilt at Conneaut, Ohio in the winter of 1918-1919 (315.75 feet x 42.25 feet x 24.16 feet; 2,394 gross tons- 1,465 net tons) when she received straight sides and a flattened deck. In 1927, she was converted to crane vessel, with two cranes on deck. In November 1934, she stranded on the north pier at Muskegon, Michigan in a storm and then broke in half. She was scrapped the following year. In 1927, the B. F. AFFLECK (Hull#178) was launched at Toledo, Ohio by Toledo Shipbuilding Co., for the Pittsburgh Steamship Co.

On June 25, 1938, the WILLIAM A. IRVIN began her maiden voyage for the Pittsburgh Steamship Co., leaving Lorain, Ohio for Duluth to load iron ore. INDIANA HARBOR set a record cargo on June 25, 1993, loading 71,369 tons of western low sulfur coal at Superior's Midwest Energy Terminal and transporting it 50 miles to Silver Bay, Minnesota.

At 1:00 a.m. on 25 June 1878, the 161 foot, 3-mast wooden schooner PESHTIGO and the 143 foot, 3-mast wooden schooner ST ANDREW collided and sank near Cheboygan, Michigan and the Straits of Mackinac. Newspapers of the time claimed that forest fire smoke hampered visibility. Both vessels sank quickly. Two of the crew of PESHTIGO were lost, but the rest were rescued by the schooner S V R WATSON. The entire crew of ST ANDREW was rescued by the Canadian propeller OCEAN.

On the afternoon of 25 June 1885, the tug NIAGARA had the schooner MOUNT BLANC in tow while coming rounding to pick up the schooner REINDEER near Stag Island on the St. Clair River. The MOUNT BLANC struck the wreck of the tug B.B. JONES. The JONES had exploded in Port Huron on 25 May 1871, and the wreck was towed to the head of Stag Island where it was abandoned. After striking the wreck of the JONES, the ore laden MOUNT BLANC sank. She was later recovered and repaired and lasted until 1901.

1903 – JOHN CRAIG was seriously damaged in a grounding on Simmons Rock in the Straits of Mackinac. Once refloated, the wooden steamer was taken to St. Ignace and declared a total loss. It was subsequently rebuilt as PANAMA only to be lost in a storm on November 1, 1906.

1950 – Five lives were lost and another 12 passengers injured aboard the passenger ship CITY OF CLEVELAND III when it was in a collision with the Norwegian freighter RAVNEFJELL in fog on Lake Huron. The former was a total loss while the latter was repaired and returned to service. It became b) RINGSTEIN in 1955 and visited the Great Lakes through 1958. It was wrecked near Achona Point, Ghana, on September 11, 1966.

1959 – The Liberian registered MONROVIA became the first saltwater vessel of the Seaway era to sink on the Great Lakes. It went down in heavy fog on Lake Huron after going off course and colliding with the downbound ROYALTON off Thunder Bay Island. The vessel landed upright on the bottom and some of the cargo of steel was salvaged in the 1970s.

1980 – MONTREALAIS of Upper Lakes Shipping and ALGOBAY of Algoma Central collided head-on in heavy fog on the St. Clair River and both suffered massive bow damage. These vessels were repaired and today both sail in the Algoma fleet with the former as ALGOMA MONTREALAIS and the latter, later rebuilt with a new forebody in China, as RADCLIFFE R. LATIMER.

1980 – JEAN LYKES collided with and sank an 18-foot fishing boat in the St. Clair River, 2 miles north of St. Clair, MI. The American flag saltwater vessel was later beached at Alang, India, for scrapping as b) VELMA LYKES on July 9, 1994

1994 – While departing Bay City, McKEE SONS was swept crossways in the Saginaw River and went aground. Four tugs pulled the ship free without damage save for some shoreline erosion.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Jody Aho, Max Hanley, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Mike Nicholls, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series. Marine Historical Society of Detroit.

 

USS Billings, Desgagnes vessel in minor collision

6/23 - The USS Billings had a minor collision with the Rosaire A. Desgagnes at the Port of Montreal on Friday. The incident happened when the Billings departed Wharf 31 with the assistance of two tugs. It somehow lost control after the lines were let go and hit the Desgagnes that was behind her at Wharf 30. It was able to continue its way without the assistance of any tugs.

 

Port Reports -  June 23

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day’s news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known).

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
Michipicoten arrived Duluth at 00:17 Saturday morning, and tied up at Canadian National to load iron ore pellets. CSL Laurentien was inbound at 05:20 with a load of salt for Compass Minerals, and Michipicoten departed at 07:23 for Sault Ste. Marie. Walter J. McCarthy Jr. departed at 08:59 with a load of coal from Midwest Energy. The Laurentien was expected to depart at some point Saturday evening for Two Harbors to load. Federal Churchill was on the hook outside the harbor, and is waiting to load grain at CHS 1. There was no traffic through the Superior entry during the day Saturday, however CSL Assiniboine was inbound at 19:50 to load iron ore pellets at BN.

Two Harbors-Silver Bay, MN – Gary A. Putney
Roger Blough should arrive Two Harbors on June 22nd between 20:00 and 21:00. Also due Two Harbors is the CSL Laurentien that, as of 17:30 on the 22nd, is unloading salt at Compass Minerals in Duluth. No ETD from Duluth or ETA Two Harbors. Due Two Harbors on June 23rd is the CSL Niagara. Northshore Mining had no traffic on June 22nd, but due June 23rd is an infrequent visitor, the Burns Harbor, and Mesabi Miner.

Northern Lake Huron ports

Drummond Island:
Saturday; 1:45 Dorothy Ann and Pathfinder departed for Fairport.

Meldrum Bay:
Friday; 20:16 Algoma Buffalo arrived to load and departed Saturday at 10:33 for Cleveland.

Alpena:
Saturday; 10:19 G L Ostrander arrived to load cement products.

Calcite:
Saturday; 4:17 Victory / barge Maumee departed for Fairport. 10:33 The tug Michigan and tank barge Great lakes weighed anchor and proceeded to the fuel storage dock to unload.16:07 H Lee White departed for Gary Harbor. 16:17 The tug Michigan and tank barge Great lakes departed for Nanticoke.

Port Inland:
Friday; 17:00 Joseph L Block weighed anchor and proceed to the loading dock and departed on Saturday at 0:43 for Duluth Superior. 1:23 American Courage weighed anchor and proceeded to the loading dock. 14:25 She departed down bound on Lake Huron.

Goderich, ON – Bruce Douglas
Algoma Sault was loading salt Saturday night, destined for Buffalo, N.Y., with Algoma Conveyor waiting at the North Dock. This is her first visit to Goderich.

Detroit-Rouge River – Raymond H
Saturday Arrivals: Lee A Tregurtha arrived at AK Steel to unload ore. Alpena arrived at Lafarge to unload cement. Ojibway and Saginaw arrived at the Waterfront Petroleum Terminal to fuel.

Rochester, NY – Tom Brewer
McKeil Spirit arrived at 11a.m. Saturday at Lehigh Cement Dock.

 

Lead paint to delay refit of Canada's oldest coast guard vessel by 6 months

6/23 - A $10-million refit of Canada's oldest coast guard vessel will be delayed by up to six months to remove lead paint found inside the ocean science ship Hudson. Repair work on the storied 56-year old ship was expected to last until this fall at the NewDock shipyard in St. John's.

But NewDock told the coast guard this week that safely dealing with lead paint discovered inside CCGS Hudson will delay the refit. "Six months is the worst-case scenario that we have from the shipyard," said Gary Ivany, the coast guard's assistant commissioner, in an interview from Ottawa.

Hudson arrived at NewDock in February and was taken out of the water to replace steel and various areas of the vessel's decks and tanks. In late April, suspected lead paint buried under newer paint layers was discovered when coatings were removed.

Sixteen unionized coast guard crew and officers were given blood tests after it was confirmed the paint contained lead. The test results are pending. Shipyard workers and their family doctors were also informed, the coast guard said.

The area was sealed off and work has yet to resume in those spaces, but work continues in areas that have been cleared and identified as safe for workers, such as the bridge deck, boat deck, engine room and motor room.

The Public Service Alliance of Canada, which is the union representing 10 coast guard crewmen, says the paint was detected in a water tank inside the ship and workers will not go back until they know the area is safe. In the meantime, the coast guard wants to move up work that was planned for after the refit and carry it out while the ship is still out of the water in St. John's.

That work, which includes engine maintenance and installing science equipment like winches, was supposed to take place dockside when the Hudson returned to her home base in Dartmouth, N.S., in the fall.

The coast guard still intends to have the Hudson back in service by April 2020 and available for at-sea science missions.

 

Like to watch the river but don't live near it?

6/23 - Port Huron, MI – A second camera has been installed on the Blue Water Convention Center to offer residents a new way to view the St. Clair River, Blue Water Bridge and all the traffic traversing both.

The Blue Water Convention Center was approached by StreamTime Live earlier this year after the streaming company noticed that the convention center had launched a live feed of the river from their own camera, according to a press release.

The company also runs a high definition live stream camera in Marine City. “The convention center clearly understood the promotional value of a live stream,” StreamTime Live co-owner Robin Rinderspacher said in the statement. “What we offer is a top-of-the-line viewing experience with our 360-degree, pan/tilt/zoom camera that can follow the boats closely as they pass by.”

The cameras are operated remotely by StreamTime Live YouTube moderators, who also engage river fans in the accompanying 24/7 live chats, according to the company.

“StreamTime Live can spread the word about the Blue Water Convention Center and its events with much greater reach than conventional advertising,” Gino Giacumbo, the convention center's general manager said in the statement, “and directly to the audience we’re targeting – folks who love the water.”

The company is also planning to install another camera in Algonac later this month, providing coverage of the St. Clair River from end to end. The Blue Water Convention Center camera can be found on the StreamTime’s Live YouTube.

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  June 23

In 1976 the NEPCO 140, carrying six million gallons of No. 6 bunker oil and being pushed toward Oswego by the tug EILEEN C., grounded on the shore of Wellesley Island in the American Narrows section of the St. Lawrence River, just upstream from Alexandria Bay, N.Y. The grounding occurred about 1:35 a.m. in heavy fog and was followed by a second apparent grounding further up river, just before the barge reached the Seaway anchorage site off Mason's Point, some four miles above the initial grounding site. In all, over 300,000 of the thick crude was spilled into the River, creating the largest slick ever to pollute an inland U.S. waterway to that day. Seaway traffic was halted immediately, sending at least 20 ships to anchor. Within hours, over 20,000 feet of boom were deployed, but the spill moved steadily down river, coating granite shoreline, trapping waterfowl, forcing boat owners to pull their boats, and oozing into sensitive marshland, particularly Chippewa Bay in New York waters. Some oil eventually reached as far down the river as Lake St. Lawrence and coated shoreline along the Long Sault Parkway on the Canadian side of the lake. Clean-up lasted into the fall and cost in excess U.S. $8 million.

On 23 June 1903, the tug O.W. CHENEY steamed out of Buffalo harbor in heavy fog to tow the steamer CHEMUNG into the harbor. The tug ran too close to the oncoming steamer, was struck by the bow, and the CHENEY overturned and sank. Three crewmen were killed; two survivors were picked up by the tug FRANK S. BUTLER. On 23 June 1969, RALPH MISENER (steel propeller bulk freighter, 730 foot, 19,160 gross tons, built in 1968, at Montreal, Quebec) transited the Soo Locks upbound for the first time. She had an innovative self-unloading system with twin booms. The movable crane was equipped with a chain of buckets so it could discharge cargo from either side. This unloading system only lasted until 1976, when it was severely damaged in a squall on Lake Michigan. The vessel was then converted from a combination self-unloader/bulk carrier to a bulk carrier. She was renamed b.) GORDON C. LEITCH in 1994.

In 1926, the GLENMHOR (Hull#16), the name was soon corrected to GLENMOHR, was launched at Midland Ontario by Midland Shipbuilding Co., for Great Lakes Transportation Co., (James Playfair). She was 6 feet wider and 4 feet shallower than the largest ship at that time. Purchased by Canada Steamship Lines in 1926, renamed b.) LEMOYNE. Scrapped at Santander, Spain in 1969.

In 1929, the WILLIAM G. CLYDE (Hull#804) was launched at Lorain, Ohio, by American Shipbuilding Co., for the Pittsburgh Steamship Co. Converted to a self-unloader and renamed b.) CALCITE II in 1961. Renamed c.) MAUMEE in 2001. Launched in 1972, was the ALGOWAY (Hull#200) at Collingwood, Ontario, by Collingwood Shipyards Ltd., for Algoma Central Railway.

The first whaleback barge, 101, was launched along the shore of St. Louis Bay near Duluth, Minnesota, on 23 June 1888. Captain Alexander Mc Dougall, the inventor and designer, was there along with his wife, her sister-in-law and several hundred spectators. As the vessel splashed in to the bay, Mrs. Mc Dougall is supposed to have muttered, "There goes our last dollar!"

On 23 June 1900, the 450 foot steel steamer SIMON J. MURPHY (Hull#135) was launched at Wyandotte, Michigan, by the Detroit Ship Building Co., for the Eddy - Shaw Transportation Co. of Bay City, Michigan.

On 23 June 1873, B. F. BRUCE was launched at Crosthwaite's yard in East Saginaw, Michigan. She is not properly a schooner, but what is known as a "three-and-after" in nautical terms. Her capacity was 50,000 bushels of grain (800 tons) and the building cost was $50,000.

1942 – EUGENE J. BUFFINGTON struck Boulder Reef, Lake Michigan and the hull cracked in two places. The vessel as on the rocks for 25 days until it coould be strapped together and refloated. The ship was towed to Chicago for one of the largest repair jobs in Great Lakes history.

1948 – CRETE and J.P. MORGAN JR. were in a head-on collision, in fog, off the Apostle Islands, Lake Superior. Both ships suffered extensive damage. Two were killed, 3 more injured, aboard the latter steamer. ALTADOC and E.A.S. CLARKE also collided in fog near the Apostle Islands but the damage, while requiring repairs, was less serious.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Jody Aho, Joe Barr, Matthew Daley, Dave Swayze, Fritz Hager, Mike Nicholls, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series. Marine Historical Society of Detroit.

 

New tugboat Ohio christened at National Museum of Great Lakes

6/22 - Toledo, OH – The script was the same, but the bottles’ contents were different when two tugboats named Ohio were dedicated to their futures.

One, fresh from the Great Lakes Towing shipyard in Cleveland, was christened with traditional champagne for its formal start of commercial service. The other, built in 1903 in Chicago as a fireboat for Milwaukee, was for a second time splashed with beer to start its new life as a museum exhibit at the National Museum of the Great Lakes.

“I christen this tug Ohio. May God bless her and all who work on her,” Jane Smith, 95, of Vermilion, Ohio and Julie LaMarre, 34, of Monroe County’s Frenchtown Township, both said before smashing their respective – and well-wrapped – bottles of Pabst Blue Ribbon and bubbly on the tugs’ forward railings during a ceremony that served as a sort of torch-passing between the two.

“This is a demonstration of evolution,” Christopher Gillcrist, the museum’s executive director, had said previously to describe the two vessels brought together for a first-of-its-kind maritime event.

The new Ohio, officially classed by Great Lakes Towing as a Loren 76 ice tug, is “smaller, more agile, and more efficient” than its predecessor, Mr. Gillcrist said. Built in an Ohio shipyard by Ohio workers, “the new tug will operate in Ohio waters and serve Ohio ports,” said Joe Starck, the tugboat operator’s president. The new Ohio specifically is to be assigned to the Toledo harbor.

Its construction and that of four new fleetmates was enabled in part by an Ohio Environmental Protection Agency grant that covered 40 percent of the cost for four of the vessels’ propulsion systems, Mr. Starck said. Older, less-efficient tugs that could not meet new Coast Guard inspection requirements will be replaced by the new boats, he said.

The old Ohio’s dedication as a museum tug followed a seven-month cosmetic restoration that included extensive repairs to its steel decks, hull reinforcement, renewal of its pilothouse, and repainting above the waterline into Great Lakes’ signature green and red.

“It was a wreck before,” said Greg Rudnick, a maritime historian from Lakewood, Ohio who noted, as Mr. Gillcrist had done previously, that the old Ohio had been stored for years downwind of a salt mine near Great Lakes Towing’s Cleveland facilities. Museum volunteers have “done so much work already, and there’s so much more to do, but it looks great,” Mr. Rudnick said.

Mr. Gillcrist effusively thanked both the museum’s volunteers and several companies that donated work or materials toward the tug’s restoration. The latter included Great Lakes Towing; Solomon Diving, Inc., of Monroe; the George Gradel Co. of Toledo; Mid American Group, a steel fabricator in Newport, Mich.; Barton International of Glens Falls, N.Y., which provided sandblasting material; and Sherwin-Williams, the Cleveland-based paint manufacturer.

Mrs. LaMarre, whose husband, Paul LaMarre III, is a member of the museum’s board and director of the Port of Monroe, said she had been honored to be chosen by Great Lakes Towing to christen its new tug, but nervous that she might not swing the champagne bottle hard enough.

A christening bottle that doesn’t break is considered bad luck. “I was getting it from two different family members – my husband and my father-in-law – that I needed to make sure I break the bottle,” she said with a laugh.

Mr. LaMarre’s father, Paul LaMarre, Jr., is a veteran Great Lakes mariner who now is captain of the Detroit-based Diamond Jack tour boat.

As a nod to its owner’s 120-year corporate history, the new Ohio displays a tribute to Great Lakes Towing’s early years, when refloating vessels that had accidentally run aground or ashore represented a substantial part of its business.

The white horse emblem displayed on the new tug’s pilot house is “the white horse of salvation, rescuing a stranded vessel in need” and at one time appeared on all Great Lakes Towing tugs, Mr. LaMarre said before the ceremony.

While Friday’s ceremony was reserved for holders of tickets sold only in advance, the rededicated Ohio will be open to the general public for a celebratory weekend Saturday and Sunday.

The new Ohio was to have been on-site – though not open for tours – during the weekend, but that plan had to be scrubbed because of high water on the Maumee River that compromised the available space to dock it.

The high water prompted the old and new Ohios to be moored nose-to-nose for their dedications, and a wind shift later in the day caused water to start flooding the dock area after the ceremony was over.

Museum admission is $17 for the general public and includes access to both the Ohio and the Col. James M. Schoonmaker museum freighter. Museum members are admitted free.

View images and video at this link: https://www.toledoblade.com/local/community-events/2019/06/21/new-tugboat-christened-at-National-Museum-of-Great-Lakes/stories/20190621117

 

Port Reports -  June 22

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day’s news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known)

Two Harbors-Silver Bay, MN – Gary A. Putney
The CN ore docks in Two Harbors saw the arrival of the Presque Isle at 20:39 for North of #2 where she took on a partial cargo at the gravity dock. She then shifted to South of #2 where she departed from at 07:46 on the 21st for Gary. The Algoma Guardian arrived off Two Harbors early on June 21st and got underway about the time the PI got underway from the dock. The Algoma Guardian then arrived on the 21st at 08:05 for South of #2. She departed on the 21st at 18:42 for Hamilton. Due Two Harbors on the 22nd are the Roger Blough and the CSL Laurentien after unloading in the Twin Ports. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay saw the departure of the Clyde S. VanEnkevort/Erie Trader on the 21st between 02:00 and 02:30 for Indiana Harbor. There is no traffic scheduled for Silver Bay on the 22nd.

Thunder Bay, ON
Thursday June 20: 21:29 Saginaw departed Richardson Current River Terminal for Owen Sound. 22:00 Tecumseh weighed anchor and returned to Richardson Current River Terminal to resume loading grain. Friday June 21: 7:08 research vessel Kiyi departed the Coast Guard base for research in Thunder Bay. 8:58 Whitefish Bay arrived at G3 to load grain. 14:09 research vessel Kiyi returned to the Coast Guard base. 14:35 Tecumseh departed Richardson Current River Terminal for Port Cartier. 17:14 Thunder Bay departed Viterra A downbound. Expected late Friday: Algoma Spirit.

St. Marys River
Downbound traffic on Friday included Industrial Skipper, Kaminisiqua, American Integrity and Gardno. Upbounders included CSL Assiniboine, tug Spartan and barge, Roger Blough and, later, Algoma Compass.

Northern Lake Huron ports

Drummond Island:
Friday; 16:27 Dorothy Ann and Pathfinder arrived to load.

Bruce Mines:
Friday; 1:45 Mississagi departed down bound on Lake Michigan.

Parry Sound:
Thursday; 18:42 Samuel Risley departed for the St Marys River to work on nav aids.

Alpena:
Thursday; 21:01 Undaunted and Pere Marquette 41 departed for Grand Haven. Friday; 6:21 The cement carrier Alpena arrived to load and departed at 11:28 for Detroit.

Stoneport:
Thursday; 22:59 Olive L Moore departed for Marysville.

Calcite:
Friday; 11:35 Wilfred Sykes departed for Indiana Harbor. 13:05 Victory and James L Kuber arrived to load. 15:38 The tug Michigan and tank barge Great lakes arrived and went to anchor.

Port Inland:
Friday; 2:36 John J Boland departed for Waukegan. 2:48 Calumet weighed anchor and proceeded to the loading dock. She departed at 11:19 down bound on Lake Michigan. 16:46 Joseph L Block arrived and went to anchor. 18:37 American Courage arrived and went to anchor.

Goderich, ON – Bruce Douglas
Algoma Conveyor departed with salt Friday. Algoma Sault is due in on Saturday.

Northeast Ohio ports – Bill Kloss
6/21 arrivals: Great Republic to Ashtabula and Sam Laud to Fairport Harbor. 6/21 departures: NACC Argonaut to Bath.

Oswego, N.Y. – Ned Goebricher
On Friday, McKeil Spirit unloaded cement.

 

Demands by customs adds to port operators’ ire

6/22 - It seemed like a game-changer for the Port of Monroe, Michigan, located less than 20 miles from a Ford Motor Co. plant, when it got an order to ship hundreds of Mustangs to Germany.

The work would require up to 200 workers at a facility that handled mostly commodities like coal and limestone. Ford’s order came as the port was working to establish itself as the first federal marine highway on the Great Lakes, a chance for an economic boon for the Rust Belt community in the shadow of Detroit. Then, U.S. Customs and Border Protection stepped in.

The border agency told Ford and the port operator that it didn’t have the resources to inspect every shipping container, and the port would need to buy new fencing, cranes, facilities and security at its own expense before it would be allowed to carry out the order, which also included imports. The upgrades were required not just for the Ford work, but to accept containers from any other company for international shipping, according to a University of Michigan case study of how the security agency has impacted the port and local economy.

Ford ultimately pulled the project and shipped the Mustangs by rail to Baltimore. Yet the agency hasn’t altered its position, and its demands have cost the region countless revenues and job creation, according to the report.

“The U.S. Customs and Border Protection has nearly put the Port of Monroe out of the international cargo business,” Paul LaMarre, the port’s director, said in an interview.

Monroe is among a growing number of public ports that say Customs and Border Protection is demanding that they front the bills for on-site upgrades and equipment to improve security. The demands add to their financial worries at a time when the Trump administration’s tariff orders and siphoning of hundreds of customs officers to the U.S.-Mexico border is already stressing resources in the midst of the busy summer shipping season.

In recent months the demands have accelerated. At least half a dozen ports of various sizes throughout the country have been told to make at least $52 million in often last-minute upgrades or potentially face inspection service issues, the American Association of Port Authorities said in a May 9 letter to congressional homeland security overseers.

The requests have included gym space and break rooms for border agency staff, additional space in cruise ship embarkment buildings, and kennels for cargo-sniffing canines, the group said.

The “disturbing” trend continues “with no end in sight,” AAPA CEO Kurt Nagle said in the letter. “They’re saying if you want to play in this space, you’re going to pay,” Gregg Ward, who has consulted for the Monroe port and is president of Detroit-Windsor Truck Ferry Inc. said in an interview.

A spokesperson from the border agency didn’t respond to a request for comment. Seaport Disrupted

Now some lawmakers are calling for oversight and provisions in spending bills aimed at ensuring ports aren’t blindsided by the agency’s demands.

An amendment to the fiscal 2020 Homeland Security spending bill that would require the border agency to brief Congress on its requirements for staffing and security upgrades at seaports, as well as lay out the process of deciding how initiatives are funded, was adopted last week by the House Appropriations Committee .

“The federal government’s responsibility is port security,” Rep. Dutch Ruppersberger (D-Md.), who offered the provision and whose district includes the Port of Baltimore, said in a hallway interview. “The states don’t have the money to do that, and they are doing a lot of it already.”

The congressman wants the border agency to justify its authority to ask for these requests, and would support a stronger provision in the Senate’s Homeland Security spending bill that would require CBP to lay out its budget for funding needs, spokeswoman Jaime Lennon from Ruppersberger’s office said in an interview.

Both Ruppersberger and Sen. Chris Van Hollen (D-Md.) said they’re worried about how widespread the issue is, beyond impacting their Port of Baltimore. Port of Baltimore operators didn’t respond to a request for comment.

Van Hollen is developing language for the Senate’s Homeland Security appropriations bill that would halt expenditures on current and future facility requests for seaports from the border agency until there has been a review of the management of funding, according to spokeswoman Bridgett Frey.

The Senate’s appropriations bill development has stalled as lawmakers and the White House negotiate top-line budget figures.

Democrats on the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee led by ranking member Gary Peters (D-Mich.), whose state includes the Port of Monroe, are also digging into the issue, an aide said in a telephone interview. Port Authorities

The agency has told ports it has statutory and regulatory authority to require a suitable environment for cargo inspections at no cost to the government. For example, a 1928 Justice Department legal opinion on customs inspections states there is no reason the federal government should “pay the costs of acts which it has power to require others to perform at their own expense.”

The reasonableness of the requests may be more of a gray area, in terms of what is actually required for customs officers to do their jobs, according to an aide from the committee’s minority office.

“This doesn’t exist everywhere, this doesn’t exist at all the ports, but it’s being forced on this little community port,” Ward said, referring to the type of equipment demands at Monroe, which he estimated would cost at least $5 million to $6 million.

To be sure, the border agency has made facility requests in the past, and the agency since 2013 has been expanding a public-private partnership program with a variety of ports that donate materials or reimburse the agency, for example, when extra cargo loads require overtime hours for inspection.

“Record increases in passenger and cargo volumes are outpacing CBP’s personnel and infrastructure resources, resulting in increased passenger wait times and cargo backups,” the agency’s website for the partnership program says.

According to the University of Michigan report, the CBP regarded serving Monroe as a “courtesy” that was not required.

The ports association said members met with acting Customs and Border Protection Commissioner John Sanders June 12 to discuss the facilities issue and staffing. The group wants a pause in the funding requests until Congress can conduct oversight of the process, and require the agency to report its funding needs and timelines.

Back in Monroe, LaMarre said that in the years since the Mustang loss they’ve been accepted to the agency’s private partnership program, but are still waiting for a clear list of needs from the agency. Meanwhile, he said, the port has lost millions of dollars in business as shipping clients chose alternative ports or transportation modes that aren’t facing the same demands from the border agency.

At this point, he said he’s willing to pay what it takes to clear cargo.

“We’re just looking for a responsive partner” he said, adding that the meeting with Sanders seemed to tip some action. “We are a public port in a distressed community, and our distressed community is being put off the list of priorities entirely.”

https://about.bgov.com/news/gym-kennel-demands-by-customs-adds-to-port-operators-ire

Bloomberg News

 

Obituary: Capt. John Bentum

6/22 - Capt. John Bentum went peacefully to his rest after a long struggle on Wednesday, June 19, at the age of 67. He sailed with Canada Steamship Lines for over 35 years before his retirement. The family will receive visitors at Pleasantview Funeral Home, 2000 Merrittville Highway, Thorold, ON, on Sunday, June 23 from 2:00 - 4:00 p.m. Private interment at a later date. Memorial donations to the Canadian Society of Transplantation.

 

Deadline near for Engineers Day Soo Freighter Chasing Cruise

6/22 - The Soo Locks Freighter-Chasing Cruise will be Friday, June 28. Reservations ($45) may be made at the Soo Boatnerd Picnic. The cut off time is noon Thursday, June 27, as we must let the boat tours know how many will be on board so they can order the right amount of food for dinner. For details, see www.boatnerd.com/gathering

 

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  June 22

On 22 June 1959, BAYPORT (steel propeller tug, 72 foot, 65 gross tons, built in 1914, at Cleveland, Ohio, formerly named a.) FAIRPORT) had the steamer MOHAWK DEER in tow when she was hooked by her own tow cable, capsized and sank at Collingwood, Ontario. Three lives were lost. The tug was later raised and converted from steam to diesel. Later renamed c.) TWIN PORT, and d.) ROD MC LEAN in 1974. She was scrapped in 2008 at the Purvis west yard at Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario.

On 22 June 1909, W.P. THEW (wooden propeller freighter, 133 foot, 207 gross tons, built in 1884, at Lorain, Ohio) was in ballast, creeping through the fog off Alpena, Michigan on Lake Huron when she was rammed by the WILLIAM LIVINGSTONE (steel propeller freighter, 532 foot, 6,634 gross tons, built in 1908, at Ecorse, Michigan). After the collision, the LIVINGSTONE drifted away and lost track of the THEW. The THEW sank in 80 feet of water. Fortunately the steamer MARY C. ELPHICKE answered the distress whistle and picked up the THEW's crew from the lifeboat. No lives were lost.

The WILLIAM R. ROESCH (Hull#901) was launched and christened at Lorain, Ohio by American Ship Building Co., on June 22, 1973, for the Union Commerce Bank, Ohio (Trustee) and managed by the Kinsman Marine Transit Co., Cleveland, Ohio. Renamed b.) DAVID Z. NORTON in 1995, c.) DAVID Z in 2007 and d.) CALUMET in 2008.

June 22, 1957 - W. L. Mercereau, known as the Father of the Fleet, died. Mercereau developed the Pere Marquette fleet of car ferries into the largest in the world.

On 22 June 1853, CHALLENGE (wooden propeller freighter, 198 foot, 665 tons, built in 1853, at Newport, Michigan) was bound from Chicago for Buffalo with barreled pork and oats on one of her first trips. However, her boiler exploded off Cheboygan, Michigan. She burned and sank. Five died. The schooner NORTH STAR heard the blast ten miles away and came to the rescue of the rest of the passengers and crew.

On 22 June 1875, The Port Huron Times reported that "the Northern Transportation Company's fleet of 20 propellers, which have been idle all the season owing to difficulties between the Central Vermont and the Ogdensburg & Champlain Railroad Companies, have passed from the control of the Central Vermont Railroad Company and will commence regular trips as soon as they can be fitted out."

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Mike Nicholls, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series. Marine Historical Society of Detroit.

 

U.S. Steel to idle blast furnace at Great Lakes Works facility on Zug Island

6/21 - Detroit, MI – U.S. Steel Corp. is idling a blast furnace at its Great Lakes Works facility in Ecorse and River Rouge. The move comes after the steel producer announced a lower-than-expected earnings forecast for the second quarter of 2019. Blast furnaces — key for processing iron into steel — in Europe and Indiana will also be idled, according to a June 18 press release.

“In response to current market conditions, we are taking actions aligned with our strategy by adjusting our global blast furnace footprint,” the release read. “We are idling two blast furnaces in the United States and one blast furnace in Europe to better align our global production with our order book.

“In the United States, we began a planned maintenance outage on the Great Lakes B2 blast furnace last week. Based on current market conditions, we expect the B2 blast furnace to remain idled after the completion of the planned outage.”

United Steelworkers could not immediately be reached for comment.

Twice in the release, the steel maker referred to weak market demand for steel. In March 2018, President Donald Trump approved the imposition of stiff tariffs on steel and aluminum imports, boosting domestic supply. The combination has lowered prices.

In August, 15 individuals were hospitalized after an incident involving the dust catcher of one of the blast furnaces on Zug Island, where the Great Lakes Works facility is located. All 15 individuals were employed by Songer Services, a Pennsylvania-based industrial contracting firm.

Less than three weeks later, more than 200 members of United Steelworkers Local No. 1299 rallied for a fair contract outside the facility. By October, union and corporation had reached a tentative agreement on a collective bargaining agreement representing 14,000 domestic employees.

The agreement was ratified in mid-November and runs until September 2022.

News Herald

 

Egmondgracht renamed

6/21 - The saltie Egmondgracht was officially renamed Aujaq at Valleyfield on June 14. The cargo vessel was built in 1994.

Rene Beauchamp

 

Corps, National Weather Service make predictions for summer Great Lakes levels

6/21 - A snowy winter, a wet spring and a rainy summer forecast are filling our Great Lakes to the brim. Water levels in the Great Lakes are rising at or near record levels, wreaking havoc on shorelines, waterfront property and coastal infrastructure.

In Ludington, drains have been overflowing regularly and water is overtaking break walls. Beaches ideal for summer strolls have been reduced to a fraction of their usual pathway because of the high water. Lake Michigan is one inch away from breaking the month of June’s high water level, while Lake Superior is four inches above the all time high.

Lakes Huron, Ontario and Erie are also extremely high.

Wednesday night, Ludington City Hall hosted the U.S. Army Corps. of Engineers and the National Weather Service to talk about the scope of the issue and answer community questions about the increasing threat.

The National Weather Service has tracked water levels every month for the past 100 years and levels have only been this high for five months in that entire time span.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers says more rain is expected this summer, raising levels even more, and potentially above records set back in the mid 1980’s.

“We’re seeing lots of instances of coastal flooding, shoreline erosion, structures are underwater in certain parts of the Great Lakes,” said chief Keith Kompoltowicz. “It’s likely that all five lakes are going to see record highs in June.”

Downstate resident John Tunis has summered in Ludington for more than 20 years and has never seen the water so high.

“We’re flabbergasted by what we’re seeing,” said Tunis. “At our place we had approximately 65 to 75 feet of access, [now] we have maybe five feet of beach all the way down towards the city beach. It’s unbelievable.”

The Army Corps of Engineers and the National Weather Service say the wet weather patterns may break by July.

9&10 News

 

Port Reports -  June 21

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day’s news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known)

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
There was no traffic through the Duluth entry during the day on Thursday. In port were Indiana Harbor, loading iron ore pellets at CN; American Mariner, loading wheat at General Mills; and Happy River, discharging wind turbine towers at Port Terminal. After experiencing loading delays, Indiana Harbor had a tentative departure time of late Thursday evening, and Paul R. Tregurtha was due just before midnight to load coal at Midwest Energy. There was also no traffic in Superior, however American Century is due early Friday to load at BN.

Two Harbors-Silver Bay, MN – Gary A. Putney
American Integrity departed CN South of #2 on June 20th at 08:20 for "Hoosier Harbor." Due Two Harbors the evening of the 20th is the Presque Isle. Due Two Harbors on June 21st is the Algoma Guardian. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay saw the arrival of the Clyde S. VanEnkevort/Erie Trader at 13:37 on June 20th. There is no inbound traffic scheduled for Silver Bay on June 21st.

Thunder Bay, ON
Wednesday June 19: 21:34 CSL Welland departed Viterra A for Montreal. Thursday June 20: 1:12 Tecumseh departed Richardson Current River Terminal and went to anchor. 2:28 Saginaw arrived at Richardson Current River Terminal to load grain. 11:47 saltie Industrial Skipper arrived at Keefer Terminal to unload kiln components. 12:34 Thunder Bay arrived at Viterra A to load grain. 13:48 Kaministiqua departed Richardson Main Terminal for Port Cartier. 16:11 saltie Industrial Skipper departed Keefer Terminal for Montreal. 17:29 research vessel Kiyi arrived at the Coast Guard base. 17:29 saltie Gardno departed Superior Elevator for Montreal. 18:01 Federal Columbia weighed anchor and proceeded to Superior Elevator to load grain. Expected for Friday: Whitefish Bay.

Green Bay, WI
Egelantiersgracht arrived from Sweden with a load of pulp Thursday afternoon with the help of the Great Lakes Towing tugs Texas and Superior.

Northern Lake Huron ports

Drummond Island:
Wednesday; 22:32 Algoma Buffalo departed for Sombra.

Bruce Mines:
Thursday; 17:18 Mississagi arrived to load trap rock.

Meldrum Bay:
Wednesday; 6:14 Algoma Innovator departed for Sarnia. 12:00 Baie Comeau weighed anchor and proceeded to the Lafarge dock to finish loading. Thursday; 10:24 Baie Comeau departed down bound on Lake Huron.

Alpena:
Thursday;13:02 Undaunted and Pere Marquette 41 arrived to unload.

Stoneport:
Thursday; 10:00 Olive L Moore arrived to load.

Calcite:
Thursday; !0:02 H Lee White arrived to load. 10:20 Great Republic departed for Ashtabula.20:04 John G Munson departed for Burns Harbor. 20:07 Wilfred Sykes arrived to load.

Port Inland:
Wednesday; 21:12 Manitowoc departed for Holland. Thursday; 13:51 John J Boland arrived to load. 16:20 Calumet arrived and went to anchor.

Detroit-Rouge River – Raymond H
Algoma Conveyor made her first ever trip to Detroit on Thursday, unloading coal at Zug Island

Northeast Ohio ports – Bill Kloss
6/20 arrivals: Edgar B. Speer to Conneaut. James R. Barker to Ashtabula. Victory 1 to the Port of Cleveland, Dock 28, NACC Argonaut to LaFarge and Petite Forte to St. Mary's Cement in Cleveland. Sam Laud to Marblehead.

Welland Canal and vicinity vessel report - Thursday Jun 20 – Barry Andersen

Nanticoke:
arrival - Jun 20 - Mesabi Miner at 0842 - docked - Jun 19 - tug Sharon M I & Niagara Spirit at 0648

Welland Canal:
upbound - Jun 19 - Sten Baltic (Nor) at 2110 - Jun 20 - Victory II (Bhs) (ex Sea Discoverer-18, Coastal Queen 2-17, Clipper Discoverer-09, Cape Cods Light-07) at 0707, Algoma Sault at 1036, light tug Ecosse at 1136, Harbour Fountain (Por) at 1404, Algosea at 1636 and CSL Tadoussac at 1733

downbound - Jun 19 - tug Everlast & Norman McLeod at 1528 - Jun 20 - Algonorth at 0645, Federal Mackinac (Mhl) at 0957, Robert S Pierson at 1129, Sten Arnold (Gib) at 1244, CSL St Laurent at 1359, G3 Marquis eta 2145

Welland Canal docks:
docked - docked - Jun 7 - CCGS Pierre Radisson at 0925 into Heddle Dry Dock at Port Weller - Jun 20 - Victory II (Bhs) (ex Sea Discoverer-18, Coastal Queen 2-17, Clipper Discoverer-09, Cape Cods Light-07) stopped wharf 2 at 0740 - departed at 1650 for Toronto

Port Weller anchorage:
anchored - Jun 12 - Emanuele S (Bds) (ex SCT Monte Rosa-17, MCT Monte Rosa-15) at 1521

Hamilton:
arrivals - none - docked - Jun 13 - Rosy (Bds) (ex SCT Stockhorn-17, MCT Stockhorn-16, HHL Caspian-08) at 0051, Federal Rhine (Bds) at 1347 - Jun 18 - Lubie (Bhs) at 2130 - Jun 19 - Federal Elbe (Mhl) at 0702 and Jana Desgagnes at 2109 - departure - Jun 20 - Jana Desgagnes at 1907 eastbound

Bronte:
docked - Jun 17 - Sarah Desgagnes at 1514 - departed Jun 20 at 0817 eastbound

Clarkson:
docked - Jun 18 - Algoma Sault at 1540 - departed - Jun 20 at 0854 for the canal

Toronto:
arrival - Jun 20 - Victory II (Bhs) (ex Sea Discoverer-18, Coastal Queen 2-17, Clipper Discoverer-09, Cape Cods Light-07) at 1907 - docked - Jun 16 - Whistler (Lbr) at 0438

Oshawa:
docked - Jun 16 - Strandja (Mlt) (ex Federal Yangtze-10, Eastwind York-10) at 1208 - Jun 18 - tug Leo A McArthur & John J Carrick at 0851 - departed Jun 20 - tug Leo A McArthur & John J Carrick at 1911 westbound

Bowmanville:
anchored - Jun 20 - Radcliffe R Latimer at 0230 - arrival - Jun 20 Radcliffe R Latimer at 1432 - docked - Jun 19 - CSL Tadoussac at 2335 - departed - Jun 20 - CSL Tadoussac at 1400 westbound

 

Museum tug Edna G needs volunteer tour guides

6/21 - Two Harbors, MN – The Friends of Edna G is seeking volunteers to give tours of the historic Edna G tugboat during Two Harbors Heritage Days 2019 and possibly through the rest of the summer. Tours have not been available in over five years. However, a new agreement with the city of Two Harbors was ironed out. A structural study recently completed shows the historic tug is not in imminent danger of sinking.

The tugboat was built by the Cleveland Shipbuilding Co. in 1896 for the Duluth and Iron Range Railroad to guide ore boats into the ore docks. The 92-foot long, 23-feet wide, steam-powered tug was built with a steel hull, which was considered a novelty at the time.

The name came from J.L. Greatsinger, then-president of the railroad, after his daughter Edna.

In 1917, the ship was outfitted and shipped to the East Coast to provide aid for World War I before returning to Two Harbors. The boat was decommissioned and given to the city of Two Harbors in 1980.

Note that tours of the Edna G require climbing steps. Koehler recommends maintaining three points of contact with the boat, one hand and two feet, at all times.

Along the tour, one could expect to see the historic engine room, the dusty crew quarters, the wood-paneled galley, the swanky captain's quarters, the pilothouse and upper and lower decks. No access is available to the boiler room, but a view from the top of the steps provides enough context.

 

Great Lakes restoration needs $100M annual investment: report

6/21 - It will cost $100-million a year over the next decade to restore the health of the Great Lakes, says an expert panel in a new report. And a team of five Great Lakes advocacy groups is asking the federal government to cover the cost of implementing the Action Plan 2030 to Protect the Great Lakes, while also hoping to secure matching funding from other levels of government as well as other organizations.

The plan, released Tuesday after nine months of research by an expert panel includes 15 initiatives that would help identify and reduce exposure to toxins and harmful chemicals in the region, target areas that contributor to algal blooms in the lakes, and to take action to prevent sewage and bacteriological contamination to help ensure beaches remain clean and safe, and protect communities along Great Lakes shorelines by helping them become more resilient to high water levels.

The expert panel, led by Ontario's former environment commissioner Gord Miller and Québec's former sustainable development commissioner Jean Cinq-Mars, focused on priorities lakeside communities are facing such as climate change, pollutants, algal blooms and beach contamination.

In a media release, Miller called the action plan a "strategic and surgical intervention using new kinds of collaboration, technologies and big data new approach."

Cinq-Mars referred to a U.S. plan launched in 2008 and supported by both Republicans and Democrats that led to a $2-billion investment in Great Lakes restoration projects, leading to a three-to-one return on investment.

"Protecting such a vast and valuable ecosystem requires significant and sustained investment like the GLRI on the U.S. side of the lakes. We need the same kind of multi-partisan leadership and commitment this side of the border," she said.

Canada's environment minister Catherine McKenna said by restoring and protecting "our fresh water, we not only secure the health of our environment, but also the health, culture and economy of millions of Canadians."

The five advocacy groups that initiated the expert panel study in October include the Great Lakes Fishery Commission, the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Cities Initiative, the Council of the Great Lakes Region, Freshwater Future Canada, and Stratégies Saint Laurent.

The full 46-page report is available online at www.westbrookpa.com/glslcollab/reports/great-lakes

 

Deadline near for Engineers Day Soo Freighter Chasing Cruise

6/21 - The Soo Locks Freighter-Chasing Cruise will be Friday, June 28. Reservations ($45) may be made the Soo Boatnerd Picnic. The cut off time is noon Thursday, June 27, as we must let the boat tours know how many will be on board so they can order the right amount of food for dinner. For details, see www.boatnerd.com/gathering

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  June 21

On 21 June 1868, the D&C Line's MORNING STAR (wooden side-wheel steamer, 243 foot, 1,075 tons, built in 1862, at Trenton, Michigan) was late in leaving her dock in Cleveland, Ohio, because she was loading some last-minute freight (iron bars and glass). As she sailed on Lake Erie to Detroit during the dark and rainy night, she collided with the heavy-laden bark COURTLAND and sank quickly, 10 miles off Lorain, Ohio. Twenty feet of the steamer's bow had been torn off while the bark was swept into one of the paddle wheels and destroyed. The side-wheel steamer R N RICE arrived on the scene at 3 a.m. and picked up the survivors - only 44 of them. In September, MORNING STAR was raised, towed to Lorain and re-sunk in 55 feet of water, for possible future rebuilding. Attempts were made to raise her again several times, but in the summer of 1872, she was abandoned because it was determined that the previous attempts had reduced her to rubble.

On 21 June 1878, the small passenger steamer J. HOLT, which ran between Chatham and Wallaceburg, Ontario, burned on Lake St. Clair. The passengers and crew escaped in the lifeboats.

On June 21, 1942, the LEON FRASER entered service as the largest vessel on the Great Lakes. The Pittsburgh Steamship Co. bulk freighter, originally 639 foot 6 inches long, retained at least a tie for that honor until the WILFRED SYKES entered service in 1949. She was shortened, converted to a self-unloading cement carrier and renamed b.) ALPENA in 1991.

June 21, 1942, the U.S. Steel bulk freighter EUGENE J. BUFFINGTON ran hard aground on Boulder Reef in Lake Michigan and broke in two. The vessel was subsequently recovered and, after a long career with U.S. Steel, was finally sold for scrap in 1980.

The m/v RANGER III (Hull#385) was side-launched at Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin by Christy Corporation, on Saturday, June 21, 1958. The vessel was custom designed by R.A. Stearns (Bay Engineering) also of Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin, for the National Park Service, Isle Royale National Park.

On June 21, 1986, during a severe thunderstorm (and unofficial observations of a funnel cloud) in the Duluth area, the JOSHUA A. HATFIELD broke loose from Azcon Scrap Dock in Duluth and was blown across the harbor and ended up hard aground on Park Point (Minnesota Point). She remained stuck for nearly 3 weeks when a storm with east winds pushed the HATFIELD free and she blew most of the way back across the harbor back to the scrap dock. Tugs were dispatched in time to safely guide the HATFIELD back to the scrap dock. (June seems to be a bad month for U.S. Steel in accidents, with the June 7, 1977, accident involving the WILLIAM A. IRVIN, the June 15, 1943, collision between the D. M. CLEMSON and the GEORGE M. HUMPHREY, and the June 21, 1942, grounding of the EUGENE J. BUFFINGTON on Boulder Reef.)

June 21, 1916 - The ANN ARBOR NO 5, after departing the shipyards in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, on June 21, 1916, where 3 buckets (blades) were replaced on her starboard propeller, arrived in Manistique, Michigan. While maneuvering around in the harbor she struck the rocky bottom and broke off the same three blades off her starboard propeller.

June 21, 1994 - The Ludington Daily News reported a planned sale of the CITY OF MIDLAND 41, to Contessa Cruise Lines of Minnesota. The deal included an option to sell the SPARTAN and Contessa was prohibited from competing against Lake Michigan Carferry Co., but it fell through.

The 3-mast wooden schooner GEORGE MURRAY was launched in Manitowoc, Wisconsin, on 21 June 1873. At the time, she was billed as the largest vessel ever built on Lake Michigan. Her dimensions were 299 foot long x 34 foot beam x 14 foot depth, with the capacity to carry 50,000 bushels of grain. She was built by G. S. Rand for J. R. Slauson of Racine, Wisconsin.

1910 – The tug C.W. ELPHICKE sank at Michigan City, Indiana, after a bizarre accident. The steamer UNITED STATES had struck the Franklin Street Bridge, which then collapsed on the tug. The tug was salvaged on July 12.

1941 – BOMMESTAD, a small Norwegian freighter, came to the Great Lakes in the 1920s and 1930s. It was sold and renamed HILDA in 1934 and registered in Finland when it was torpedoed and sunk by U-52 in the Bay of Biscay while enroute from Dunkirk, France, to the U.K. with a cargo of wheat.

1964 – The Norwegian freighter STELLA NOVA ran aground off Alexandria Bay, N.Y., while enroute from Duluth to Bombay, India. It was refloated June 24 with major bottom damage but was repaired. It had been a Seaway trader as a) VITO in 1959 and was scrapped as f) CORALBA after arriving at Split, Yugoslavia, on September 19, 1978.

On 21 June 1900, the wooden bulk freighter R C BRITTAIN was raised at Toledo, Ohio. She was brought to Sarnia where repairs were made and the engine of the tug F A FOLGER was installed in her. She had previously sunk at Toledo and remained there for several years before being raised. She lasted until 1912, when she burned at Sarnia.

Data from: Jody Aho, Max Hanley, Joe Barr, Skip Gillham, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Cedarglen takes another step closer to the scrap yard

6/20 - Canadian registry for Canada Steamship Lines’ Cedarglen was closed on June 18 and transfered to Sierra Leone for the trip overseas to be recycled. New name is Eda. She had arrived in Montréal on May 18 under her own power from Toledo.

René Beauchamp

 

Frontenac heads down Gulf of St Lawrence for 5-year survey

6/20 - Canada Steamship Lines’ Frontenac made a rare trip into the Gulf of St Lawrence this week and is now at the shipyard in Les Mechins, Que. for her 5-year survey. The 51-year-old bulk carrier handles a variety of bulk cargoes between different ports on both sides of the Lakes, including 6- 8 trips a year from Thunder Bay to Midland, Ont. with grain.

 

Port Reports -  June 20

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day’s news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known)

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
Philip R. Clarke departed Duluth at 07:19 Wednesday morning with a load of sinter from Canadian National, and Indiana Harbor arrived at 09:10 to load iron ore pellets at CN. Happy River made her third visit of the season to the Twin Ports, arriving at 14:17 with a load of wind turbine towers for Port Terminal. American Mariner was inbound at 16:19 with a load of limestone for Graymont. Also in port on Wednesday were Industrial Skipper, unloading wind turbine blades at Port Terminal, and Federal Leda, taking on wheat at CHS 1. Both salties were expected to depart Wednesday evening, and Indiana Harbor should complete loading early Thursday morning. In Superior, Stewart J. Cort departed at 02:23 Wednesday with a load of iron ore pellets from BN, and Algoma Discovery arrived from anchor at 02:45 to load. She was outbound at 16:48 for Hamilton.

Two Harbors-Silver Bay, MN – Gary A. Putney
The Cason J. Callaway departed Two Harbors on June 18th at 22:54 after loading bft and pellets. She's headed for Gary. The Edwin H. Gott arrived Two Harbors on June 18th at 21:27 for South of #2. She departed the CN dock on June 19th at 11:11 for Nanticoke. Arriving off Two Harbors on June 19th at approx. 09:00 was the American Integrity. She arrived thru the piers on the 19th for South of #2 at 11:22. As of 19:30 on the 19th she is still loading. Due Two Harbors on June 20th is the Presque Isle. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay saw the arrival/departure of the Hon. James L. Oberstar on June 19th. She arrived on the 19th at 08:15 and departed at 18:03 for Cleveland Bulk. Due Silver Bay on June 20th is the Clyde S. VanEnkevort/Erie Trader.

Thunder Bay, ON
Tuesday June 18: 22:48 Tecumseh arrived at Richardson Current River Terminal to load grain. Wednesday June 19: 4:42 Kaministiqua arrived at Richardson Main Terminal to load grain. 5:05 Baie St Paul departed Thunder Bay Terminals for Sydney, Nova Scotia. 12:10 Federal Columbia arrived and went to anchor. Expected for Thursday: Saginaw and Thunder Bay.

Milwaukee, WI – Paul Erspamer
Federal Dart arrived in Milwaukee from Cleveland about 2:45 p.m. Wednesday, docking at Terminal 2 in the outer harbor, a dock usually used for steel deliveries.

Northern Lake Huron ports

Drummond Island:
Wednesday; 10:38 Algoma Buffalo arrived to load.

Bruce Mines:
Tuesday; 20:50 Cuyahoga arrived and went to anchor. Wednesday; 0:30 Algoma Compass departed for Toledo. 0:50 Cuyahoga weighed anchor and proceeded to the loading dock. 9:50 she departed for Port Colborne.

Thessalon:
Wednesday; 2:59 Baie Comeau arrived to take on a partial load of gravel and departed at 10:13 for Meldrum Bay.

Meldrum Bay:
Wednesday; 6:14 Algoma Innovator arrived to load. 12:00 Baie Comeau arrived and went to anchor.

Parry Sound:
Wednesday; CCGS Samuel Risley arrived at the coast guard station.

Calcite:
Wednesday; 9:09 Mississagi arrived to load.9:12 American Courage departed down bound on Lake Michigan. 18:10 Mississagi departed and is up bound on the St Marys River. 20:16 Great Republic arrived to load.

Port Inland:
Tuesday; 23:16 Joseph L Block departed for Indiana Harbor. Wednesday; 12:39 Manitowoc arrived to load limestone.

Goderich, ON – Bruce Douglas
CSL Laurentien at 3.30 pm was backing-in to load salt

Detroit-Rouge River – Raymond H
Wednesday Arrivals: Kaye E Barker-arrived at AK Steel to unload ore. CSL Assiniboine-arrived at Motor City Materials to unload salt. GL Ostrander/Integrity-arrived at Lafarge to unload cement. Leonard M and Niagara Spirit-arrived at Zug Island to load coke. Robert S Pierson-arrived at the Waterfront Petroleum Terminal to fuel. Sea Eagle 2/St. Mary's Cement 2-arrived at the St. Mary's Cement dock to unload cement.

Northeast Ohio ports – Bill Kloss
6/19 arrivals: Herbert C. Jackson to Cleveland Bulk Terminal, then to Marblehead after unloading. Sam Laud and Dorothy Ann/Pathfinder continue to wait out currents in the Cuyahoga River.

Welland Canal and vicinity vessel report - Wednesday Jun 19 - Barry Andersen

Nanticoke:
arrivals - Jun 19 - tug Sharon M I & Niagara Spirit at 0648 - docked - Jun 17 - tug Everlast & Norman McLeod at 2245 - departed Jun 19 at 1017 for the canal

Buffalo:
arrival - Jun 18 - Grande Caribe (cruise ship) at 1939 - departed - Jun 19 at 1846 for Cleveland

Welland Canal:
upbound - Jun 18 - light tug Ecosse at 1105 (to Heddle DD at Port Weller), Victory I (Bhs) (ex Saint Laurent-16, Sea Voyager-15, Cape May Light-06) at 2020 from Toronto and tug Petite Forte & St Marys Cement at 2152 - Jun 19 - Algoma Spirit at 0218, CSL Niagara at 1042, NACC Argonaut at 1408 and Sten Baltic (Nor) at 2110

downbound - Jun 18 - tug Ecosse departed Heddle DD with barge Dowden Spirit and survey and painting headed for Hamilton and tug Wilf Seymour & Alouette Spirit at 1823 (stopping wharf 16) - Jun 19 - tug Everlast & Norman McLeod at 1528

Welland Canal docks:
docked - docked - Jun 7 - CCGS Pierre Radisson at 0925 into Heddle Dry Dock at Port Weller

Port Weller anchorage:
anchored - Jun 12 - Emanuele S (Bds) (ex SCT Monte Rosa-17, MCT Monte Rosa-15) at 1521

Hamilton:
arrival - Jun 18 - tug Ecosse with Dowden Spirit - Jun 19 - Federal Elbe (Mhl) at 0702 and Jana Desgagnes at 2109 - docked - Jun 13 - Rosy (Bds) (ex SCT Stockhorn-17, MCT Stockhorn-16, HHL Caspian-08) at 0051, Federal Rhine (Bds) at 1347 - Jun 18 - Lubie (Bhs) at 2130 from the anchorage - departures - Jun 19 - Algoma Spirit at 0020 for the canal, Sider Venture (Por) (ex Oslo Venture I-17, Sian-C-16) at 1617 eastbound and Sten Baltic (Nor) at 1859 for Sarnia

Bronte:
docked - Jun 17 - Sarah Desgagnes at 1514

Clarkson:
docked - Jun 18 - Algoma Sault at 1540 - departed - Jun 19 - Blair McKeil (ex Gagliarda-19) at 1618 eastbound

Toronto:
docked - Jun 16 - Whistler (Lbr) at 0438 - departed - Jun 18 - Victory I (Bhs) (ex Saint Laurent-16, Sea Voyager-15, Cape May Light-06) at 1832 for the canal - Jun 19 - McKeil Spirit at 0728 eastbound

Oshawa:
docked - Jun 16 - Strandja (Mlt) (ex Federal Yangtze-10, Eastwind York-10) at 1208 - departure - Jun 19 - Aragonborg (Nld) at 1326 eastbound and tug Leo A McArthur & John J Carrick at 0851

 

Prescott-Ogdensburg ferry project held up by U.S. border officers

6/20 - Ogdensburg and Prescott say they are working hard to get a small ferry boat up and running for the summer long weekends.

The ferry boat would hold about a dozen passengers and their bikes, allowing people to move between the two countries for the Founders Day and our August long weekend. Prescott Mayor Brett Todd says Canadian Border officials have offered officers for free.

"We would have a couple of officers in Prescott, during the hours of operation to process visitors," explains Todd.

Todd says they're hoping for U-S Homeland Security and US Customs to provide something similar. But that seems to be a sticking point for them.

Despite support from Ogdensburg City Council, which passed a motion this week to work closely with Prescott Council on the project, US Customs officials are looking for border "enhancements." Todd says that seems to involve essentially creating another border and paying for more officials to man the entry point.

"One of the reasons we went over [to see Ogdensburg City Council] is really trying to get the message out, we're not talking about huge numbers of visitors particularly over those weekends."

Todd says supporters of the project on both sides of the St. Lawrence will continue to push for the pilot-project launch date in five weeks.

 

Great Lakes are overflowing with record amounts of water

6/20 - Lake Erie and Lake Superior broke records for average water levels in May, as did Lake St. Clair on Detroit’s eastern edge, according to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. In May, Lake Erie also reached its highest level on record for any month.

Record- or near-record-high water levels are forecast to continue in the summer before making the usual downturn into fall. The effects of these high waters have been wide-reaching. Recreational beaches have shrunk, and water has inundated docks and destroyed roads.

Damage to lakeshore property was reported again this week along Lake Ontario in Upstate New York in the town of Henderson.

“There’s houses surrounded by water, water going into houses and lake water in the roads,” Eric Anderson, an operations coordinator for the Henderson Fire District, told the Watertown Daily Times. “Carp are feeding in people’s front lawns.”

This kind of flooding has occurred along the shores of the Great Lakes for months, in some places repeatedly, and intensifies during high-wind events and storms. Major winter snowfalls and excessive rainfall are primary drivers for high water this year.

Normal water levels in the Great Lakes are largely modulated by precipitation, natural springs and rivers. Great Lakes water levels typically rise during the spring into summer, but this year it has been extreme.

Year-to-date precipitation in much of the Great Lakes region is running 150- to 200-plus percent of normal. Only the Lake Ontario region has seen somewhat lesser amounts, though it has still endured flooding. Winter saw record snowfall. Last year was also fairly wet.

Although rainfall surpluses have continued to be significant in recent months, the past few weeks have seen a drier pattern take hold. But this drier spell may not last, and only persistent dryness would meaningfully reduce the risk of future flooding.

The outlook from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers indicates monthly mean water levels for June are likely to meet or surpass record highs for that month. Water levels are forecast to continue rising through June on Lake Superior and through the heart of summer. For Superior, levels are anticipated to stay near or above previous monthly records every month through September.

Lakes Michigan and Huron also are likely to see additional rises of several inches through June. Elsewhere, lake levels are anticipated to fall but remain near or above record levels for that time of year.

Although water levels in the Great Lakes are in constant flux, the recent observed shifts have been particularly extreme.

“Over the past two decades, water levels on the Great Lakes have gone through an unprecedented period of persistent below-average conditions, a record-setting rate of water level rise and, now, a series of record-setting high levels,” said Drew Gronewold, a hydrologist at the University of Michigan.

While experts work to better understand the effects of climate change on Great Lakes water levels, they are seeing increased evidence of a new normal, characterized by rapid shifts between extreme high and low levels. To see this in action, we need look no further than the flooding of today, compared with the record lows six years ago.

“We are undoubtedly observing the effects of a warming climate in the Great Lakes,” wrote Richard Rood, a University of Michigan climate scientist. “We are at the beginning of what’s going to be a number of decades where the climate is going to be changing very fast. During that time, we will have many unexpected weather events, and we need to learn from these events to better prepare for the future.”

View charts at this link: https://windsorstar.com/news/local-news/great-lakes-are-overflowing-with-record-amounts-of-water

 

Deadline near for Engineers Day Soo Freighter Chasing Cruise

6/20 - Reservations are now being accepted for the Soo Locks Freighter-Chasing Cruise on Friday, June 28. Reservations ($45) will be accepted at the Soo Boatnerd Picnic; the cut off time is noon Thursday, June 27, as we must let the boat tours know how many will be on board so they can order the right amount of food for dinner. For details, see www.boatnerd.com/gathering

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  June 20

On this day in 1943, the IRVING S. OLDS departed Two Harbors with 20,543 tons of ore and the BENJAMIN F. FAIRLESS departed Two Harbors with 20,386 tons of ore. It was the first time that two lakers departed the same harbor on the same day with cargos in excess of 20,000 tons.

The SENATOR (steel propeller freighter, 410 foot, 4,048 gross tons) was launched by the Detroit Dry Dock Company (Hull #122) at Wyandotte, Michigan, on 20 June 1896, for the Wolverine Steamship Company. She lasted until 31 October 1929, when she collided with the steamer MARQUETTE in fog off Port Washington, Wisconsin, and sank with her cargo of 241 automobiles.

On 20 June 1893, GEORGE STONE (wooden propeller freighter, 270 foot, 1,841 gross tons) was launched by F. W. Wheeler & Co. (Hull #98) at West Bay City, Michigan. She lasted until 1909, when she stranded and burned on Lake Erie.

The WILLIAM P. COWAN (Hull#724) cleared Lorain, Ohio on her maiden voyage in 1918. Renamed b.) AMOCO ILLINOIS in 1962. Scrapped at Windsor, Ontario, by M & M Steel Co., in 1987.

In 1903, the twin-screw rail car ferry GRAND HAVEN (Hull#92) was launched at Toledo, Ohio, by the Craig Ship Building Co., for the Grand Trunk Carferry Line, Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

1953 – The Paterson steamer SCOTIADOC sank in Lake Superior near Trowbridge Island after a collision in wind and fog with the BURLINGTON of Canada Steamship Lines. One man was lost when the starboard lifeboat was swamped after being launched.

1954 – The bulk carrier PATRIA, built in Canada during World War Two as the tanker MOOSE MOUNTAIN PARK, was declared a total loss after coming ashore 1 mile northwest of East Point, Santa Rosa Island, California. The ship was salvaged, repaired and made one trip through the Seaway in 1961 as PATAPSCO RIVER before being scrapped at Hirao, Japan, in 1963.

1973 – The bulk carrier ATLANTIC TRADER first traded through the Seaway in 1961 and returned on a regular basis as INVEREWE beginning in 1962. It was back again as d) THEOKEETOR in 1972 but sank June 20, 1973, after a collision with MARINA L. in dense fog off the Baja Peninsula of Mexico. All on board were saved.

1978 – A fire broke out in the cargo of coal aboard WILLIS B. BOYER and the ship docked at River Rouge where part of the cargo was unloaded to get at the fire. The vessel was enroute from Toledo to Silver Bay.

1995 – SAULT AU COCHON, built by Port Weller Dry Docks as a pulpwood barge in 1969, buckled and sank at Forestville, QC. The hull was refloated and taken to Hamilton for repairs later in the year.

2007 – KAPITAN RADIONOV first came to the Great Lakes in May 1992 with coal tar for Cleveland. It sank in severe weather on this date in 2007 as i) ALEXANDRA C. after flooding began in the engine room the previous day. The vessel went down 95 miles off Socotra Island, Yemen, while enroute to Australia with ammonium nitrate. All 19 crew on board were rescued.

On June 20, 1959, the SEAWAY QUEEN began her maiden voyage. The vessel was appropriately named, as at the time she was the largest Canadian vessel on the Great Lakes, the 2nd largest on the Great Lakes overall (behind the EDMUND FITZGERALD), and she entered service the same week that Queen Elizabeth II and President Dwight D. Eisenhower formally dedicated the St. Lawrence Seaway. She was one of the more popular and classic looking vessels on the Great Lakes. June 20, 1936 - PERE MARQUETTE 21 was blocked in Manitowoc following an accident that disabled the Manitowoc Tenth Street Bridge, making it impossible to raise the structure.

June 20, 1993 - BADGER struck the Ludington breakwall while arriving Ludington. She was sent to Sturgeon Bay for repairs. Ten operating days and 21 sailings were lost. The 230-foot wooden freighter JAMES DAVIDSON (Hull#4) was launched at West Bay City, Michigan, for James Davidson at his shipyard on 20 June 1874. JAMES DAVIDSON was wrecked in Lake Huron in 1883.

The MINNEHAHA, a wooden "clipper" schooner, was launched at James A. Baker's shipyard in Oswego, New York, on 20 June 1857. Her dimensions were 110 foot keel, 125 foot overall, x 25 foot 6 inches x 10 foot 6 inches. She could carry 13,000 bushels of grain. Mr. James Navagh, her master builder, received a gold watch and chain worth $200 in appreciation of his fine work on this vessel.

On Wednesday night, 20 June 1877, the schooner EVELINE (wooden schooner, 118 foot, 236 gross tons, built in 1861, at Litchfield, Michigan) was struck by lightning about sixty miles out from Alpena, Michigan. The bolt shattered the mainmast, throwing three large pieces over the vessel's sides. The large spar was split perpendicularly in two and the lightning bolt followed the grain of the wood in a circular manner until it reached the main boom jaw, which is enclosed in a band of iron fastened by a large bolt. This bolt was literally cut in two. The mate, George Mayom, had the left side of his body blistered and the skin burned off from the shoulder to the foot. His right leg, hands and arm were also severely burned, and he suffered internal injuries and bled freely. The vessel made it to port and she was repaired. She lasted until September 1895, when she sank off Kewaunee, Wisconsin.

Data from: Max Hanley, Joe Barr, David Swayze, Skip Gillham, Russ Plumb, Father Dowling Collection, Historical Collections of the Great Lakes, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Ship incident closes Canadian shipping route on Detroit River for 30 hours

6/19 - Windsor, Ont. – The Detroit River’s Canadian shipping channel was closed Monday after lines tying to shore a ship carrying 25,000 tons of gravel snapped.

Three mooring lines holding the 730-foot Algoma Niagara’s bow to a dock in Sandwich Town snapped around 11 p.m., according to Steve Salmons, president and CEO of the Windsor Port Authority. The river’s current swung the ship’s hull into the channel 90 degrees, while the stern’s mooring lines remained attached to the dock.

“The captain did what is the right protocol. He dropped anchor to stop it from swinging out,” Salmons said Tuesday. By the time the two-year-old ship stopped fully, it was already blocking the shipping channel.

A member of the ship’s crew was reportedly injured when the mooring lines broke, Salmons said, but he didn’t know the nature or severity of the injury. Peter Winkley, spokesman for the Algoma Central Corporation, which owns the ship, would not confirm if a member of the Algoma Niagara’s crew had been injured. He declined to provide a statement about the incident.

The ship’s captain first reported the incident to Transport Canada’s Ontario office in Sarnia, who then notified the Windsor Port Authority, Salmons said. His organization immediately closed the Canadian side of the shipping channel to prevent collisions, and kept the channel closed for approximately 30 hours. During that time, the Windsor Port Authority coordinated with the U.S. Coast Guard to route ships to the American side of the water.

“It caused minor inconvenience, but no backups,” Salmons said. If another ship had been in the area at the time, it could have collided with the anchored vessel and created a much worse situation. “We are fortunate across the board.”

The ship’s anchor dropped near to the Kinder Morgan pipeline that carries ethane below the Detroit River, but the pipeline was not damaged during the incident. As a precaution, Kinder Morgan “sealed and purged out” the line, Salmons said, but the company told him its monitoring gauges registered no change in pressure—the line, which is buried several metres below the riverbed, suffered no leak, and has resumed transporting ethane.

Two tugboats on Tuesday held the ship in place while crews cut the anchor’s chain and lowered it to the riverbed, Salmons said. The Algoma Central Corporation, the vessel’s owner, will come “as soon as possible” with a salvage operation to remove the anchor and chain.

The tugboats then maneuvered the ship back to its spot along Windsor’s shore near Prospect Avenue, where it was re-tied to the port and crew unloaded the gravel. Once the channel was clear, the Windsor Port Authority reopened the shipping route’s Canadian side. “It’s not unusual for a mooring line to break—they do wear, they do get under stress,” Salmons said. “It was unusual that all three broke and it went out into the middle of the river.”

Representatives from Transport Canada have been on scene to investigate the incident, Salmons said. He did not have the results of the investigation and said he did not expect to see results for several days.

Windsor Star

 

US Steel to idle 3 blast furnaces as market conditions cool

6/19 - United States Steel Corp. will temporarily idle three blast furnaces, including two in the Midwest, and cut production of flat-rolled steel as market conditions soften.

U.S. Steel said late Tuesday it would keep idled the Great Lakes B2 blast furnace, which began a planned outage last week, after the work is completed. Another blast furnace, this at the Gary Works facility, will be idled temporarily. Both could be idled for the rest of the year, which will cut production starting in July by between 200,000 and 225,000 tons. It said the blast furnace adjustments will be temporary but are to align production with its orders.

It said flat-rolled steel sales are being hit by lower prices and lower demand, as well as shipments in the second quarter being lower due to flooding in the South. "We will resume blast furnace production at one or both idled blast furnaces when market conditions improve," U.S. Steel said in a statement.

Imports and what the manufacturer called "market headwinds" are also impacting its European operations, where it will idle a blast furnace that produces about 125,000 tons of steel a month. That also could be idled through the end of the year, although U.S. Steel did not specifically state how long.

"We will resume #2 blast furnace production when market conditions improve," U.S. Steel said.

It also said that it would have $15 million in impact in the second quarter due to the Dec. 24 fire at the Clairton Coke Works.

Pittsburgh Business Times

 

Port Reports -  June 19

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day’s news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known)

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
American Spirit departed Duluth a few minutes after midnight on Tuesday with a load of iron ore pellets for Indiana Harbor, and Great Lakes Trader/tug Joyce L. VanEnkevort arrived at 03:25 to load at Canadian National. Cason J. Callaway was outbound at 08:35 after unloading limestone at the C. Reiss dock, and headed for Two Harbors to load. Her sister Philip R. Clarke was inbound at 09:38, also with limestone for C. Reiss. During the evening, Alamosborg left port at 18:51 with a load of beet pulp pellets from Gavilon, and Great Lakes Trader was outbound from CN at 19:20. Industrial Skipper remained moored at Port Terminal offloading wind turbine blades, and Federal Leda continued taking on wheat at CHS 1. The Clarke was expected to shift over to CN at some point Tuesday night to load sinter. At the Superior entry, Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin departed at 02:57 with a load of iron ore pellets from BN, and Stewart J. Cort arrived at 14:50 to load. She was expected to depart early Wednesday morning.

Two Harbors-Silver Bay, MN – Gary A. Putney
G3 Marquis departed Two Harbors on June 18th at 02:01 for Quebec City. The Cason J. Callaway arrived Two Harbors on June 18th at 10:46 for South of #1. After loading a partial blast furnace trim cargo she shifted to North of #2 to load pellets. Then between 16:20 and 16:50 she shifted to North of #1 to finish loading blast furnace trim. As of 19:30 June 18 she was still loading. Also on June 18th the Edwin H. Gott should arrive Two Harbors around 21:00. Due Two Harbors on June 19th is the American Integrity. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay had no traffic on June 18th. Due Silver Bay on June 19th is the Hon. James L. Oberstar. Joyce L. VanEnkevort/Great Lakes Trader had been showing up to load in Silver Bay, but she loaded at the CN ore dock in West Duluth. Once again, all times are approx., but are close.

Thunder Bay, ON
Sunday June 16: 22:38 Federal Kumano arrived at Richardson Current River Terminal to load grain. Monday June 17: 16:43 Federal Mackinac departed Thunder Bay Terminals for Sorel. 19:11 CSL St Laurent departed G3 for Quebec City. 21:05 Algoma Conveyor arrived at Thunder Bay Terminals to load. Tuesday June 18: 4:02 Ojibway arrived at Viterra A to load grain. 9:30 Algoma Conveyor departed Thunder Bay Terminals for Detroit Zug Island. 11:35 saltie Gardno weighed anchor after 2 days in the harbor and proceeded to Superior Elevator to load grain. 11:57 saltie Narie departed Superior Elevator for Montreal. 17:12 Ojibway departed Viterra A for Windsor. 17:39 CSL Welland arrived at Viterra A to load grain. 17:47 Baie St Paul arrived at Thunder Bay Terminals to load. 20:35 Federal Kumano departed Richardson Current River Terminal for Montreal. Expected late Tuesday: Tecumseh. Expected for Wednesday: Kaministiqua and Federal Columbia.

St. Marys River
Tuesday was an unusually busy day on the river. Upbounders included Indiana Harbor and Kaministiqua early, followed by the Hon. James L. Oberstar, American Marinr, Happy River, Federal Columbia and Saginaw (to Drummond Island). Downbounders included Edgar B. Speer, Kaye E. Barker, Mesabi Miner, H. Lee White (headed to Charlevoix), Federal Mackinac, training vessel State of Michigan, CSL St.-Laurent, James R. Barker and Roger Blough.

Northern Lake Huron ports
Drummond Island:
Tuesday; 11:03 Saginaw arrived to load and departed at 19:11 upbound on the St Marys River.

Bruce Mines:
Tuesday; 10:51 Algoma Compass arrived to load trap rock. Cuyahoga is expected later tonight.

Meldrum Bay:
Tuesday; 6:01 Michipicoten arrived to load and departed at 18:51 for Duluth Superior.

Parry Sound:
Monday; 20:50 The cruise ship Pearl Mist departed for Midland. Midland:
Tuesday; 7:19 The cruise ship Pearl Mist arrived for shore excursions and departed at 17:39 for Windsor.

Owen Sound:
Tuesday; 0:10 Saginaw departed for Drummond Island. Alpena:
Monday; The cement carrier Alpena arrived to load and departed on Tuesday at 4:04 for Green Bay. 14:47 G L Ostrander arrived to load and departed at 19:49 for Detroit.

Stoneport:
Tuesday; 1:24 Calumet arrived to load and departed at 13:29 down bound on Lake Michigan. Calcite:
Tuesday; 4:49 Olive L Moore arrived to load and departed at 18:25 down bound on Lake Huron. 19:18 American Courage arrived to load.

Port Inland:
Monday; 20:37 American Mariner departed for Duluth Superior. 12:41 Joseph L Block arrived to load limestone.

Goderich, ON – Bruce Douglas
Robert S. Pierson was loading salt on Tuesday. Tug Zeus and barge were also in port.

Welland Canal and vicinity vessel report - Tuesday Jun 18 - Barry Andersen

Nanticoke:
arrivals - none

Long Point Bay anchorage:
anchored - Jun 14 - Algoscotia at 1901 - departed Jun 18 at 1525 for the canal Welland Canal:
upbound - Jun 17 - CSL Laurentien at 1833 and Algoma Guardian at 1856 - Jun 18 - CSL Assiniboine at 0215, Grande Caribe (passenger vessel) (Ame) at 0632, tug Sea Eagle II & St Marys Cement II at 0704 and Victory I (Bhs) (ex Saint Laurent-16, Sea Voyager-15, Cape May Light-06) at 2020 from Toronto

downbound - Victory I (Bhs) (ex Saint Laurent-16, Sea Voyager-15, Cape May Light-06) at 0714, Evans Spirit at 0841, Pacific Huron (Atg) (ex Seven Islands-10) at 1002, Algoma Sault at 1421, Algoma Spirit at 1607, CSL Tadoussac at 1950 and Algoma Harvester at 2019 - Jun 18 - Atlantic Huron at 0145, Patalya (Mlt) (ex Maersk Newport-13) at 0237, Tim S Dool at 0632, Algoscotia at 0846, Manitoulin at 1148 and tug Wilf Seymour & Alouette Spirit at 1823 (stopping wharf 16)

Port Weller anchorage:
anchored - Jun 12 - Emanuele S (Bds) (ex SCT Monte Rosa-17, MCT Monte Rosa-15) at 1521

Hamilton:
arrival - Jun 18 - Algoma Spirit at 0842 - docked - Jun 13 - Rosy (Bds) (ex SCT Stockhorn-17, MCT Stockhorn-16, HHL Caspian-08) at 0051, Federal Rhine (Bds) at 1347 - Jun 16 - Sider Venture (Por) (ex Oslo Venture I-17, Sian-C-16) at 1401 - anchored - Jun 15 - Sten Baltic (Nor) at 1880 - Jun 16 - Lubie (Bhs) at 1545 - departures - Jun 18 - Chestnut (Cyp) at 0640 for Belgium and Lake St Clair (Atg) (ex Federal Miramichi-16) at 2044 for Ireland

Bronte:
docked - Jun 17 - Sarah Desgagnes at 1514

Clarkson:
arrival - Jun 18 - Algoma Sault - anchored off dock at 0748 - docked at 1540 - docked - Jun 17 - Blair McKeil (ex Gagliarda-19) at 2033 from Hamilton -

Mississauga:
docked - Jun 15 - Hinch Spirit ex Topaz-I-19 at 1137 from Hamilton - departed - Jun 17 at 2243 eastbound

Toronto:
arrival - Jun 18 - Victory I (Bhs) (ex Saint Laurent-16, Sea Voyager-15, Cape May Light-06) at 0908 - docked - Jun 16 - Whistler (Lbr) at 0438, and McKeil Spirit at 2144 - departed - Jun 17 - tug Petite Forte & St Marys Cement at 1841 eastbound

Oshawa:
arrival - Jun 18 - tug Leo A McArthur & John J Carrick at 0851 and Aragonborg (Nld) at 1335 - docked - Jun 16 - Strandja (Mlt) (ex Federal Yangtze-10, Eastwind York-10) at 1208 - Jun 17 - NACC Quebec at 1922 from Toronto - departure- Jun 18 - NACC Quebec at 1544

 

International boaters can again check in at Rogers City harbor

6/19 - Rogers City, Mich. Rogers City is once again able to administer customs to “pleasure boaters” from Canada or to U.S. citizens returning from Canada at its marina. The city lost its designation as a point of entry with U.S. Customs and Border Protection two years ago when customs agent Pete Ardini, who served the region, retired. But it recently received a kiosk from the federal government which allows “pleasure boaters” to report their arrival using the agency’s Reporting Offsite Arrival-Mobile app.

“We’re one of four communities in the state now who have one of these things,” City Manager Joe Hefele said of the kiosk. “That was a welcome surprise.” Hefele said losing the city’s port-of-entry designation was a blow to the marina and to the community.

City Harbormaster Wayne Saile said that, two years ago, the city would have about 25 boaters arrive at the marina from Canada expecting a customs agent to be available. Saile would then have to direct them either to Sault Ste. Marie or Port Huron to clear customs, which he said was a “huge inconvenience.”

“The year he left, we had about 20 people show up and I couldn’t help them,” he said of the summer Ardini retired.

Saile, along with members of the community, wrote a letter to anyone involved with customs or the government – including President Donald Trump – letting them know about their plight. “We thought it fell on deaf ears,” he said.

The next thing Saile knew, customs agents contacted him about the CBP ROAM app, which provides boaters with a faster way to report their arrival to the United States. He said customs agents were able to provide the marina with a kiosk that can be used with an iPad tablet.

“We market this as just another tool that we have available to the people who don’t have it on their phone,” he said of the kiosk. “We have one of these delivered to us from Customs and Boarder Patrol that was delivered here and set up for the boaters’ convenience.”

Pleasure boaters arriving in the U.S. from a foreign port are required by law to immediately report their arrival to Customs and Boarder Protection. Boaters can use the kiosk to enter their personal information, enter their boat information, declare any goods, and have a video conference with a customs agent right from the marina’s office.

The Alpena News

 

Deadline near for Engineers Day Soo Freighter Chasing Cruise

6/19 - Reservations are now being accepted for the Soo Locks Freighter-Chasing Cruise on Friday, June 28. Mail reservations must be received no later than June 21 to receive the $40 price. Reservations ($45) will also be accepted at the Soo Boatnerd Picnic; the cut off time is noon Thursday, June 27, as we must let the boat tours know how many will be on board so they can order the right amount of food for dinner. For details, see www.boatnerd.com/gathering

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  June 19

On 19 June 1889, NORTH STAR (steel propeller freighter, 299 foot, 2,476 gross tons, built in 1889, at Cleveland, Ohio) collided with CHARLES J. SHEFFIELD (steel propeller freighter, 260 foot, 1,699 gross tons, built in 1887, at Cleveland, Ohio) about sixty miles west of Whitefish Point on Lake Superior in heavy fog. The NORTH STAR kept her bow in the SHEFFIELD's side after the impact, giving the crew time to board. The SHEFFIELD then sank in 8 minutes. Her loss was valued at $160,000. The courts found both vessels to be equally at fault after years of litigation.

In 1954, GEORGE M. HUMPHREY (Hull#871) (named for President Eisenhower's Secretary of Treasury) was launched at Lorain, Ohio, by American Shipbuilding Co, for National Steel Co., M.A. Hanna, mgr.

In 1978, ALGOBAY (Hull#215) was launched by Collingwood Shipyards Ltd. for Algoma Central Railway. Renamed b.) ATLANTIC TRADER in 1994, and renamed c.) ALGOBAY in 1996 and d.) RADCLIFFE R. LATIMER in 2012.

On 19 June 1836, DELAWARE (wooden passenger/package freight side wheeler, 105 foot, 178 tons, built in 1833, at Huron, Ohio) was carrying general merchandise and passengers in a storm on Lake Michigan when she was thrown ashore off Niles, Illinois. She broke in two and was wrecked. No lives were lost.

On 19 June 1900, the wooden schooner THOMAS L. HOWLAND was raised and towed to Buffalo, New York for repairs. She had been sunk by the ice off Windmill Point in the Detroit River early in the season.

At 5:30 p.m., on 19 June 1872, the wooden package freight/passenger propeller MONTANA (236 foot, 1,535 gross tons) was finally afloat at Port Huron, Michigan. She was successfully launched at the Port Huron Dry Dock Company on Saturday, 15 June, but she got stuck in the mud. The tugs VULCAN, PRINDEVILLE, BROCKWAY and BURNSIDE were all employed to free her and the MONTANA's engines were also going. It took four days of pulling, hoisting and dredging to free her. The effort to get her free and afloat cost Alexander Muir, her builder, over $3,000 (in 1872 dollars). She lasted until 1914, when she burned near Alpena, Michigan.

1905 – The wooden passenger and freight steamer CITY OF COLLINGWOOD of 1893 vintage was destroyed by a fire at Collingwood and four lives were lost.

1917 – The Canadian bulk carrier NATIRONCO was beached in the Detroit River after a collision with the ASTERN STATES and was deemed a total loss. It was raised and repaired at Toledo and survived until scrapping at Civitavecchia, Italy, as d) SAN CARLO in 1929.

1925 – The wooden freighter MAPLEGLEN (i), is scuttled in Lake Ontario, west of Kingston, near Amherst Island. It had been idle since 1921 and was originally the WYOMING of 1881.

1929 –JOHN HANLAN was torched as a spectacle off the Sunnyside area of Toronto after having failed an inspection to continue service as a Toronto Island ferry. 1933 – MEADCLIFFE HALL sustained rudder damage after being struck by the CALGADOC (i) at Thorold. The grain-laden canaller was towed back to Port Colborne, unloaded, and repaired at Port Dalhousie.

1962 – Hatch cover planks give way at Cleveland aboard FLOWERGATE and a forklift and two men fell into the cargo hold, striking a third man. All were badly injured. The British freighter later returned through the Seaway under Panamanian registry as b) AMENITY and was scrapped at Troon, Scotland, in 1977.

Data from: Jody Aho, Joe Barr, David Swayze, Skip Gillham, Father Dowling Collection, Historical Collections of the Great Lakes, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Algoma Niagara stranded in Detroit River

6/18 - Algoma Niagara broke loose Sunday night while discharging stone at the Coco Dock in Windsor. The vessel is now sitting in the Detroit River with the anchor down near a natural gas line. Two tugs are being used to hold her in place. A large yacht passed by shortly before the Niagara broke loose.

Video from the Detroit side of the river shows the wake from the yacht breaking over docks and causing the docked fireboat to surge violently. Mailboat crews were alongside the Algoma Spirt and reported the wake felt more like rolling ocean swells than the usual chop generated by small yachts.

 

Reinstating Customs in Marine City may be a challenge for Bluewater Ferry

6/18 - Morgan Dalgety said his family doesn’t want to sell its ferry in Sombra, Ontario. But they’re also frustrated, he said, that reinstating operations with U.S. Customs and Border Protection across the St. Clair River in Marine City may be what’s preventing an offer from moving forward.

The Bluewater Ferry has been closed since January 2018 after heavy ice flow collided with the causeway connecting mainland Canada to the ferry dock and Canadian Customs building. What followed was a 17-month effort to first attempt to raise funds to cover costs to repair the damage before taking the Canadian government to court.

Dalgety said the process has begun to drain them financially and that they’re considering a conditional offer to purchase and repair the ferry causeway to keep the service alive. The family is keeping specifics of the conditional sale confidential, though he said one of those conditions is that the U.S. CBP commits to staffing the port building in Marine City.

“Now, they’re saying they have no staff,” Dalgety said. Three attempts to reach a CBP spokesman in Detroit for comment were unsuccessful Friday.

“We haven’t given up, (but) we do not have the funds. The causeway needs to be built,” he added. “… We don’t want to sell. This is a fifth-generation family business.”

Leaders in Marine City are expressing a similar concern for the latest snafu in reopening the ferry — some encouraging local residents to write federal lawmakers.

Marine City’s manager, its six city commissioners and Mayor Dave Vandenbossche all signed a June 6 letter to Sen. Gary Peters asking he “give sincere and thoughtful consideration” to reinstating the CPB office in Marine City in order to accommodate any future ferry options.

“The city adamantly expresses that the benefits of the reinstatement of the United States Customs’ port justify the government expense associated with the Customs office,” it reads, "and more importantly, the reopening of the port is imperative to the continued economic and community well-being in both Michigan and Ontario.”

During the June 6 City Commission meeting, Vandenbossche said he hoped igniting a letter-writing campaign would pressure “our local and elected officials in Washington to make a difference.”

This week, the mayor added he’s kept in contact with the Dalgety family during the process and continued that sentiment.

Dalgety said he, too, wanted help from Peters, Sen. Debbie Stabenow and Michigan’s national representatives “to figure out” the best path forward with the CBP post in Marine City.

Port Huron Times Herald

 

Port Reports -  June 18

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day’s news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known)

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
American Spirit arrived Duluth at 00:13 Monday morning, and tied up at Canadian National to load iron ore. H. Lee White was outbound at 04:52 with a load of coal for Charlevoix after taking a delay at Lakehead Pipeline. Industrial Skipper arrived from Thunder Bay at 05:46 with wind turbine blades for Port Terminal, and Federal Leda was inbound at 06:58 to load grain at CHS 1. During the afternoon, Cason J. Callaway arrived at 14:31 with a load of limestone for C. Reiss. She is expected to depart early Tuesday morning for Two Harbors to load. Alamosborg was also in port Monday, taking on beet pulp pellets at Gavilon. In Superior, Mesabi Miner departed at 02:45 for Nanticoke with iron ore pellets, and Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin arrived at 15:04 to load at Burlington Northern. She is due to depart early Tuesday.

Two Harbors-Silver Bay, MN – Gary A. Putney
Edgar B. Speer departed Two Harbors at 01:30 on June 17th for Conneaut. The Blough then shifted from North of #2 lay-by to South of #2. The Blough then departed Two Harbors on June 17th at 11:47 for Gary. After being anchored off Two Harbors the G3 Marquis got underway around noon and arrived thru the piers at 12:30 on June 17th for South of #2. As of 19:15 on the 17th she was still at the dock. Due Two Harbors on June 18th is the Cason J. Callaway arriving after unloading stone at the C. Reiss dock. Also due Two Harbors on the 17th is the Edwin H. Gott. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay saw the departure of the James R. Barker at 16:30 on the 17th for Ashtabula. Due Northshore Mining early on the 18th will be the Joyce L. VanEnkevort/Great Lakes Trader.

St. Marys River
Downbound traffic on Monday included Walter J. McCarthy Jr., Herbert C. Jackson and Algocanada. Upbounders included Stewart J. Cort, Algoma Discovery, CSL Welland, Baie St. Paul and Edwin H. Gott.b Federal Churchill arrived at the Algoma Export Dock in the morning.

Green Bay, WI
At 8 am Monday, the tug G.L Ostrander and Barge Integrity arrived with cargo of slag from Michigan to the Lafarge Terminal.

Northern Lake Huron ports

Stoneport:
Saturday; 0:07 Cason J Callaway arrived to load and departed Sunday at 2:03 for Duluth Superior. 6:57 Algoma Buffalo arrived to take on a partial load and at 15:00 departed for Meldrum Bay. 15:59 John G Munson arrived to load and departed Monday at 5:53 down bound on Lake Huron.6:17 Joseph H Thompson arrived to load and departed at 19:18.

Calcite:
Sunday; 3:07 Victory and James L Kuber departed for Fairport. 10:27 Philip R Clarke arrived to load and departed at 23:33 for Duluth Superior. Monday; 3:44 Great Republic arrived to load and departed at 18:42 for Detroit.

Little Current:
Saturday CCGS Samuel Risley spent the day working on Nav Aids off of Strawberry Island and the eastern channel to Little Current. Sunday; 12:20 The cruise ship Pearl Mist arrived and departed at18:23 for Parry Sound. CCGS Samuel Risley was working on Nav Aids on the North Channel side of Little Current.

Meldrum Bay:
Saturday; 2:12 Algoma Niagara arrived to load. 15:11 Kaye E Barker arrived and went to anchor.22:16 Algoma Niagara departed for Windsor. 22:56 Kaye E Barker weighed anchor and proceeded to the loading dock. Sunday 11:34 Kaye E Barker departed for Marquette. 18:23 Algoma Buffalo arrived to finish loading and departed on Monday at 1:39 for Windsor.

Parry Sound:
Monday; The cruise ship Pearl Mist arrived for shore excursions.

Owen Sound:
Sunday 22:00 Saginaw arrived at the P&H elevator to unload grain from Thunder Bay.

Port Dolomite:
Saturday; 14:03 Cuyahoga arrived to load and departed Sunday at 8:04 for Sarnia.

Drummond Island:
Sunday; 10:36 American Courage arrived to load and departed at 21:13 for Fairport.

Port Inland:
Sunday; 10:21 Robert S Pierson arrived to load and departed at 17:23. 19:47 Wilfred Sykes arrived to load and departed Monday at 6:03 for Indiana Harbor. 6:55 American Mariner arrived to load.

Cleveland, OH – Raymond H
6/17 arrivals: Dorothy Ann/Pathfinder at anchor in Lake Erie and Sam Laud is at the wall at Lehigh Cement as they wait for river currents to subside. Clyde S. VanEnkevort/Erie Trader are delivering Silver Bay pellets to the Bulk Terminal.

Welland Canal and vicinity vessel report - Monday Jun 17 - Barry Andersen

Nanticoke:
arrivals - Jun 15 - tug Michigan & Great Lakes at 2257 - Jun 16 - Algoma Hansa at 0117, tug Leonard M & Niagara Spirit at 0901 and CSL Tadoussac at 1536 - Jun 17 - tug Everlast & Norman McLeod eta 2240 - departed - Jun 17 - Algoma Hansa at 1620, tug Michigan & Great Lakes at 1625, tug Leonard M & Niagara Spirit at 1427 and CSL Tadoussac at 1525 -

Long Point Bay anchorage:
anchored - Jun 14 - Algoscotia at 1901

Buffalo:
docked - Jun 14 - Calumet at 0150 - Jun 16 NAC C Argonaut at 0615 - departures - Jun 14 - Calumet at 1352 westbound - Jun 16 - NACC Argonaut at 1149 for the canal

Port Colborne anchorage:
anchored - Jun 16 - Finnborg (Nld) at 2354 - Jun 17 - FPacific Huron (Atg) (Seven Islands-10) at 0540 - departed Jun 17 - Finnborg (Nld) at 0614 and Pacific Huron (Atg) at 0938 - both for the canal

Welland Canal:
upbound - Jun 17 - tug Everlast & Norman McLeod at 0548, Thunder Bay at 0735, CSL Laurentien at 1833 and Algoma Guardian at 1856

downbound - Jun 16 - Federal Nakagawa (Mhl) at 1053, USS Billings LCS-15 at 1707, Spruceglen at 1806, Jun 16 - Whitefish Bay at 0138 (stopping wharf 20), Finnborg (Nld) at 0629, Victory I (Bhs) (ex Saint Laurent-16, Sea Voyager-15, Cape May Light-06) at 0714, Evans Spirit at 0841, Pacifi Huron (Atg) (ex Seven Islands-10) at 1002, NACC Argonaut at 1326, Algoma Sault at 1421, Algoma Spirit at 1607, CSL Tadoussac at 1950 and Algoma Harvester at 2019

Port Weller anchorage:
anchored - Jun 12 - Emanuele S (Bds) (ex SCT Monte Rosa-17, MCTMonte Rosa-15) at 1521

Hamilton:
arrivals - Jun 11 - Lake St Clair (Atg) at 2233, Jun 13 - Rosy (Bds) (ex SCT Stockhorn-17, MCT Stockhorn-16, HHL Caspian-08) at 0051, Chestnut (Cyp) at 2306 - Federal Rhine (Bds) at 1347 - Jun 16 - Sider Venture (Por) (ex Oslo Venture I-17, SIAN-C-16) at 1401 - anchored - Jun 15 - Sten Baltic (Nor) at 1880 - Jun 16 - Lubie (Bhs) at 1545 - departures - Jun 15 - Algoma Discovery at 1145 for the canal - Jun 17 - Blair McKeil (ex Topaz-1-19) 1854 eastbound

Bronte:
docked - Jun 12 - Paul A Desgages at 2156 from the anchorage - departed - Jun 13 at 2127 - Arrival - Jun 17 - Sarah Desgagnes at 1514

Clarkson:
arrival - Jun 17 - Blair McKeil (ex Gagliarda-19) at 2033 from Hamilton

Mississauga:
docked - Jun 15 - Hinch Spirit ex Topaz-I-19 at 1137 from Hamilton

Toronto:
arrivals - Jun 16 - Whistler (Lbr) at 0438, tug Petite Forte & St Marys Cement at 1653 and McKeil Spirit at 2144 - departed - Jun 16 - Aragonborg (Nld) at 0940 for Oshawa

Oshawa:
arrival - tug Leo A McArthur & John J Carrick at 2312 - docked - Jun 11 - Lubie (Bhs) at 1830 - departed - Jun 14 - tug Leo A McArthur & John J Carrick at 1955 eastbound

 

St. Clair Power Plant Construction

6/18 - Kiewit Construction is expecting a Manitowoc MLC 650 Crane to arrive by ship at the St. Clair Power Plant Monday. The crane is one of the largest cranes Manitowoc builds, the public may be interested in seeing this massive piece of equipment offloaded or at least on the freighter.

The 640 tons of counter weights and 300 tons of belly weights for the crane have arrived by truck and half of the lattice boom are now on the site. These items have required over 40 semi trailer trucks for delivery. The entire construction project is slated to take 2 1/2years to complete. The assembly of the crane on site takes better than four weeks.

Francis Becigneul

 

Duluth Seaway Port Authority rates favorably in Green Marine report

6/18 - Duluth, MN – The Duluth Seaway Port Authority and its terminal operations on Rice’s Point earned high marks in the Green Marine environmental performance report released June 6.

The report rates port authority participants in seven categories: air emissions, community impacts, dry bulk handling and storage, environmental leadership, spill prevention, underwater noise and waste management. Forty-two (42) North American port authorities participated in the 2018 evaluation process, with the Duluth Seaway Port Authority ranking among the United States’ top 5 and No. 10 overall.

Of participating port authorities managing their own dry bulk handling and storage, none ranked higher overall than the Duluth Seaway Port Authority.

“We’re proactive about minimizing environmental impact,” said Jeff Stollenwerk, Duluth Seaway Port Authority director of government and environmental affairs. “The Green Marine program helps guide and inspire those efforts, while also giving participants a tangible scoreboard for environmental stewardship.”

The voluntary Green Marine certification program began in 2007 and now includes nearly 150 participating ship owners, port authorities, seaway corporations, terminal operators and shipyard managers. Program participants must adopt practices and technologies that continually reduce their environmental footprint on the land, air and sea. The Duluth Seaway Port Authority has participated since the program’s inception.

Duluth Seaway Port Authority

 

Sign up now for Engineers Day Soo Freighter Chasing Cruise

6/18 - The 2019 schedule of Boatnerd Gatherings has been set and information is now available now on the Gathering page, www.boatnerd.com/gathering Gatherings include Soo Locks Engineers weekend festivities and the annual Welland Canal weekend. Reservations are now being accepted for the Soo Locks Freighter-Chasing Cruise June 28. Reservations must be received no later than June 21 to receive the $40 price. Sign up now – don't be left on the dock.

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  June 18

The steamer ILLINOIS was the first vessel to pass through the newly opened Soo Locks in 1855. To help commemorate the 100th anniversary of this event, an open house was held aboard the J. L. MAUTHE. While tied up at the Cleveland Lakefront dock, an estimated 1,700 persons toured the MAUTHE.

During a moonlight charter on 18 June 1936, the TASHMOO (steel side-wheel excursion steamer, 308 foot, 1,344 gross tons, built in 1900, at Wyandotte, Michigan) struck a boulder in the Sugar Island channel in the Detroit River. The vessel docked at Amherstburg, Ontario, where her passengers disembarked as the vessel settled to the bottom in 14 feet of water. Although the damage was not fatal, the salvage crew botched the job. The TASHMOO had one end raised too quickly and her keel broke. This ended this well-loved vessel’s too-short career.

The Soo Locks opened for their first season on 18 June 1855. The first vessel through the locks was the steamer ILLINOIS of 1853.

In 1949, the WILFRED SYKES (Hull#866) was launched at American Shipbuilding Co., Lorain, Ohio, for Inland Steel Co. At the time she was the largest and most powerful vessel on the lakes. The SYKES was also the first boat to have a poop deck. She was converted to a self-unloader in 1975.

In 1964, the bulk freighter SAGUENAY (Hull#647) was launched at Lauzon, Quebec, by Davie Ship Building Ltd., for Canada Steamship Lines Ltd.

In 1968, the ALGOCEN (Hull#191) was launched at Collingwood, Ontario by Collingwood Shipyards Ltd, for Algoma Central Railway. Renamed b.) VALGOCEN in 2005, she was used as a spoils barge in Keasby, New Jersey. She returned to the lakes in in 2008 as J.W. SHELLEY. Sold and renamed PHOENIX STAR in 2012.

On 18 June 1869, a little less than a week after being launched, the schooner DAVID A. WELLS sailed on her maiden voyage from Port Huron for Menominee, Michigan. On 18 June 1858, the steamship CANADA left the Lakes via the St. Lawrence rapids since she was too large for the existing locks. She had been built by Louis Shickluna at the Niagara Drydock Company in 1853, at a cost of $63,000. She was sold for ocean service after the Depression of 1857. Her hull was rebuilt and she was renamed MISSISSIPPI. She foundered in a gale in the South Atlantic on 12 August 1862.

The venerable side-wheel passenger ferry TRILLIUM (Hull #94) was launched June 18, 1910, at Toronto, Ontario by Polson Iron Works, for the Toronto Ferry Co. 1905 –ETRURIA sank after a collision with the AMASA STONE off Passage Island Light, Lake Superior.

1942 – The steamer THOMAS MAYTHAM of 1892 vintage was rebuilt as the New York State Barge Canal tanker DOLOMITE 2 in 1938 and renamed MOTOREX in 1942. It was sunk by gunfire from U-172 near the Colon entrance to the Panama Canal and all on board were rescued.

1944 – ALBERT C. FIELD, a former Great Lakes bulk canaller, was hit by an aerial torpedo from German aircraft and broke in two and sank in minutes. There were 4 lives lost when the ship was hit in the English Channel while carrying munitions and 130 bags of mail in support of the Normandy invasion.

1959 – SPRINGDALE, a Great Lakes trader in the early 1950s and later operated on charter to Reoch Transports, capsized and sank in the Gulf of Bothnia after the cargo of timber shifted in heavy weather.

1960 – GEERTJE BUISMAN came to the Great Lakes in 1960 and ran aground on Vienne Shoal in northern Lake Michigan while outbound from Chicago with a cargo that included new Nash Rambler automobiles for Europe. The Dutch vessel was stuck for 4 days, and had to be lightered. It returned to the Seaway again in later years and was finally scrapped as f) MOUNT at Varna, Bulgaria, in 2003-2004.

1991 – The saltwater trader AKTI was driven aground 14 miles north of Necochea, Argentina, in a storm and sold “as lies” before being refloated as d) AKTO on July 27. Examination determined that the ship was a total loss but it was rebuilt by Chilean interests as e) RIO CIERVOS. The vessel had been through the Seaway as a) ASIA PROSPERITY beginning in 1974, as b) HAN PACIFIC in 1983, and c) AKTI in 1988. It was scrapped at g) AL GIORGIS after arriving at Chittagong, Bangladesh, on November 17, 2005.

1997 – CANADIAN MARINER ran aground in the St. Lawrence near Crossover Shoal after losing power. The vessel had to be lightered to be released and was repaired by Port Weller Dry Docks. The ship was scrapped at Aliaga, Turkey, in 2007.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Gerry O., Joe Barr, Russ Plumb, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Christening at Great Lakes museum to celebrate new, old tugboats

6/17 - Toledo, OH – It’ll be a passing-of-the-torch, tugboat style. During a ceremony Friday, one tug named Ohio, 116 years old, will begin its new life as a centerpiece of the National Museum of the Great Lakes’ collection. The other, fresh from the Great Lakes Towing Co.’s shipyard in Cleveland, will be christened as the older tug’s successor in that company’s working fleet.

Christopher Gillcrist, the museum’s executive director, said that based on some “relatively quick research,” the event is believed to be the first occasion of “past and present being there at the same time.”

Joe Starck, Great Lakes Towing’s president, credited the idea to Paul LaMarre III, who helped arrange the Ohio’s donation to the museum and previously led efforts to save the museum’s freighter, then known as the S.S. Willis B. Boyer and owned by the city of Toledo, from being scrapped.

“We were just chatting; he was cleaning it [the old Ohio] up for the exhibit, and he said, ‘Maybe we ought to do this together.’ I thought it was a good idea,” Mr. Starck said Wednesday, adding that the Great Lakes museum also seemed like a good venue to dedicate the new tug.

And while the old Ohio spent relatively little time in Toledo’s port, Mr. Starck said the new one will be based here — offering frequent opportunities for the new Ohio to pass and salute its maritime ancestor.

It was Mr. Starck’s idea, meanwhile, to invite Mr. LaMarre’s wife, Julie, to christen the new tugboat. “Paul helped put this all together,” Mr. Starck said. “It’s his vision, and also he’s a good friend of the company…. We’re really glad to have him and his wife participate, and we know his wife will bring the tug good luck. That’s what it’s all about.”

The museum tug Ohio’s sponsor will be Jane Smith, a longtime museum employee and volunteer, who is to break over its bow rail a bottle of beer — rather than traditional champagne — because that was what was done when at its original 1903 christening in Chicago before entering service as a fireboat in Milwaukee, famous for its breweries.

“Mrs. Smith was chosen as the sponsor because she best represents the volunteer spirit that makes projects like this one possible,” Mr. Gillcrist said.

The old Ohio got its current name during the 1950s when Great Lakes Towing bought it and converted it into a tug. The company approached the museum about a donation after determining the veteran tugboat could not economically be brought into compliance with new inspection procedures required by the Coast Guard. After receiving initial repairs at the George Gradel Co. shipyard downriver, the old Ohio was moved last fall to the museum’s Maumee River wharf, where it underwent cosmetic restoration and painting.

The veteran tug had sustained substantial rust damage during several years of storage downwind from a Cleveland salt mine after it was withdrawn from service. “When we sandblasted, we made holes,” Mr. Gillcrist said.

But the new metal plating and sealant that have been applied during the restoration have been effective, he said, based on how dry the tug’s interior has been during recent rainstorms.

At the museum, it will be moored as if it is providing assistance to the museum’s freighter, the S.S. Col. James M. Schoonmaker, which was moved to the museum site in 2012 after being rechristened with its original name the year before.

Friday’s events will be reserved for advance ticket holders only. A limited number of tickets is available for $25 apiece — $20 for museum members. The museum will be closed to non-ticketholders on Friday.

Vessel christenings traditionally attract substantial crowds, and Mr. Gillcrist said it’s conceivable 500 will attend this one, including people who bought tickets last fall for “before and after” tours of the old Ohio as well as invited guests of the museum and Great Lakes Towing.

Museum officials planned for the new Ohio tug to remain at the museum throughout the weekend on display — albeit with members of the public not allowed to board it — but Mr. Starck said even that may not be possible because of high water spilling over from Lake Erie into the Maumee River.

If necessary, Mr. Starck said, barges will be brought in to provide a temporary mooring at the museum for the new Ohio, but if that is needed, the vessel can’t stay all weekend.

In any case, he said, the general public can’t be allowed aboard because the safety risk — and thus the potential liability — but a virtual video tour of the new Ohio will be offered for viewing. At a public event, “you’re going to have people in high-heeled shoes, you’re going to have headbangers, and we just don’t want anybody to get hurt,” Mr. Starck said.

The old Ohio is larger than the smaller tugs Toledoans routinely see assisting freighters up and down the Maumee River, with a galley, lounge, and sleeping quarters for its crews’ use during longer trips.

But as an exhibit, Mr. Gillcrist said, it will have more to show than would one of the workaday tugs, which are basically an engine with a hull and command station surrounding it. “We’re still determining the nature of our Ohio exhibit,” the museum director said. “We have to decide if it will be an app tour, or have physical displays.”

As for the cost of the Ohio’s cosmetic restoration, Mr. Gillcrist said, “we’re comfortably close to budget” and still receiving donations, such as a recent $2,000 from the Great Lakes Foundation. “We’re on target,” he said. “We knew we were going to spend $35,000 to $45,000 for the work.”

The new Ohio is one of five tugboats Great Lakes Towing is building at its Cleveland shipyard to modernize its fleet.

The first one, the Cleveland, was completed two years ago and is currently assigned to its namesake city but is likely to be reassigned to Detroit, Mr. Starck said. The next, the Michigan, will be finished next month, with the Pennsylvania and the Wisconsin to be done after that. The Pennsylvania is likely to also be assigned to Toledo, where it and the Ohio will replace four older tugs that not provide vessel assistance in the local harbor.

The new Wisconsin will also be a successor to an existing Great Lakes tug with that name, currently assigned to the Monroe port. Mr. Starck said the old Wisconsin is to be renamed to a prior name and preserved, while other tugs retired as a result of the company’s new-vessel construction likely will be scrapped.

Museum admission Saturday and Sunday will be $17 for the general public, while museum members will be admitted free. The museum will be open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and noon to 5 p.m. Sunday.

View a video at this link: https://www.toledoblade.com/local/community-events/2019/06/16/ohio-to-replace-older-tugboat-in-great-lakes-museum-s-collection/stories/20190614082

 

Port Reports -  June 17

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day’s news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known)

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
Walter J. McCarthy Jr. departed Duluth at 02:41 Sunday with a load of coal for St. Clair, and Michipicoten arrived at 07:19 to pick up iron ore pellets at Canadian National. She was outbound at 15:15 for the Algoma steel mill at Sault Ste. Marie. After spending more than a week anchored outside the harbor, Alamosborg weighed anchor and arrived at 16:52, and tied up at Gavilon to load beet pulp pellets. At the Superior entry, Mesabi Miner arrived at 06:47 to load iron ore pellets at BN. She is expected to depart early Monday morning. H. Lee White remained at Lakehead Pipeline on Sunday, and will ultimately be loading coal at Midwest Energy.

Two Harbors-Silver Bay, MN – Gary A. Putney
Edgar B. Speer arrived Two Harbors on June 16th at 13:00 for South of #2. Also arriving Two Harbors on the 16th was the Roger Blough at 14:54 for North of #2 lay-by. Due Two Harbors late on the 16th is the G3 Marquis. She'll probably anchor out until the Blough departs. There is no scheduled traffic for Two Harbors on June 17th. Arriving Northshore Mining in Silver Bay on June 16th at 01:39 was the Herbert C. Jackson after unloading stone at Hallett #5 in Duluth. She departed for Cleveland on the 16th at 08:30. Also arriving Silver Bay on the 16th was the James R. Barker at 15:05. There is no scheduled inbound traffic for Silver Bay on June 17th. Just a reminder: All times are approx., but are fairly accurate.

Thunder Bay, ON
Saturday June 15: 21:52 saltie Narie arrived at Superior Elevator to load grain. Sunday June 16: 9:07 CSL St Laurent arrived at G3 to load grain. 15:31 Federal Mackinac weighed anchor after 8 days in the harbor and proceeded to Thunder Bay Terminals to load. 15:37 saltie Gardno arrived and went to anchor. 16:49 saltie Industrial Skipper departed Keefer Terminal for Duluth. Expected late Sunday: Federal Kumano.

St. Marys River
Downbound traffic on slow Sunday included Tim S. Dool early, followed by Paul R. Tregurtha, Presque Isle, Lee A. Tregurtha and American Century. Upbounders included Cason J. Callaway and Rt. Hon. Paul Martin early, with Algocanada and Kaye E. Barker in the afternoon and evening. Algoma Conveyor was inbound at DeTour late in the evening.

Sturgeon Bay, WI
Wilfred Sykes left BayShip on Sunday and headed for Port Inland to load.

Detroit, MI – Raymond H
Sunday Arrivals: Iver Bright-arrived at the Waterfront Petroleum Terminal. Alpena-arrived at Lafarge to unload cement. Olive L Moore/Menominee-arrived at the Carmeuse Dock to unload stone. Sharon M I and barge Huron Spirit-arrived at Nicholson's Ecorse Terminal to unload steel coils.

Northeast Ohio ports<BR> Sunday Arrivals: Iver Bright-arrived at the Waterfront Petroleum Terminal. Alpena-arrived at Lafarge to unload cement. Olive L Moore/Menominee-arrived at the Carmeuse Dock to unload stone. Sharon M I and barge Huron Spirit-arrived at Nicholson's Ecorse Terminal to unload steel coils.

Oswego, NY – Ned Goebricher
On Sunday, 6/16/19, the cruise ship Grande Caribe transited the NYS Barge Canal System for Lake Ontario.

 

Sign up now for Engineers Day Soo Freighter Chasing Cruise

6/17 - The 2019 schedule of Boatnerd Gatherings has been set and information is now available now on the Gathering page, www.boatnerd.com/gathering

Gatherings include Soo Locks Engineers weekend festivities and the annual Welland Canal weekend. Reservations are now being accepted for the Soo Locks Freighter-Chasing Cruise June 28. Reservations must be received no later than June 21 to receive the $40 price. Sign up now – don't be left on the dock.

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  June 17

On June 17, 1895, the J. W. Westcott Co. inaugurated its unique mail delivery service.

On 17 June 1878, the Canadian schooner JAMES SCOTT of Port Burwell capsized and sank in Lake Erie. The captain's wife, their child and two seamen were drowned.

The wooden schooner MONTEREY, which stranded on Sleeping Bear Point on Lake Michigan in early December 1890, was released on 17 June 1891.

The SCOTT MISENER (Hull#11) was christened on June 17, 1951, for Colonial Steamships Ltd. She was the first vessel built at Port Weller Drydocks Ltd. Renamed b.) JOHN E. F. MISENER in 1954, she was scrapped at Cartagena, Columbia, in 1986.

The PATERSON of 1954 collided with the steamer EDMUND W. MUDGE in 1957, in fog on the St. Clair River opposite Marine City, Michigan.

The WILLIAM A. IRVIN was towed to the Duluth Convention Center on June 17, 1986, by the tugs SIOUX and DAKOTA to be on station as a museum ship at the new $3 million convention facility.

June 17, 1998 - The barge PERE MARQUETTE 41 and tug UNDAUNTED arrived Ludington, Michigan from Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin, after the remainder of the conversion there.

The propeller OWEN SOUND was launched at Collingwood, Ontario, on 17 June 1875. She measured 900 tons and could carry 30,000 bushels of grain.

1909 – The iron hulled passenger and freight steamer CAMPANA had been cut in two to leave the Great Lakes in 1895, but the hull broke in 1909 where the sections had been rejoined and sank in the St. Lawrence at Point St. Michael a few miles below Quebec City.

1918 – JAY GOULD was loaded with coal and towing the barge COMMODORE when it began leaking and then sank eight miles southeast of Southeast Shoal, Lake Erie. The hull was later dynamited as a hazard to navigation. The barge was overwhelmed by the seas and rolled in the trough for about two hours before it also sank. All on board both ships were saved.

1941 – The Lake Ontario passenger steamer KINGSTON ran aground on a shoal in the St. Lawrence 15 miles SW of Ogdensburg, NY after losing her way in thick fog. The passengers were transferred to RAPIDS PRINCE and the ship was released with the aid of pontoons and repaired at Kingston.

1998 – MOUNTAIN BLOSSOM was downbound in the Seaway when it struck the approach wall at the Eisenhower Lock, opening a crack in the hull that allowed about 50 gallons of xylene to escape. The immediate area was evacuated but the problem was quickly cleaned up. The ship was a regular Great Lakes trader from 1986 to 2007 and was scrapped at Xinhui, China, after arriving on January 10, 2010.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Max Hanley, Joe Barr, Father Dowling Collection, Historical Collections of the Great Lakes, Detroit Marine Historian, Marine Historical Society's Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Port Reports -  June 16

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day’s news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known)

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
American Century arrived Duluth at 01:32 Saturday morning to load coal at Midwest Energy. She had to wait for the Paul R. Tregurtha, which finished loading and departed at 03:29 for the St. Clair power plant. Presque Isle was outbound from Canadian National at 08:18 with a load of iron ore pellets, and Walter J. McCarthy Jr. arrived at 10:32 to load at SMET. The Century was outbound with her coal cargo at 13:50, at which point the McCarthy docked and began loading. Herbert C. Jackson arrived at 14:15 to discharge limestone at Hallett #5. She was expected to depart late Saturday night for Silver Bay, and the McCarthy should depart from SMET early Sunday. Alamosborg was still on the hook outside the Duluth harbor, with a tentative arrival time of 16:00 Sunday. The only traffic through the Superior entry on Saturday was H. Lee White, which arrived at 12:47 and backed into the Lakehead Pipeline dock. She is next in line to load at Midwest Energy, and will likely shift to that dock once the McCarthy clears.

Two Harbors-Silver Bay, MN – Gary A. Putney
Algoma Harvester departed Two Harbors on June 14th at approx. 23:50 for Quebec City. Lee A. Tregurtha arrived Two Harbors on June 14th at 21:04 for North of #2 lay-by. After the Harvester departed the Tregurtha shifted to South of #2. She departed on June 15th at 12:38 for Indiana Harbor. Traffic for Two Harbors on June 16th is the Edgar B. Speer and the Roger Blough. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay had no traffic on June 15th. Herbert C. Jackson should arrive on the morning of June 16th after unloading stone at Hallett #5 in Duluth. Also due Silver Bay on June 16th is the James R. Barker.

Thunder Bay, ON
Saturday June 15: 13:13 Tim S Dool departed Richardson Main Terminal for Port Cartier. 13:29 Saginaw departed Viterra A for Owen Sound. Expected late Saturday: saltie Narie. Expected for Sunday: CSL St Laurent and saltie Gardno.

Northern Lake Huron ports

Alpena:
Friday; 13:18 Cuyahoga arrived and went to anchor.17:05 With more favorable wind Cuyahoga weighed anchor and backed into the Thunder Bay River to unload road salt. 22:48 Samuel De Champlain departed for Milwaukee. Saturday; 6:48 Cuyahoga departed for Port Dolomite.

Stoneport:
Friday; 10:38 Algoma Conveyor weighed anchor and proceeded to the loading dock and departed at 23:33 for Sombra. Saturday; 0:07 Cason J Callaway arrived to load.

Calcite:
Thursday; 21:14 John J Boland departed for Ashtabula. .21:14 Philip R Clarke weighed anchor proceeded to the loading dock. Friday; 4:15 American Mariner departed for Buffington.13:23 Philip R Clarke departed for Detroit. 14:50 Dorothy Ann and Pathfinder arrived to finish loading. 17:48 Hon. James L Oberstar arrived to load. 21:04 Dorothy Ann and Pathfinder departed for Cleveland. 21:15 Olive L Moore arrived to load. Saturday; 8:30 Hon. James L Oberstar departed for Cleveland. 9:01 Olive L Moore departed down bound on Lake Huron. 9:02 Victory and James L Kuber arrived to load.

Little Current:
Thursday; 5:46 The cruise ship Victory I arrived and went to anchor in the Goat Island Channel north of the marina. Shore excursions were transferred to shore by the ships launches. At 16:33 she departed for Detroit.

Meldrum Bay:
Thursday; 16:54 Hebert C Jackson arrived to finish loading and departed Friday at 0:01 for Duluth Superior. Saturday; 2:12 Algoma Niagara arrived to load. 15:11 Kaye E Barker arrived and went to anchor.

Thessalon:
Friday; 17:00 Joseph L Thompson arrived to load gravel and departed Saturday at 3:37 for Marine City.

Bruce Mines:
Thursday; 23:33 Robert S Pierson arrived to load trap rock and departed Friday at 8:33 down bound on Lake Michigan. 20:00 Manitowoc arrived to load trap rock and departed on Saturday at 9:09 for Chicago.

Drummond Island:
Friday; 7:26 Dorothy Ann and Pathfinder arrived to take on a partial load and at 11:26 departed for Calcite.12:59 John G Munson arrived to load limestone and departed Saturday 1:26 for Marine City. 10:36 American Courage arrived to load.

Goderich, ON – Bruce Douglas
Algoma Compass arrived 7:30 a.m. on Saturday to load salt and departed for Muskegon in the evening. Cuyahoga was downbound from Alpena, making a return trip to Goderich.

 

Prince Edward Island company aims to build Lake Ontario ferry

6/16 - A Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, company is one of 10 that's been awarded money from Transport Canada's new $2.4 million clean transportation fund. Redrock Power Systems has been given $15,000 towards a $35,000 feasibility study on a zero-emissions passenger ferry it wants to develop for Lake Ontario.

The company is leading a partnership that wants to build a ferry to carry commuters from St. Catharines, on the south shore of Lake Ontario near the U.S. border, to downtown Toronto.

"A huge number of commuters have migrated from the crazy real estate situation in Toronto to St. Catharines," said company founder Paul Paterson.

"They're spending up to three hours each way per day in car traffic going back and forth. We figure we can do the trip in about one hour. So we think there's a strong business case for it, but there are a lot of technicalities which have to be addressed first."

Paterson said they're looking at a 150-person ferry to operate nine months a year.

The feasibility study will determine what kind of drive system to choose. It could be hydrogen fuel cells, bio-gas or bio-diesel. Paterson hopes this work will eventually spinoff into work on the new federal East Coast ferries, if Ottawa commits to those being low-carbon vessels.

According to a note from Transport Canada to CBC News, the four ferries the federal government owns on the East Coast account for approximately 70 per cent of that department's greenhouse gas emissions. It does expect two new ferries will have a less environmental impact.

CBC

 

How autonomous vessels could change Great Lakes commerce, research

6/16 - There’s been a lot of talk in recent years about the future of self-driving cars. But what about autonomous ships? When the Great Lakes governors and the premiers of Ontario and Quebec begin their 2019 summit on Friday, one of the events on the schedule will be a demonstration of “smart ship” technology.

Guy Meadows directs the Great Lakes Research Center at Michigan Technological University where he specializes in marine engineering.

He says that the demonstration will feature what his team believes to be “the world leader in autonomous surface vessels.” It's a bright yellow, 18-foot, fully-autonomous research vessel that can operate for up to seven days completely unattended.

Per an agreement with the Coast Guard, this particular vessel will be operating under “supervised autonomy” to ensure safety in Lake Superior, where Meadows and his team are testing its usefulness as a research vessel. “There will be a supervisory vessel that can take control at any moment,” Meadows said.

These kinds of unoccupied vessels, Meadows says, are best used to complete tasks that fall into the “three Ds”: dirty, dangerous, and dull.

“Dull would be resurveying the Great Lakes, which is really necessary. In some places, the surveys are 100 years old. Dangerous are things that you would not want to risk human exposure — that would be clean-ups of contaminants, spills, collisions between ships, oil spills, things of that nature,” Meadows explained.

Research into autonomous land vehicles is far beyond that of autonomous ships, but Meadows says there's a lot of interest in bringing the technology being developed at auto companies into the marine sector. Twenty years from now, Meadows says he hopes that smart ship technology will help improve water quality, give us a better understanding of invasive species, and create more accurate maps of the depths and substrates of the Great Lakes.

Meadows acknowledges that the widespread implementation of autonomous vessels would cause a shift in the duties of ship pilots and crew members. Still, he argues that the development of this technology presents “tremendous opportunity” to create jobs and boost the region's economy as well.

“Part of the governors’ and premiers’ interest is to use our capacity here throughout the Great Lakes Basin to become an exporter worldwide of these technologies,” Meadows said. "We think we could lead the market in that rather than playing catchup.”

Listen to an interview at this link: https://www.michiganradio.org/post/how-autonomous-vessels-could-change-great-lakes-commerce-research

 

Ports of Indiana become first inland waterway to secure Green Marine designation

6/16 - The Ports of Indiana have become the first inland waterway system in the country and the first statewide port authority in the nation to earn a Green Marine certification for environmental sustainability.

The certification comes after the state's two ports on the Ohio River caught up to the Port of Indiana-Burns Harbor in adopting environmental best practices.

The port on Lake Michigan in Porter County earned the honor in 2014 in recognition of steps it took beyond regulatory requirements in areas like aquatic invasive species, greenhouse gases and air pollutants. Now, the entire Indianapolis-based ports system, including the Port of Indiana-Jeffersonville and Port of Indiana-Mount Vernon on the southern edge of the state, has received the distinction from Green Marine, a voluntary environmental certification program for North America's maritime industry.

“The Green Marine certification emphasizes our commitment to adopt practices and technologies that have a direct impact at our three port locations and beyond,” said Ports of Indiana CEO Vanta Coda II. “We will continue to seek improvement of our environmental performance by adhering to the Green Marine guiding principles.”

The Port of Indiana-Burns Harbor improved its Green Marine score last year, most dramatically in the spill prevention category. It also adopted and implemented a stormwater management program in November.

NW Indiana Times

 

Updates

6/16 - The saltie gallery has been updated with the following images: Aragonborg, Arsland, Carolus Magnus, Chestnut, Eeborg, Egelantiersgracht, Egmondgracht, Emanuele S, Federal Columbia, Federal Satsuki, Gardno, Industrial Skipper, Juno, Kivalliq W, Lake St Clair, Lubie, Mitiq, Pacific Huron, Patalya, Selasse, Sten Arnold, Strandja, Victory II, and Whistler.

 

Pre-orders now being taken for new ‘Know Your Ships: Decades’ book

6/16 - To mark the 60th anniversary of ‘Know Your Ships,’ a new book, ‘Know Your Ships: Decades,’ will be released this fall. The 240-page book will be hardcover and in a larger format (11” x 8.5”) than the regular Know Your Ships.

‘Know Your Ships: Decades’ represents an editors' choice of the best of the many outstanding images that have appeared in the annual Know Your Ships since its founding in 1959. The book also includes a year-by-year timeline of important events on the shipping scene from 60-year Seaway era as well as the major fleet stack markings and house flags. In making this book, nearly 2,000 photographs were considered, and the ones selected were re-scanned to yield the highest quality possible.

Pre-ordered books will be autographed and will include a free commemorative reprint of the original, 44-page 1959 Know Your Ships. The pre-order runs to June 30. Books will ship in mid-September. Price is $49.95 plus shipping and tax.

Hardcover, high-quality books such as this one are expensive to print. Pre-orders will help determine how many will be printed. There will not be a reprint - once they are gone they are gone.

http://knowyourships.com/kysdecades.html

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  June 16

On 16 June 1891, Alexander McDougall himself took his brand-new whaleback steamer JOSEPH L. COLBY (steel propeller whaleback freighter, 265 foot, 1,245 gross tons, built in 1890 at West Superior, Wisconsin) down the St. Lawrence River to the sea. The double-hulled COLBY left Prescott, Ontario at 3 p.m., drawing six feet nine inches aft and five feet six inches forward and started on her wild ride through the rapids. The whaleback freighter plowed through the Galops, Iroquois, Long Sault, Coteau, Cedar, Split Rock and Cascade Rapids. She grated the bottom a number of times and had a number of close calls. Captain McDougall stood immobile throughout the trip but great beads of perspiration broke out on his forehead. When the vessel finally made it through the Cascades and was safe on Lake St. Louis, the French Canadian pilot left and the crew let out shouts of joy with the whistle blowing. The COLBY was the first screw steamer to attempt running the rapids.

On 16 June 1892, GENERAL BURNSIDE (3-mast wooden schooner, 138 foot, 308 gross tons, built in 1862, at Wolfe Island, Ontario) foundered in a powerful northwest gale on Lake Erie near Southeast Shoal Light. Her crew was rescued by the tug GREGORY.

The steamer UNIQUE (wooden propeller passenger/package freight steamer, 163 foot, 381 gross tons) was built by Alexander Anderson at Marine City, Michigan. She was launched stern first at 3:00 p.m. on 16 June 1894. There was quite a crowd assembled to watch the launch. While waiting for the launch, Engineer Merrill of the steamer MARY composed the following verse:

"The new steamer Unique
Made a beautiful suique
On a direction oblique
Into a big crique,
So to spique."

The vessel was painted a bright yellow up to the promenade deck with white cabins and upper works. In 1901, she left the upper lakes and was chartered for the Thousand Islands cruise trade. Later that year, she was sold to Philadelphia buyers for Delaware River service. Her upper cabins were removed in 1904, when she was rebuilt as a yacht. She lasted until 20 November 1915, when she burned to a total loss in New York harbor.

On 16 June 1905, at 2:00 a.m., a fire was discovered around the smokestack of the North Shore Navigation Company's CITY OF COLLINGWOOD (wooden propeller passenger-package freight steamer, 213 foot, 1,387 gross tons, built in 1893, at Owen Sound, Ontario) burned at the Grand Trunk Railway docks at Collingwood, Ontario and was destroyed along with the dock and nearby sheds. Four died, but most of crew jumped overboard. Captain Wright had gone to his home on Pine St. about an hour before and was preparing for bed when he heard four whistles sounded by the steamer BRITTANIC, which was laying alongside. He ran to the dock, went aboard and woke the 1st mate J. D. Montgomery and a wheelsman. They had to jump to the dock to escape the flames. James Meade, Lyman Finch, A. McClellan, and another unidentified crewmember who had just joined the vessel at the Soo were all sleeping in the forecastle and lost their lives.

In 1967, the FEUX FOLLETS (Hull#188) was launched at Collingwood, Ontario, by Collingwood Shipyards Ltd., for Papachristidis Co. Ltd. She was the last steam-powered lake ship. Renamed in 1972 as b.) CANADIAN LEADER and scrapped in 2012.

Upbound in the Welland Canal on June 16, 1963, loaded with iron ore for Chicago, U.S. Steel's BENJAMIN F. FAIRLESS suffered bow damage in collision with Canadian steamer RALPH S. MISENER. In 1918, the WILLIAM P. SNYDER JR was in collision with the steamer GEORGE W. PERKINS in Duluth Harbor resulting in damage of $5,000 to both vessels.

On 16 June 1861, ANDOVER (2-mast wooden schooner, 98 foot, 190 tons, built in 1844, at Black River, Ohio) was carrying lumber in a storm and ground on Pointe aux Barques reef on Lake Huron. Though not thought to be seriously damaged, she resisted all efforts by the tug ZOUAVE to release her. She was finally stripped and abandoned.

On 16 June 1887, CHAMPLAIN (wooden propeller passenger/package freight vessel, 135 foot, 438 gross tons, built in 1870, at Cleveland, Ohio) was carrying passengers, merchandise and horses on Lake Michigan when an engine room lamp exploded. The fire spread so quickly that the pumps could not be started. She headed for Fisherman's Island, Grand Traverse Bay, Lake Michigan, but struck a bar and sank a mile short of the beach. 22 of the 57 persons aboard died, most from drowning. Although initially declared a total loss, the hull was towed into Harbor Springs, Michigan, then taken to Milwaukee, Wisconsin and rebuilt as CITY OF CHARLEVOIX. She was also lengthened to 165 foot. She lasted until 1924, when she burned at her lay-up dock in Manistee, Michigan. At that time, she was named KANSAS.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Historical Collections of the Great Lakes, Ahoy & Farewell II, the Fr. Dowling Collection and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Lakes limestone trade up 13.6 percent in May

6/15 - Cleveland, OH – Shipments of limestone on the Great Lakes totaled 4.3 million tons in May, an increase of 13.6 percent compared to a year ago. May’s loadings also bettered the month’s 5-year average by 17.8 percent.

Loadings from U.S. quarries totaled 3.4 million tons, an increase of 8.2 percent compared to a year ago. Shipments from Canadian quarries totaled 890,000 tons, an increase of over 40 percent.

Year-to-date the Lakes limestone trade stands at nearly 6.7 million tons, an increase of 26.7 percent compared to a year ago. Loadings from Michigan and Ohio quarries total 5.5 million tons, an increase of 23.2 percent. Shipments from Ontario quarries total 1.18 million tons, an increase of 45.9 percent.

Lake Carriers’ Association

 

Saltie Thorco Isadora may be chartered by Desgagnés

6/15 - The general cargo ship Thorco Isadora built in 2011 arrived in Montréal on June 2. Her agent is now Transport Desgagnés. It is not known if she was bought or chartered. Probably chartered for some trips to the Arctic. She has a departure time from Montréal for Bécancour, QC on July 1 to load according to the Port of Montréal website. Under her previous name of Maersk Illinois, she transited the Seaway in 2012 and was registered in the USA then.

René Beauchamp

 

Port Reports -  June 15

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day’s news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known)

Two Harbors-Silver Bay, MN – Gary A. Putney
Joseph L. Block departed Two Harbors at 01:34 on June 14th for Indiana Harbor. Algoma Harvester arrived Two Harbors at 11:10 on June 14th for South of #2. As of 19:20 she was still at the dock, but should depart shortly. She is headed for Quebec City. Due Two Harbors on the 14th is the Lee A. Tregurtha. She unloaded stone at Graymont in Superior. As of 19:20 on the 14th she's roughly halfway between Superior and Two Harbors. There is no scheduled inbound traffic for Two Harbors on June 15th. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay saw the arrival of the Clyde S. VanEnkevort/Erie Trader on June 14th at 02:00 and she departed on the 14th at 15:35 for Cleveland. There is no inbound traffic scheduled for Silver Bay on June 15th. An update: When the American Integrity departed Silver Bay on the 13th she was showing an Ashtabula destination. On the afternoon of the 14th her destination is now Indiana Harbor.

Thunder Bay, ON
Thursday June 13: 22:32 saltie Finnborg departed Superior Elevator for Montreal. 23:05 Saginaw weighed anchor and proceeded to Superior Elevator to load grain. Friday June 14: 3:14 Tim S Dool arrived at Richardson Main Terminal to load grain. 10:55 Whitefish Bay departed G3 for Port Colborne. 15:14 Saginaw departed Superior Elevator and shifted over to Viterra A to load grain. 17:42 Evans Spirit departed Richardson Current River Terminal for Port Cartier. Expected for Saturday: saltie Narie.

Alpena, MI – Ben & Chanda McClain
On Friday afternoon the Cuyahoga was anchored off Alpena. It waited for winds to subside before coming into the river during the evening to unload salt. The tug Samuel de Champlain and barge Innovation remained in port on Friday, loading product at Lafarge.

Goderich, ON – Bruce Douglas
Cuyahoga cleared upbound at 4.16 am Friday for Alpena with salt.

Northeast Ohio ports – Bill Kloss
6/14 arrivals: Sam Laud to Cleveland from Ashtabula with a shuttle, Mississagi to Fairport Harbor and Algoma Sault to Sandusky
departures: American Courage from Cleveland to Stoneport

Welland Canal and vicinity vessel report - Friday Jun 14 – Barry Andersen

Nanticoke:
docked - Jun 12 - Algoterra at 2141 - departed - Jun 13 - Rt Hon Paul J Martin at 0900 - departed - Jun 14 - Rt Hon Paul J Martin at 0900 westbound

Long Point Bay anchorage:
anchored - Jun 13 - tug Leonard M & Niagara Spirit at 1415 - Jun 14 - Algoscotia at 1901

Buffalo:
arrivals - Jun 14 - Calumet at 0150 - departures - Jun 14 - Calumet at 1352 and Manitoulin at 1417 - both westbound

Welland Canal:
upbound - Jun 13 - Algoma Enterprise at 1702, Egelantiersgracht (Nld) at 1742 (stopping wharf 12) and G3 Marquis at 2115 - Jun 14 - light tug Ocean A Gauthier at 0616, Egelantiersgracht (Nld) departed wharf 12 at 1234 eastbound

downbound - Jun 14 - Federal Rhine (Bds) at 0222, Algoma Strongfield at 0517, Algonova at 0800 and Juno (Bhs), at 1815

Welland Canal docks:
docked - Jun 7 - CCGS Pierre Radisson at 0925 at Heddle Dry Dock Port Weller - Jun 14 - Egelantiersgracht ( Nld) - arrived wharf 12 at 0420 - departed Jun 14 at 1234 westbound

Port Weller anchorage:
anchored - Jun 11 - Strandja (Mlt) (ex Eastwind York-10) at 2137 - awaiting dock at Oshawa - Jun 12 - Emanuele S (Bds) (ex SCT Monte Rosa-17, MCT Monte Rosa-15) at 1521 from Hamilton

Hamilton:
arrivals - Jun 14 - Sten Baltic (Nor) at 0947 and Federal Rhine (Bds) at 1338 - docked - Jun 4 - Blair McKeil (ex Gagliarda-19) at 1415 - (renamed - Blair McKeil on Friday June 7th) - Jun 11 - Lake St Clair (Atg) (ex Federal Miramichi-16) at 2238 - Jun 13 - Rosy (Bds) (ex SCT Stockhorn-17, MCT Stockhorn-16, HHL Caspian-08) at 0051, Algoma Discovery at 0252 and Chestnut (Cyp) at 2306 from Toronto - departures - Jun 11 - Algoma Harvester at 0715 - Jun - 12 - Egmondgracht (Nld) at 0059 - Jun 14 - Federal Satsuki (Mhl) at 0005 for Spain and Redhead ii (Atg) (ex Bora-19, Hermann Schoening-15) at 0430

Bronte:
docked - Jun 12 - Paul A Desgages at 2156 from the anchorage - departed - Jun 12 - Sarah Desgagnes at 1049 - Jun 13 - Paul A Desgagnes at 2117 - both eastbound

Mississauga:
arrival - Jun 11 - Arsland (Mlt) (ex CT Dublin-11) at 0633 - departed - Jun 13 at 0428 eastbound

Toronto:
arrivals - Jun 8 - Aragonborg (Nld) at 2051 - Jun 10 - McKeil Spirit at 0114 - Jun 13 - Frontenac at 2251 - Departures - Jun 13 - Chestnut Cyp) at 1920 - Jun 14 - Frontenac at 0924 and McKeil Spirit at ___ - both eastbound

Oshawa:
arrival - tug Leo A McArthur & John J Carrick at 2312 - docked - Jun 11 - Lubie (Bhs) at 1830 - departed - Jun 14 - tug Leo A McArthur & John J Carrick at 1955 eastbound

 

High waters prompt protocols on Seaway shipping speed, passing

6/15 - Shipping on the St. Lawrence Seaway system will lag, but not stop, due to speed and movement protocols enacted in response to flooding mitigation efforts.

The International Lake Ontario and St. Lawrence River Board on Friday announced its plan to raise outflows consecutively and beyond the threshold for safe commercial navigation to help mitigate damage caused by high water levels on both water bodies.

In order to adapt to rising outflows, the St. Lawrence Seaway Development and Management corporations, entities that operate the Seaway on the U.S. and Canadian sides, respectively, issued speed controls and prohibitions of vessels meeting and passing in certain areas of the international waterway. Seaway officials said on background they also directed mariners to operate “at the lowest safe speeds to minimize vessels’ wakes” and planned to station a tug boat at the Iroquois Lock, located in Canada across from the town of Waddington, in case vessel operators need assistance.

Bruce Burrows, president of the Chamber of Marine Commerce, which advocates for more than 130 marine industry stakeholders, in a statement the outflow adjusts will help shoreline residents, but the longer transit times and additional costs prompted by them will still cause “significant loss to the economy.” Shipping companies cannot make up lost time because the Seaway closes in the winter, he said.

“The 2017 outflows on the St. Lawrence Seaway ... resulted in a two-hour delay for all transits. On a per day basis, this two-hour delay equals to an estimated $4 million loss in business revenue. The business losses are not just for shipowners but the region-wide supply chain that is dependent upon the cargo being moved through the Seaway,” he said. “There is a reduced amount of cargo that can be transported and a critical interruption of timely deliveries.”

Frequent rainfall across the entire Great Lakes basin and outflows from Lake Erie have caused the lake to rise beyond record levels, which has submerged docks, closed roads and recently flooded homes.

Effects of the adverse weather and Lake Erie outflows were compounded by high outflows from the Ottawa River, forcing the river board to reduce outflows from the lake through the Robert Moses-Robert H. Saunders Power Dam in Massena and Cornwall, Ontario earlier this year. The board, however, has since raised outflows several times as the Ottawa River has subsided and lake levels have begun to stabilize.

Outflows reached 10,200 cubic meters of water, enough water to fill 33,682 average-sized bathtubs per second, on Friday, and the river board planed to continue raising them in increments until reaching 10,400 cubic meters, enough water to fill 34,342 bathtubs, per second by Thursday. Outflows reached 10,260 cubic meters, enough to fill 33,880 bathtubs, per second on Monday, according to the board.

The last time outflows reached 10,400 cubic meters per second, the maximum rate on record, was in 2017, the last time Lake Ontario experienced record-breaking levels and flooded shoreline properties. Seaway officials said they also instituted the same speed and movement protocols they recently initiated in 2017.

“Seaway Corporation officials have been involved in regular discussions with the International Lake Ontario-St. Lawrence River Board in recent weeks focused on higher outflows that allow for safe commercial navigation, and will continue to monitor the situation closely,” they said.

Mr. Burrows said the outflow rate of 10,400 cubic meters per second “is the best compromise solution” for commercial shippers and shoreline residents.

“The accumulation of these losses will depend on how long the outflows are maintained at this level,” he said.

Despite record high water levels in 2017, shipping companies were able to transport 38 million tons of cargo on the Seaway, 9 percent more than in 2016, in part with increased shipments of stone, cement and finished steel products and healthy iron ore shipments to steel mills in both the U.S. and Asia. Last year, vessels shipped more cargo than any other year since 2007 at 40.9 million tons.

Watertown Daily Times

 

Lake Ontario reaches 249 feet for first time in recorded history

6/15 - Wilson, NY – Lake Ontario has reached 249 feet for the first time in recorded history. "Unfortunately we hit 249 (feet), and we're climbing," said Jonathan Schultz, Director of Emergency Services for Niagara County.

The International Joint Commission, which regulates the lake's water level, says the lake will continue rising gradually, and likely won't peak out for another one-to-three weeks.

Just days ago, the record for water height set during 2017's historic flooding was matched. That year, there were localized lake readings above 249 feet in some communities, like Olcott for instance, where there was a reading of 249.2 feet. However, the lake-wide average topped out at just 248.95 feet.

On Sunset Island, in Wilson, residents are concerned about what might happen if the lake continues to rise. Sunset Island is actually a peninsula, connected to the mainland by a stone walkway which has narrowed in recent weeks.

"It is quickly going to become an island again unless the water recedes," said resident Kevin Doherty.

Doherty, who has had a summer home on Sunset Island for the last 11 years, is concerned the stone may wash away. If that happens, the only way to access his home would be by boat.

WIVB

 

Cruise ship makes first stop of the season in Milwaukee

6/15 - Milwaukee, WI – The cruise ship season is now underway on the Great Lakes. The 200-passenger ship called the Pearl Mist arrived in Milwaukee Tuesday morning around 8 a.m.

The ship makes stops along the Great Lakes in Wisconsin, Michigan and Canada. Milwaukee is a turn-around city meaning it will serve as the passenger’s beginning or end of the trip, bringing in thousands over the next few months.

Last summer, ships stopped in Milwaukee only twice. This summer there will be 11 stops. Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett hopes it will continue to grow for years to come. “I really think that you’re going to see this Great Lakes cruising industry grow and we are so well positioned right now,” he said. “It’s very, very exciting.”

The Pearl Mist leaves Milwaukee on Wednesday morning. The next cruise ship is expected to arrive on July 4.

CBS 58

 

Sign up now for Engineers Day Soo Freighter Chasing Cruise

6/15 - The 2019 schedule of Boatnerd Gatherings has been set and information is now available now on the Gathering page, www.boatnerd.com/gathering

Gatherings include Soo Locks Engineers weekend festivities and the annual Welland Canal weekend. Reservations are now being accepted for the Soo Locks Freighter-Chasing Cruise June 28. Reservations must be received no later than June 21 to receive the $40 price. Sign up now – don't be left on the dock.

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  June 15

On this day in 1967, the new $6 million Allouez taconite pellet handling facility in Superior, Wisconsin, was dedicated. The first cargo of 18,145 tons of pellets was loaded into the holds of the Hanna Mining Company freighter JOSEPH H. THOMPSON.

At midnight, on Saturday, 15 June 1901, OMAR D. CONGER (wooden propeller ferry, 92 foot, 199 gross tons, built in 1882, at Port Huron, Michigan) burned at her dock on the Black River in Port Huron, Michigan. Her upper works were destroyed, but she was repaired and put back in service. She lasted until 1922, when her boiler exploded, killing four people and destroying the vessel.

On June 15, 1943, the D.M. CLEMSON collided with and sank the GEORGE M. HUMPHREY in the Straits of Mackinac. Both of these 600-footers recovered for long careers. The D.M. CLEMSON was sold for scrap in 1980. The GEORGE M. HUMPHREY was recovered over a year later, renamed the b.) CAPTAIN JOHN ROEN, later converted to a self-unloader, and finished her career as d.) CONSUMERS POWER at the end of the 1985, season before being scrapped in 1988.

In 1989, the ROGER M. KYES was rechristened b.) ADAM E. CORNELIUS by American Steamship Co.

The wooden 180-foot schooner JOHN A. FRANCOMB was launched at West Bay City, Michigan, on 15 June 1889. She was built by F. W. Wheeler & Co. (Hull #61). She lasted until she was abandoned at Bay City in 1934.

GRECIAN (steel propeller freighter, 296 foot, 2,348 gross tons, built in 1891, at Cleveland, Ohio by Globe Iron Works (Hull#40) struck a rock near Detour, Michigan, on 7 June 1906, but made dock at Detour before settling on bottom. After her cargo was removed, she was raised, and towed by her fleet mate SIR HENRY BESSEMER, bound for Detroit Shipbuilding Co. in Wyandotte, Michigan, for repairs, relying on air pressure in her sealed holds to keep her afloat. However, on 15 June 1906, her holds began to fill with water and she sank in Lake Huron off Thunder Bay. Her crew was rescued by SIR HENRY BESSEMER.

1933 – BRENTWOOD ran aground in the St. Marys River and was released on June 19 with about $60,000 in damage. The CSL vessel soon tied up at Midland and was scrapped there in 1937.

1943 – WILLIAM BREWSTER was on her maiden voyage when she collided with the W.D. CALVERLEY JR. and sank on her side in the St. Clair River off Algonac. The ship was not refloated until November and, after repairs, finally left the lakes in June 1944. It operated on saltwater routes until scrapping at Calcutta, India, as e) RAY MAYABUNDAR in 1967.

1962 – NYON, a Seaway visitor in 1961 and 1962, sank in the English Channel, 5 miles south of Beachy Head, after a collision in heavy fog with the Indian freighter JALAZAD. The latter came to the Great Lakes in 1969 and was eventually scuttled off Tema, Ghana, as b) JYOTI VINOD in September 1983.

1965 – BREIM, a Great Lakes visitor from Norway, got stuck in the mud below the Snell Lock at Massena, NY was released the next day after some cargo was lightered. The ship arrived at Visakhapatnam, India, for scrapping as c) CHRISTINA C. on October 24, 1983.

1988 – ALGOWEST and COUDRES D'ILE collided in fog on the St. Lawrence and the small coastal freighter sank with the loss of one life. The former now sails for Algoma as PETER R. CRESSWELL.

2001 – Fire broke out in the engine room of the Cypriot freighter FELIX 60 miles off Las Palmas, Canary Islands and the 21-member crew was removed. The ship first came to the Great Lakes as a) BEGONIA in 1978 and returned as b) TIMUR SWALLOW in 1983 and c) JENNIFER JANE in 1985. The burning vessel was anchored and the fire extinguished June 16. A total loss, the ship arrived at Aliaga, Turkey, under tow as f) ELI on December 1, 2001, and was broken up.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Jody Aho, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Russ Plumb, Father Dowling Collection, Historical Collections of the Great Lakes, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Parts of the Great Lakes may get pounded by 13-foot waves

6/14 - Some 7.5 million Americans in the Great Lakes are under threat of gale force winds and flooding. Don't go in the water. Don't even go near the water. That's the message that authorities are telling lakeshore residents of Lake Michigan, Lake Huron and Lake Erie.

It's all thanks to a weather system roaring through the region on Thursday and Friday bringing gale force wind gusts and rain to the region.

The situation along the lakeshore is made even more dangerous by the water in the lakes being already at near-record high levels. That's from all the rain and snow that's fallen in the last 12 months.

Gale force wind, and the massive waves, are going to push water onshore and cause some beach erosion and flooding, the National Weather Service says. Some areas are already feeling the effects of the nasty weather.

Portage, Indiana, was being pounded by massive waves and the pier in South Haven, Michigan, is under water. Water was coming onshore in New Buffalo, Michigan.

Flood and gale warnings from the National Weather Service have already been posted for much of the Chicagoland area along Lake Michigan, even extending into parts of Michigan. Waves up to 13-feet high and winds up to 40 mph are predicted for some spots.

As the storm moves further east overnight the Canadian shore and the southern shore of Lake Erie will begin to feel the effects. The NOAA Great Lakes Coastal Forecasting System indicates that the Lake Erie shore that includes Cleveland, Ohio and Erie, Pennsylvania, could see 10-foot waves.

CNN

 

Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Seaway shipping rebounds in May

6/14 - After a slow start due to ice conditions, St. Lawrence Seaway cargo surged in May fueled by grain and iron ore exports and shipments of road salt. According to the latest numbers, cargo shipments from March 22 through the end of May totaled 8.3 million metric tons, bringing it in line with last year’s strong performance.

“If the May pace continues, we should be able to build on the 17 percent Seaway cargo growth accumulated over the past two years,” said Bruce Burrows, President of the Chamber of Marine Commerce. “U.S. Great Lakes ports are also reporting an acceleration in business. Two key growth areas are increased domestic and imported road salt and iron ore volumes due to domestic demand for steel production and exports of iron ore pellets from Minnesota to international locations like China.”

Iron ore shipments via the St. Lawrence Seaway (from March 22 to May 31) totaled 1.5 million metric tons, up 8 percent compared to the same period last year. Dry bulk cargoes via the Seaway (2.2 million metric tons) are up 11 percent, buoyed by road salt shipments as cities across the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence region replenished their supplies after the long, difficult winter.

At the Port of Toledo, tonnage through May is 8 percent ahead of 2018. Iron ore, petroleum products and dry bulk led the way, while grain shipments remained on par with last year. A combination of grain, salt, pig iron and other bulk products along with project cargo for the Cleveland Cliffs HBI Facility have accounted for 14 ocean vessel calls in Toledo this year.

“So far this year, we’ve had more ‘salties” (ocean-going vessels) calling on Toledo than any year since 2006,” said Joseph Cappel, VP of Business Development for the Toledo-Lucas County Port Authority. “We are cautiously optimistic that this early momentum can continue throughout the season, with the hope that aluminum volumes return to normal and that the wet spring does not impact our fall grain program too badly.”

The Duluth Seaway Port Authority also reports a similar start to the season. “After an ice-slowed start in March, the pace picked up considerably in April and May,” said Jayson Hron, Duluth Seaway Port Authority Director of Communications and Marketing.

“Overall tonnage for the Port of Duluth-Superior increased 9 percent over April 2018, led by an early-season surge in coal shipments, the typically robust levels of iron ore and our first grain shipments of the season,” added Hron. “That steady pace continued in May, and we also welcomed the first of numerous wind energy cargo shipments scheduled to arrive throughout the summer. All in all, it’s been a good start to the season.”

Port Milwaukee has maintained its momentum through the early part of the international shipping season with the Port’s commercial tenants up 10 percent compared to the start of the season in 2018. “Total cargo via Milwaukee Harbor remains sturdy, averaging a 2 percent increase in overall economic activity when compared to May 2018,” said Municipal Port Director Adam Schlicht.

He added, “Port Milwaukee’s ship-to-rail supply chain initiatives have already taken almost 500 trucks off of Wisconsin’s roads in 2019. With increased visibility of its commercial operations as well as strategic marketing to domestic and international customers, Port Milwaukee is enthusiastic about tonnage throughput despite a challenging trade environment impacted by tariffs. Inbound steel, cement and salt traffic will lead the way.”

The Port of Green Bay moved 265,600 tons in and out of the Port in May, making overall tonnage up 21 percent from the same time last year. The top contributors to this were coal, salt and petroleum products, which alone are up 190 percent from this time in 2018.

“In April, we moved over 168,500 tons, which was a great kick-off to the season; but May saw tonnage increase over that number by more than a third,” explained Port Director Dean Haen.

Meanwhile, the Illinois International Port District had just over 49,000 net tons of inbound cargo in May, mostly steel and metals. “While tonnage is starting off well, things have been slow due to the historic rise of all of the Great Lakes,” says Clayton Harris III, Executive Director of the Illinois International Port District. “Many of the barges were delayed last month due to the rainfall and high-water levels throughout the system.”

Chamber of Marine Commerce

 

Port Reports -  June 14

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day’s news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known).

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
Joseph L. Block departed Duluth at 10:28 Thursday with a partial cargo of blast furnace trim from Hallett #5, and headed for Two Harbors to complete her load. Michipicoten was inbound at 18:31 to load iron ore pellets at CN, and Pacific Huron left port at 20:07 with a load of wheat from CHS 2. Alamosborg remained anchored outside the harbor, and is tentatively expected to arrive Friday afternoon to load beet pulp pellets. In Superior, the CSL Tadoussac loaded ore at BN Thursday morning before departing at 09:00. Burns Harbor then shifted to the dock from Lakehead Pipeline, and continued loading throughout the day. She is expected to depart early Friday morning. Algoma Spirit was on the hook waiting her turn to load.

Two Harbors-Silver Bay, MN – Gary A. Putney
Indiana Harbor departed Two Harbors on June 13th at 03:36 for Zug Island. Arriving Two Harbors on June 13th for South of #2 at 04:18 was the Spruceglen. She departed on June 13th at 16:26. No updated AIS, but she'll be going to Quebec City. Arriving Two Harbors on the 13th was the Joseph L. Block after unloading stone at the CN hopper in Duluth and taking on a partial load of bft at Hallett #5. She arrived Two Harbors at 14:10 for North of #2 lay-by. She shifted to South of #2 from approx. 17:02 to 17:20. Due Two Harbors on June 14th is the Algoma Harvester. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay saw the arrival of the American Integrity on June 12th at 20:36. She departed on June 13th at 13:10 for Ashtabula. Due Silver Bay early on the 14th will be the Clyde S. VanEnkevort/Erie Trader. An update: When the Joyce L. VanEnkevort/Great Lakes Trader departed Silver Bay there was no updated AIS. She is headed for the Cleveland Bulk Terminal.

Thunder Bay, ON
Thursday June 13: 11:33 Whitefish Bay arrived at G3 to load grain. 19:05 Saginaw arrived and went to anchor southwest of the Welcome Islands. 19:15 Evans Spirit arrived at Richardson Current River Terminal to load grain. Expected for Friday: Tim S Dool.

St. Marys River
Traffic Thursday included the tug Nathan S., which was downbound in the MacArthur Lock in the late morning pushing a barge with the unloading boom from the now-scrapped laker American Victory (ex-Middletown). The boom is being taken to Sturgeon Bay, WI, for use on the new vessel being built there for Interlake Steamship Co

Northern Lake Huron ports

Alpena:
Thursday; 3:45 Samuel De Champlain arrived to load cement products.

Stoneport:
Thursday; 0:02 Manitowoc departed for Marine City. 0:55 Herbert C Jackson arrived to take on a partial load and at 12:48 departed for Meldrum Bay.13:09 Algoma Conveyor arrived and went to anchor.

Calcite:
Wednesday; 23:34 John J Boland arrived to load. Thursday; 4:46 American Mariner arrived to load. 10:00 Philip R Clarke arrived and went to anchor.

Meldrum Bay:
Thursday; 0:35 Mississagi departed for Fairport. 16:44 Hebert C Jackson arrived to finish loading.

Port Inland:
Thursday; 6:16 Undaunted arrived to load and at 10:01 departed down bound on Lake Michigan.

Goderich, ON – Bruce Douglas
Cuyahoga was loading grain on Thursday.

Cleveland, OH – Bill Kloss
6/13 arrivals: American Courage on a shuttle and tug Pioneerland from Marblehead.
6/13 departures: Federal Rhine to Hamilton.

Northeast Ohio ports – Bill Kloss
Sam Laud to Ashtabula and Edgar B. Speer to Conneaut.

Welland Canal and vicinity vessel report - Thursday Jun 13 - by Barry Andersen

Nanticoke:
docked - Jun 12 - Algoterra at 2141 - Jun 13 - Rt Hon Paul J Martin at 1402 and - departed - tug Albert (ex Craig Eric Reinauer-18, El Bronco Grande-06, Hercules-81) at 2059 westbound and Jun 13 -

Long Point Bay anchorage:
anchored - Jun 13 - tug Leonard M & Niagara Spirit at 1415

Buffalo:
arrivals - Jun 12 - Manitoulin at 2357

Welland Canal:
upbound - Jun 13 - CSL St Laurent at 0350, Federal Columbia (Mhl) at 0808, Algoma Sault at 1133, tug Wilf Seymour & Alouette Spirit at 1353, Algoma Enterprise at 1702, Egelantiersgracht (Nld) at1742 and G3 Marquis at 2115

downbound - Jun 12 - Kivalliq W eta 2215 - Jun 13- Frontenac at 0504, tug Leo A McArthur & John J Carrick at 0534, Algoma Buffalo at 0808 stopping wharf 6 and Federal Rhine (Bds) eta 2300

Welland Canal docks:
arrival - Jun 13 - Algoma Buffalo stopped wharf 6 at 1235 - departed Jun 13 at 1900 approx. - docked - Jun 7 - CCGS Pierre Radisson at 0925 into Heddle Dry Dock at Port Weller

Port Weller anchorage:
anchored - Jun 11 - Strandja (Mlt) (ex Eastwind York-10) at 2137 - awaiting dock at Oshawa - Jun 12 - Emanuele S (Bds) (ex SCT Monte Rosa-17, MCT Monte Rosa-15) at 1521 from Hamilton

Hamilton:
arrivals - Jun 13 - Rosy (Bds) (ex SCT Stockhorn-17, MCT Stockhorn-16, HHL Caspian-08) at 0051, Algoma Discovery at 0252 and Chestnut (Cyp) eta 2300 from Toronto - docked - Jun 4 - Federal Satsuki (Mhl) at 1113 and Blair McKeil (ex Gagliarda-19) at 1415 - (renamed - Blair McKeil on Friday June 7th) - Jun 9 - Rt Hon Paul J Martin at 2043 and Egmondgracht (Nld) at 2203 - Jun 10 - Redhead ii (Atg) (ex Bora-19, Hermann Schoening-15) at 1845 from the anchorage - Jun 10 - Algoma Harvester at 0121 - Jun 11 - Lake St Clair (Atg) (ex Federal Miramichi-16) eta 2330 - Jun 11 - Lake St Clair (Atg) (ex Federal Miramichi-16) at 2238 - departed - Jun 13 - Jana Desgagnes at 1006 eastbound and G3 Marquis at 1855 westbound

Bronte:
docked - Jun 12 - Paul A Desgages at 2156 from the anchorage - departed - Jun 12 - Sarah Desgagnes at 1049 eastbound

Clarkson:
arrival - Jun 12 - Algoma Sault at 1814 - departed - Algoma Sault at 1316

Mississauga:
arrival - Jun 11 - Arsland (Mlt) (ex CT Dublin-11) at 00633 from Port Weller anchorage

Toronto:
arrivals - Jun 8 - Aragonborg (Nld) at 2051 and Chestnut (Cyp) at 1753 - Jun 10 - McKeil Spirit at 0114

Oshawa:
arrival Jun 11 - Lubie (Bhs) at 1830 from Port Weller anchorage

Oswego, N.Y. – Ned Goebricher
On Thursday BBC Argonaut unloaded cement. Ryba Marine was dredging the harbor.

 

Algoma increases interest in ocean self-unloader pool

6/14 - St. Catharines, ON – Algoma Shipping Ltd., a subsidiary of Algoma Central Corporation, has announced that the acquisition of the interest held by Oldendorff Carriers GMBH & Co. in the CSL International Pool including the three vessels owned by Oldendorff operating in the pool has been finalized. As a result of the transaction, Algoma’s interest in the pool has increased to approximately 40 percent.

The handy-sized Algoma Verity (formerly the Alice Oldendorff) and the panama- sized Algoma Valour and Algoma Victory (formerly the Harmen Oldendorff and the Sophie Oldendorff, respectively) bring Algoma’s ocean going self-unloader fleet to eight vessels operating in the pool.

“Deploying our capital to grow our position in the ocean self-unloader business is strategic and positions Algoma well for pool growth that we foresee in the years ahead,” said Peter Winkley, Chief Financial Officer of Algoma. “We know this business and these ships well and with customer demand remaining strong, we believe this is a good time to increase our investment in a business that has generated strong returns for us in the past.”

The company currently manages over 30 vessels from offices in St. Catharines, Ontario and Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Management of these vessels will be handled from the Fort Lauderdale office.

 

Lake Erie’s high water levels causing damage, impacting boaters, property owners

6/14 - Cleveland, Ohio – Lake Erie’s record high water level is having an impact being felt by boaters and property owners facing an increased threat from erosion. The lake’s level is about 30 inches above normal, causing some shoreline flooding and submerging docks.

Some docks were underwater in places like the Mentor Lagoons Marina where contractor Adam Williams of Williams Brothers Construction was building a new, higher dock for a boat owner Wednesday. “I've not seen the water this high,” he said. “Since we started this project about two weeks ago, this water has consistently risen.”

The water is also speeding erosion, threatening the city-owned marina and neighboring nature preserve. “There's really no easy answer. We can't control the lake levels. All we can do is really react to them,” said Mentor City Manager Ken Filipiak.

He said the shoreline is disappearing at a rate of five to ten feet per year. “We're losing several acres a year to erosion,” he said. “Our community used to have the longest stretch of natural beach along Lake Erie. Most of that is now gone completely.”

To combat the erosion problem, the City of Mentor paid $600,000 to build a rock barrier wall in recent years. It's now hoping to double the size of the wall and expand it by 600 feet to the east.

Filipiak said the city needs more financial resources from the state and federal government. “Protecting the assets we have is important, so we need some help with that from our legislators,” he said.

The impact is also being felt to the west. Erosion toppled trees at Sherod Park in Vermilion, water encroached on the Jet Express boat launch in Sandusky and marina docks were underwater in Catawba.

U.S. Coast Guard Petty Officer Brian McCrum said the high water level also means there’s a higher risk of hidden hazards for boaters. “People can drive their boats closer into land than they normally would because they think that is deeper water, so you can run your boat aground, you could damage it,” he said.

McCrum said even some break walls that are usually visible are now submerged. The Coast Guard also warned about reduced bridge clearance for boats on rivers.

McCrum said on June 1, a barge hit the raised railroad bridge at the mouth of the Cuyahoga River in the Flats. He said some boaters are even overloading their boats with people to weigh them down to clear the Liberty Avenue Bridge in Vermilion. “It's not safe to overload boats,” he said.

Fox 8 Cleveland

 

Help wanted: Key Lakes/Great Lakes Fleet

6/14 - Key Lakes/Great Lakes Fleet is currently hiring ABs to support the operation of our fleet. We are operating nine self-unloading bulk cargo vessels, which provide service to taconite, coal, and limestone customers on the lower and upper Great Lakes. Key Lakes, Inc. is an Equal Opportunity Employer and is committed to excellence through diversity. To inquire for applications call 218-723-2412. Further information can be found at https://jobsite.gcaptain.com/job/able-bodied-seaman-must-be-a-us-citizen/48729665/

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  June 14

On this day in 1985, Captain Edward Rogowski passed away. Captain Rogowski started sailing as a deckhand on the 514 foot JOHN SHERWIN in 1936. He retired in 1982 as the first captain of the largest freighter on the Great Lakes, the 1,013 foot PAUL R TREGURTHA.

On this day in 1957, the Interlake Steamship Company freighter HARVEY H. BROWN, Captain Percy E. Mc Ginness, delivered the first cargo of coal to the new taconite loading port of Taconite Harbor, Minnesota.

ROGER BLOUGH departed the shipyard in ballast on her maiden voyage for U.S. Steel Corp. the night of June 14, 1972, for Two Harbors, Minnesota to load 41,608 gross tons of taconite ore pellets. She was nearly a year late because of a fire in her engine room.

On June 14, 1988, the CONSUMERS POWER of 1927, with her former fleet mate JOHN T. HUTCHINSON, departed Lauzon, Quebec, in tow of the Panamanian tug/supply ship OMEGA 809, bound for a scrap yard in Kaohsiung, Taiwan. The steamer PRINCESS was sold to Little and Fitzgerald on 14 June 1873. She was built in 1858, at Algonac, Michigan by Z. Pangborn.

The wooden scow TINKER was launched at Leighton & Dunford's yard in Port Huron, Michigan on 14 June 1876.

1954 – W.F. WHITE crushed the tug OHIO against a pier in Buffalo and the latter was a total loss. The tug was refloated and scrapped at Cleveland in 1955.

1977 – ALMAR came to the Great Lakes under Greek registry in 1964. It caught fire in the engine room as c) IJESHA LION at Abidjan, Ivory Coast, and sustained major damage. The hull was abandoned by the owners, towed out to sea and scuttled in 1978

Data from: Skip Gillham, Jody Aho, Max Hanley, Joe Barr, David Swayze, Russ Plumb, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II, The Marine Historical Society of Detroit and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Iron ore trade up 2 percent in May

6/13 - Cleveland, OH – Shipments of iron ore from U.S. Great Lakes ports totaled 6 million tons in May, an increase of nearly 2 percent compared to a year ago, and 4 percent above the month’s 5-year average.

Year-to-date the iron ore trade stands at 14.5 million tons, an increase of 2.8 percent compared to the same point in 2018. Iron ore shipments are also 7.7 percent ahead of their 5-year average for five months of the year.

Lake Carriers’ Association

 

Port Reports -  June 13

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day’s news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known).

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
Stewart J. Cort arrived Duluth at 00:07 Wednesday after waiting at anchor outside the ship canal for her turn to load, and proceeded down the harbor to Burlington Northern in Superior. Joseph L. Block came in at 08:13 with limestone to discharge at CN. She was expected to shift over to Hallett #5 at some point Wednesday night to take on a partial cargo of blast furnace trim. Pacific Huron continued loading wheat at CHS 2, and Alamosborg continued her stay in the Duluth anchorage. At the Superior entry, Edwin H. Gott departed at 01:18 with a load of iron ore from BN, at which point the Cort began loading. She was still tied up as of 20:00 Wednesday night, and had a departure time of 22:00 listed. Burns Harbor also arrived in Superior at 18:00 Wednesday evening, and moored at Lakehead Pipeline to wait for her turn to load. CSL Tadoussac is due next at the dock, and was at anchor waiting for the Cort to finish. Algoma Spirit was expected to join the waiting party late Wednesday night.

Two Harbors-Silver Bay, MN – Gary A. Putney
American Spirit departed Two Harbors on June 12th at 10:33 for Zug Island. Arriving Two Harbors on the 12th for South of #2 at 15:39 was the Indiana Harbor. At 19:30 on the 12th the Spruceglen was NE of Outer Island, so she won't arrive Two Harbors until the 13th. Also due Two Harbors on the 13th is the Joseph L. Block that on the evening of the 12th is unloading stone at the CN dock in Duluth. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay saw the departure of the Joyce L. VanEnkevort/Great Lakes Trader on the 12th at 08:21. As of 19:30 on the 12th her AIS hasn't been updated. Arriving Silver Bay around 21:00 on the 12th will be the American Integrity. There is a possibility the Clyde S. VanEnkevort/Erie Trader could arrive Silver Bay late on the 13th, but will probably arrive early on June 14th.

Thunder Bay, ON
Wednesday June 12: 7:55 Ojibway departed Keefer Terminal for Windsor. She had been berthed at Keefer Terminal since May 15. 15:20 saltie Finnborg arrived at Superior Elevator to load grain. Expected for Thursday: Whitefish Bay and Evans Spirit.

Northern Lake Huron ports

Alpena:
Tuesday: The cement carrier Alpena arrived at 14:34 Tuesday to load and departed Wednesday at 21:20 for Essexville. Wednesday; 5:10 Undaunted arrived to unload and departed at 14:51 for Port Inland.

Calcite:
Wednesday; 3:34 John G Munson arrived to load. 5:47 Lee A Tregurtha arrived to load.19:41 John G Munson departed for Marine City. 21:02 Lee A Tregurtha departed for Duluth Superior.

Stoneport:
Wednesday; 7:17 Manitowoc arrived to load.

Bruce Mine:
Wednesday; 7:58 Algoma Compass departed for Detroit.

Drummond Island:
Wednesday; 13:07 Great Republic departed for Buffington.

Meldrum Bay:
Wednesday; 4:58 Joseph H Thompson arrived to load and at 16:51 departed for Marysville.

Brevort:
Tuesday; 18:40 Calumet departed down bound on Lake Huron.

Port Inland:
Wednesday; 0:48 Cason J Callaway arrived to load and at 13:38 departed for Muskegon.

Goderich, ON – Bruce Douglas
Algoma Transport cleared Wednesday for Burns Harbor.

Cleveland, OH – Bill Kloss
6/13 arivals: Petite Forte to St. Mary's Cement, American Courage to RiverDock, Sam Laud to Arcelor Mittal Steel, Algoma Buffalo loading at Cargill Salt, Leonard M to the Port, Dock 22E and Federal Dart to the Port, Dock 24W.

Welland Canal and vicinity vessel report - Wednesday Jun 12 - by Barry Andersen

Nanticoke:
arrival - Jun 11 - Algoma Sault at 0050 from the anchorage - docked - Jun 10 - tug Albert (ex Craig Eric Reinauer-18, El Bronco Grande-06, Hercules-81) at 1441 - departed - Jun 11- Algoma Sault at 2133 to the canal

Long Point Bay anchorage:
anchored - Jun 11 - Algoterra at 0237

Buffalo:
arrivals - Jun 12 - Manitoulin anchored at 0816 off the breakwater

Welland Canal:
upbound - Jun 11 -Strandja (Mlt) (ex Eastwind York-10) at 2058 - anchoring at Port Weller - Jun 12 - no vessels

downbound - Jun 11 - tug Spartan & Spartan II at 1605 and NACC Argonaut at 2301 - Jun 12 - Algoma Sault at 0359, Thunder Bay at 0450, Baie Comeau at 0557, CSL Laurentien at 0925, Algoma Discovery at 1244 and Kivalliq W eta 2215

Welland Canal docks:
docked - Jun 7 - CCGS Pierre Radisson at 0925 into Heddle Dry Dock at Port Weller

Port Weller anchorage:
anchored - Jun 11 - Strandja (Mlt) (ex Eastwind York-10) at 2137 - awaiting dock at Oshawa - Jun 12 - Emanuele S (Bds) (ex SCT Monte Rosa-17, MCT Monte Rosa-15) at 1521 from Hamilton - departed - Jun 12 - Paul A Desgagnes at 0650 for Bronte

Hamilton:
arrival - Jun 11 - Lake St Clair (Atg) (ex Federal Miramichi-16) at 2238 - Jun 12 - G3 Marquis at 0338, Jana Desgagnes at 1158 and Rosy (Bds) (ex SCT Stockhorn-17, MCT Stockhorn-16, HHL Caspian-08) at _______ docked - Jun 4 - Federal Satsuki (Mhl) at 1113 and Blair McKeil (ex Gagliarda-19) at 1415 - (renamed - Blair McKeil on Friday June 7th) - Jun 9 - Rt Hon Paul J Martin at 2043 and Egmondgracht (Nld) at 2203 - Jun 10 - Redhead ii (Atg) (ex Bora-19, Hermann Schoening-15) at 1845 from the anchorage - Jun 10 - Algoma Harvester at 0121 - Jun 11 - Lake St Clair (Atg) (ex Federal Miramichi-16) eta 2330 - departed - Jun 12 - Emanuele S (Bds) (ex SCT Monte Rosa-17, MCT Monte Rosa-15) at 1235

Bronte:
docked - Jun 10 - Sarah Desgagnes at 2156 from the anchorage

Clarkson:
arrival - Algoma Sault at 1814

Mississauga:
arrival - Jun 11 - Arsland (Mlt) (ex CT Dublin-11) at 00633 from Port Weller anchorage

Toronto:
arrivals - Jun 8 - Aragonborg (Nld) at 2051 and Chestnut (Cyp) at 1753 - Jun 10 - McKeil Spirit at 0114

Oshawa:
arrival Jun 11 - Lubie (Bhs) at 1830 from Port Weller anchorage

 

Family of 4 rescued at Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore

6/13 - Munising, MI – A family of four from Minnesota is safe after their canoe took on water Tuesday night along the Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore.

At approximately 9 p.m. Tuesday, the Alger County Sheriff’s Office received a call from a Pictured Rocks cruise boat reporting several people stranded on the Pictured Rocks Lakeshore near Bridal Falls, located approximately 1 mile east of Miners beach. The Alger County Rescue 21 team responded with two vessels.

Upon completion of the rescue it was determined that a family of four from Minneapolis, MN, was canoeing along the Pictured Rocks Lakeshore when they were overtaken by rising winds and waves. The victims said their canoe had taken on a substantial amount of water.

The two adults and two small children, who were wearing life jackets, had to swim approximately 150 yards to reach a small rocky beach near Bridal Falls of Pictured Rocks. Passengers and the captain of a Pictured Rocks Cruise boat saw the victims and contacted the Alger County Sheriff’s Office.

The victims were recovered from the rocky shores and transported to the Munising Marina by the Alger County Rescue boat. All four were transported to MMH for evaluation by the Alger County EMS staff. The rescue team was assisted by an employee and a passenger of the Pictured Rocks Cruises.

Following is a report posted on social media from Pictured Rocks Cruises:

Last night (Tuesday), while returning from the 7:30pm Spray Falls Cruise, Captain David Sliter of Pictured Rocks Cruises spotted a family stranded on a rock near the Painted Coves at Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore. His vigilance and subsequent efforts probably saved the lives of two adults and two young children.

The family stranded on the rock had upset their canoe and been forced to swim to the base of the cliffs. Surface water temperature at the time was 47 degrees Fahrenheit, and winds were building.

The area where the family was stranded is littered with boulders and underwater obstacles making it impossible for the Pictured Rocks Cruise boat to get near the family. Captain Sliter made several emergency calls, and the Alger County Sheriff's Department, as well as Dean Seaberg of the Grand Island Ferry Service responded. Mr. Seaberg's boat had a shallow enough draft to allow him to approach the stranded family.

Deckhand Alex Hill of Pictured Rocks Cruises and a physician who happened to be a passenger on the Pictured Rocks Cruise boat boarded Mr. Seaberg's boat and climbed up the rocks to the stranded family. The two children were so weak and numbed by cold that they couldn't walk. Alex Hill and the physician carried them approximately 40 yards down the rock pile to an area where the Alger County Sheriff Boat could pick them up and rush them to Munising for medical attentio

 

Seaway system starts conversion to automated locks

6/13 - Calling it "the most important technological advance" in the Saint Lawrence Seaway since its opening 60 years ago, the U.S. government announced this month that hands-free mooring was deployed on locks in the Saint Lawrence River connecting the Great Lakes to the Atlantic Ocean.

Instead of workers and ropes, the technology uses vacuum pads and automation to get ships through the locks — cutting transit times and creating other efficiencies for foreign ships coming into the Great Lakes.

“This new technology is a significant modernization of the Saint Lawrence Seaway’s infrastructure and will enhance workplace safety, lower operating costs for carriers, and decrease vessel transit times through the locks,” U.S. Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao said in a news release.

The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Saint Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation announced the new technology following its additions to the Snell and Eisenhower locks on a section of the Saint Lawrence River making up the northeastern border of New York state.

The $23-million project is the first use of the technology on the inland waterway.

Hands-free mooring is expected to migrate to the Soo Locks sometime in the future. The Soo Locks connect Lake Superior with the remaining Great Lakes, and efforts to build another super lock next to the Soo’s 1,000-foot-plus Poe Lock are ongoing. Any new construction would undoubtedly feature hands-free mooring, sources said.

The Duluth Seaway Port Authority greeted the news by calling it a “win.”

“Time is money, so technology that reduces transit time through the seaway is definitely intriguing,” Executive Director Deb DeLuca said. “Hands-free mooring is designed to do that, and enhance safety, so it has potential to be a significant win-win. Plus, it could open the Great Lakes to new vessel operators.”

The system uses vacuum pads, each of which provides up to 20 tons of holding force, mounted on vertical rails inside the lock chamber wall to secure the ship during the lockage process as it is raised or lowered — always keeping ships a fixed distance from the lock wall.

The last step in the lockage operation consists of releasing the vacuum and retracting the pads so that the vessel can sail safely out of the lock.

Full implementation of the technology is important to the Great Lakes-Saint Lawrence Seaway System, the government said, explaining how with increased tonnage comes a desire to relieve congestion. A 7 percent increase in vessels transiting the Saint Lawrence Seaway last year resulted in moving 41 million tons of cargo through what is a binational waterway with Canada.

The increase in shipping through the Saint Lawrence Seaway amounted to the highest cargo total since 2007.

“Hands-free mooring will dramatically improve vessel transit,” Craig Middlebrook, of the Saint Lawrence Seaway Development Corp., said.

Duluth News Tribune

 

Take This Job and Love It: Soo Locks Engineer

6/13 - Seven thousand ships pass through the Soo Locks each year. Whether it is small recreational boats or thousand foot freighters, every boat that passes through the locks does so with the help of engineers.

Beverly McCreedy is a Civil Engineer at the Soo Locks. She gets a taste of everything - working on construction, maintenance, and electrical projects.

“On any given day I don’t necessarily know what is going to come up. I could be working on anything from structural design work for lock gates, we have a hydro power plant here sometimes it is things to keep their building up and running. I’ve been involved with some electrical upgrade projects. It is just a huge amount of variety in projects.”

Beverly works Monday through Friday, from 8 A.M. until 5 P.M. She’s worked at the locks for the past five years but has been an engineer for the past thirty. Earlier this year she was promoted to technical engineer. She said she’s top tier employee, which puts her pay around eighty thousand dollars a year.

Beverly works in the maintenance department, and her main job is to fix problems. She said around ninety percent of her time is dedicated to planning. During the navigational period, she investigates problems in the locks and evaluates what needs repairs, she prioritizes the work and develop the logistics for each repair.

Beverly said the locks have a lot going on year round, but she’s busiest between January and March, during the non-navigational season. That’s when the locks are drained, covered, and heated so maintenance crews can do repairs.

She said her favorite thing is how so many moving parts work together to keep the locks moving. “There are so many unseen parts and people doing jobs that you don’t think about until you actually work here and you realize what an involved operation it is to make everything work right.”

Beverly said visitors most often see lock operators, putting the lines on the boats and open the gates. But there are so many other workers that are behind the scenes. She says the reason the locks are able to work is because of how all of the parts work together.

Currently the Soo Locks send around 86 percent of boats through the huge Poe lock. For every ten boats that come through the Soo, nine of them are carrying iron ore that is used in businesses across the United States.

According to the U.S. Department of Homeland Security if the Poe Lock closes it could impact ten million jobs across the country and at least two million jobs internationally.

Beverly said the Soo may soon be starting a new,big project. Right now the federal government is deciding whether or not to appropriate money to build a new lock in Sault Ste Marie. One as big as the Poe. The project is estimated to cost close to one billion dollars and will take around a decade to complete.

If the Soo gets funding for a new lock, construction will pick up over the next decade and Beverly will have a lot more to love about her job.

Listen to the interview at this link: https://radio.wcmu.org/post/take-job-and-love-it-soo-locks-engineer

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  June 13

On 13 June 2003, after completing her conversion from American to Canadian registry, Lower Lakes Towing's newly-acquired MICHIPICOTEN, a.) ELTON HOYT 2ND, departed the Government dock at Sarnia, Ontario. First she went to the Shell Oil dock in Corunna, Ontario to fuel, then she departed for Marquette, Michigan to load ore for Algoma Steel in Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario.

On June 13, 1983, JOHN B. AIRD began its maiden voyage for Algoma Central Railway, a load of coal from Thunder Bay to Nanticoke, Ontario.

IRVING S. OLDS carried a record 17,817 gross tons of iron ore on June 13, 1943, from Lake Superior and transported a total of 736,800 short tons of various bulk cargoes the next year.

On the morning of June 13, 1905, running downbound on Lake Superior, the heavily-laden SYLVANIA encountered heavy fog as she approached the Soo. Confused whistle signals resulted in the SYLVANIA glancing off the Pittsburgh Steamship Co., steamer SIR HENRY BESSEMER, which sustained a 175-foot port side gash from the SYLVANIA's anchor. The BESSEMER required $40,000 in repairs and the SYLVANIA's damage totaled $10,000, which included a new anchor and shell plating which was completed at the Craig Shipbuilding Co., Toledo, Ohio.

June 13, 1930 - Shortly after leaving Menominee, Michigan, fireman Walter O'Leary of the ANN ARBOR NO 7 became ill. The carferry proceeded at full speed to the nearest doctor at Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin, where surgery was performed to remove gallstones.

June 13, 1974 - The CITY OF GREEN BAY, formerly WABASH was sold to Marine Salvage Company to be scrapped. She was scrapped at Castellon, Spain in 1974. On 13 June 1903, CHARLES H. DAVIS (wooden propeller bulk freighter, 145 foot, 391 gross tons, built in 1881, at Saginaw, Michigan) was carrying limestone on Lake Erie off Cleveland when she developed a leak which quickly got worse and admitted water faster than her pumps capacity. She sank near the Cleveland breakwater. She was an unusual vessel, reportedly built of pine and pointed at both ends with her planking set diagonally.

1905 – The wooden steamer YAKIMA had stranded in Lake St. Clair on June 10, 1905, but caught fire and burned on this date while waiting to be salvaged. The remains were later towed into Lake Huron and scuttled.

1906 – The newly-built J. PIERPONT MORGAN carried a record 13, 294 tons of iron ore out of Escanaba for Chicago.

On 13 June 1902, METROPOLIS (wooden side-wheel steamer, 168 foot, 425 tons, built in 1868, at Detroit, Michigan) caught fire and burned to a total loss at her dock in Toledo, Ohio. She was only used occasionally for excursions and spent most of her time tied up to the dock.

1944 – CANADIAN OTTER was built at Welland in 1920 but, in 1944, was sailing as f) FUKOKU MARU as a Japanese army cargo ship. It was sunk by aircraft from U.S.S. ESSEX while in a convoy from Philippines to Japan in the overnight hours of June 13-14, 1944.

1959 – A fire in the crew quarters of the FEDERAL PIONEER, docked at Section 51 in Montreal, was quickly controlled with only minor damage and sailing was delayed by three hours. The ship was a frequent Seaway trader for Federal Commerce and Navigation, now known as FedNav, and arrived at Hsinkiang, China, for scrapping on January 21, 1971.

1978 – Seven men were lost aboard the ANCO DUKE while cleaning tanks out in the Pacific. They were likely overcome by fumes. The ship later came to the Great Lakes as c) LAKE ANETTE in 1980, as d) SATU MAR in 1984 and as e) TOVE COB in 1987. It was scrapped in Bangladesh in 1993.

1978 – The bulk carrier ARCTIC hit the Cherry Street Bridge at Toledo on its first trip and had to return to Port Weller Dry Docks for repairs.

1980 – TROYAN first came through the Seaway in 1972. The ship began leaking in heavy weather as c) SUNRISE and foundered June 13, 1980, in the outer anchorage at Bombay, India, while enroute from Japan to Damman, Saudi Arabia, with bagged cement.

2004 – The SINGAPORE STAR first came to the Great Lakes in 1982. It caught fire in the accommodation area while on the Black Sea as c) BARBADOS OKTAY on June 13, 2004. The ship was carrying scrap steel from Novorossiysk, Russia, to Eregli, Turkey. The blaze was put out with tug assistance but the ship was sold for scrap and arrived at Aliaga, Turkey, to be broken up on July 19, 2004.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Jody Aho, Max Hanley, Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II, The Marine Historical Society of Detroit and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Rossi A. Desgagnes arrived in Canada on her maiden voyage

6/12 - The newest member of the Groupe Desgagnes Inc. fleet, the tanker Rossi A. Desgagnes, arrived in Quebec City on Tuesday from Cartagena, Spain, on her maiden voyage.

Rossi A. Desgagnes is the fourth and final vessel of a series of tankers that began in 2017 at the Besiktas Gemi Insa Shipyard in Turkey with Damia Desgagnes, followed by Mia Desgagnes and Paul A. Desgagnes. Each vessel is about 443 feet in length and about 77 feet in width.

Denny Dushane

 

Port Reports -  June 12

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day’s news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known).

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
The only traffic in Duluth on Tuesday was James R. Barker, which departed at 04:06 with a load of iron ore pellets for Toledo. Pacific Huron was tied up at CHS 2 loading wheat, and Alamosborg was anchored outside the harbor. In Superior, Edwin H. Gott arrived at 01:08 to load ore at Burlington Northern, and was expected to depart Tuesday evening. Stewart J. Cort was anchored waiting for her turn at the dock. Also in the Twin Ports on Tuesday was the tug Nathan S., which had arrived on Monday with a spud barge. The pair tied up at Fraser Shipyards, where the self-unloading boom of the former American Victory will be loaded onto the barge. Nathan S. is due next in Sturgeon Bay, where the boom will be refurbished at Bay Shipbuilding and eventually placed on the deck of the new vessel being constructed for Interlake Steamship.

Two Harbors-Silver Bay, MN – Gary A. Putney
American Spirit arrived Two Harbors on June 10th at 19:11 for North of #2 lay-by. She was originally scheduled to load at Northshore Mining. Also arriving Two Harbors on June 10th was the Edwin H. Gott for South of #2 to fuel. She arrived at 19:57 for fuel and departed at 23:20 for BNSF #5 in Superior. She was originally scheduled to load in Two Harbors. After the Gott departed the American Spirit shifted to South of #2 where she departed from on June 11th at 10:33 for Zug Island. Due Two Harbors on June 12th are the Indiana Harbor and the Spruceglen. Due Northshore Mining on June 11th is the Joyce L. VanEnkevort/Great Lakes Trader. She should arrive at approx. 20:00. There is no scheduled traffic for Silver Bay on June 12th.

Thunder Bay, ON
Tuesday June 11: 5:25 tug Sharon M I and barge Huron Spirit departed Pollard Highway Products for Sault Ste Marie. 17:05 Algoma Strongfield departed Superior Elevator for Baie Comeau. 19:46 saltie Juno departed Viterra A for Montreal. Expected for Wednesday: saltie Finnborg.

St. Marys River
After spending most of Tuesday at anchor in the upper river, Roger Blough was downbound in the evening with the tug Indiana escorting her as far as the lower end of the Rock Cut. Indiana was at the Blough’s stern, however it is unknown what kind of mechanical issues the Blough may have been experiencing. Other evening traffic included American Integrity, Spruceglen and Algoma Spirit upbound and Mesabi Miner downbound. Algoma Innovator remained at Algoma Steel.

Port Inland, MI – Denny Dushane
Kaye E. Barker loaded at Port Inland on Sunday. Also expected to arrive on Sunday was the Joseph L. Block in the late evening hours to load. Cason J. Callaway was due on Tuesday in the early evening to load.

Charlevoix, MI
Atlantic Huron arrived on Tuesday.

Sturgeon Bay, WI
Wilfred Sykes arrived at Bayship Tuesday morning for unspecified repairs.

Northern Lake Huron ports

Parry Sound:
Tuesday; 8:37 Samuel Risley arrived at her home base after an extended deployment working on Nav Aids along Lake Superior to Thunder Bay.

Alpena:
Tuesday; 5:28 Great Republic departed for Drummond Island.14:01 G L Ostrander departed for Milwaukee. 14:34 The cement carrier Alpena arrived to load.

Calcite:
Tuesday; 5:39 Olive L Moore arrived to load and departed at 17:52 for Detroit.

Stoneport:
Tuesday; 0:45 Dorothy Ann and Pathfinder arrived to load limestone and departed at 17:24 for Caseville.

Bruce Mine:
Tuesday 18:10 Algoma Compass arrived to load trap rock.

Drummond Island:
Tuesday; 19:42 Great Republic arrived to load.

Port Dolomite:
Monday; 19:13 Joseph L Block departed for Duluth Superior Brevort:
Tuesday; 18:40 Calumet arrived to load.

Detroit-Rouge River – Raymond H.
Tuesday Arrivals: John G Munson, Manitowoc, and Clyde S VanEnkevort/Erie Trader fueled at the Waterfront Petroleum Terminal. Herbert C Jackson arrived at Zug Island to unload coal.

Toledo, OH – Denny Dushane
Herbert C. Jackson was expected to arrive at the CSX Coal Dock to load on Tuesday in the early morning. Also due at CSX to load is the tug Victory / barge Maumee on Sunday, June 16 during the morning. Due at the Torco Dock is the Interlake Steamship 1,000-footer James R. Barker to unload iron ore pellets on Friday during the early morning. Algoma Conveyor arrived on Sunday for the first time to unload a grain cargo from Thunder Bay, ON.

Northeast Ohio ports – Bill Kloss
6/11 arrivals: Robert S. Pierson to Marblehead, John J. Boland to Ashtabula. 6/11 departures: American Courage from Marblehead to Cleveland.

Cleveland, OH – Bill Kloss
6/11 arrivals: Clyde S. VanEnkevort to the Bulk Terminal, Samuel deChamplain to LaFarge and Federal Dart to the Port. Manitou was erroneously reported to have departed but remains in Cleveland.

6/11 departures: Clyde S. VanEnkevort to Silver Bay and Calusa Coast to Detroit.

Welland Canal and vicinity vessel report - Tuesday June 11 - by Barry Andersen

Nanticoke:
arrival - June 11 - Algoma Sault at 0050 from the anchorage - docked - June 10 - tug Albert (ex Craig Eric Reinauer-18, El Bronco Grande-06, Hercules-81) at 1441 - departed - June 10 - Whitefish Bay at 2229

Long Point Bay anchorage:
anchored - June 10 - Algoma Sault at 1751 - June 11 - Algoterra at 0237 - departed - June 11 - Algoma Sault at 2329 for the dock

Buffalo:
arrivals - June 9 - NACC Argonaut at 0924 (anchored) and American Mariner at 121

Welland Canal:
upbound - June 10 - Rt Hon Paul J Martin at 1556 and Federal Dart (Mhl) at 1939 - Jun 11 -Tim S Dool at 0038, Gardno (Bhs) at 0743, Algoma Harvester at 0914 and Strandja (Mlt) (ex Eastwind York-10) at 2058 - anchoring at Port Weller

downbound - Jun 10 - CSL Welland at 1106, CCGS Sacred Bay at 1730 (on her maiden trip from Hike Metal Products Ltd yard - H207), Qikiqtaaluk W at 2248 - Jun 11 - CSL Niagara at 0717, tug Spartan & Spartan II at 1605,

Welland Canal docks:
docked - Jun 7 - CCGS Pierre Radisson at 0925 into Heddle Dry Dock at Port Weller - Jun 10 - CCGS Sacred Bay - stopped Coast Guard dock Port Weller overnight - departed Jun 11 at 0945 for Prescott

Port Weller anchorage:
anchored - Jun 9 - Federal Kivalina (Mhl) at 1225 - Jun 11 - Paul A Desgagnes at 0044 awaiting dock at Bronte and Strandja (Mlt) (ex Eastwind York-10) eta 2130 - awaiting dock at Oshawa - departed - departed - Jun 10 - Federal Kivalina (Mhl) eastbound - Jun 11 - Arsland (Mlt) (ex CT Dublin-11) at 0430 for Mississauga dock and Lubie (Bhs) at 1453 for Oshawa

Hamilton:
arrival - Jun 11 - Emanuele S (Bds) (ex SCT Monte Rosa-17, MCT Monte Rosa-15) at 0257 and Lake St Clair (Atg) (ex Federal Miramichi-16) eta 2330 - docked - Jun 4 - Federal Satsuki (Mhl) at 1113 and Blair McKeil (ex Gagliarda-19) at 1415 - (renamed - Blair McKeil on Friday June 7th) - Jun 9 - Rt Hon Paul J Martin at 2043 and Egmondgracht (Nld) at 2203 - Jun 10 - Redhead ii (Atg) (ex Bora-19, Hermann Schoening-15) at 1845 from the anchorage - Jun 10 - Algoma Harvester at 0121 - departed - Jun 10 - Tim S Dool at 2236 eastbound and Algoma Harvester at 0715 for the canal

Bronte:
docked - Jun 10 - Sarah Desgagnes at 2156 from the anchorage

Mississauga:
arrival - Jun 11 - Arsland (Mlt) (ex CT Dublin-11) at 00633 from Port Weller anchorage

Toronto:
arrivals - June 8 - Aragonborg (Nld) at 2051 and Chestnut (Cyp) at 1753 - June 10 - McKeil Spirit at 0114

Oshawa:
arrival June 11 - Lubie (Bhs) at 1830 from Port Weller anchorage - departed - June 11 - Lake St Clair (Atg) (ex Federal Miramichi-16) at 1820 for Hamilton

 

Help Wanted: Licensed Master for Ranger III

6/12 - Isle Royale National Park - Houghton, MI This position functions as master of the Isle Royale National Park operated vessel, Ranger III, a 165’, 650 gross ton passenger (H), tank (D) and miscellaneous cargo (I) vessel. The Ranger III provides logistical support and commercial passenger/freight service during the months of April – October to a wilderness island national park located approximately 70 miles north of park headquarters in Lake Superior.

During the off-season months (November – March), this position will be duty stationed at park headquarters in Houghton, MI. The Master is responsible for all aspects of vessel operations, administration, and maintenance.

Requirements include a Master of Steam or Motor Vessels, minimum 1,600 gross tons for the Great Lakes and Inland, First Class Pilot License and Radar Observer (unlimited) endorsement. This is a permanent-full time, federal government position, with a competitive wage and benefits package. Contact Randy Rastello, Chief of Maintenance, at (906) 487-7145, for further job related information or with questions. Please email resumes/qualifications to (randy_rastello@nps.gov) or mail to: Isle Royale National Park, 800 E Lakeshore Dr., Houghton, MI.

 

Sign up now for Engineers Day Soo Freighter Chasing Cruise

6/12 - The 2019 schedule of Boatnerd Gatherings has been set and information is now available now on the Gathering page, www.boatnerd.com/gathering

Gatherings include Soo Locks Engineers weekend festivities and the annual Welland Canal weekend. Reservations are now being accepted for the Soo Locks Freighter-Chasing Cruise June 28. Reservations must be received no later than June 21 to receive the $40 price. Sign up now – don't be left on the dock.

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  June 12

On 12 June 1898, SAKIE SHEPHERD (wooden propeller freighter, 100 foot, 189 gross tons, built in 1883, at Huron, Ohio) burned while at the dock in Courtright, Ontario. The fire was discovered at 1:00 a.m. and the crew just had time to escape. The schooner YOUNG AMERICA also caught fire and had damage done to her stern. The SHEPHERD was towed to Detroit where she was rebuilt and lasted until 1903, when she sank in Lake Huron.

On 12 June 1900, the UNIQUE (wooden propeller, 163 foot, 381 gross tons, built in 1894, at Marine City, Michigan) was sold at public auction at St. Clair, Michigan to satisfy a mortgage. W. J. Laidlaw of Ogdensburg, New York purchased her for $20,000 for the Rapid Transit Co. to run between Ogdensburg and Kingston, Ontario. In 1904, her upper cabins were removed and she was rebuilt as a yacht. She lasted until 1915, when she burned in New York City harbor.

"STUBBY", the bow and stern sections of the STEWART J. CORT welded together, passed Port Colborne, Ontario on June 12, 1970, bound for Erie, Pennsylvania under her own power. STUBBY's bow and stern sections were later separated at Erie Marine, Inc., a Div. of Litton, and joined to the 816 foot hull mid-body.

The NANTICOKE (Hull#218) departed Collingwood, Ontario in 1980, beginning her maiden voyage for Canada Steamship Lines Ltd.

In 1959, the BENSON FORD of 1924 ran aground in the Amherstburg Channel on her upbound trip with coal for the Rouge Plant. After five days of lightering and with tug assistance, she was freed. Damage amounted to 41 bottom plates, which took 30 days to repair.

On 12 June 1832, the wooden schooner GUERRIER was sailing from Oswego, New York for Detroit when she capsized in a squall off Bar Point on Lake Erie. Captain Pember and the crew and most of the passengers made it to the Canadian shore, but one family was trapped in the cabin. The husband was able to keep his head above water in the upside down cabin, but through the night, one by one, his four children and then his wife slipped from his grasp and perished. The following day, Capt. Stanard took his steamer NIAGARA to the wreck and rescued the man.

On 12 June 1900, the steel tow barge BRYN MAWR (Hull#41) was launched at South Chicago, Illinois by the Chicago Ship Building Co., for the Pittsburgh Steamship Company.

The wooden propeller freighter MILWAUKEE (264 foot, 1,770 gross tons) was launched at Quayle & Sons yard in Cleveland, Ohio on 12 June 1879, for the Western Transportation Company of Buffalo, New York. She had supporting arches above decks. In 1902, she was renamed YONKERS and rebuilt as a barge in 1911. She lasted until 1917-1918 when she stranded, then burned.

1897 – I.W. NICHOLAS (ii) stranded at Point Aux Pins in fog and was released two days later. The ship needed drydocking for repairs.

1904 – The sidewheel passenger ship CANADA sank on her side off Sorel after a collision with the CAPE BRETON. Five of the 110 on board perished. The ship was refloated and rebuilt at Sorel in 1905 as ST. IRENEE which later became part of the C.S.L. Fleet.

1919 – GERMAN was cut in two to leave the Great Lakes in 1918 and renamed b) YANKEE. It sank after a collision with the Italian steamer ARGENTIA off Fire Island, NY, while enroute from Norfolk, VA to Boston MA with coal. The hull has been found and is in two pieces on the ocean floor.

1977 – The VERA CRUZ first came to the Great Lakes in 1964 as a 10-year old Liberian flag freighter. It foundered in the Arabian Sea as c) BUKOM ISLAND on June 12, 1974, during a cyclone. The ship was enroute from Umm Said, Qatar, to Singapore with a cargo of bagged fertilizer and seven lives were lost.

1978 – YELLOWSTONE had been built as the C-4 troop carrier MARINE PERCH in 1944. After being laid up in the Reserve Fleet, it was rebuilt as a bulk carrier and renamed at Tampa in 1965. The ship was downbound in the Seaway with grain from Duluth to North Africa in May 1978 and sank after a collision in fog with the IBN BATOUTA on June 12, 1978. YELLOWSTONE was taken in tow but went down June 13 about 14 miles south of Gibraltar. Five lives were lost.

1993 – The deep-sea tug VORTICE was abandoned after fire broke out near the Canary Islands, while on a voyage from Bari, Italy, to Veracruz, Mexico. The vessel was laid up, unrepaired, and then towed to Canada for McKeil Marine. It received partial repairs but was sold and left the lakes for additional work. It returned inland as e) NORFOLK in 2005 and now serves Lafarge North America Inc. as f) SAMUEL DE CHAMPLAIN.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Max Hanley, Joe Barr, Father Dowling Collection, Historical Collections of the Great Lakes, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Port Reports -  June 11

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day’s news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known).

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
James R. Barker arrived Duluth at 15:26 Monday afternoon to load iron ore pellets at Canadian National, and the saltie Pacific Huron was inbound at 19:52 for a load of wheat from CHS 2. Alamosborg remained at anchor offshore, and now has an estimated arrival date of Friday, June 14 listed. She will head to Gavilon to load beet pulp pellets. There was no traffic at Burlington Northern in Superior on Monday, however Stewart J. Cort and CSL Tadoussac are both expected Tuesday afternoon/evening to load.

Two Harbors, MN – Gary A. Putney
Edgar B. Speer departed Two Harbors on June 10th at 06:17 for Conneaut. Arriving Two Harbors for South of #2 at 19:11 was the American Spirit. Due Two Harbors at approx. 20:00 will be the Edwin H. Gott. There is no scheduled traffic for Two Harbors on June 11th. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay saw the departure of the Mesabi Miner at approx. 16:30 on June 10th for Indiana Harbor. Due Silver Bay on June 11th is the Joyce L. VanEnkevort/Great Lakes Trader.

Thunder Bay, ON
Monday June 10: 3:49 tug Sharon M I and barge Huron Spirit arrived at Pollard Highway Products to discharge calcium chloride. 9:06 saltie Juno arrived at Viterra A to load grain. 10:25 Algoma Strongfield arrived at Superior Elevator to load grain.

Alpena, MI – Ben & Chanda McClain
The tug G.L. Ostrander and barge Integrity was in port on Monday. It was tied up at Lafarge but is not expected to load product until Tuesday morning. On Monday evening the Great Republic came into Lafarge stern first and tied up to unload cargo at the dock.

Northern Lake Huron ports

Alpena:
Monday; 18:22 Great Republic arrived to unload petroleum coke.

Calcite:
Monday; 6:43 Philip R Clarke departed down bound on Lake Huron.

Cheboygan:
Monday; 13:29 The tug Michigan and barge Great Lakes departed for Green Bay.

Drummond Island:
Sunday; 21:12 Victory and James L Kuber arrived to load and departed on Monday at 12:50 for Fair Port.

Port Dolomite:
Monday; 13:33 Joseph L Block arrived to finish loading.

Port Inland:
Sunday; 20:49 Joseph L Block arrived to take on a partial load and on Monday at 5:10 departed for Port Dolomite.

Detroit-Rouge River – Raymond H
Monday Arrivals: American Integrity arrived at Zug Island to unload ore. Samuel De Champlain/Innovation arrived at Lafarge to unload cement. Spartan/Spartan 2-arrived at the Waterfront Petroleum Terminal. Lee A Tregurtha arrived at AK Steel to unload ore.

Toledo, OH
The new Algoma vessel Algoma Conveyor was at the Hanson Mueller Dock unloading a grain cargo on Monday. This dock is located just north of the Craig Bridge by the salt pile.

Northeast Ohio ports – Bill Kloss
6/10 arrivals: Manitowoc to Marblehead, Joseph H. Thompson and Frontenac to Fairport Harbor and John G. Munson and Saginaw to Ashtabula

Cleveland, OH – Bill Kloss
6/10 arrivals: Federal Rhine to the Port, Dock 24E, USS Billings-Port Dock 28W, Herbert C. Jackson to Arcelor Mittal Steel, Sea Eagle II to St. Mary's Cement, Sam Laud on a shuttle and Calusa Coast to Marathon. 6/10 departures: Manitou to Port Huron and American Courage to Marblehead.

Welland Canal and vicinity vessel report - Monday Jun 10 – Barry Andersen

Nanticoke:
arrivals - Jun 10 - Whitefish Bay at 1420 and tug Albert (ex Craig Eric Reinauer-18, El Bronco Grande-06, Hercules-81) at 1441 docked - Jun 9 - tug Leonard M & Niagara Spirit at 1012 - departed - Jun 10 - Algoma Compass at 0522 and Algosea at 1351 west bound

Long Point Bay anchorage:
anchored - Jun 9 - Albert (ex Craig Eric Reinauer-18, El Bronco Grande-06, Hercules-81) & Margaret at 1637 - departed - Jun 10 - tug Albert & Margaret 1357 for the dock - Jun 10 - tug Petite Forte & St Marys Cement at 0825 and Algoma Sault at 1754 westbound

Buffalo:
arrivals - Jun 9 - NACC Argonaut at 0924 (anchored) and American Mariner at 121

Welland Canal:
upbound - Jun 9 - tug Petite Forte & St Marys Cement at 1429, Evans Spirit at 1722, Algonova at 1846 and Algoma Spirit at 2014 - Jun 10 - Robert S Pierson at 1059, Rt Hon Paul J Martin at 1556 and Federal Dart (Mhl) at 1939

downbound - Jun 10 - CSL Welland at 1106, CCGS Sacred Bay at 1730 (on her maiden trip from Hike Metal Products Ltd yard - H207), Qikiqtaaluk W eta2220

Welland Canal docks:
docked - Jun 7 - CCGS Pierre Radisson at 0925 into Heddle Dry Dock at Port Weller

Port Weller anchorage:
anchored - Jun 4 - Arsland (Mlt) (ex CT Dublin-11) at 0740 - Jun 8 - Lubie (Bhs) at 2240 - Jun 9 - Federal Kivalina (Mhl) at 1225 - departed -

Hamilton:
arrival - Jun 10 - Algoma Harvester at 0121 - docked - Jun 4 - Federal Satsuki (Mhl) at 1113 and Blair McKeil (ex Gagliarda at 1415 - (renamed Blair McKeil on Friday June 7th) - Jun 9 - Tim S Dool at 0100, Rt Hon Paul J Martin at 2043 and Egmondgracht (Nld) at 2203 - Jun 10 - Redhead ii (Atg) (ex Bora-19, Hermann Schoening-15) at 1845 from the anchorage departed - Jun 10 - Rt Hon Paul J Martin at 1347 for the canal and Tecumseh at 1526 eastbound

Bronte:
arrival - Jun 9 - Sarah Desgagnes at 1039

Clarkson:
docked - Jun 10 - Robert S Pierson at 0012 - departed Jun 10 at 0915 westbound for the canal

Toronto:
arrivals - Jun 8 - Aragonborg (Nld) at 2051 and Chestnut (Cyp) at 1753 - Jun 10 - McKeil Spirit at 0114

Oshawa:
arrival - Jun 7 - Lake St Clair (Atg) (ex Federal Miramichi-16) at 1735

 

J.W. Westcott: How ships get mail on the Detroit River

6/11 - Detroit, MI – With waves crashing over the bow of his 14-metre boat, Capt. Sam Buchanan and his crew were alongside a freighter and a giant cargo ship the length of two football fields, with a tiny bucket dangling off the edge. Inside that bucket? The mail.

Buchanan skippers the J.W. Westcott II, a boat that delivers mail, parcels and everything from flowers to cookies for the people on board the ships that pass through the Detroit River.

And despite the challenges he and the crew face, they nearly always see the delivery through to the end.

The skipper said he has instilled in his crew the true value of what they do: bringing the outside world to these ships. "We certainly connect folks that are on ships to their home and to the rest of the world," said Buchanan.

Some days those deliveries are easier than others. A recent trip saw their boat battling wind blowing around 65 kilometres an hour as the bucket was thrown down.

"I've made about 50,000 deliveries in my career and I've only failed at one or two because of weather, but we know how important it is for the men and women on those ships to get their stuff."

Buchanan has been doing this for over 30 years, a career he forged through shear ambition and peskiness. Growing up in the shadow of the Ambassador Bridge, he watched the boat make deliveries and decided he needed to be a part of it. "I started bugging them for a job and when I turned 18, got out of high school, they gave me a part-time job," said Buchanan.

Capturing the moments

The trips are at times, documented online – including the Instagram page DetroitCapt and YouTube page, fittingly titled BoatNerd.
Both are run by Neil Schultheiss who mounts GoPros on the boat and sometimes flies a drone up above.

"You're getting a whole new perspective of the world," said Buchanan, who said even as someone who skippers the boat, it brings views he could never see.

View the video at this link: https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/windsor/boat-mail-detroit-windsor-1.5162558

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  June 11

TASHMOO (steel side-wheel excursion steamer, 308 foot, 1,344 gross tons, built in 1900, at Wyandotte, Michigan) entered regular service for the White Star Line at Detroit, Michigan, on 11 June 1900.

On 11 June 1903, HORACE H. BADGER (wooden 3-mast schooner, 129 foot, 263 gross tons, built in 1867, at Conneaut, Ohio as a 2-mast schooner, formerly KATE GILLETT) was carrying coal in a storm on Lake Erie. She was driven onto the breakwater at Cleveland, Ohio and broke up in the storm waves. The crew of seven was rescued by the Life Saving Service. This vessel had been wrecked twice before; once at Cross Village, Michigan, in 1895, and again near Alpena, Michigan in 1896.

ATLANTIC SUPERIOR (Hull#222) was float-launched at Thunder Bay, Ontario, by Port Arthur Ship Building Co. Ltd., in 1982, for Federal Commerce & Navigation Ltd., Montreal, Quebec (Canada Steamship Lines Ltd., mgr.), built for the Caribbean trade. MESABI MINER was christened at Duluth, Minnesota in 1977; she became the fourth thousand-foot bulk carrier on the Great Lakes and Interlake Steamship Co.'s second. CARL D. BRADLEY (Hull#718) cleared Lorain, Ohio, in her gray and white livery in 1917, on her maiden voyage light bound for Calcite, Michigan, to load limestone. She was the first Great Lakes commercial ship equipped with both Morse code telegraphy as well as ship-to-shore radio in 1922, which was standard on only 20 vessels by 1924. Renamed b.) JOHN G. MUNSON in 1927, c.) IRVIN L. CLYMER in 1951, she was scrapped at Duluth, Minnesota, in 1994-5.

June 11, 1981 - The BADGER steamed out of Ludington en route to Milwaukee under an MDOT subsidy that was approved earlier in March.

The propeller E. B. HALE was launched at Cleveland, Ohio, at the yard of Quayle & Sons on 11 June 1874. Her length was 217 foot keel, 227 foot overall. She was owned by Capt. Bradley, Mr. Thomas Quayle and Mr. Loomis, and she cost $100,000.

The wooden rabbit J. S. RUBY was launched at Fair Haven, Michigan, on 11 June 1881. Her dimensions were 106 feet 6 inches x 21 feet x 7 feet. She was towed to Port Huron for the installation of her boiler and engine that were built by the Phoenix Iron Works. She lasted until burned to a total loss off Stag Island in the St. Clair River on November 9, 1891.

1872 – Fire broke out aboard the passenger steamer KINGSTON about 18 miles upstream after the ship had left Brockville for Toronto. The ship was beached and the superstructure was destroyed but there were only two casualties. The hull was rebuilt at Montreal and later sailed as BAVARIAN, ALGERIAN and CORNWALL before being scuttled in Lake Ontario about 1929.

1936 – AYCLIFFE HALL sank in fog shrouded off Long Point, Lake Erie after a collision with the EDWARD J. BERWIND. All 19 on board were rescued. After salvage efforts failed, the rigging was blown clear by explosives. The EDWARD J. BERWIND was repaired and last sailed as LAC STE. ANNE in 1982.

1942 – HAVTOR, a Norwegian freighter, first came to the Great Lakes in 1932 and returned as late as 1939. It was sunk by a German submarine enroute from Reykjavik, Iceland, to Pictou, Nova Scotia, and 6 of the crew were lost.

1950 – The Italian freighter MARIA PAOLINA G. had been built in Canada as FORT ISLAND in 1944. It was downbound from the Saguenay River when it struck the Canada Steamship Lines passenger steamer ST. LAWRENCE, which had turned to dock at Tadoussac. Injuries were reported by 25 people and 30 cabins were damaged aboard the CSL ship.

1978 – The hull of the former passenger steamer RAPIDS QUEEN arrived at Toronto under tow from Kingston to be sunk as a breakwall off for the Queen City Yacht Club. It is still there.

1993 – PITRIA SKY first visited the Great Lakes in 1978. It departed Singapore for Shantou in southeast China, as h) HAI HONG 3 on June 11, 1993, but went back out to sea on arrival to ride out a pending typhoon. The ship was never seen again and it disappeared with all hands.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Max Hanley, Joe Barr, Father Dowling Collection, Historical Collections of the Great Lakes, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

McKeil Marine names newest member of fleet after Blair McKeil

6/10 - Burlington, ON – McKeil Marine Ltd. christened its latest acquisition, the dry-bulk cargo vessel Blair McKeil, in a ceremony Friday at Hamilton. The vessel honors the former chairman and CEO of McKeil Marine.

Formerly the saltwater vessel Gagliarda, Blair McKeil was built in 2010 and is a close sister ship to the fleet’s Evans Spirit and McKeil Spirit. She measures 140 metres by 21 metres, with a DWT of 14,600 metric tonnes.

The Blair McKeil is expected to trade throughout the Great Lakes and Eastern Seaboard, carrying cement powder, grain and other bulk cargo.

 

River board says outflow will increase, even at risk to shipping

6/10 - Watertown, NY – The International Lake Ontario-St. Lawrence River Board announced Saturday afternoon it will be increasing outflows to a point above the safe threshold for commercial shipping.

The announcement comes after weeks of high water, including record-breaking highs and flooding of residences near the water. Last week, water levels climbed to 249.02 feet, slightly over the 2017 record high of 248.95 feet.

The board implements Plan 2014, the document from the International Joint Commission that regulates water levels on the Great Lakes and the river. The announcement said that outflows reached 10,200 cubic meters per second on Friday and would gradually be increased until they hit 10,400 cubic meters a second next Thursday, the maximum sustained flow on record.

Also on Saturday, Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo continued his attack on the IJC, which he has consistently blamed for the high water levels, in a letter sent to the chairs of the commission.

“The IJC was put on notice in 2017 when the Lake set high-water level records and should have been aware of the present danger from the massive snowpack and likelihood of continued rains into the spring of this year,” Gov. Cuomo wrote in the letter. “Yet, rather than acting, the IJC continued the status quo, resulting in more flooding and more property damage in New York.”

Gov. Cuomo also said that State Sen. Robert G. Ortt, R-North Tonawanda, has suggested the possibility of taking legal action and listed several demands which, he said, if not met, could trigger legal action from New York State.

“The State of New York demands that the IJC reimburse New York for its costs, and make additional funds available for resiliency projects and other protective measures made necessary by the IJC’s acts and omissions,” Gov. Cuomo wrote. “The IJC must also immediately determine how much water can be safely released, irrespective of shipping, and release that amount.”

The letter was released shortly after the announcement from the board that it would be increasing outflows.

The IJC for its part said that it has been taking every possible opportunity to reduce water levels over the past year, while balancing a number of different obligations and concerns.

“The board did not miss any opportunities to remove water in 2018,” Frank Bevacqua, public information officer for the IJC, told the Times in May. “The goal was to remove as much water as possible, based on conditions in the St. Lawrence River.”

At the time, Mr. Bevacqua shared several graphs with the Times, showing historical outflows from Lake Ontario for 2018. Except for two dips in October, outflows from the lake through the summer and fall remained above average, even while the lake levels on Ontario were fairly close to average.

Engineer Robert J. Campany, a member of the river board from Clayton, said the board discussed the prospect of increasing outflows with officials from the St. Lawrence Seaway Management Corp. and Seaway Development Corp. on Friday. Officials, he said, plan to implement protocols to ensure safe navigation for the mariners.

“The board does coordinate with the Seaway entities to push flows as high as we can without creating unsafe conditions,” said Andrew Kornacki, chief of public affairs for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in Buffalo, who also serves as a spokesman for the river board.

The river board previously raised outflows to 10,400 cubic meters per second in the summer 2017, the last time Lake Ontario experienced record-breaking levels and flooded shoreline properties. Mr. Bevacqua said on Friday that Seaway officials enforced slower shipping speeds and launched extra tugboats in case of difficulties.

“They took measures that allowed them to accommodate higher flows, higher flows than were technically considered for safe navigation,” he said, “and at considerable cost.”

Frequent rainfall across the entire Great Lakes basin and outflows from Lake Erie have caused the rising lake levels that have submerged docks, closed roads and recently flooded homes.

Effects of the adverse weather and Lake Erie outflows were compounded by earlier high outflows from the Ottawa River, forcing the International Lake Ontario-St. Lawrence River Board to reduce outflows from the lake through the Robert Moses-Robert H. Saunders Power Dam in Massena and Cornwall, Ontario. The lake level reached 249.08 feet on Saturday.

The board, however, has since increased outflows multiple times with the Ottawa River subsiding and lake levels beginning to stabilize. The current conditions, coupled with prediction of warmer, drier weather this week, influenced the board’s decision on Friday to raise outflows to 10,200 cubic feet per second. The river board also stated Friday that lake levels could peak and possibly decline this week, although they will remain above average, and any additional increase “is likely to be small.”

Watertown Daily Times

 

Port Reports -  June 10

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day’s news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known).

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
The Midwest Energy dock in Duluth saw Sunday's only harbor traffic. Great Republic departed in the first few minutes of the day with a load of petroleum coke for Alpena, and then American Century tied up and began loading coal. Walter J. McCarthy Jr. arrived from anchor at 06:44, and waited behind the dock for her fleetmate to finish. American Century topped off and was outbound at 08:00, and the McCarthy then began loading. She remained at SMET for the rest of the day and was expected to depart around 21:00 Sunday night. Roger Blough was still loading iron ore pellets at CN on Sunday evening, and her departure time was unknown. Alamosborg remained on the hook outside the harbor.

Two Harbors, MN – Gary A. Putney
The Great Republic arrived Two Harbors on June 8th at 23:44 to fuel. She then departed on June 9th at 02:02 for Alpena. The CSL Laurentien departed Two Harbors on June 9th at 04:50 for Quebec City. The Algoma Discovery arrived Two Harbors on June 9th at 05:15 after being stopped out in the lake. She went to South of #2. The Algoma Discovery departed on June 9th at 17:16 for Hamilton. The Edgar B. Speer arrived Two Harbors on June 9th at 19:23 after being stopped in the lake. She went to South of #2. Due Two Harbors on June 10th is the Edwin H. Gott. The Mesabi Miner arrived Northshore Mining in Silver Bay on June 9th at approx. 18:30 after being anchored off Duluth for over a day. Due Silver Bay on June 10th is the American Spirit.

Thunder Bay, ON
Saturday June 8: 21:40 Manitoulin arrived at Richardson Main Terminal to load grain. Sunday June 9: 11:10 saltie Industrial Skipper arrived at Keefer Terminal to offload wind turbine parts. 12:23 Thunder Bay departed Viterra A for Montreal. 17:59 Manitoulin departed Richardson Main Terminal for Buffalo. Expected for Monday: Algoma Strongfield, saltie Juno and tug Sharon M I with barge Huron Spirit.

Northern Lake Huron ports
Alpena:

Sunday; 4:43 Samuel De Champlain arrived to load cement products and at 11:17 departed for Detroit. 17:47 G L Ostrander arrived to load cement products.

Stoneport:
Saturday; 21:16 Olive L Moore arrived to load. 23:13 Dorothy Ann and Pathfinder arrived and went to anchor. Sunday; 6:43 Olive L Moore departed for Saginaw. 7:03 Dorothy Ann and Pathfinder weighed anchor and proceeded to the dock to load. 16:38 She departed for Caseville.

Calcite:
Saturday; 16:43 Cason J Callaway arrived to load. Sunday; 0:26 John J Boland arrived to load limestone.9:36 Cason J Callaway departed for Burns Harbor. 9:37 Philip R Clarke arrived to load. 16:45 John J Boland departed down bound on Lake Huron.

Cheboygan:
Sunday; 13:29 The tug Michigan and barge Great Lakes arrived to unload petroleum products.

Port Dolomite:
Saturday:17:59 H Lee White arrived to load and departed Sunday at 9:36 for Erie PA.

Port Inland:
Saturday; 9:37 John G Munson arrived to load and departed at 22:01 for Ashtabula. Sunday; 0:05 Kaye E Barker arrived to load and departed down bound on Lake Michigan. Joseph L Block is expected later this evening.

Goderich, ON – Bruce Douglas
Algoma Buffalo was loading salt on Sunday. Algoma Transport remained at the north dock.

Detroit-Rouge River – Raymond H
Sunday Arrivals: Joyce L VanEnkevort/Great Lakes Trader-arrived at Zug Island to unload ore. Hon. James L Oberstar-arrived at AK Steel to unload ore. Iver Bright-arrived at the Marathon Asphalt Terminal to load.

Welland Canal and vicinity vessel report - Sunday Jun 9 – Barry Andersen

Nanticoke:
arrivals - Jun 8 - Algosea at 2121 - Jun 9 - tug Leonard M & Niagara Spirit at 1012 - Jun 9 - Algoma Compass at 1515 - departed - Jun 8 - Damia Desgagnes at 2222 eastbound

Long Point Bay anchorage:
anchored - Jun 8 - Algosea at 1359 - departed at 2110 for the dock

Buffalo:
arrivals - Jun 9 - NACC Argonaut at 0924 (anchored) and American Mariner at 1212

Port Colborne anchorage:
anchored - Jun 8 - Federal Kivalina (Mhl) at 2044 - departed - Jun 9 at 0156 eastbound

Welland Canal:
upbound - Jun 8 - tug Sea Eagle II & St Marys Cement II at 1528, Patalya (Mlt) at 1706 and NACC Argonaut at 1749 - Jun 9 - Algonorth at 0052, tug Albert & Margaret at 0158, Algoma Niagara at 0329, Spruceglen at 1124, Baie Comeau at 1314, tug Petite Forte & St Marys Cement at 1429, Evans Spirit at 1722, Algonova at 1846 and Algoma Spirit at 2014,

downbound - Jun 9 - Damia Desgagnes at 0226, Rt Hon Paul J Martin at 0612, Egmondgracht (Nld) at 0745, Federal Kivalina (Mhl) at 1111

Welland Canal docks:
docked - Jun 7 - CCGS Pierre Radisson at 0925 into Heddle Dry Dock at Port Weller

Port Weller anchorage:
anchored - Jun 4 - Arsland (Mlt) (ex CT Dublin-11) at 0740 - Jun 8 - Lubie (Bhs) at 2240 - Jun 9 - Federal Kivalina (Mhl) at - departed - Jun 9 - Selasse (Mlt) (ex CT Dublin-11) at 1440 -

Hamilton:
arrivals - Jun 9 - Algoma Spirit at 0150, Rt Hon Paul J Martin at 2043 and Egmondgracht (Nld) eta 2200 - anchored - Jun 7 - Redhead ii (Atg) (ex Bora-19, Hermann Schoening-15) at 0350 docked - Jun 4 - Tecumseh at 0217, Federal Satsuki (Mhl) at 1113 and Gagliarda at 1415 - Jun 9 - Tim S Dool at 0100 from the anchorage - departed - Jun 9 - Algoma Niagara at 0114 and Algoma Spirit 1704

Bronte:
arrival - Jun 9 Sarah Desgagnes at 1039 - departed - Jun 9 - Mia Desgagnes at 0621

Clarkson:
docked - Jun 8 - Robert S Pierson at 1411 - departed Jun 8 at 2254 eastbound

Toronto:
arrival - Jun 8 - Aragonborg (Nld) at 2051 and Chestnut (Cyp) at 1753 - Jun 9 - Baie Comeau at 0324, Victory II (Mhl) (ex Sea Discoverer-18, Clipper Discoverer-09, Coastal Queen 2-09, Cape Cod Light-07) at 0523 - departed - Jun 9 - Baie Comeau at 1147 for the canal and Victory II (Mhl) cruise ship at 1745 for Brockville, Ontario

Oshawa:
arrival - Jun 7 - Lake St Clair (Atg) (ex Federal Miramichi-16) at 1735

 

New $4M vessel coming to Shepler's in Mackinaw City for 2020

6/10 - Onaway, MI – Shepler's Mackinac Island Ferry is having another vessel constructed to take passengers to and from one of Michigan's top tourist destinations. The company says the $4 million ferry is being built by Moran Iron Works of Onaway. It's scheduled to start operating in summer 2020.

The 210-passenger boat will be wheelchair accessible and have an aft deck for luggage, bikes and strollers. Instead of propellers, the vessel will have four jet drives intended to provide a quieter, smoother and faster trip.

Moran Iron Works previously built another ferry for Shepler's, the 281-seat Miss Margy, which was launched in 2015. The new ferry will be assembled over the next several months and taken by trailer to a deep-water port in Rogers City, then sailed to Shepler's facility in Mackinaw City.

Associated Press

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  June 10

On 10 June 1891, the tug AMERICAN EAGLE (wooden propeller tug, 46 gross tons, built in 1865, at Buffalo, New York) collided with the tug ALVA B (wooden propeller tug, 73 foot, 83 gross tons, built in 1890, at Buffalo, New York), which was not in motion, about 2.5 miles west of the Cleveland breakwater. The ALVA B hooked up a line and started towing the AMERICAN EAGLE in, but she sank a half-mile from the harbor entrance.

On 10 June 1891, CHARLES W. WETMORE (steel propeller whaleback freighter, 265 foot, 1,399 gross tons) left the shipyard at West Superior, Wisconsin, on her maiden voyage, bound for Liverpool, England with a cargo of grain. During her trip to the Atlantic Ocean, she shot the St. Lawrence River rapids. In Liverpool, she loaded machinery for Puget Sound. She only lasted until September 1892, when she stranded one mile north of Coos Bay, Oregon in fog. Bad weather stopped salvage attempts and the vessel was abandoned.

Bethlehem's LEWIS WILSON FOY loaded her first cargo June 10, 1978, at Burlington Northern #5, Superior, Wisconsin, with 57,952 tons of Hibbing taconite pellets for Burns Harbor, Indiana. Renamed b.) OGLEBAY NORTON in 1991.

In 1892, the keel for the ANN ARBOR NO 1 (Hull#55) was laid at Toledo, Ohio by Craig Shipbuilding Co.

The ANN ARBOR NO 4 was sold to the Michigan State Ferries in 1937, and renamed b.) CITY OF CHEBOYGAN.

On 10 June 1877, while lying at her dock at Detroit, the wooden side-wheeler R N RICE burned. The damage was estimated at $30,000. After this fire, she was rebuilt as a barge.

The propeller MONTGOMERY burned in the early morning hours of 10 June 1878. The fire started while she was laying at the dock in Point Edward, Ontario. The carferry INTERNATIONAL towed her out into the St. Clair River and cast her off to drift. Fortunately there were no injuries. She finally was beached opposite Batchelor's Mill on the Canadian side by the tugs CRUSADER and J H MARTIN. At 10:00 a.m., she was still burning. The MONTGOMERY was a steam barge of 1,104 tons, built in 1856, and owned by Capt. John Pridgeon. She was fully loaded with 29,000 bushels of corn, 320 barrels of flour, 540 barrels of corn meal, 200 bags of timothy seed and 111 bales of broom corn, besides other freight. The local papers claimed that the spectacle presented by the burning vessel as she drifted down the river was "grand and beautiful". The light was so brilliant that the entire city of Port Huron was illuminated and many people came out to watch. The following day, the wreck was towed to the American side of the river just below Avery's Mill. Whatever was left of her cargo was taken off and sold. Her engines and boiler were so badly warped and twisted from the intense heat that they were worthless except as scrap.

U.S. Army Corps of Engineer dredge MARKHAM (Hull#904) was launched in 1959, at Avondale, Louisiana, by Avondale Marine Ways Inc.

1940 – PAIPOONGE was cut in two and left the Great Lakes for saltwater service in 1919. It was registered in Latvia as d) KAUPO when it was sunk as a blockship at Dieppe, France, on this date in 1940. The hull was reported as refloated and scrapped in 1946-1947.

1942 – CONTINENT came to the Great Lakes in 1939-1940. The Newfoundland owned freighter was on a bareboat charter to the U.S. Army when it sank, following a collision with the American tanker BYRON D. BENSON, while enroute from New York to Bermuda.

1967 – The former Norwegian Seaway salty FRO was abandoned in sinking condition as c) WINSOME after a fire broke out in the cargo holds and spread throughout the ship on June 10, 1967. The vessel was enroute to Bangkok, Thailand, when it sank in the South China Sea.

1968 – JOHN T. HUTCHINSON suffered damage above the waterline when it was in a collision with the SUSANNE REITH at the head of Lake St. Clair. The latter, a West German salty, was on her first trip to the Great Lakes. This ship was eventually scrapped after arriving at Alang, India, as m) ALFA I on October 18, 2000.

1977 – RUTHIE MICHAELS came inland in 1970 and last reported in as d) EUROBULKER on June 10, 1977. The ship was enroute from Djibouti, to Bandar Shahpoir, Iran when it disappeared with the entire crew of 29. The ship is believed to have sunk off the coast of Oman perhaps as late as June 12.

1998 – The Greek flag bulk carrier OLYNTHIA first traveled the Seaway in 1978. It ran aground off Veraval, India, as d) OCEAN CRUISER in a tropical cyclone while bound for the United Arab Emirates. While released, it appears that the 26-year-old ship never sailed again and was broken up at Bharnvar, India, due to the damage.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Jody L. Aho, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Port Reports -  June 9

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day’s news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known).

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
Paul R. Tregurtha arrived Duluth at 00:54 Saturday morning to load coal at Midwest Energy, and CSL Niagara departed from Canadian National at 01:05 with iron ore. Roger Blough was inbound at 03:24 to load at CN. The Tregurtha departed at 15:43 for St. Clair, and Great Republic, which had been at Hallett #5 discharging stone, then shifted to SMET to load petroleum coke. She was expected to depart around 21:00. American Century and Walter J. McCarthy Jr. were due Saturday night to load coal, and Mesabi Miner was anchored outside the harbor waiting to load at CN after Roger Blough. Alamosborg was also still on the hook, and has no estimated arrival date.

Two Harbors-Silver Bay – Gary A. Putney
When the American Integrity departed Two Harbors on the 8th her AIS hadn't been updated. She's headed for Zug Island. After the Presque Isle finished her load, she shifted to South of #1 between 16:00 and 16:30. Those times are approx. She then departed stern first thru the piers at 19:30. She is heading for Indiana Harbor. The CSL Laurentien stopped off Two Harbors on the 8th approx. at 21:30. She got underway on the 8th at approx. 17:10 and arrived stern first thru the piers at 17:36. She went stern first up into Agate Bay then went bow first into South of #2. Arriving off Two Harbors on the 8th was the Algoma Discovery. She stopped at approx. 08:10 off Flood Bay. American Century was originally scheduled for Two Harbors, but was switched to the Twin Ports. Due Two Harbors on June 9th are the Edgar B. Speer and the Frontenac. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay saw the departure of Clyde S. VanEnkevort/Erie Trader on June 8th at 08:00 for Cleveland. Silver Bay has no scheduled traffic on June 9th.

Thunder Bay, ON
Saturday June 8: 3:31 Thunder Bay arrived at Viterra A to load grain. 13:18 Federal Mackinac arrived and went to anchor. Expected late Saturday: Manitoulin. Expected for Sunday: saltie Industrial Skipper.

Northern Lake Huron ports

McGregor Bay:
Saturday; 5:50 Samuel De Champlain arrived at the Lafarge Whitefish Terminal to unload and departed at 17:46.

Meldrum Bay:
Saturday; 1:32 Algoma Compass departed for Nanticoke.

Thessalon:
Saturday; 7:13 Joseph H Thompson arrived to load gravel and departed at 16:27 down bound on Lake Huron.

Stoneport:
Saturday; Olive L Moore is expected this evening.

Calcite:
Saturday; 16:43 Cason J Calloway arrived to load.

Port Dolomite:
Saturday:1:06 Wilfred Sykes departed down bound on Lake Michigan. 17:59 H Lee White arrived to load.

Port Inland:
Friday; 20:31 Manitowoc departed for Cleveland. Saturday; 9:37 John G Munson arrived to load.

Detroit-Rouge River – Raymond H
CSL Tadoussac unloaded cement clinker at the St Mary's Cement dock on Saturday

Welland Canal and vicinity vessel report - Saturday June 8 - by Barry Andersen

Nanticoke:
docked - Jun 7 - Damia Desgagnes at 1457

Long Point Bay anchorage:
anchored - Jun 8 - Algosea at 1359

Port Colborne anchorage:
anchored - Jun 7 - Happy River (Nld) at 2229 - Jun 8 - Federal Kivalina (Mhl) at 2044 - departed - Jun 8 - Sunda (Lbr) (ex Emilie -15 at 0215 and Happy River (Nld) at 0748

Welland Canal:
upbound - Jun 7 - Federal Rhine (Bds) at 1445, and Algoscotia at 1529 - Jun 8 - Iver Bright (Nld) at 0534, tug Sea Eagle II & St Marys Cement II at 1528, Patalya (Mlt) at 1706, NACC Argonaut at 1749 and Algonorth eta 2359

downbound - Algoma Spirit at 1532, Kaministiqua at 1606, Algoma Sault at 1859 and Happy River (Nld) at 2229 - to the anchorage - Jun 8 - Sunda (Lbr) (ex Emilie-15) at 0340, Victory II (Mhl) (ex Sea Discoverer-18, Clipper Discoverer-09, Coastal Queen 2-09, Cape Cod Light-07) at 0652, Happy River (Nld) at 0809, Baie Comeau at 1438, Federal Kivalina (Mhl) to the anchorage

Welland Canal docks:
docked - Jun 7 - CCGS Pierre Radisson at 0925 into Heddle Dry Dock at Port Weller

Port Weller anchorage:
anchored - Jun 4 - Arsland (Mlt) (ex CT Dublin-11) at 0740 - Jun 5 - Selasse (Mlt) (ex CT Dublin-11) at 1440 - Jun 8 - Happy River (Nld) at 1650 - Jun 8 - Lubie (Bhs) eta 2225 from Toronto - departed - Jun 8 - Happy River (Nld) at 2107 eastbound

Hamilton:
arrivals - Jun 8 - Algoma Spirit at 0730 - anchored Tim S Dool at 1930 - docked - Jun 4 - Tecumseh at 0217, Federal Satsuki (Mhl) at 1113 and Gagliarda at 1415 - Jun 7 - Redhead ii (Atg) (ex Bora-19, Hermann Schoening-15) at 0350 and Algoma Niagara at 1644

Bronte:
arrival - Jun 7 - Mia Desgagnes at 0538

Toronto:
arrival - Jun 8 - Aragonborg (Nld) at 2051 - departed - Jun 8 - tug Petite Forte & St Marys Cement at 1437 eastbound and Lubie (Bhs) at 2051 to Port Weller anchorage

Oshawa:
arrival - Jun 7 - Lake St Clair (Atg) (ex Federal Miramichi-16) at 1735

 

D-Day: Muskegon LST-393 was there 75 years ago

6/9 - Muskegon, MI – The USS LST-393 is now moored on Muskegon Lake near downtown Muskegon. Seventy-five years ago, it took part in one of the most important events of World War II: D-Day. The ship made more than 30 round trips to the beaches near Normandy, France, carrying tanks and the supplies necessary to win the war.

It's believed only two LSTs remain. The one in Muskegon is now a museum packed full of exhibits and photos.

Landing ship tanks were useful in the D-Day invasion because of their big front doors that swung open, allowing a ramp to be deployed to get tanks and troops onto the beach. "It saw action in Italy, Sicily and Normandy, but mostly in Normandy," said Ike Villalpando, LST-393 museum manager.

After unloading, the ship was used to transport wounded soldiers and German prisoners. It was prepared to unload on Omaha Beach on June 6, 1944, but the landing location was too congested. So, it anchored offshore for two days, eventually making its first landing on June 8, 1944.

Among the museum's collection is the American flag that flew over the ship during that first beach landing. It was recently located by the son of the ship’s engineering officer and sent to the museum to go on permanent display.

The museum is open seven days a week. There are a number of special events planned all summer long, including ship’s Movies on the Deck film series.

Grand Haven Tribune

 

Pre-orders now being taken for new ‘Know Your Ships: Decades’ book

6/9 - To mark the 60th anniversary of ‘Know Your Ships,’ a new book, ‘Know Your Ships: Decades,’ will be released this fall. The 240-page book will be hardcover and in a larger format (11” x 8.5”) than the regular Know Your Ships.

‘Know Your Ships: Decades’ represents an editors' choice of the best of the many outstanding images that have appeared in the annual Know Your Ships since its founding in 1959. The book also includes a year-by-year timeline of important events on the shipping scene from 60-year Seaway era as well as the major fleet stack markings and house flags. In making this book, nearly 2,000 photographs were considered, and the ones selected were re-scanned to yield the highest quality possible.

Pre-ordered books will be autographed and will include a free commemorative reprint of the original, 44-page 1959 Know Your Ships. The pre-order runs to June 30. Books will ship in mid-September. Price is $49.95 plus shipping and tax.

Hardcover, high-quality books such as this one are expensive to print. Pre-orders will help determine how many will be printed. There will not be a reprint - once they are gone they are gone.

http://knowyourships.com/kysdecades.html

Know Your Ships

 

Sign up now for Engineers Day Soo Freighter Chasing Cruise

6/9 - The 2019 schedule of Boatnerd Gatherings has been set and information is now available now on the Gathering page, www.boatnerd.com/gathering

Gatherings include Soo Locks Engineers weekend festivities and the annual Welland Canal weekend. Reservations are now being accepted for the Soo Locks Freighter-Chasing Cruise June 28. Reservations must be received no later than June 21 to receive the $40 price. Sign up now – don't be left on the dock.

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  June 9

TASHMOO (steel side-wheel excursion steamer, 308 foot, 1,344 gross tons, built in 1900, at Wyandotte, Michigan) hosted Admiral George Dewey on her inaugural trip from Cleveland, Ohio, to Detroit, Michigan, on 09 June 1900. Admiral Dewey had just returned from his conquest of the Philippines during the Spanish American War and was a national hero. TASHMOO entered regular service for the White Star Line two days later.

The Lubeck, Germany-built, 305-foot Greek freighter CASTALIA of 1953 struck the north tower pier of the Mackinac Bridge at 7 p.m. on 09 June 1968, in dense fog. The bridge was not damaged and the ship took on water, but was able to proceed to Chicago without assistance.

LIGHTSHIP 103 was delivered to the 12th District Headquarters at Milwaukee, Wisconsin, on June 9, 1921, to begin her Great Lakes career.

June 9, 1983, ALGOWEST loaded a record 1,047,758 bushels of wheat at Thunder Bay, Ontario.

ROGER BLOUGH began sea trials in 1972.

June 9, 1911, The ANN ARBOR NO 1 was raised by Smith Wrecking Company of Muskegon after being considered a menace to navigation by the Coast Guard (she had been sunk by the south breakwater at Frankfort, Michigan, after burning on March 8th). She was taken to Muskegon, and repaired sufficiently to become a sand scow for the Love Construction Company. The cost of raising her was $8,000. On 9 June 1884, ANNAPEE (2-mast wooden scow-schooner, 71 foot, 118 gross tons, built in 1867, at Ahnapee (Wolf River), Wisconsin) was bound from Torch Lake, Michigan, for Milwaukee with a load of railroad ties and cordwood when she stranded in fog on North Point in Lake Michigan, 2 1/2 miles from Sheboygan, Wisconsin. Later a strong wind blew her into the rocks and she broke up. No lives were lost and part of her cargo was saved.

On 9 June 1882, the LIZZIE A. LAW (wooden schooner, 196 foot, 747 gross tons, built in 1875, at Port Huron, Michigan) collided with the R.B. HAYES (wooden schooner, 147 foot, 668 gross tons, built in 1877, at Gibraltar, Michigan) near the foot of Lake Huron. Although the LAW suffered severe damage, she completed her trip to Buffalo and was repaired there. The LAW lasted until 1908, when she was lost in a storm.

1909 ASSINIBOIA and CRESCENT CITY were washed through the Canadian Lock at Sault Ste. Marie when the upbound PERRY WALKER struck the lower gate. All three ships were damaged but were repaired and returned to service.

1963 The newly built SILVER ISLE of Mohawk Navigation and the PRINS ALEXANDER of the Oranje Line, collided in fog and rain on the St. Lawrence near Kingston. Both ships required repairs. The former was scrapped at Aliaga, Turkey, in 2010 as ALGOISLE while the latter struck a reef and sank in the Red Sea as f) POLIAIGOS on December 28, 1980.

1979 The French freighter MELUSINE first came to the Great Lakes in 1962 and returned as b) LENA in 1978. It sank the French fishing vessel ANTIOCHE III in the English Channel with the loss of 4 lives on this day in 1979. LENA was scrapped at Ferrol, Spain, in 1982, after suffering engine damage on a voyage from Bilbao, Spain, to Detroit.

1998 COMMON VENTURE began Great Lakes trading in 1980. It broke loose of its moorings in a cyclone as f) PEARL OF DAMMAN and grounded at Kandla, India, on this date in 1998. The ship was loaded with sulphur and sustained considerable damage. Following a sale for scrap, the 27 year old carrier arrived at Alang, India, September 12, 1998, for dismantling.

1998 TOKAI MARU was a first time Seaway caller in 1977 and a return visitor as b) EASTERN HERO in 1993. This ship was also blown aground off Kandla, India, by the same cyclone. It was now d) SURPRISE and became a total loss. This ship arrived at Alang October 8, 1998, and was broken up.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Jody L. Aho, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series. This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels.

 

Cleveland-Cliffs’ CEO sees a big upswing in steel prices soon

6/8 - Cleveland-Cliffs’ CEO Lourenco Goncalves believes that US steel prices should see a big upswing in the next few months. He told S&P Global Platts that the second half of 2019 will be “fantastic” for US steel pricing. Goncalves believes that the prices of hot-rolled coil in the US are affected by the buying behavior of service centers and mini-mills. His optimism is based on the fact that service centers have no inventory. He added, “The mills will get their pound of flesh, because the service centers allowed things to get a lot worse than they should be.”

He also feels that the current behavior of the mini-mills and service centers of going on a buyers’ strike is “the usual, seasonal procurement behavior,” which happens every year around June and July. This situation, he believes, happens as people are on vacation and the automotive sector is changing over for new-model vehicles. Steel prices to gain

US steel prices have fallen 21% year-to-date. The prices are down more than 27% since they peaked at $925 per ton in July last year. The declining prices have impacted the companies across the steel supply chain. But Goncalves believes that service centers will need to start buying soon, which will support steel prices. U.S. Steel (X) has been among the worst-performing steel stocks in 2019. U.S. Steel and AK Steel (AKS) have fallen 39.2% and 37.5%, respectively, while Nucor (NUE) and Steel Dynamics (STLD) have fallen 17.7% and 28.7%, respectively. Cleveland-Cliffs’ stock has also fallen by 13%, but its year-to-date performance has been positive mainly due to positive price action in the seaborne iron ore prices.

During his interview with the S&P Global Platts, Goncalves, also talked about the US economy. He said, he is building a plant in Toledo, Ohio, and currently, 900 people are working on the plant. He mentioned that he could have used more workers, but that he couldn’t find them because “they are busy. There is a lot going on in this country.”

 

Port Reports -  June 8

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day’s news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known).

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
CSL Niagara arrived Duluth at 06:38 Friday, and tied up at Canadian National to load iron ore. There was no traffic for the rest of the day, but Great Republic was due at 22:30 with limestone for Hallett #5. Federal Mackinac was still unloading cement at CRH on Friday, but was tentatively expected to depart Friday night for Thunder Bay. CSL Niagara was also due to finish loading before midnight. Alamosborg remained at anchor waiting to load at Gavilon. In Superior, the tank barge Robert F. Deegan departed light at 05:50 after unloading calcium chloride, and Whitefish Bay was outbound from Burlington Northern at 12:19 with a load of ore for Nanticoke. No further traffic is due in Superior until early next week.

Two Harbors, MN – Gary A. Putney
Friday Report: American Integrity arrived Two Harbors for South of #2 on June 7th at 01:39 and departed on the 7th at 14:34. As of 18:45 there's no updated AIS. Presque Isle arrived Two Harbors on the 7th for South of #2 at 14:53. Due Two Harbors late on the 7th is the CSL Laurentien. The CSL Niagara was originally showing a Two Harbors AIS, but she went to CN ore dock in West Duluth. Due Two Harbors on June 8th are the Algoma Discovery and the American Century. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay will see the arrival of the Clyde S. VanEnkevort/Erie Trader late on June 7th. She will be arriving after unloading stone in Marquette. There is no scheduled inbound traffic for Silver Bay on June 8th.

Thursday Report: When the Gott departed Two Harbors on June 5th it didn't have an updated AIS. It's heading for Gary. The Indiana Harbor arrived Two Harbors on June 5th at 21:22 for South of #2. She departed on the 6th at 15:02 for Gary. Due Two Harbors on June 7th are the American Integrity, Presque Isle, and the CSL Laurentien. The CSL Niagara was originally showing a Two Harbors AIS, but went to Duluth. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay had no traffic on June 6th and none scheduled on June 7th.

Thunder Bay, ON
Friday June 7: 16:19 CSL Welland departed Viterra A for Montreal. 20:20 Algoma Conveyor departed Viterra B for Toledo. Expected for Saturday: Thunder Bay and Manitoulin.

Northern Lake Huron ports
Little Current:
Friday; 7:56 The cruise ship Pearl Mist arrived for shore excursions and departed at 12:54 for Sault Ste Marie Ontario.

Meldrum Bay:
Friday; 1:57 With a change in orders Mississagi arrived to load and departed for Sarnia. 15:00 Algoma Compass arrived to load.

Bruce Mines:
Thursday: 16:36 Michipicoten arrived to load trap rock and departed on Friday at 4:06 for Grand Haven.

Alpena:
Friday; 0:30 The cement carrier Alpena departed for Green Bay. 14:36 Samuel De Champlain arrived to load cement products and departed at 20:15 for McGregor Bay.

Stoneport:
Thursday; 23:21 Kay E Barker departed for Milwaukee.

Calcite: 1:56 Victory and James L Kuber departed for Detroit. 11:08 Dorothy Ann and Pathfinder departed for Bay City.

Port Dolomite:
Friday: 4:21 Philip R Clarke departed down bound on Lake Huron. 18:09 Wilfred Sykes arrived to load dolomite.

Port Inland:
Thursday; 23:09 H Lee White departed for Muskegon. Friday; 11:17 Manitowoc arrived to load.

Goderich, ON – Bruce Douglas
Algoma Transport remained at the north dock on Friday.

Detroit-Rouge River – Raymond H
Friday Arrivals: John J Boland arrived at Zug Island to unload coal. Calusa Coast and Delaware arrived at the Marathon Asphalt Terminal to load. Victory/Maumee arrived at the Carmeuse Dock to unload stone.

Monroe, MI – Raymond H
Olive L Moore/Menonminee arrived to unload stone at the DTE Energy plant. Calusa Coast and her tank barge arrived at the Michigan Paving and Materials dock to unload asphalt.

Northeast Ohio Ports – Bill Kloss
6/7 arrivals: Leonard M (Dock 24N) and Egmondgracht (Dock 22E) to the Port of Cleveland. the Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin to Sandusky. Algoma Buffalo continues to wait in Lake Erie for currents to abate on the Black River in Lorain. 6/7 departures: John J. Boland to Zug from Sandusky. American Courage from Cleveland.

Welland Canal and vicinity vessel report - Friday June 7 - by Barry Andersen

Nanticoke:
arrivals - Jun 6 - Rt Hon Paul J Martin at 0900, Algoterra at 2319 - Jun 7 - Damia Desgagnes at 1457 - departed - Jun 6 - Rt Hon Paul J Martin at 2028 - Jun 7 - Algoterra at 1136

Long Point Bay anchorage:
anchored - Jun 6 - Rt Hon Paul J Martin at 0118 - departed Jun 6 - at 0842 - Jun 7 - Damia Desgagnes at 1441 - both for the dock

Port Colborne anchorage:
anchored - Jun 7 - Sunda (Lbr) (ex Emilie-15) at 1415

Welland Canal:
upbound - Jun 6 - Juno (Bhs) at 1742 and Egmondgracht (Nld) at 1900 approx from wharf 12 - Jun 7 - Eeborg (Nld) at 0840, Algoma Strongfield at 0915, tug Leo A McArthur at 1257, Federa Rhine (Bds) at 1445, and Algoscotia at 1529

downbound - Jun 6 - tug Sea Eagle II & St Marys Cement II at 1120, Algoscotia at 1158, Federal Biscay (Mhl) at 1251, Greenwing (Cyp) at 1724, John D Leitch at 1812, NACC Argonaut at 1849, Algoma Niagara at 2148 - Jun 7 - Florence Spirit at 1118, CSL St Laurent at 1503, Algoma Spirit at 1532, Kaministiqua at 1606, Algoma Sault at 1859 and Happy River (Nld) eta 2245

Welland Canal docks:
docked - Jun 7 - CCGS Pierre Radisson at 0925 into Heddle Dry Dock at Port Weller - departed Jun 6 Egmondgracht (Nld) at approx 1900 for Cleveland

Port Weller anchorage:
anchored - Jun 4 - Arsland (Mlt) (ex CT Dublin-11) at 0740 - Jun 5 - Selasse (Mlt) (ex CT Dublin-11) at 1440 - Jun 7 - Greenwing (Cyp) at 0738 and ver Bright (Nld) at 2045 - departed - Jun 7 - Greenwing (Cyp) at 1800 approx. eastbound

Hamilton:
arrivals - Jun 7 - Redhead ii (Atg) (ex Bora-19, Hermann Schoening-15) at 0350 and Algoma Niagara at 1644 - docked - Jun 1 - Federal Schelde (Bds) at 1100 - Jun 3 - Brant (Cyp) at 0530 - Jun 4 - Hinch Spirit (ex Topaz I-19 at 1830 - Jun 4 - Tecumseh at 0217, Federal Satsuki (Mhl) at 1113 and Gagliarda at 1415 - Jun 6 - Eeborg (Nld) at 0700, Algoma Strongfield at 1138 - departures - Jun 6 - Pacific Huron (Atg) at 2329 - Jun 7 - Eeborg (Nld) at 0009 for Chicago, Brant (Cyp) at 0457 eastbound, Federal Schelde (Bds) at 0551 eastbound, Algoma Strongfield at 0721 for the canal and Hinch Spirit (ex Topaz I-19) at 1604 eastbound

Bronte:
arrival - Jun 7 - Mia Desgagnes at 0538

Toronto:
docked - Jun 2 - Lubie (Bhs) at 1122 - Jun 6 - Jun 6 - tug Petite Forte & St Marys Cement at 1148 - departed - Jun 6 - Redhead ii (Atg) (ex Bora-19, Hermann Schoening-15) at 2143 for Hamilton - Jun 7 - McKeil Spirit at 1650 eastbound

Oshawa:
arrival - Jun 7 - Lake St Clair (Atg) (ex Federal Miramichi-16) at 1735

 

 

Pride of Baltimore II clipper is headed for the Great Lakes

6/8 - Baltimore, MD – The Pride of Baltimore II is headed for the Great Lakes, where it will participate in the Tall Ships Challenge throughout the summer.

The ship, a topsail schooner modeled after a Baltimore clipper from the War of 1812, set sail Wednesday from the Inner Harbor’s Pier 1 with state delegates Maggie MacIntosh and Brooke Lierman, among other officials, in attendance.

The ship is scheduled to arrive in Toronto in about three weeks, and from there it will visit ports in Michigan, Wisconsin and Ontario, Canada. It will call in Buffalo, New York, for a Fourth of July celebration.

At each of the ports in the challenge, Pride will participate in city festivals, and it will offer a variety of sailings and charters, said Jeff Buchheit, the executive director of Pride of Baltimore Inc., the nonprofit that supports the ship.

Its crew also will compete in several tall ship races between ports for the challenge, which has been run since 2001, said challenge director Erin Short.

“They are incredibly popular in the Great Lakes. They’ve been numerous times,” Short said. “It’s a ship that people definitely remember.”

Captain Jan Miles, who’s been with Pride for nearly 40 years, and his crew, are standouts at the festivals they visit, Short said.

“It is an exciting time for Pride of Baltimore II," said Jayson Williams, chairman of Pride Inc.’s board of directors, in an email. "Pride was built to remind people that Baltimore is a water town, fun, full of promise and worth investment. Pride returns this year to tell that story to over 100,000 in the Great Lakes.”

 

Pre-orders now being taken for new ‘Know Your Ships: Decades’ book

6/8 - To mark the 60th anniversary of ‘Know Your Ships,’ a new book, ‘Know Your Ships: Decades,’ will be released this fall. The 240-page book will be hardcover and in a larger format (11” x 8.5”) than the regular Know Your Ships.

‘Know Your Ships: Decades’ represents an editors' choice of the best of the many outstanding images that have appeared in the annual Know Your Ships since its founding in 1959. The book also includes a year-by-year timeline of important events on the shipping scene from 60-year Seaway era as well as the major fleet stack markings and house flags. In making this book, nearly 2,000 photographs were considered, and the ones selected were re-scanned to yield the highest quality possible.

Pre-ordered books will be autographed and will include a free commemorative reprint of the original, 44-page 1959 Know Your Ships. The pre-order runs to June 30. Books will ship in mid-September. Price is $49.95 plus shipping and tax.

Hardcover, high-quality books such as this one are expensive to print. Pre-orders will help determine how many will be printed. There will not be a reprint - once they are gone they are gone.

http://knowyourships.com/kysdecades.html

Know Your Ships

 

Annual Great Lakes Marine Market Saturday in St. Clair

6/8 - St. Clair, Mich. – The Lake Huron Lore Marine Historical Society is sponsoring its annual Great Lakes Maritime Market at the Riverview Plaza Mall in St. Clair on Saturday, June 8, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. The mall is just across the street from the boardwalk in downtown St. Clair.

If you have an interest in the ships that ply the Great Lakes, present or past, you will want to attend this event. There will be more that 30 vendors offering various items relating specifically to the ships and shipping industry of this region. Among the items that will be available for sale are historical artifacts, books, photographs, artwork, shipwrecks, memorabilia, advertising and more. It is a great way to learn more about the fascinating history of the Great Lakes shipping for the beginner or the advanced historian.

For more information, contact Lake Huron Lore at 586-725-6276 or micheldr2005@yahoo.com

 

Sign up now for Engineers Day Soo Freighter Chasing Cruise

6/8 - The 2019 schedule of Boatnerd Gatherings has been set and information is now available now on the Gathering page, www.boatnerd.com/gathering

Gatherings include Soo Locks Engineers weekend festivities and the annual Welland Canal weekend. Reservations are now being accepted for the Soo Locks Freighter-Chasing Cruise June 28. Reservations must be received no later than June 21 to receive the $40 price. Sign up now – don't be left on the dock.

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  June 8

June 8 1951, CLIFFS VICTORY entered Cleveland with a load of iron ore from Marquette. The VICTORY completed the one-way trip in 37 hours - 20 hours faster than the best previous time.

On 08 June 1854, J. YOUNG SCAMMON (2-mast wooden brig, built in 1845, at Chicago, Illinois) was sheltering from a storm at S. Manitou Island on Lake Michigan when she dragged her anchors, stranded and broke in three pieces. She was driven in so close to the shore that the crew was able to use a broken spar to climb to the beach. No lives lost.

On 08 June 1897, RITA MC DONALD (wooden propeller tug, 72 foot, 69 gross tons) was launched by J. Davidson (Hull #84) at West Bay City, Michigan. She lasted until 1920, when she was abandoned in Chicago, Illinois.

In 1978, the LEWIS WILSON FOY was christened for the Bethlehem Steel Co., Cleveland, Ohio. Renamed b.) OGLEBAY NORTON in 1991. She now sails as AMERICAN INTEGRITY.

In 1938, the GOVERNOR MILLER (Hull#810) a sister ship to the WILLIAM A. IRVIN, began her maiden voyage, leaving Lorain, Ohio. The GOVERNOR MILLER was only the second Great Lakes vessel to be powered by a steam turbine with a direct drive to the propeller shaft via reduction gear.

In 1976 - the Midwest Energy Terminal at Superior, Wisconsin, loaded its first cargo of low-sulfur coal. The steamer JOHN J. BOLAND of 1953, took the honors as the first vessel to load at this dock. She was sold Canadian and renamed b.) SAGINAW in 1999.

On this date in 1977, the HARRY .L ALLEN was the first freighter to load at Burlington Northern's Dock #5 in Superior, Wisconsin.

On 8 June 1847, CHESAPEAKE (wooden side-wheeler, 172 foot, 412 tons, built in 1838, at Maumee, Ohio) was fully laden and had 97 aboard when she rammed the schooner JOHN F PORTER on a dark night off Conneaut, Ohio. As she started to sink, she was run to shore in an effort to save her, but she sank a mile short of the beach. Lake Erie was fairly calm and the crew and passengers tried to get to shore in boats and makeshift rafts. Most made it and many were also picked up by the steamer HARRISON. Estimates of the number of dead vary from 7 to 13. The wooden side-wheel tug and upriver packet TRAFFIC (75 foot, 50 tons, built in 1853, at St. Clair, Michigan) sank near Sebewaing, Michigan on 8 June 1868. She was recovered and repaired, but only lasted a little longer than a year since she burned in Saginaw in October 1869.

1933: WILHELMINE, dated from 1888 and was one of the world's earliest tankers, ran aground off Morgan Point, west of Port Colborne, while enroute from Chicago to Liverpool with 2,700,000 lbs of lard. The crew were removed and the ship abandoned. The hull was refloated June 3 but was not repaired and may have been dismantled at Ashtabula.

1954: The tug EDWARD C. WHALEN sank in Lake Superior near Corbeil Point. It was salvaged in 1955 and rebuilt a decade later as b) JOHN McLEAN. It survives in the Purvis Marine fleet as c) ADANAC.

1977: CYDONIA first came through the Seaway in 1962 and returned as b) VERMONT I in 1969. It was under tow due to rudder damage as e) JOY when a fire broke out in the engineroom near the mouth of the Mississippi River. The vessel was rocked by three explosions and sank in the Gulf of Mexico.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Jody L. Aho, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Russ Plumb, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Museum ship William A. Irvin bows out for 2nd season

6/7 - Duluth, MN – The William A. Irvin, a 611-foot-long laker that has long served as a floating museum in Duluth, will sit out another full season of operation. The former member of the U.S. Steel fleet was displaced from its berth in Minnesota Slip last year as crews worked to shore up failing seawalls and cap contaminated sediments that have accumulated through decades of industrial maritime traffic.

To make room for the work, the Irvin was moved across the harbor to Fraser Shipyards in Superior, where it was to be placed in drydock for some long-overdue repairs and a fresh coat of paint below its waterline. But the Irvin encountered delays, when the cost of the work came in higher than anticipated, and then the vessel lost its place in line this spring when other working lakers arrived at Fraser in need of immediate attention.

Nevertheless, Chelly Townsend, executive director of the Duluth Entertainment Convention Center, which operates the Irvin, expressed confidence Wednesday that a contract for the work would be signed in a matter of days and for a cost in keeping with a $500,000 Minnesota Historical Society grant that was awarded to cover the repairs.

“Once that goes through, we will be able to zero in on a date. But of course that date will be subject to work being finished on the Arthur M. Anderson, that’s in drydock now,” she said.

Townsend said the best-case scenario likely would return the Irvin to its mooring in Minnesota Slip by July, and at worst, she expects to have it back in its old home by October or November. The Irvin is expected to spend 30 to 45 days in drydock, but then it will need to wait for calm weather in order to slowly navigate its way back into Minnesota Slip, with only a few inches to spare, as it passes through the pedestrian draw bridge that spans the water.

“It will not be open this year,” Townsend said.

“Even if it gets back in say September, there’s not enough time to get it ready. You know, it’s been closed up for almost two years now, and there’s going to be a lot of work to do on the inside and the exterior. So, we just plan to have it open next spring,” she said.

Don Ness, president of the DECC board of directors, said: “I’m disappointed with how it has rolled out, the costs involved and the delays that we’ve seen. To lose another season is discouraging, and clearly there’s a financial impact on the DECC.”

He noted that the DECC will take a financial hit as a result of having the Irvin sidelined for another season, as the vessel typically generates about $200,000 per year.

On top of that, the DECC also agreed to bear $300,000 of the cost of moving the Irvin. “We finally have just resigned ourselves to the fact that this is the way it’s going to be. And then we’ll just go forward from there,” Townsend said.

Ness said the DECC had been placed in a difficult situation. “Unfortunately these things happen when projects are put on tight timelines, and when the DECC was first approached by the city and the MPCA (Minnesota Pollution Control Agency), there was a real rush to approval, saying that they had to hit these tight timelines, that there were dollars that were available now and we couldn’t afford to miss this opportunity,” he said.

Ness said the DECC would have benefited from more time to plan and make arrangements, but he also acknowledged the pressing need to address the slip’s failing seawalls and sinkholes that had developed in the area, calling the city “a good partner.”

The city has borne financial challenges, as well. On Monday, the Duluth City Council will be asked to approve an additional $700,000 to complete work on the Minnesota Slip project, which now is expected to total about $7.2 million. But Jim Filby Williams, Duluth’s director of public administration, said the added cost comes as little surprise, given that the city budgeted only a modest 6.8 percent contingency into its project budget.

“The 15.44 percent cost overrun is actually a bit lower than you would usually expect and provide for on a project like this, which is to say a project involving the repair and replacement of 125-year-old buried marine infrastructure whose character cannot be fully known until you dig it up,” he said.

Filby Williams contends it would have been advisable to build in a contingency of 20 to 25 percent for a project of such a nature. “The issue was the inadequate contingency included in the original budgetary appropriation for the project,” he said.

Townsend said she’s looking forward to the Irvin’s return and reopening the vessel to the public in 2020 “The whole area is going to look beautiful in a short time, because they’re working on all the landscaping and the curbs and all of that stuff,” she said.

“We’re happy to have a stable property, and we’ll be set up to serve our customers better. It’s safer. It’s going to be beautiful. We’ll have bike lanes and proper sidewalks. So, it will definitely be an improvement for us,” Townsend said.

Duluth News Tribune

 

National Museum announces Tug Ohio christening weekend

6/7 - Toledo, OH – On Friday, June 21, two tugs will be formally christened at the National Museum of the Great Lakes in Toledo Ohio. The first tug to be christened was donated to the museum by The Great Lakes Towing Company in 2018, and will be known as the Museum Tug Ohio. The National Museum of the Great Lakes has spent the last nine months restoring the tug. It will be a feature exhibit at the museum and the Maumee River’s second floating museum ship. The second tug to be christened is The Great Lakes Towing Company’s newest tug, also named Ohio. This tug will serve the maritime community as a member of The Great Lakes Towing Company’s fleet of tugs that operate across the Great Lakes and on the Maumee River.

“We believe this event is the first of its kind on the Great Lakes and perhaps beyond---the christening of a museum tug that shares its name with the tug built to take its place in the commercial towing fleet,” said Christopher Gillcrist, Executive Director of the National Museum of the Great Lakes. “The past meets the present and future all in one wonderful event.”

The addition of the Museum Tug Ohio represents only the second commercial museum ship on the Maumee River – first being the Col. James M. Schoonmaker. Thirty years ago, the Schoonmaker (as the Willis B. Boyer) was introduced to Toledo as its first museum ship.

The addition of a museum tug fills a significant void in the permanent exhibit plan of NMGL, Gillcrist said.

The Great Lakes Towing Company’s new commercial tug represents the application of cutting edge technology in tug design. The new Damen 1907 Ice Tug was built at The Great Lakes Towing Company’s shipyard in Cleveland. In 2019, The Great Lakes Towing Company Ohio will celebrate 120 years of serving as an invaluable resource to the Great Lakes maritime community.

“The new tug is aptly named Ohio,” said Joe Starck, president of The Great Lakes Towing Company. “She was built in Ohio, by an Ohio shipyard, for an Ohio-based company, will operate on Ohio waters and serve Ohio ports. In addition, her construction cost was supported by the Ohio EPA and she replacing the historical tug Ohio. We memorialize the Museum Tug Ohio as we celebrate her modern successor that will continue to keep cargo moving, here in Toledo, for generations.”

The christenings will take place at the National Museum of the Great Lakes’ commercial dock located behind the building on the Maumee River. Guests and attendees will observe from the dock and patio behind the museum. Christenings of commercial vessels on the Great Lakes have a long and illustrious history. These events often drew thousands of spectators and VIP’s from the maritime industry from across the country.

The sponsor of the Museum Tug Ohio is long-time NMGL employee and volunteer Mrs. Jane Smith. Mrs. Smith will break a bottle of beer over the bow rail of the Museum Tug Ohio instead of the traditional bottle of champagne. According to Gillcrist, when the boat was christened the first time in Chicago in 1903, beer was used because the boat was going to serve the city of Milwaukee – the city that made beer famous. Gillcrist noted that Mrs. Smith was chosen as the sponsor because she best represents the volunteer spirit that makes projects like this one possible.

The Museum Tug Ohio has a 115-year history on the Great Lakes. During its career as a fireboat in Milwaukee it participated in some of the most important disasters in Milwaukee history. As a tug, it logged more miles of commercial activity than any other tug on the Great Lakes. “This tug tells a story that no other tug can tell,” said Gillcrist. “How many tugs towed not one but two navy submarines on the Great Lakes?”

The christening on June 21 is open to the public but only with advance ticket purchase. Tickets are $25 per person ($20 per person for museum members). Purchase of the ticket gets you admission to the christenings, admission to the museum, admission to the Schoonmaker museum ship and admission to the restored museum tug Ohio. The new Ohio can be viewed from dockside. Tickets can be purchased at nmgl.org or by calling 419-214-5000 ext. 0.

On June 22-23, the public can purchase at the door a general admission ticket for $17 per person. Members of the museum are admitted free at this point.

National Museum of the Great Lakes

 

Port Reports -  June 7

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day’s news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known).

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
The only traffic through the Duluth entry on Thursday was American Mariner, which departed at 11:35 for Buffalo with a load of wheat from General Mills. Alamosborg arrived offshore and dropped anchor at 14:30, where she will be inspected before arriving to load at Gavilon. Great Lakes Trader/tug Joyce L. VanEnkevort was loading iron ore pellets at CN, and was expected to depart during the late afternoon/early evening Thursday. Federal Mackinac continued unloading cement at CRH. In Superior, the tank barge Robert F. Deegan and tug Zeus arrived at 08:50 to discharge calcium chloride at Hallett #8. During the afternoon, Burns Harbor departed at 15:09 with iron ore pellets, and Whitefish Bay arrived at 15:32 to load at Burlington Northern.

Thunder Bay, ON
Thursday June 6: 13:44 CSL Welland arrived at Viterra A to load grain.

Northern Lake Huron ports
Midland:
Wednesday 7:44 The cruise ship Pearl Mist arrived and shore excursions were completed departed at 19:30 for Parry Sound.

Parry Sound:
7:56 Pearl Mist arrived. 8:58 Mississagi arrived to unload salt and departed at 13:16 for Windsor. 18:56 After a full day of shore excursions Pear Mist departed.

Little Current:
Wednesday; 7:33 The cruise ship Victory1 arrived for shore excursions and at 17:50 departed for Sault Ste Marie Michigan.

Meldrum Bay:
Tuesday; 11:51 Saginaw arrived to load dolomite and on Wednesday at 6:36 departed for Saginaw Michigan.

Bruce Mines:
Thursday: 16:36 Michipicoten arrived to load trap rock.

Alpena:
Thursday; 19:49 The cement carrier Alpena arrived to load. Stoneport:
Wednesday; 23:07 Olive L Moore departed for Monroe. Thursday; 14:59 Kaye E Barker arrived to load.

Calcite:
Wednesday; 21:67 Sam Laud arrived to load. 23:44 Cason J Calloway departed for Buffington. Thursday; 3:50 The tug Victory and James L Kuber arrived to load.17:06 Sam Laud departed down bound on Lake Huron. 17:09 Dorothy Ann and Pathfinder arrived to load.

Port Dolomite:
Wednesday; 21:39 Great Republic arrived to load and departed on Thursday at 10:26 for Duluth Superior. 17:06 Philip R Clarke arrived to load.

Port Inland:
Wednesday; 22:16 Calumet arrived to load and departed Thursday at 6:09 down bound on Lake Michigan. 14:59 H Lee White arrived to load.

Goderich, ON – Bruce Douglas
Algoma Innovator was at the salt dock Thursday night, with Algoma Transport at the north dock, probably waiting to load salt.

Detroit-Rouge River – Raymond H
Algoma Compass unloaded trap rock at the Motor City Materials dock on Thursday.

Northeast Ohio Ports – Bill Kloss
6/6 arrivals: Federal Leda has joined fleetmate Federal Kumano at the Port of Cleveland. Algoma Buffalo is waiting out currents in Lake Erie off of Lorain. She has stone for LaFarge. 6/6 departures: John J. Boland to Sandusky from Fairport Harbor.

Welland Canal and vicinity vessel report - Thursday June 6 - by Barry Andersen early morning fog delayed shipping for

Nanticoke:
arrivals - Jun 5 - Baie Comeau at 2348 - docked - Jun 5 - tug Leonard M & Niagara Spirit at 1322 departed - Jun 6 - Algocanada at 0232, Baie Comeau at 0829

Long Point Bay anchorage:
anchored - Jun 5 - Algoterra at 1819 - Jun 5 - Damia Desgagnes at 0728 - Jun 6 - Rt Hon Paul J Martin at 0118 - departed - Jun 4 - tug Leonard M & Niagara Spirit at 1126 for the dock

Port Colborne anchorage:
anchored - Jun 5 - tug Everlast & Noman McLeod at 2251, Algoma Enterprise at 2332, Greenwing (Cyp) at 0400, Federal Biscay (Mhl) at 0819, departed - Jun 6 - tug Everlast & Noman McLeod at 0304, Algoma Enterprise at 0413 Greenwing (Cyp) at 1200, Federal Biscay (Mhl) at 1229 - all for the canal

Welland Canal:
upbound - Jun 5 - Federal Leda (Mhl) at 1706, Kivalliq W (ex Sten Fjord-18, Falcon-09) at 1751, Algoma Hansa at 1940 and Industrial Skipper (Lbr) at 2349 - Jun 6 - CSL Tadoussac at 0708, Juno (Bhs) at 1922 for Thunder Bay, ,

downbound - Jun 5 - Egmondgracht (Nld) at 2141 (turned in Lake Erie and headed to wharf 12) - Jun 5 - Egmondgracht (Nld) stopping wharf 12 at 0020), tug Everlast & Norman McLeod 0353, Algoma Enterprise at 0432, tug Sea Eagle II & St Marys Cement II at 1120, Algoscotia at 1158, Federal Biscay (Mhl) at 1251, Greenwing (Cyp) at 1724, John D Leitch at 1812, NACC Argonaut at 1849, Algoma Niagara at 1618 - delayed

Welland Canal docks:
docked - Jun 3 - CCGS Pierre Radisson at 1430 approx - tied alongside fitout berth at Heddle DD, Port Weller - Jun 5 - Egmondgracht (Nld) docked wharf 12 at 0020) - departed Jun 6 Egmondgtracht (Nld)

Port Weller anchorage:
anchored - Jun 4 - Arsland (Mlt) (ex CT Dublin-11) at 0740 - Jun 5 - Selasse (Mlt) (ex CT Dublin-11) at 1440

Hamilton:
arrivals - Jun 6 - Eeborg (Nld) at 0700, Algoma Strongfield at 1138 - docked - Jun 1 - Federal Schelde (Bds) at 1100 - Jun 3 - Brant (Cyp) at 0530 - Jun 4 - Hinch Spirit (ex Topaz I-19 at 1830 - Jun 4 - Tecumseh at 0217, Federal Satsuki (Mhl) at 1113 and Gagliarda at 1415 - Jun 5 - Pacific Huron (Atg) at 1537 - departures - Jun 3 - tug Leonard M & Niagara Spirit as 2304 - Jun 4 - Federal Kumano (Mhl) at 0910 and Robert S Pierson at 1915 - Jun 5 - Algoma Discovery at 0204

Bronte:
docked - Jun 4 - Harbour Fashion (Por) at 2301 from the canal - departed Jun 5 at 1521 eastbound

Mississauga:
arrival - Jun 4 - Selasse (Gib) (ex Selay S-17) at 0537 - departed Jun 5 sat 1302 Toronto:
arrivals - Jun 6 - McKeil Spirit at 0114 and tug Petite Forte & St Marys Cement at 1148 - docked - May 31 - Redhead ii (Atg) (ex Bora-19, Hermann Schoening-15) at 0440 - Jun 2 - Lubie (Bhs) at 1122

Oshawa:
docked - Jun 1 - Juno (Bhs) at 0657 - departed Jun 6 at 1320 for Port Weller anchorage

 

'It cannot go another inch higher': Lakes water levels may hit Michigan tourism

6/7 - Lansing, MI – The high water levels on Lake Superior are manageable, but only if the forecasters are wrong about the lake's projected rise, Capt. Donald Kilpela Jr. said. Right now, only a few docks in his small, Upper Peninsula home of Copper Harbor are submerged by the swollen lake, and summer storms are rarely strong enough to carry that extra water inland.

The Upper Peninsula community can weather the record-high Lake Superior water level, but only if the lake holds fast. "It cannot go another inch higher," said Kilpela Jr., who operates The Isle Royale Queen IV ferry. "Then things get really compromised."

Kilpela is among thousands of Michiganders who had a lakeside view as the Great Lakes rose above record heights in May, according to a report the Army Corps of Engineers issued Tuesday.

The rising waters have washed out roads, inched over boat slips, covered beaches and flooded properties. Some residents of Michigan’s coastal communities worry their tourism-based economies will suffer if visitors turn away from their shrinking beaches and waterlogged marinas.

The phone has "really been ringing off the hook for the past several weeks" at the Army Corps of Engineers office in Detroit, where property owners, municipal officials and reporters call to ask why the Great Lakes water levels are so high and whether they'll continue to rise, Detroit District Chief of Watershed Hydrology Keith Kompoltowicz said.

Water levels on the Great Lakes fluctuate depending on precipitation, evaporation and the amount of water flowing in and out. Several years of heavy rain and snowfall are behind the recent, steep rise in Great Lakes water levels, Kompoltowicz said.

Lansing State Journal

 

Joseph H. Thompson was part of D-Day invasion fleet

6/7 - Escanaba, MI – Thursday marked the 75th anniversary of D-Day — the day when Allied forces landed in Normandy during World War II. The Joseph H. Thompson, a ship that has been docked in “Escanaba’s backyard,” has close ties to this historical event. “She was at D-Day,” VanEnkevort Tug & Barge (VTB), Inc. Director of Purchasing Peter Groh said of the ship.

VTB has owned the Joseph H. Thompson for about four years.

According to information from www.boatnerd.com, the Joseph H. Thompson was originally built by Sun Shipbuilding and Dry Dock of Chester, Pa. in early 1944. It was constructed for the U.S. Maritime Commission as part of the World War II effort; originally, it was known as the Marine Robin.

The brochure “From Salt Water to Fresh Water,” which focuses on the Joseph H. Thompson’s history, states the Marine Robin’s maiden voyage brought U.S. troops from Newport News, Va., to Bremen, Germany. For three months, the ship brought soldiers from North Africa to southern France, and it was present at the Normandy invasion on June 6, 1944.

After D-Day, the Marine Robin took 1,500 German prisoners of war to the United States. The ship also visited Oran, Le Havre, Naples, Southampton, Marseille and Mediterranean ports.

On Oct. 5, 1945, the ship traveled through the Suez Canal and entered the Pacific theater. It was used by the military through August 1946; along with a repatriation trip to return German nationals from China, it visited Hawaii, Japan and the Philippines. The Marine Robin was then retired.

In the early ’50s, the Marine Robin was purchased by the Hansand Steamship Company, converted for use as a lake carrier and transported to the Great Lakes. A new midsection was built for the ship; as the ship’s new length was about 714 feet — a significant increase from its original length of 515 feet — it had to be transported on the Mississippi River and Chicago’s canal system in two sections and rejoined later.

Over the years, the Joseph H. Thompson has been used as a vessel and a tug barge. It currently serves as a tug barge in VTB’s fleet, and is docked at North Shore Marine Terminal & Logistics, Inc.’s facility in Escanaba.

Groh said VTB is proud to own and operate the Joseph H. Thompson.“I think it’s unique that she does have past history supporting our troops and that she has survived all these years and is still in general commerce today,” he said.

The Joseph H. Thompson left Escanaba Wednesday and is currently sailing the Great Lakes.

Escanaba Daily Press

 

New rear admiral takes over command at Cleveland Coast Guard station

6/7 - Cleveland, OH – Rear Admiral Donna L. Cottrell took over Thursday as the leader of the ninth district, relieving fellow Rear Admiral Joanna M. Nunan. Cottrell is a native of Wellington, Ohio and a graduate of Ohio University.

What makes this historic is that RADM Cottrell becomes the third straight woman to command the ninth district, something that has never happened before in the Coast Guard's history and a feat that is "unlikely to be repeated. RADM Nunan relieved RADM June Ryan back in 2017, marking the first time a female district commander relieved another in the agency's history.

As ninth district commander, RADM Cottrell will oversee operations across the entire Great Lakes, spanning eight states.

One of the special guests at Thursday's change of command ceremony was 104-year-old Mabel Johnson. She served in the Coast Guard at the Cleveland station during World War II as a SPAR, doing the jobs of thousands of Coast Guardsmen who had to leave their posts to fight overseas.

Also, Rear Admiral Nunan received a nice honor by the Cleveland Indians on Thursday as she threw out the first pitch prior to the Tribe's game against the Twins as part of the commemoration of the 75th anniversary of D-Day.

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  June 7

1958, the largest freighter ever built on the Great Lakes slid down the ways at River Rouge, Michigan. The new freighter was christened by Mrs. Edmund Fitzgerald and named EDMUND FITZGERALD. The 729-foot FITZGERALD was owned by Northwestern Mutual Insurance Company and operated by Columbia Transportation under a 25-year bare boat charter.

In 1977, tugs refused to tow the new MESABI MINER out of the harbor due to high winds. Captain William McSweeney brought the MESABI MINER out under her own power to begin her maiden trip. On 07 June 1890, EMILY P. WEED (steel propeller freighter, 300 foot, 2,362 gross tons) was launched by F. W. Wheeler (Hull #69) at W. Bay City, Michigan for the Hollister Transportation Co. She lasted until 02 September 1905, when she stranded on Sand Island Reef, Apostle Islands on Lake Superior and broke in two.

On 07 June 1862, MORNING STAR (wooden side-wheel steamer, 248 foot, 1,265 gross tons) was launched by A. A. Turner at Trenton, Michigan. She only lasted until 1868, when she sank in Lake Erie in a collision with the bark COURTLAND.

In 1977, WILLIAM A. IRVIN ran into the side of the Rock Cut after a power failure on board. The vessel received only slight damage. (For a more detailed account, read Jody Aho's book "The Steamer William A Irvin: Queen of the Silver Stackers").

On June 7, 1991, the ALPENA, the former LEON FRASER) began her maiden voyage as a cement carrier, departing Superior, Wisconsin, for her namesake port. Fraser Shipyards, which performed the conversion, took out a full-page ad in the Superior Evening Telegram proclaiming "INLAND LAKES MANAGEMENT, YOUR SHIP IS READY" and a picture of the vessel.

On 7 June 1859, COLUMBIA (2-mast wooden brig, 92 foot, 177 gross tons, built in 1842, at Sandusky, Ohio) broke up in a storm near Sherwood Point, Green Bay (Death's Door). She was famous for bringing the first load of copper ore from the Keweenaw Peninsula to through the Soo. She also brought the first locomotive to Marquette.

The METEOR (wooden steam barge, 201 foot, 729 gross tons, built in 1863, at Cleveland, Ohio) burned at Buckley's dock at the foot of 2nd Street in Detroit, Michigan on 7 June 1873. The fire supposedly started in her hold at 1:30 a.m. and was not discovered until it was too late. The ship burned to the waterline and sank. Some docks and warehouses also burned in this catastrophe. The wreck was raised in early September 1875, and towed to the foot of Belle Isle where the machinery and hull were sold at the U.S. Marshall's sale on 24 April 1876. Although originally thought to be the end of this vessel, the hull was purchased by Stephen B. Grummond of Detroit for $480. It was rebuilt as the schooner-barge NELSON BLOOM in 1882 and lasted until abandoned in 1925.

1894: The wooden steamer OCEAN received a massive hole in the bow after a collision with the barge KENT at Alexandria Bay on the St. Lawrence.

1902: The whaleback steamer THOMAS WILSON sank after a collision with the GEORGE G. HADLEY a mile off the Duluth piers while outbound with iron ore and nine lives were lost.

1915: JAMES B. EADS and the CHICAGO collided in the St. Clair River.

1941: The fish tug FINGLO caught fire and burned at Toronto. It was rebuilt for harbor duty as the steam tug H.J.D. NO. 1. In 1956-1957, the ship was unofficially renamed Salamander to star in the Canadian television series Tugboat Annie.

1971: SILVER CREST visited the Seaway in 1971 after previous calls as a) VIGRID in 1959 and 1963. It also returned as b) ROSTO in 1963 before becoming d) SILVER CREST in 1968. The ship stranded on Sisal Reef, in the Gulf of Mexico while enroute from Veracruz to Progresso, Mexico, but was refloated on June 12. The vessel arrived at Whampoa, China, for scrapping in July 1973.

1991: HERMES SCAN, a first time Seaway trader in 1977, sank in the Bay of Bengal as d) BRAUT TEAM after developing leaks the previous day. The heavy-lift vessel was reportedly carrying a Chinese steam locomotive for delivery to New York for the New York, Susquehanna and Western Railroad. All on board were saved.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Jody Aho, Max Hanley, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Russ Plumb, Father Dowling Collection, Historical Collections of the Great Lakes, Ahoy & Farewell II, The Marine Historical Society of Detroit and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

 

NTSB releases report on last year’s Straits anchor strike

6/6 - The federal government released a report Wednesday that shines a light on exactly what happened leading up to an anchor striking a pipeline in the Straits of Mackinac in April 2018.

A dragging anchor hit decommissioned utility lines and Enbridge’s Line 5 west of the Mackinac Bridge, and fueled fears of an environmental catastrophe.

The report says a barge (Erie Trader with tug Clyde S. VanEnkevort) unknowingly released its anchor, dragging it and caused damaged to electrical cables and dented line 5. The NTSB also determined the likely cause was a failure to secure the barge’s anchor, and the improper adjustment of the anchor’s brake band. The report says those two factors that caused the anchor strike.

Attorney General Dana Nessel said this report reinforces the danger Line 5 is to the Great Lakes. She says she is “prepared to take legal action to decommission Line 5.”

Oil company Enbridge says they take their responsibility seriously to protect the environment. The company says they’ll continue with their plans to construct a tunnel for Line 5.

Governor Gretchen Whitmer is negotiating with Enbridge to speed up that tunnel.

9 & 10 News

 

Great Lakes set record high water levels, could continue rising

6/6 - Two Great Lakes and Lake St. Clair broke water level records in May, according to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

Lakes Erie and Superior and Lake St. Clair set new record high monthly mean water levels, preliminary data from the Corps shows, amid a persistent rainy period. And all five Great Lakes and Lake St. Clair could continue to hit record highs this summer, the Corps said.

"As we expected, record highs were set in May on a few of our Great Lakes, and our June forecast shows additional record highs likely this summer," Keith Kompoltowicz, chief of Watershed Hydrology, Detroit District, said in a Corps news release.

Precipitation in May was 21% higher than average in the Great Lakes basin. Water levels are based on what scientists call “water balance,” or how much water is coming into and out of a body of water, said Drew Gronewold, associate professor of environment and sustainability at the University of Michigan. This is based on factors like precipitation and evaporation.

These extreme levels pose a threat to human health and safety, especially for communities close to the water, Gronewold said. High water levels cause issues like flooding, coastal erosion, property damage, delay in planting spring crops and displacement of people from their homes.

People with shoreline property are especially impacted, added Brent Lofgren, a physical scientist with the Great Lakes Environmental Research lab.

“People who build docks on the lake, they tend to build them for a particular water level,” Lofgren said. “If it changes, their docks don’t work as well. Shoreline properties might have had a beach there and now it’s really not there anymore.”

The Great Lakes basin has experienced high precipitation for at least six years, with a steep increase in the last month, Lofgren said. But this increase comes at the end of a lengthy period of record low water levels that lasted from the 1990s to about 2013, both scientists said. “It was not long ago we were talking about record lows,” Gronewold said.

Experts disagree on whether these fluctuations are linked to climate change.

Gronewold and another University of Michigan professor, Richard Rood, published an article on Tuesday arguing that climate change is driving the rapid shifts between high and low lake levels. Lofgren, however, said he does not agree with the research.

Detroit Free Press

 

Port Reports -  June 6

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day’s news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known).

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
Michipicoten departed Duluth at 03:30 Wednesday morning with a load of iron ore for Algoma Steel in Sault Ste. Marie, and Great Lakes Trader/tug Joyce L. VanEnkevort arrived at 16:34 to unload limestone at Hallett #5. Also in port Wednesday were American Mariner, loading wheat at General Mills; Federal Kivalina, loading wheat at Riverland Ag; and Federal Mackinac, discharging cement at CRH. Both the Mariner and Kivalina were expected to depart at some point Wednesday evening. In Superior, Stewart J. Cort departed at 10:40 after loading iron ore pellets at Burlington Northern, and Burns Harbor then shifted to BN from Lakehead Pipeline to load. She is expected to depart early Thursday morning.

Two Harbors-Silver Bay – Gary A. Putney
Joseph L. Block departed Two Harbors on June 5th at 02:28 for Indiana Harbor. Arriving Two Harbors on June 5th at 07:26 for South of #2 was the Edwin H. Gott. She departed Two Harbors on the 5th at 18:38. As of 19:30 on the 5th she didn't have an updated AIS. Arriving Two Harbors on the 5th will be the Indiana Harbor. As of 19:15 on the 5th she was SW of Silver Bay. There is a possibility the American Integrity will arrive Two Harbors late on the 6th, but probably she will arrive Two Harbors early on June 7th. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay had no traffic on June 5th and none scheduled on June 6th.

Thunder Bay, ON
Tuesday June 4th: 19:47 CSL St-Laurent departed Viterra A for Montreal. 21:12 Kaministiqua departed Richardson Main Terminal for Port Cartier. Wednesday June 5th: 19:43 Algoma Conveyor arrived at Viterra B to load grain. Expected for Thursday: CSL Welland.

Northern Lake Huron ports
MacGregor Bay:
Monday;14:00 Algoma Compass arrived at Fisher Harbour to unload salt and later departed for Bruce Mines.

Alpena:
Tuesday; Manitowoc departed for Port Dolomite.

Stoneport:
Wednesday; 12:12 Olive L Moore arrived to load.

Calcite:
Tuesday; Joyce L Vanenkevort departed for Duluth Superior. 14:46 H Lee White departed for Green Bay. Wednesday; 3:48 Cason J Calloway arrived to load limestone.

Cheboygan:
Wednesday; 17:04 The tug Michigan and barge Great Lakes departed for Toledo.

Port Dolomite:
Tuesday; Manitowoc arrived to load and on Wednesday; at 1:23 departed for Ludington.

Drummond Island:
Tuesday; Cuyahoga departed for Detroit.

Bruce Mines:
Monday; Algoma Compass arrived to load trap rock and on Tuesday; 1:24 departed for Detroit.

Goderich, ON – Bruce Douglas Algoma Sault was at the salt dock Wednesday night. Algoma Innovator was at the grain elevators. Algoma Transport was at the north dock, probably waiting to load salt.

Detroit-Rouge River – Raymond H Wednesday Arrivals: Hon. James L Oberstar arrived at AK Steel to unload ore. Presque Isle arrived at the Waterfront Petroleum Terminal to fuel. Calusa Coast and Delaware arrived at the Marathon Asphalt Terminal to load.

Monroe, MI – Raymond H Paul R Tregurtha was unloading coal at the DTE Energy plant on Wednesday.

Toledo, OH
Tugs Colorado and Nebraska assisted Federal Biscay from Anderson's K. Elevator on Wednesday.

Northeast Ohio Ports
6/5 arrivals: Manitoulin to Sandusky to load coal at Norfolk Southern. NACC Argonaut with cement for LaFarge, American Courage to Arcelor Mittal with a shuttle from Ashtabula and Federal Kumano to the Port dock 24E. 6/5 departures: Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin from Sandusky.

Erie, PA
Happy River was unloading turbine parts on Wednesday.

Welland Canal and vicinity vessel report - Wednesday June 5 ... by Barry Andersen

Nanticoke:
docked - Jun 3 - Algocanada at 2103 - Jun 5 - tug Leonard M & Niagara Spirit at 1322 - departed - Jun 4 - Algoma Sault at 0316 - Jun 5 - Mesabi Miner at 1218 westbound

Long Point Bay anchorage:
anchored - Jun 5 - Algoterra at 1819 - Jun 5 - Damia Desgagnes at 0728 - departed - Jun 4 - tug Leonard M & Niagara Spirit at 1126 for the dock

Welland Canal:
upbound - Jun 4 - Egmondgracht (Nld) at 1050 - stopping wharf 12 and Thunder Bay at 2156 - Jun 5 - Algoma Discovery at 0409, Federal Leda (Mhl) at 1706, Kivalliq W (ex Sten Fjord-18, Falcon-09) at 1751 and Algoma Hansa at 1940

downbound - Jun 4 - Acadia Desgagnes at 1448 and Egmondgracht (Nld) at 2141 (turned in Lake Erie and headed to wharf 12) - Jun 5 - Egmondgracht (Nld) stopping wharf 12 at 0020), tug Everlast & Norman McLeod eta 2245 and Algoma Enterprise eta 2300

Welland Canal docks:
docked - Jun 3 - CCGS Pierre Radisson at 1430 approx - tied alongside fitout berth at Heddle DD, Port Weller - Jun 5 - Egmondgracht (Nld) docked wharf 12 at 0020)

Port Weller anchorage:
anchored - Jun 4 - Arsland (Mlt) (ex CT Dublin-11) at 0740 - Jun 5 - Selasse (Mlt) (ex CT Dublin-11) at 1440 - departed - Jun 5 - Federal Caribou (Mhl) at 1500, Patras (Mlt) (ex Gan-Sword-10) at 2030 - all eastbound

Hamilton:
arrival - Jun 5 - Pacific Huron (Atg) at 1537 - docked - Jun 1 - Federal Schelde (Bds) at 1100 - Jun 3 - Brant (Cyp) at 0530 - Jun 4 - Hinch Spirit (ex Topaz I-19 at 1830 - Jun 4 - Tecumseh at 0217, Federal Satsuki (Mhl) at 1113 and Gagliarda at 1415 - departures - Jun 3 - tug Leonard M & Niagara Spirit as 2304 - Jun 4 - Federal Kumano (Mhl) at 0910 - Robert S Pierson at 1915 - Jun 5 - Algoma Discovery at 0204

Bronte:
docked - Jun 4 - Harbour Fashion (Por) at 2301 from the canal

Mississauga:
arrival - Jun 4 - Selasse (Gib) (ex Selay S-17) at 0537

Toronto:
docked - May 31 - Redhead ii (Atg) (ex Bora-19, Hermann Schoening-15) at 0440 - Jun 2 - Lubie (Bhs) at 1122 - departed - Jun 5 - USCG Biscayne Bay at 2031 (headed to Baltimore, MD for refit)

Oshawa:
docked - Jun 1 - Juno (Bhs) at 0657

 

Surging Great Lakes water levels shrink beaches, flood docks in Michigan

6/6 - Lakes Erie, St. Clair and Superior broke records for average water heights during the month of May, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers announced Tuesday.

And as wet weather persists across the region, all five Great Lakes — as well as Lake St. Clair — may set additional records, the agency added, stirring concerns about ongoing flooding and shoreline erosion.

“Our June forecast shows additional record highs likely this summer," Keith Kompoltowicz, chief of watershed hydrology, in the Corps’ Detroit District, said in a news release. The Great Lakes Basin last month saw 21 percent more precipitation than normal, filling the lakes to levels unseen in decades. Average water heights hovered 1 to 3 inches above previous May records set in 1986.

Winds often affect local water levels, pushing them dramatically higher during storms, the Corps warned. Flood risks extend to communities along rivers and other channels connecting the Great Lakes.

The full lakes are breaking records just six years after low water levels bedevilled ships that haul iron ore, grain and other commodities between ports.

"These changes are a response to unusual combinations of extreme lake evaporation, persistent increases in the magnitude and intensity of precipitation events, and intermittent outbursts of cold arctic air,” a Drew Gronewold, a hydrologist with the University of Michigan’s School for Environment and Sustainability, said in a statement Tuesday.

Though ship captains and some marina owners welcome the recovery from low levels years ago, the flooding has shrunk beaches and left docks underwater across the Great Lakes region.

Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer on Monday declared an emergency in Tuscola County, which borders the Saginaw Bay in Lake Huron, after flooding washed away roads and caused millions of dollars in damage. That came one month after Whitmer declared a flooding emergency in Wayne County, which borders the Detroit River, the nexus between Lakes Erie and St. Clair. The county saw more than 3,000 homes damaged, according to media reports.

 

Price to sell Blue Water Bridge? Michigan House Republicans want to know

6/6 - Lansing, MI – State House Republicans want to know the price tag for the Blue Water Bridge in Port Huron and plan to ask the Michigan Department of Transportation to solicit bids for the structure.

The House Transportation Appropriations Subcommittee’s proposed budget Thursday will include boilerplate language directing the Department of Transportation to solicit proposals or bids for the international crossing, which is jointly owned by the U.S. and Canada.

The Michigan Department of Transportation did not have an immediate estimate of the bridge’s worth, but said outstanding debt on the bridge is roughly $89.7 million with a final payment set for 2037.

The House's budget boilerplate language also will request similar solicitations for bids for several state-owned small airports, some rest stops and one rail line for transportation funding, said Gideon D’Assandro, a spokesman for House Speaker Lee Chatfield, R-Levering.

The plan would allow the Legislature “to get an idea of what the market looks like and get a better accounting what assets the state has,” D’Assandro said.

The language is not part of the House’s roads plan, which he expects to be released at a later date, he said.

“Obviously, the state has to fund a lot of priorities every year so it's good to know what kind of assets its sitting on,” D’Assandro said.

The subcommittee is already aware of some parties interested in the bridge, including a group of investment funds, said Rep. Matt Maddock, R-Milford, chairman of the transportation subcommittee. The bridge’s sale remains a possibility, but a serious one, he said.

“I’m all for building bridges, but I think if you had an asset lying around that’s worth half a billion to a billion dollars, I’d rather sell that bridge than force Michigan families to pay more at the gas pump,” he said.

Maddock said he'll explore any options that will sidestep tax increases for residents and check the reach of government agencies.

"MDOT used to focus on transportation, not bridges or airports or welcome centers," Maddock said. "There’s a lot of things that we’re in the business of that we shouldn’t be in the business of.”

The Port Huron-Sarnia crossing consists of two bridges — the original bridge with three lanes of west-bound traffic into the United States that was renovated in 1999 and a modern bridge opened in 1997 with three lanes of east-bound traffic into Canada. The state of Michigan owns the U.S. portions of the spans, while a Canadian authority owns the Canadian section, according to the Michigan Department of Transportation

There already is a private owner of a key international bridge in Michigan. The Moroun family owns the 90-year-old Ambassador Bridge that connects Detroit and Windsor.

The Ambassador Bridge is set to get competition from the Gordie Howe International Bridge, a private-public crossing that is being built two miles south. The $4.4 billion project is expected to be completed by 2023.

U.S. Rep. Rashida Tlaib cited the Moroun's ownership of the Ambassador Bridge Wednesday as a warning against tapping private interests for public infrastructure.

"Come to Detroit, and I will show you how selling a bridge to a private owner is a bad, no terrible, idea," said Tlaib, D-Detroit.

It is not clear if the Moroun-owned Detroit International Bridge Company or one of its affiliated firms is interested in buying the Blue Water Bridge.

The Blue Water Bridge long ago was supposed to get its customs plaza expanded in a $165 million construction project. But the customs plaza project languished during the Obama administration and remains dormant.

Local leaders in St. Clair County learned of the plan Wednesday and said it appeared to be a preliminary exploration of how to monetize the twin spans over the St. Clair River.

“I think it is reasonable that the state Legislature would want to look at the value of its asset and see how those assets could be best used for the people of Michigan,” Port Huron City Manager James Freed said.

The bridge certainly is an asset to the community but is ultimately outside of the county’s purview or ownership, said St. Clair County Board Chairman Jeff Bohm, who noted the plan would “get vetted at a much higher pay grade than mine.”

“I guess it’s the old adage, everything’s for sale, even the Blue Water Bridge,” Bohm said.

The Detroit News

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  June 6

On 06 June 1891, BAY CITY (wooden propeller freighter, 152 foot, 372 gross tons, built in 1867, at Marine City, Michigan) burned to a total loss while being repaired at the foot of Rivard Street in Detroit, Michigan. She was loaded with 300,000 feet of white pine lumber at the time. Her watchman reported the fire during the night and firemen thought they had it out, but it re-ignited and the vessel burned to a total loss. This ship had previously burned 20 years before on 10 April 1871, when she was on her first trip of the season after being rebuilt over the winter. Then she caught fire and burned nearly to the waterline but was rebuilt again and lasted until this last fire in 1891.

On 06 June 1917, ISABELLA J. BOYCE (wooden propeller sandsucker, 138 foot, 368 gross tons, built in 1889, at Manitowoc, Wisconsin as a freighter) grounded on Middle Bass Island in Lake Erie and then was destroyed by fire. No lives were lost.

In 1944, the C-4 bulk carrier MARINE ROBIN participated in the D-Day invasion at Normandy. In 1952, after conversion into a bulk freighter she began service in the lakes for M.A. Hanna Co., as b.) JOSEPH H. THOMPSON. She serves today as a tug barge combination created from the sections of the original vessel.

E.B. BARBER (Hull#111) of the Port Arthur Shipbuilding Co., entered service on June 6, 1953, for Algoma Central Railway Ltd.

In 1953, ARMCO (Hull#870) began her maiden voyage from Lorain, Ohio, for the Columbia Transportation Div., bound for Superior, Wisconsin, to load iron ore.

On June 6, 1959, ADAM E. CORNELIUS (Hull#) 424) began her maiden voyage for the American Steamship Co., from Manitowoc, Wisconsin. This was the last Great Lakes vessel constructed with telescoping hatch covers. Sold Canadian and converted to a barge she was renamed b.) CAPT. EDWARD V. SMITH in 1988, and c.) SEA BARGE ONE in 1991 and d.) SARAH SPENCER in 1996.

Upper Lakes Shipping's POINTE NOIRE was in collision with Cleveland Tanker's SATURN on June 6, 1977, near Fighting Island in the Detroit River.

On 6 June 1869, ASA COVELL (wooden propeller tug, 20 gross tons, built in 1852, at Buffalo, New York) was towing the brig IROQUOIS up the Cuyahoga River at Cleveland when her boiler exploded and she sank. Her captain was killed when the pilothouse was blown into the river.

On 6 June 1883, HERCULES (wooden schooner-barge, 139 foot, 195 tons, built in 1867, at Algonac, Michigan) was upbound in the south bend of the St. Clair River near Algonac, Michigan when the CLARION (iron propeller package freighter, 240 foot, 1,711 gross tons, built in 1881, at Wyandotte, Michigan) overtook her and collided with her in broad daylight. HERCULES drifted to the bank, capsized and sank. No lives were lost.

1956: NEWBRUNDOC ran aground at Densmore Bay on the southeast side of Wellesley Island in the St. Lawrence after straying out of the channel in fog. The ore-laden vessel, enroute from Contrecoeur to Buffalo, was released the next day.

1964: The Norwegian freighter FRO made 10 trips through the Seaway from 1961 to 1965. It ran aground at Milwaukee after loading 7500 tons of scrap for France on June 6, 1964, and was lightered to the YANKCANUCK before being refloated June 9.

1967: FRANKCLIFFE HALL ran aground off Hare Island, Lake Superior in dense fog and received heavy damage to bottom plates. The ship was lightered and released June 9 and went to the Davie shipyard for repairs. This vessel was scrapped at Aliaga, Turkey, as HALIFAX in 2011.

1967: AUGUSTUS B. WOLVIN struck the bank of the Welland Canal and grounded. A subsequent survey of the damage at Port Weller Dry Docks revealed it was not worth the cost of repairs and the ship was laid up and sold for scrap.

1982: ALGOSEA (i) rammed the west pier at Port Weller entering the Welland Canal in fog turning the bulbous bow by 90 degrees. The damaged ship was allowed to go to Thunder Bay for repairs. It became c) SAUNIERE later in 1982 and was scrapped at Aliaga, Turkey, in 2011.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Jody Aho, Max Hanley, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Historical Collections of the Great Lakes, Ahoy & Farewell II, The Marine Historical Society of Detroit and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Soo’s Norgoma museum ship towed to dock above the locks

6/5 - Sault Ste. Marie, ON – Shortly before 8 a.m. Tuesday, the museum mhip Norgoma was pulled from its spot at Bondar Marina. Purvis Marine moved the museum ship through the American locks to its new temporary docking location west of Algoma Steel.

The city changed the locks on the boat last month and fenced it off after deciding in March that the Norgoma would need to be removed from the Bondar Marina – where it has been moored since its decommissioning in the mid-1970s – to allow for dock replacement. Council had determined that the ship was an eyesore in the downtown core and that attempts by the board to spruce it up and encourage tourism had not been fruitful.

As of March, the city’s plan was to tow the Norgoma to the Purvis Dock at Algoma Steel, billing the $50,000 cost to the volunteer-run marine centre.

The St. Marys River Marine Centre board of directors had embarked upon developing partnerships that saw a number of new ship activities to provide revenue for the volunteer organization, including a local food market, Open Mic Night and renting the facility for movie filming.

Watch a video of the move at this link: https://www.sootoday.com/videos/news/video-watch-this-mornings-norgoma-move-1488712

View images at this link: https://saultonline.com/2019/06/norgoma-on-the-move

 

Combat ship USS Minneapolis St. Paul rolled off assembly line in Wisconsin

6/5 - Marinette, WI – The USS Minneapolis Saint Paul was rolled off the assembly line in Marinette, WI, Friday.

According to the USS Minneapolis Saint Paul Commissioning Committee, the ship is scheduled to launch this summer at a private military ceremony at its location north of Green Bay. It is expected to be commissioned in the first half of 2020.

The Littoral Combat Ship, constructed by Lockheed Martin, is the 21st in its class to join the U.S. Navy. In February 2018, officials with the Navy held a keel laying ceremony at the Fincantieri Marinette Shipyard as crews began construction on the hull.

There, the ship’s sponsor authenticated the keel by welding her initials onto a steel plate that was placed in the hull of the ship. The sponsor was Deputy Under Secretary of the Navy for Policy Jodi J. Greene, of Duluth.

The USS Minneapolis Saint Paul is being designed for coastal water battlespace and will be used for missions like mine-clearing, anti-submarine and anti-surface warfare.

This will be the second vessel in the U.S. Navy to be named after the Twin Cities. The SSN-708 submarine was the first USS Minneapolis Saint Paul. It was decommissioned in 2008.

Image gallery at this link: http://www.fox9.com/news/combat-ship-uss-minneapolis-st-paul-rolled-off-assembly-line-in-wisconsin

 

Port Reports -  June 5

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day’s news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known).

Two Harbors-Silver Bay – Gary A. Putney
The Algoma Spirit arrived Two Harbors on June 4th at 05:20 for South of #2. As of 19:15 on the 4th she was still loading. She is loading for Hamilton. Arriving Two Harbors on the 4th at 15:19 for North of #2 lay-by was the Joseph L. Block. She arrived from Duluth after taking on a partial load of bft. Due Two Harbors on June 5th are the Edwin H. Gott and the Indiana Harbor. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay had no traffic on June 4th and none scheduled on June 5th.

Goderich, ON – Bruce Douglas
Algoma Transport remained at North Pier Tuesday to allow dredging in channel.

Marine City, MI – Rod Burdick
Cason J. Callaway unloaded at the aggregates dock and Tuesday and received fuel from Gaelic's William Hoey and fuel barge.

Detroit-Rouge River – Raymond H
Tuesday arrivals: Mississagi arrived at the Waterfront Petroleum Terminal to fuel. American Integrity arrived at the Waterfront Petroleum Terminal to fuel. Algoma Sault arrived at Motor City Materials to unload salt.

Northeast Ohio Ports
6/4 arrivals: Algoma Niagara to Conneaut, American Courage to Ashtabula from Fairport Harbor, Sharon M1 to Cleveland, Rt. Hon Paul J. Martin to Sandusky and Victory/Maumee to Marblehead. Manitoulin will arrive in Sandusky later Tuesday night. 6/4 departures: Polsteam's Narie from Cleveland to Burns Harbor.

 

Great Lakes shipping group calls for more icebreakers

6/5 - As the warm weather settles in, members of a shipping industry group are still thinking, and worrying, about winter and ice on the Great Lakes.

The Chamber of Marine Commerce is calling on the federal government to increase the number of Canadian Coast Guard icebreakers on the lakes by at least five under a $15.7-billion fleet renewal plan announced recently.

Bruce Burrows, president of the chamber representing the shipping industry on both sides of the U.S.-Canada border, said its members were “plagued with ice problems in the Great Lakes this past spring and during the winter on the St. Lawrence River.”

The chamber said the cost to the Canadian economy of just one domestic ships being delayed delivering its cargo is estimated at more than $500,000 a day. “This is a big hit to the economy,” Burrows said.

While Canadian and U.S. Coast Guard crews worked tirelessly during the spring on the Great Lakes, they were hampered by the age and condition of their ships, the chamber says. “The existing fleet is breaking down, a lot,” Burrows said.

According to the chamber, two U.S. Coast Guard icebreakers were out of service in March and a Canadian icebreaker assigned to Lake Superior was only able to operate at 60 per cent of capacity. That ship also sat idle in April because of mechanical problems.

“We need to preserve the international reputation of the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence navigation system as being a reliable trade gateway that’s open for business,” Burrows said. “But, it’s not just about dealing with service breakdowns due to the aging fleet – we need more overall capacity.”

The chamber says shipping on the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River generates more than $60 billion in economy activity and supports 329,000 jobs in Canada and the U.S. “These are big numbers and we need ice breaking to support this economy,” Burrows said.

If the eight states and two provinces on the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River were treated as a single economy, it would be the world’s third largest, he said. “Sarnia is right in the middle of that,” Burrows added.

As well as promising new ships, the Canadian government is moving to add three refurbished icebreakers as an interim measure, including the Captain Molly Kool that was dedicated recently at its home port in Newfoundland.

“That will help address this immediate issue of ships going in for long-term repair because they’re so old,” Burrows said. “But, we still need additional capacity.”

Fleet renewal the government announced last week is needed because the average large coast guard ship is 38 years old and nearing the end of its service life, said Jocelyn Lubczuk, press secretary for the minister of fisheries, oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard.

She said the as many as 16 new multi-purpose vessels included in the announcement “will provide the coast guard with enhanced capabilities to meet evolving demands from its various clients, including for ice-breaking services in the Great Lakes.”

The Canadian Coast Guard has two light icebreakers in the Great Lakes, supplemented by medium icebreakers at the opening of the seaway season, or when needed, Lubczuk said.

No decisions have been made regarding the replacement of the medium icebreakers, she added.

As well as 16 multi-purpose vessels capable of light ice breaking duty, the government announced two new Arctic and offshore patrol ships will be built. Repairs, refits and life-extension work will also be carried out on the existing fleet until the new ships are delivered.

“We are ensuring the Canadian Coast Guard has the equipment and tools it needs to carry out its important work to ensure the high-quality service Canadians expect,” Lubczuk said.

Burrows said he worries most of the ships announced will be for regions outside of the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Seaway where the chamber is seeking a commitment for additional icebreakers to be built “quickly” and put to work. “We don’t have that yet,” he said.

Burrows said shipping on the lakes and seaway grew 17 per cent over the last two years.

That growth is expected to continue while the industry also works with its partners to extend the navigation season on the seaway, and deal with unpredictable weather events brought on by climate change. “We just don’t have enough icebreakers,” Burrows said.

Sarnia Observer

 

Seaway visitor Hanse Gate sold, renamed Lake Erie

6/5 - The 27,781 dwt ton bulk carrier Hanse Gate, built in 2004 at Guangzhou Shipyard in China and flagged in Antigua & Barbuda has been sold for $4.7 million. The ship recently visited the seaway and Great Lakes, entering April 10 to load grain in Thunder Bay and becoming the first ocean ship to visit that port in the 2019 season. Upon leaving the seaway on April 25 she proceeded to Oran, Algeria, to unload. Subsequently she was sold and renamed Lake Erie. Previous names were Federal Matane until 2011, CL Hanse Gate to 2015 and Hanse Gate to 2019, visiting the seaway under all of them.

Her owner, Johs Thode Reederei of Hamburg, Germany, may well be exiting the shipowning business. They have sold three ships from their fleet, leaving only one containership from their business focus of container feeders with the handysize bulk carrier segment. Her new manager, Sunship Schiffahrtskontor, has had other vessels serving the seaway, giving way to potential return of the Lake Erie in the future.

Ron Oliveira

 

Saltie demolition report

6/5 - Vessels with Great Lakes / Seaway connection reported as a casualty or sold for demolition. Taken from June 2019 issue of Marine News – Journal of the World Ship Society

Casualties: none reported

Demolitions:
Cape Lobos (7216854; United States of America) (Federal Seaway-88 - 1st trip into Seaway 1986, Laurentien Forest-86, Grand Encounter-85, Laurentien Forest-80 - 1st trip in Seaway 1972) Ro-Ro cargo ship. 22,286 / 1972. By the Government of the United States of America (Department of Transportation - Maritime Administration) (MARAD), United States of America to Steelcoast, USA and arrived Brownsville, TX. 31.08.2018

Clear Aurora (8208189; Comoros) (Anna Karenina-12, Bereket Ka-08, Mopa Daniel-00, Chemical Harmony -92, Gogo Chemstar-91 - 1st trip into Seaway 1985) 5,209 / 1982 - Chemical / Products tanker - By Aviso Shipping Co Ltd, Seychelles, to Apuyama Steel Pvt Ltd., India and arrived Alang 8.09.2018 - commenced demolition 14.09.2018

Icto (5234395, Sierre Leone) (Victo-18 - 1st trip in Seaway 2018, American Victory-17, Middletown-06, Pioneer Challenger-62 - 1st trip into Seaway 1961, Gulfoil-61, Neshanic-47, launched as Marquette) 13,167 / 1943 - bulk carrier, self-discharging laker - By Algoma Central Corp. (ACC) Canada to Leyal Gemi Sokum Ltd., Turkey and arrived Aliaga 3.09.2018 - commenced demolition 3.09.2018

Sea Raven (7806506; United States of America) (Dixie Commander-99 - 1st trip into Seaway 1995, Star Providence-93, Sea Skimmer-90, Gemini-80) 695 / 1941 - Articulated pusher tug. By Kirby Offshore Marine Operating LLC, United States of America, to American breakers and reported 2018

Report prepared by Barry Andersen and René Beauchamp

 

All roads (and canals) lead to a booming Welland

6/5 - Welland, ON – A unique convergence presents itself to truckers, engineers and helmsmen approaching the Townline Tunnel from the north, south, east or west. While it’s not a regular occurrence, big rigs and Canadian Pacific Railway trains have been known to simultaneously pass under the Welland Canal in Ontario’s Niagara Region at exactly the same time as lake freighters ply the waters directly overhead.

“That intersection is priceless,” says Welland Mayor Frank Campion. “Our industrial amenities and transportation infrastructure are attracting industry and the jobs associated with it, and align perfectly with the federal government’s plans for transporting goods on an international scale.”

Combine this with bountiful incentives and a wealth of newly zoned land, and it’s no wonder commercial and industrial real estate development is growing at an unprecedented rate in the Rose City.

Welland’s building boom, which started about two years ago, owes much to the continuing divestment of some 1,600 hectares of federally-owned land along the working canal. “There are several plots we will be interested in purchasing as soon as they come up for sale,” Mr. Campion says. “Given our current levels of residential and industrial growth, we need to have enough land inventory for the future.”

A recent federal transport and infrastructure committee recommendation to use canal corridor lands to boost Niagara’s economy has only strengthened the city’s bid to build a dock and loading area on the working canal with financial support from Ottawa’s $2-billion National Trade Corridors Fund, which began a call for proposals in January.

"A diversified economy is important to Welland,” Mr. Campion says, adding that the city is working hard to avoid a repeat of the spate of local plant closures that accompanied the 2008 financial crisis.

The value of the 726 construction permits issued in Welland in 2017 – $164,548,600 – was more than double that of 2016, with the 802 permits issued in 2018 setting a new record. “We’re taking an aggressive approach to development, and it’s been very successful,” says Mr. Campion, who credits the Welland By-Pass channel for allowing the city “to separate residential, recreational and tourism development from industrial development.”

The original route of the fourth Welland Canal, which passes through the city centre, is lined with bike paths, parks, a 750-seat amphitheatre, and the 12-year-old Welland International Flatwater Centre, which hosted canoeing and rowing events during the 2015 Pan American Games.

At the other end of the real estate spectrum is the canal’s 13.4-kilometre-long bypass, which opened on the city’s eastern outskirts in 1973. It is lined with dozens of industrial and commercial operations, such as Welded Tube of Canada, Canadian Tire Financial Services Ltd., and Austrian engine manufacturer Innio, which recently moved into a $240-million, 500,000-square-foot assembly plant established by General Electric in 2016.

Newer arrivals, such as Northern Gold Foods and Intravision Greens Canada, occupy the six-year-old Enterprise Industrial Subdivision off Highway 140. Intravision, which is slated to grow leafy vegetables in a 20,000-square-foot automated indoor farm, will benefit greatly from its Niagara Foreign Trade Zone setting, says Neville D’Souza, chief executive officer of site developer Niagara Holdings Canada.

“The proximity to the U.S. border and major highways, combined with the ability to apply for tax, duty and tariff exemptions, gives us a real advantage,” he says. “The City of Welland has a very proactive team, and that’s attracting skill sets to the region and bringing the younger generation back. It’s exciting to see all the momentum.”

Northern Gold Foods, meanwhile, is one of 13 ventures that have already benefited from the Gateway Community Improvement Plan, which offers financial incentives to property owners who strengthen and diversify the local economy through private-sector investment. In 2018 alone, four applicants received $2.4-million in grants from the City of Welland and the Niagara Region by investing $38.6-million in 225,000 square feet of new industrial space.

Then there’s the new River Road Industrial Park, a cleared and as-yet-unoccupied 12-hectare expanse slated to be serviced in the coming months. It’s already drawing interest from buyers, especially those based in the Greater Toronto Area, says Dan Degazio, the City of Welland’s director of economic development.

“Companies are paying $200,000 an acre for commercial-industrial property in the GTA. In Welland it’s $125,000 an acre – serviced, configured for drainage, and ready to go. You can be in the ground in eight weeks. In the GTA, I’m hearing stories of 30 months for a permit. We work to accommodate whatever needs to be done. When GE bought here in 2016, they needed to be operational in less than two years. We had them in the ground in eight weeks.”

Mr. Degazio also credits the area’s relatively low wages and cost of living for enticing industry. “I’ve been in touch with a decent-sized GTA employer that’s looking at putting in a 200,000-square-foot building. The owner asks me, ‘Am I going to be able to hire anyone for $18 an hour?’ And I told him: ‘All day long.’ Here, your employees get twice the house for a third the cost.”

Niagara College’s Welland campus is also playing a key role, Mr. Degazio adds, by offering programs that develop manufacturing skills such as machining, tooling and drafting.

All this has made Roy Timms a busy man. The owner of Timbro Design Build Contractors says current levels of development surpass anything he’s experienced since founding the company in 1974.

“In the last few years, city council has done what needed be done to create an environment that encourages growth,” he says. “Instead of just policing, the Welland Development Commission assists in expediting projects. One of our clients came to Welland last June to set up a 75,000-square-foot food production facility. By the end of September he had purchased the land and in October we were building. That’s unique. In most communities, it takes much longer complete the process.”

Globe & Mail

 

Wayward moose goes for swim near Soo Locks

6/5 - Sault Ste. Marie, MI – A wandering moose took a swim near the Soo Locks Tuesday morning. Parks Canada and Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry personnel who were assembled on the Canadian side and appeared to be trying to coax the animal out of the water. Fortunately, the moose was able to make its own way to land on the U.S. side near the Valley Camp/Soo Locks Boat Tours dock. It’s unclear how the moose got into the water in the first place.

M Live

 

Annual Great Lakes Marine Market Saturday in St. Clair

6/5 - St. Clair, Mich. – The Lake Huron Lore Marine Historical Society is sponsoring its annual Great Lakes Maritime Market at the Riverview Plaza Mall in St. Clair on Saturday, June 8, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. The mall is just across the street from the boardwalk in downtown St. Clair.

If you have an interest in the ships that ply the Great Lakes, present or past, you will want to attend this event. There will be more that 30 vendors offering various items relating specifically to the ships and shipping industry of this region. Among the items that will be available for sale are historical artifacts, books, photographs, artwork, shipwrecks, memorabilia, advertising and more. It is a great way to learn more about the fascinating history of the Great Lakes shipping for the beginner or the advanced historian.

For more information, contact Lake Huron Lore at 586-725-6276 or micheldr2005@yahoo.com

 

Sign up now for  Soo 2019 Boatnerd Gathering

6/5- The 2019 schedule of Boatnerd Gatherings has been set and information is now available now on the Gatherings page, www.boatnerd.com/gathering

Gatherings include Soo Locks Engineers weekend festivities, and the annual Welland Canal weekend. Reservations are now being accepted for the Soo Locks Freighter-Chasing Cruise June 28. Sign up now. Don't be left on the dock.

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  June 5

In 1955, J. L. MAUTHE established a new Great Lakes cargo record for a coal cargo delivered to an upper lakes port. She loaded 18392 tons of coal at the Toledo C&O dock.

1943, BENJAMIN F. FAIRLESS, Captain Harry Ashby, delivered a record cargo of 19343.5 net tons of iron ore at Cleveland. The ore was loaded at Two Harbors, Minnesota.

In 1947, the Canada Steamship Lines steamer EMPEROR, loaded with ore and bound for Ashtabula, hit the rocks off Isle Royale at 4:10 a.m. The vessel sank within minutes but the crew was able to launch 2 lifeboats. Captain Eldon Walkinshaw, First Mate D. Moray, and 10 other crew members drowned when one of the lifeboats overturned. Twenty-one other survivors were rescued by the U.S.C.G. cutter KIMBALL.

On 04 June 1872, while carrying wooden barrel staves from Bay City, Michigan to Buffalo, New York, the bark AMERICAN GIANT encountered rough weather off Port Stanley, Ontario, on Lake Erie. Heavy seas carried off her deck cargo of 25,000 staves and the vessel became waterlogged. As the crew considered abandoning, the steamer MENDOTA saw their plight and took the GIANT in tow for Buffalo where they arrived the following day. For days afterward, other vessels reported the litter of barrel staves floating in the middle of Lake Erie.

At 2:00 a.m., 04 June 1891, in heavy fog, the NORTHERN QUEEN (steel propeller freighter, 299 foot, 2,476 gross tons, built in 1889, at Cleveland, Ohio) struck the schooner FAYETTE BROWN (wooden schooner, 178 foot, 553 gross tons, built in 1868, at Cleveland, Ohio) about ten miles off Dummy Light on Lake Erie. The BROWN, which was loaded with stone blocks, quickly sank in over 60 feet of water. One of the schooner's crewmen climbed aboard the QUEEN while the others barely had time to scramble up the schooner's masts. Accounts of the accident differ. The schooner's skipper claimed that the NORTHERN QUEEN continued on her journey while the schooner's crew clung to the masts while the skipper of the NORTHERN QUEEN claimed that he tried to find survivors, but lost the wreck in the fog and reluctantly continued on his journey, figuring that there were no survivors. Nevertheless, about an hour after the disaster, the steamer ROBERT MILLS (wooden propeller freighter, 256 foot, 1,790 gross tons, built in 1888, at Buffalo, New York) came along, heard the cries of the unfortunate seamen clinging to the masts and rescued them. No lives were lost.

On 04 June 1881, the OGEMAW (wooden propeller freighter, 167 foot, 624 gross tons) was launched at Simon Langell's yard in St. Clair, Michigan for Mr. Wood & Company of Cleveland, Ohio.

CLIFFS VICTORY sailed on her maiden voyage in ballast from South Chicago, Illinois, in 1951.

On June 4, 1968, the keel for OTTERCLIFFE HALL (Hull#667) was laid at Lauzon, Quebec, by Davie Shipbuilding Co. Ltd., for the Hall Corporation of Canada. Renamed b.) ROYALTON in 1983, c.) OTTERCLIFFE HALL in 1985, d.) PETER MISENER in 1988 and e.) CANADIAN TRADER in 1994. She arrived at Alang, India, for scrapping on January 7, 2005.

EDGAR B. SPEER (Hull#908) was christened on June 4th 1980, at Lorain, Ohio, for the Connecticut Bank & Trust Co., Hartford, Connecticut, managed by the Great Lakes Fleet of the United States Steel Corp., Duluth, Minnesota.

In 1988, IRVING S. OLDS departed Duluth under tow of tug SALVAGE MONARCH, headed for overseas scrapping. She was scrapped by Sing Cheng Yung Iron & Steel Co., in Kaohsiung, Taiwan, scrapping began on November 24, 1988.

June 4, 1940 - Oiler George Riemersma, 50, died of a heart attack while at work on the PERE MARQUETTE 21.

June 4, 1942 - John A. Clancey, 58, general manager of the Grand Trunk Western Railway and president of the Grand Trunk Milwaukee Carferry Co. died suddenly of a heart attack while at his desk in Detroit.

The Port Huron Times reported "The new trim and tidy tug, the P L JOHNSON, built for Capt. Sol Rummage, passed up last night with her first tow. She is of medium size and wears the national colors on her smokestack for which some of the boys call her a floating barber shop."

On 4 June 1859, GENERAL HOUSTON (2-mast wooden schooner, 83 foot, 123 tons, built in 1844, at French Creek, New York) was bound from Port Huron for Buffalo with a load of lumber. During a terrific gale, she missed the mouth of the Grand River near Fairport, Ohio and went on the pier where she broke up. Fortunately no lives were lost. The lighthouse keeper on the pier where she broke up later refused to light the lantern while the wreck was in place for fear of drawing other vessels into it. The U. S. Government quickly contracted to remove the hulk from the channel, but a month later, a storm did the job for free, obliterating the wreck so completely that it was reported to have just "disappeared." June 4th is the anniversary of the famous race between the TASHMOO and the CITY OF ERIE, an exciting race that included many thousands of dollars in wagers, great advance publicity, and the use of many other boats to watch the action along the way. The drama was such that carrier pigeons were released at various times to take the latest updates to waiting newspaper reporters. The CITY OF ERIE won the race in a very close match, and the story has been retold in several books about the Great Lakes.

1961: C.A. BENNETT went aground in the Wiley-Dondero Channel of the Seaway while trying to avoid the REDFERN and was released with her own power.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Jody Aho, Max Hanley, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Russ Plumb, Father Dowling Collection, Historical Collections of the Great Lakes, Ahoy & Farewell II, The Marine Historical Society of Detroit and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Lake Erie breaks all-time high water record

6/4 - Cleveland, OH – Lake Erie last month broke its all-time high water record, set in 1986. The lake in May averaged 574.3 feet over sea level, about 30 inches above normal and 6 inches above the May record, according to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. We’re a quarter-inch above the all-time record, set in June 1986.

The reason? Rain -- in both the Lake Erie watershed and around Lakes Superior, Michigan and Huron.

“The main driver here is precipitation,” said Army Corps spokesman Andrew Kornacki. “What does it look like for the next few weeks, as far as Lake Erie? I don’t know. If we get less rain, water levels are going to start to decline. If we get more rain, water levels are probably going to increase. It’s a little hard to say.”

Boaters and beach goers throughout the Great Lakes have been awed by high water this spring. Beaches have disappeared and water has washed onto roads.

As a whole, the Great Lakes basin has received 28 percent above its normal May precipitation, according to the Army Corps. Lakes Superior and Ontario have also hit records.

But Lake Erie is the highest above its record. The Army Corps predicts Lake Erie will drop 2 inches by July 1. “There’s a lot of water in the system right now,” Kornacki said.

About 92 percent of the water in Lake Erie comes from the upper lakes, through Lake St. Clair and the Detroit River, into Lake Erie. Lake Erie then flows into the Niagara River, into Lake Ontario.

The International Joint Commission can control outflow in the Great Lakes only from Superior and Ontario. But the impact is very small.

 

New Seaway salties for 2019

6/4 - As of May 31, the following new ocean-going vessels transited the St. Lawrence Seaway so far this year: Algonorth, Algoterra, BBC California, BBC Fortune, BBC Tennessee, Chembulk Yokohama, Eider, Gagliarda, Gaïa Desgagnés, HC Melina, Jamno, LS Jamie, Narie, Onego Deusto, Paul A. Desgagnés, Redhead, Sider Bilbao, Topaz I and Tuvaq W. Expected: Industrial Skipper, Patalya and Turquoise I

René Beauchamp

 

Port Reports -  June 4

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day’s news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known).

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
A busy Monday in Duluth started with Walter J. McCarthy Jr., which departed at 01:21 with a load of ore from CN. Later in the morning, American Century arrived at 06:44 to load coal at Midwest Energy; Federal Kivalina came in from anchor at 06:57 for a load of wheat from Riverland Ag; and John G. Munson was inbound at 07:40 with limestone for the C. Reiss dock. James R. Barker spent most of the day at anchor before arriving at 16:59 to load at Canadian National. She had been waiting for the Joseph L. Block, which was unloading stone there. The Block shifted over to Hallett #5 at about 17:30 to load a partial cargo of blast furnace trim, and American Century was outbound from SMET at 17:35. John G. Munson was expected to shift to the gravity dock at CN on Monday evening to load ore once she finished unloading. Also in port was Federal Mackinac, offloading cement at CRH. In Superior, American Spirit arrived at 02:20, loaded iron ore pellets at BN, and departed at 17:08.

Two Harbors-Silver Bay – Gary A. Putney
Roger Blough departed Two Harbors on June 2nd at 20:41 for Gary. The Edgar B. Speer arrived Two Harbors on June 2nd at 21:03 for South of #2. She departed Two Harbors on June 3rd at 14:06 for Gary. Due Two Harbors on June 4th is the Algoma Spirit. Also due Two Harbors on June 4th is the Joseph L. Block arriving from Duluth after loading a partial cargo of bft at Hallett #5. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay had no traffic on June 3rd and none scheduled on June 4th.

Thunder Bay, ON
Sunday June 2nd: 21:26 CSL St Laurent arrived at Viterra A to load grain. Monday June 3rd: 6:13 tanker Algoscotia weighed anchor and proceeded to Suncor Energy Terminal to discharge petroleum products. 12:54 CCGS Samuel Risley departed the Coast Guard base and exited Thunder Bay. She was moving east along the Canadian north shore. 16:46 Kaministiqua arrived at Richardson Main Terminal to load grain. 20:25 tanker Algoscotia departed Suncor Energy Terminal for Nanticoke.

Alpena, MI – Ben & Chanda McClain
The Alpena arrived in port Monday morning to load cement under the silos at Lafarge. Manitowoc was the second vessel of the day at Lafarge, tying up before 9 pm to unload cargo at the dock. The research vessel Spencer F. Baird docked in the river Monday evening.

Northern Lake Huron ports

MacGregor Bay:
Monday;14:00 Algoma Compass arrived at Fisher Harbour to unload salt.

Alpena:
Monday; 6:25 The cement carrier Alpena arrived to load and departed at 11;06 FOR Green Bay. 20:00 Manitowoc arrived to unload.

Stoneport:
Monday; 5:04 Olive L Moore arrived to load and at 18:43 departed down bound on Lake Huron.

Calcite:
Monday; 8:07 H Lee White arrived to load. 10:17 Joyce L Vanenkevort arrived to load.

Cheboygan:
Monday; 8:27 The tug Michigan and its barge arrived to load petroleum.

Port Dolomite:
Monday; 8:07 Cason J Callaway departed for Marine City.

Drummond Island:
Monday 16:51 Cuyahoga arrived to load limestone.

Thessalon:
Monday; 3:28 after loading gravel Mississagi departed for Windsor.

Detroit-Rouge River – Raymond H
Monday Arrivals: Herbert C Jackson-arrived at AK Steel to unload ore. Sharon M I and Barge Huron Spirit-arrived at Nicholson's Ecorse Terminal to unload. John J Boland-arrived at the Waterfront Petroleum Terminal to fuel.

Fairport OH – John Unterwagner
American Courage was unloading stone at the Osborne dock on a sunny Monday afternoon. The lake water is over the top of the boat ramps at Fairport.

Northwest Ohio Ports – Bill Kloss
6/3 arrivals: American Integrity to Conneaut, American Courage to Fairport Harbor, Sea Eagle II to Cleveland and Victory/Maumee to Marblehead. 6/3 departures: John J. Boland from Cleveland and Algoma Buffalo to Thessalon from Cleveland.

Welland Canal and vicinity vessel report for Monday June 3 – Barry Andersen

Nanticoke:
arrivals - Jun 2 - Algoma Sault at 2246 - Jun 3 - Algocanada at 2103 - departed - May 3 - Sten Arnold (Gib) at 0208 for Sarnia

Welland Canal:
upbound - Jun 2 - Manitoulin at 1455, Algoma Conveyor at 1826 and Florence Spirit at 1856 - Jun 3 - Whitefish Bay at 0139, CSL Welland at 0511, Happy River (Nld) at 0644, Algoma Niagara at 0754, CCGS Pierre Radisson at 0826 (going to Heddle DD at Port Weller), Rt Hon Paul J Martin at 1222, CSL Niagara at 1534 and NACC Argonaut at 2123

downbound - May 2 - Algoma Guardian at 1150, Federal Danube (Mhl) at 1245, Mamry (Bhs) at 1345, CSL Tadoussac at 1445 - Jun 3 - HC Melina (Atg) (ex Flinterschelde-11) at 0923, Tecumseh at 0943, G3 Marquis at 1721, Arsland (Mlt) at 1938 and tug Petite Forte & St Marys Cement at 2058

Welland Canal docks:
docked - Jun 3 - Manitoulin at 0227 (stopped wharf 12) and CCGS Pierre Radisson at 1430 approx (entered north dock at Heddle DD, Port Weller)

Port Weller anchorge:
anchored - May 28 - Patras (Mlt) (ex Gan-Sword-10) at 2350 - Jun 3 - Federal Danube (Mhl) at 0310, Mamry (Bhs) at 0317 and HC Melina (Atg) (ex Flinterschelde-11) at 2110 - departed - Jun 3 - Gaia Desgagnes at 0900 back to Bronte and Mamry (Bhs) at 1910 and Federal Danube (Mhl) at 2133 eastbound

Hamilton:
arrivals - Jun 4 - Agoma Discovery eta 0030 - docked - May 24 - Hinch Spirit (ex Topaz I-19 at 2106 - Jun 1 - Federal Schelde (Bds) at 1100 and tug Leonard M & Niagara Spirit as 2306 - Jun 2 - Robert S Pierson at 0620, Federal Kumano (Mhl) at 0759, Jun 3 - Brant (Cyp) at 0530 - departures - Jun 3 - Algoma Niagara at 0237 and Rt Hon Paul J Martin at 1000,

Bronte:
docked -Jun 3 - Gaia Desgagnes at 1052 from Port Weller anchorage - departed Jun 1 - Paul A Desgagnes at 2248 - Jun 3 - Sarah Desgagnes at 0903 - both eastbound

Toronto:
arrivals - Jun 2 - USCG Biscayne Bay at 2114 (headed to Baltimore, MD for refit) - docked - May 31 - Redhead ii (Atg) (ex Bora-19, Hermann Schoening-15) at 0440

Oshawa:
docked - Jun 1 - Juno (Bhs) at 0657

Rochester, NY – Tom Brewer
McKeil Spirit departed at 20:00 Monday for Picton, ON.

 

Coast Guard to hold change of command ceremony

6/4 - Cleveland, OH – The U.S. Coast Guard is scheduled to hold a change-of-command ceremony for its 9th District, which encompasses the five Great Lakes, the St. Lawrence Seaway and eight states in the surrounding region, at Windows on the River, downtown Cleveland, Thursday afternoon. Vice Adm. Scott Buschman, Commander, Coast Guard Atlantic Area, will preside over the ceremony to transfer command of the 9th District from Rear Adm. Joanna Nunan to Rear Adm. Donna Cottrell.

USCG

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  June 4

In 1955, J. L. MAUTHE established a new Great Lakes cargo record for a coal cargo delivered to an upper lakes port. She loaded 18392 tons of coal at the Toledo C&O dock.

1943, BENJAMIN F. FAIRLESS, Captain Harry Ashby, delivered a record cargo of 19343.5 net tons of iron ore at Cleveland. The ore was loaded at Two Harbors, Minnesota.

In 1947, the Canada Steamship Lines steamer EMPEROR, loaded with ore and bound for Ashtabula, hit the rocks off Isle Royale at 4:10 a.m. The vessel sank within minutes but the crew was able to launch 2 lifeboats. Captain Eldon Walkinshaw, First Mate D. Moray, and 10 other crew members drowned when one of the lifeboats overturned. Twenty-one other survivors were rescued by the U.S.C.G. cutter KIMBALL.

On 04 June 1872, while carrying wooden barrel staves from Bay City, Michigan to Buffalo, New York, the bark AMERICAN GIANT encountered rough weather off Port Stanley, Ontario, on Lake Erie. Heavy seas carried off her deck cargo of 25,000 staves and the vessel became waterlogged. As the crew considered abandoning, the steamer MENDOTA saw their plight and took the GIANT in tow for Buffalo where they arrived the following day. For days afterward, other vessels reported the litter of barrel staves floating in the middle of Lake Erie.

At 2:00 a.m., 04 June 1891, in heavy fog, the NORTHERN QUEEN (steel propeller freighter, 299 foot, 2,476 gross tons, built in 1889, at Cleveland, Ohio) struck the schooner FAYETTE BROWN (wooden schooner, 178 foot, 553 gross tons, built in 1868, at Cleveland, Ohio) about ten miles off Dummy Light on Lake Erie. The BROWN, which was loaded with stone blocks, quickly sank in over 60 feet of water. One of the schooner's crewmen climbed aboard the QUEEN while the others barely had time to scramble up the schooner's masts. Accounts of the accident differ. The schooner's skipper claimed that the NORTHERN QUEEN continued on her journey while the schooner's crew clung to the masts while the skipper of the NORTHERN QUEEN claimed that he tried to find survivors, but lost the wreck in the fog and reluctantly continued on his journey, figuring that there were no survivors. Nevertheless, about an hour after the disaster, the steamer ROBERT MILLS (wooden propeller freighter, 256 foot, 1,790 gross tons, built in 1888, at Buffalo, New York) came along, heard the cries of the unfortunate seamen clinging to the masts and rescued them. No lives were lost.

On 04 June 1881, the OGEMAW (wooden propeller freighter, 167 foot, 624 gross tons) was launched at Simon Langell's yard in St. Clair, Michigan for Mr. Wood & Company of Cleveland, Ohio.

CLIFFS VICTORY sailed on her maiden voyage in ballast from South Chicago, Illinois, in 1951.

On June 4, 1968, the keel for OTTERCLIFFE HALL (Hull#667) was laid at Lauzon, Quebec, by Davie Shipbuilding Co. Ltd., for the Hall Corporation of Canada. Renamed b.) ROYALTON in 1983, c.) OTTERCLIFFE HALL in 1985, d.) PETER MISENER in 1988 and e.) CANADIAN TRADER in 1994. She arrived at Alang, India, for scrapping on January 7, 2005.

EDGAR B. SPEER (Hull#908) was christened on June 4th 1980, at Lorain, Ohio, for the Connecticut Bank & Trust Co., Hartford, Connecticut, managed by the Great Lakes Fleet of the United States Steel Corp., Duluth, Minnesota.

In 1988, IRVING S. OLDS departed Duluth under tow of tug SALVAGE MONARCH, headed for overseas scrapping. She was scrapped by Sing Cheng Yung Iron & Steel Co., in Kaohsiung, Taiwan, scrapping began on November 24, 1988.

June 4, 1940 - Oiler George Riemersma, 50, died of a heart attack while at work on the PERE MARQUETTE 21.

June 4, 1942 - John A. Clancey, 58, general manager of the Grand Trunk Western Railway and president of the Grand Trunk Milwaukee Carferry Co. died suddenly of a heart attack while at his desk in Detroit.

The Port Huron Times reported "The new trim and tidy tug, the P L JOHNSON, built for Capt. Sol Rummage, passed up last night with her first tow. She is of medium size and wears the national colors on her smokestack for which some of the boys call her a floating barber shop."

On 4 June 1859, GENERAL HOUSTON (2-mast wooden schooner, 83 foot, 123 tons, built in 1844, at French Creek, New York) was bound from Port Huron for Buffalo with a load of lumber. During a terrific gale, she missed the mouth of the Grand River near Fairport, Ohio and went on the pier where she broke up. Fortunately no lives were lost. The lighthouse keeper on the pier where she broke up later refused to light the lantern while the wreck was in place for fear of drawing other vessels into it. The U. S. Government quickly contracted to remove the hulk from the channel, but a month later, a storm did the job for free, obliterating the wreck so completely that it was reported to have just "disappeared." June 4th is the anniversary of the famous race between the TASHMOO and the CITY OF ERIE, an exciting race that included many thousands of dollars in wagers, great advance publicity, and the use of many other boats to watch the action along the way. The drama was such that carrier pigeons were released at various times to take the latest updates to waiting newspaper reporters. The CITY OF ERIE won the race in a very close match, and the story has been retold in several books about the Great Lakes.

1961: C.A. BENNETT went aground in the Wiley-Dondero Channel of the Seaway while trying to avoid the REDFERN and was released with her own power. Data from: Skip Gillham, Jody Aho, Max Hanley, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Russ Plumb, Father Dowling Collection, Historical Collections of the Great Lakes, Ahoy & Farewell II, The Marine Historical Society of Detroit and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

All five Great Lakes now at record high water levels

6/3 - The water levels of all five Great Lakes surged to all-time May records and will continue to rise. Lake Ontario shows a spectacular rise ... up 18" in the last month. Ontario is up 24 inches in the last year and is 34" above the average May level.

Lake Superior is up 5" in the last month (nearly 3 trillion gallons of water added to the lake in just one month - from rainfall and snowmelt). The lake is up 11" in the last year and is now 18" higher than the May average and 3" higher than the previous record high level for the month of May.

The water level of Lake Michigan/Huron is up 9" in the last month, up 13" in the last year and is now 32" above the May average level. The lake is now 1" higher than the previous May record level of 1986, and is expected to continue to rise another several inches in the next month.

Lake Erie is up 6" in the last month, up 9" year-to-year and is now 32" higher than the May average level. It's now 5" higher than it has ever been in the month of May.

High water is a mostly good thing for Great Lakes shipping, as we don't need to dredge as much and ships can carry more weight (ride lower in the water). However, it means boaters have to be cautious. Objects (like logs) that are usually above the water may now be just below the water and hard to see. The high water means beach erosion that may threaten some homes and cottages. It also means less beach to play on. High water on Lake Michigan means high water on the smaller connected lakes like Lake Macatawa, Muskegon Lake and Mona Lake and on rivers that empty into the lake. It also means that moderate winds will push waves over the breakwaters (which you need to avoid during windy days, especially here in late spring when the water is quite cold (and it's colder than average due to the cloudy and cool weather pattern we've had.

Many rivers that empty into the Great Lakes are running at close to double average flow: Grand River at Grand Rapids 7,400 cubic feet per second (average is 3,690 cfs). Kalamazoo River at Comstock 1,800 cfs vs. avg. 924 cfs. The Saginaw River at Saginaw 7,050 cfs vs. avg. 4,240 cfs. The Fox River at Green Bay 9,260 cfs vs. 4,340 cfs. The St. Clair River 247,000 cfs vs. avg. 189,000 cfs. The rain we're getting now will only make rivers go up.

View the charts at this link: https://www.woodtv.com/weather/bill-s-blog/all-five-great-lakes-now-at-record-high-water-levels/2042988731

 

Port Reports -  June 3

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day’s news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known).

Duluth-Superior
Walter J. McCarthy Jr. arrived Duluth at 01:19 Sunday morning to load iron ore pellets at CN. Philip R. Clarke departed at 04:56 for Two Harbors after offloading limestone, and Paul R. Tregurtha was outbound with coal from SMET at 07:48. Federal Mackinac came in at 10:35 with an unusual load of powdered cement for CRH. Joseph L. Block was due late Sunday night with limestone for CN, and the McCarthy is expected to depart from CN early Monday morning. Federal Kivalina remained anchored outside the harbor, and is expected to arrive early Monday to load grain. In Superior, Baie Comeau arrived at 10:00 Sunday to load at BN, and had been expected to depart around 20:00 but was still at the dock at that time.

Two Harbors-Silver Bay – Gary A. Putney
Algoma Enterprise arrived Two Harbors on June 2nd at 00:13 for South of #2 (shiploader). She departed Two Harbors on the 2nd at 10:58 for Quebec City. Roger Blough arrived Two Harbors at 00:28 on the 2nd for North of #2 lay-by. The Blough departed Two Harbors on the 2nd at 10:50 for the lake so the Clarke could shift from South of #1 to North of #2 so it could load pellets. The Blough got underway at 11:10 and arrived back at Two Harbors at 11:21 on the 2nd for South of #2. As of 19:45 on the 2nd the Blough was still at the shiploader. The Philip R Clarke arrived Two Harbors on May 2nd at 06:38 for South of #1 to load bft. She then shifted from #1 to North of #2 between 10:15 and 10:30 so it could load pellets. It then shifted from 12:50 to 13:18 from #2 to North of #1 so it could finish loading bft. It then departed Two Harbors on the 2nd at 17:40. As of 19:30 it didn't have an updated AIS. Due Two Harbors on either May 3rd or 4th is the Joseph L. Block that is due Duluth late on May 2nd to unload stone. After she unloads stone she will load a partial load of bft at Hallett #5 before heading to Two Harbors to finish off with pellets. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay had no traffic on May 2nd and none scheduled on May 3rd. Note: I try to be as accurate as possible on times, but most are approx.

Thunder Bay, ON
Saturday June 1st: 21:40 Federal Caribou departed Thunder Bay Terminals for Montreal. Sunday June 2nd: 12:19 CCGS Samuel Risley departed the Coast Guard base to lay nav aids in Thunder Bay harbor. 20:19 CCGS Samuel Risley returned to the Coast Guard base. Expected late Sunday: CSL St Laurent. Expected for Monday: Kaministiqua.

Northern Lake Huron ports

Alpena:
Saturday; 20:08 G L Ostrander arrived to load cement products and departed Sunday at 1:34 for Detroit.

Calcite:
Saturday; 22:05 John G Munson departed for Duluth Superior.

Port Dolomite:
Sunday; 1:30 American Mariner arrived to load and departed at 17:31 for Duluth Superior. 21:30 Cason J Callaway arrived to load

Spragge:
Sunday; 8:24 John D Leitch departed and has gone to anchor in the St Marys River off of Drummond Island.. 9:31 Mississagi weighed anchor and proceeded to the dock to unload limestone and departed at 14:27 for Thessalon.

Thessalon:
Sunday; 17:58 Mississagi arrived and went to anchor.

Port Inland:
Sunday; 2:12 Calumet departed for Holland. 2:13 Undaunted arrived to load and departed at 6:22 for Holland.

Tawas City, MI
Sam Laud was loading at the National Gypsum Dock in Alabaster Twp (Tawas City) on Sunday.

Detroit-Rouge River – Raymond H
Sunday Arrivals: Herbert C Jackson-arrived at Zug Island to unload coal. Dorothy Ann/Pathfinder-arrived at the Waterfront Petroleum Terminal to fuel. GL Ostrander/Integrity-arrived at Lafarge to unload cement. Damia Desgagnes-arrived at the Waterfront Petroleum Terminal to load/unload.

Rochester, NY – Tom Brewer
McKeil Spirit was unloading at Lehigh Cement on Sunday.

Welland Canal and vicinity vessel report -Sunday June 2 - by Barry Andersen

Nanticoke:
docked - May 31 - Sten Arnold (Gib) at 1301 and Edwin H Gott at 0241- departed - Jun 2 Edwin H Gott at 1840 westbound

Port Colborne anchorage:
anchored - Jun 2 - USCG Biscayne Bay # 404 at 0005 - departed Jun 2 - at 0728 for the canal

Welland Canal:
upbound - Jun 1 - tug Everlast & Norman McLeod at 1357, Damia Desgagnes at 1455, Acadia Desgagnes at 1651, Pearl Mist (Mhl) at 1710 and Qikiqtaaluk W at 2307 - Jun 2 - Algoma Sault at 0718, Victory II (Mhl) (ex Sea Discoverer-18, Clipper Discoverer-09, Coastal Queen 2-09, Cape Cod Light-07) at 1355, Manitoulin at 1455, Algoma Conveyor at 1826 and Florence Spirit at 1856

downbound - Jun 1 - tug Leo A McArthur & John J Carrick at 1616, ALgoma Harvester at 1656 and Spruceglen at 2024 - stopped wharf 16 - Jun 2 - Sloman Hera (Atg) at 0248, Rt Hon Paul J Martin at 0312, Iver Bright at 0607, tug Wilf Seymour & Alouette Spirit, USCG Biscayne Bay at 0752, tug Albert & Margaret at 0650, Algonorth at 1018, Federal Dee (Mhl) at 1028, Algoma Guardian at 1150, Federal Danube (Mhl) at 1245, Mamry (Bhs) at 1345, CSL Tadoussac at 1445

Welland Canal docks:
docked - Jun 1 - Spruceglen - stopped wharf 16 at 2057 - departed Jun 2 at 2100 approx. downbound

Port Weller anchorge:
anchored - May 26 - Patras (Mlt) (ex Gan-Sword-10) at 2350 from Hamilton - Jun 1 - Gaia Desgagnes at 2052 from Bronte - Jun 2 - Lubie (Bhs) at 1314 and Iver Bright (Nld) at 1633 - departed - Jun 2 - Iver Bright (Nld) at 2300 and Lubie (Bhs) etd 2359

Hamilton:
arrivals - Jun 2 - Robert S Pierson at 0620, Federal Kumano (Mhl) at 0759, Rt Hon Paul J Martin at 1813 - anchored - May 31 - Brant (Cyp) at 1250 - docked - May 24 - Topaz I (Pan) at 2106 - (renamed Hinch Spirit on May 28th at Hamilton for McKeil Marine) - Jun 1 - Algoma Niagara at 0142, Federal Schelde (Bds) at 1100 and tug Leonard M & Niagara Spirit as 2306 - departures - May 2 - Shoveler (Cyp) at 0640 for Ireland, Algoma Conveyor at 0635 and Florence Spirit at 1640,

Bronte:
docked -Jun 1 - Sarah Desgagnes at 2309 - departed Jun 1 Paul A Desgagnes at 2248 eastbound

Clarkson:
arrival - Jun 1 - Robert S Pierson at 2039 - departed Jun 2 at 0534 for Hamilton

Mississauga:
departed - Adfines Sea (Mlt) (ex Osttank Norway-12) dock at 0634 - anchored Jun 2 at 0247 - departed anchorage at 0713 for the Netherlands

Toronto:
arrivals - Jun 2 - Whitefish Bay at 1211 - docked - May 31 - Redhead ii (Atg) (ex Bora-19, Hermann Schoening-15) at 0440 - departed Jun 2 - NACC Argonaut at 0949, Lubie (Bhs) at 1122, Algoma Sault at 0547

Oshawa:
docked - Jun 1 - Juno (Bhs) at 0657

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  June 3

On 03 June 1882, the schooner C. BELL was launched at the yard of Mason, Corning & Company in East Saginaw, Michigan. Her dimensions were 185 feet x 30 feet x 11 feet, and she cost $20,000.

JOHN B. AIRD was christened in 1983, at Thunder Bay for Algoma Central Marine, Sault Ste. Marie, Ont.

After successfully completing her sea trials on June 3, 1951, CLIFFS VICTORY entered service for Cleveland Cliffs Steamship Co., a little under six months from the time she was purchased from the U.S.M.C.

PATERSON (Hull#113) of the Port Arthur Shipbuilding Co. Ltd., entered service for N.M. Paterson & Sons Ltd., on June 3, 1954, by carrying 440,000 bushels of wheat from Port Arthur, Ontario. She was scrapped at Thunder Bay, Ontario in 1985.

On 3 June 1870, T.F. PARK (wooden side-wheeler, 170 foot, 450 tons, built in 1851, at Chatham, Ontario) caught fire and burned to the waterline at the dock near the Detroit & Milwaukee Grain Elevator at Detroit, Michigan. The hull was later removed after being struck by several vessels.

On 3 June 1875, the iron carferry HURON (238 foot, 1,052 gross tons) was launched at Point Edward, Ontario for the Grand Trunk Railway. Miss Jessie S. Hughes of Toronto christened the vessel with a bottle of wine. The hull's iron plates were manufactured in Scotland and shipped to Point Edward where they were assembled. Work began on 12 August 1874. Her engine and boiler were built at Dundas, Ont. This vessel ran between Windsor and Detroit for over a century. Her hull is still in existence, submerged in the old Great Lakes Engineering Works slip in River Rouge, Michigan.

1911: The passenger steamer NORTH WEST was gutted by a fire while fitting out at Buffalo. The hull remained idle until it was cut in two in 1918 for a tow to saltwater, but the bow section sank in Lake Ontario. The stern was rebuilt on the St. Lawrence as MAPLECOURT and returned to the lakes, again in two sections, in 1922.

1923: WILLIAM B. SCHILLER and HORACE S. WILKINSON collided in Whitefish Bay. The former was anchored when hit on the port side at #5 hatch. The SCHILLER’s captain pulled up the hook and raced for shore so as to sink in shallow water. It went down in about 40 feet and was salvaged on July 2.

1940: JOHN J. RAMMACHER and WILLIAM A. REISS (ii) collided just after midnight beneath the Blue Water Bridge at Sarnia-Port Huron and both ships were damaged.

1999: HOPE I lost power in the Seaway while downbound with wheat and stranded above Morrisburg. The hull was holed and the ship was released with the aid of tugs on June 5. The ship first came inland as a) NOSIRA MADELEINE in 1983 and returned as c) HOPE I for the first time in 1993, and then as d) HOPE in 2004. It was last reported as f) H. PIONEER in 2011.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Historical Collections of the Great Lakes, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Port Reports -  June 2

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day’s news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known).

Duluth-Superior
Michipicoten departed Duluth at 03:11 Saturday morning with a load of iron ore pellets from Canadian National. Philip R. Clarke was inbound at 12:32 with limestone for C. Reiss, and Algoma Enterprise followed a few minutes later laden with salt for Compass Minerals. Both vessels will depart for Two Harbors once they finish unloading, likely late Saturday or early Sunday. Paul R. Tregurtha was inbound at 19:30 Saturday evening to load coal at Midwest Energy. Federal Kivalina was anchored outside the harbor, and is waiting to load grain at Riverland Ag. At the Superior entry, Alpena departed at 09:57 after unloading powdered cement at Lafarge, and Mesabi Miner departed at 19:23 with a load of ore from BN.

Two Harbors-Silver Bay – Gary A. Putney
CSL Assiniboine departed Two Harbors on May 31st at 20:39 for Quebec City. Presque Isle arrived Two Harbors shortly before the CSL Assiniboine departed. The PI arrived at 19:45 for North of #2 gravity dock where she loads between 10-25,000 tons before she shifts to the shiploader. She departed on June 1st at 07:56 for Conneaut. Due Two Harbors late on June 1st is the Roger Blough. Due Two Harbors on June 2nd is the Philip R. Clarke after she unloads stone at the C. Reiss dock in West Duluth. Also due is the Algoma Enterprise after she unloads salt at the Compass Minerals dock in Duluth. The Edgar B. Speer is also due later in the day.

Thunder Bay, ON
Saturday June 1st: 1:09 G3 Marquis departed Superior Elevator for Baie Comeau. 14:38 saltie Helena G departed Viterra A for Montreal. 21:07 tanker Algoscotia arrived and went to anchor. Expected for Sunday: CSL St Laurent.

Northern Lake Huron ports

Alpena:
Saturday; 3:33 Cuyahoga departed for Drummond Island.

Stoneport:
Friday; 21:48 Olive L Moore arrived to load and departed on Saturday at 9:39 down bound on Lake Huron.

Calcite:
Saturday; 6:34 John G Munson arrived to load. 13:48 Victory and James L Kuber departed for Ashtabula.

Port Dolomite:
Saturday; 5:01 Joseph L Block arrived to finish loading and departed at 9:29 for Duluth Superior.

Drummond Island:
Saturday; 11:46 Cuyahoga arrived to load and departed at 19:39 for Sombra.

Spragge:
Saturday; 3:42 John D Leitch arrived to unload slag.

Meldrum Bay:
Saturday; 21:49 Algoma Buffalo departed for Cleveland. 22:44 Algoma Innovator arrived to load dolomite. Saturday; 12;00 Great Republic arrived and went to anchor. 16:38 Algoma Innovator departed down bound on Lake Huron. 17:30 Great Republic weighed anchor and proceeded to the loading dock.

Port Inland:
Friday; 18:46 Joseph L Block departed for Port Dolomite to finish loading. 22:33 Mississagi arrived to load and departed on Saturday at 7:72 for Spragge. Saturday; 11:02 Wilfred Sykes arrived to load and at 17:30 departed for Indiana Harbor.17:54 Calumet; arrived to load limestone.

Detroit-Rouge River – Raymond H
Saturday Arrivals: Algonova-arrived at Nicholson's Detroit Terminal (odd dock for this vessel). Hon. James L Oberstar-arrived at AK Steel to unload ore.

Welland Canal and vicinity vessel report -Saturday June 1 – Barry Andersen

Nanticoke:
docked - May 31 - Sten Arnold (Gib) at 1301 - departed - Jun 1 - Algosea at 1114 westbound

Welland Canal:
upbound - May 31 - sailing vessel Lettie G Howard at 1345, Victory I (Bhs) passenger ship (ex Saint Laurent-16, Sea Voyager-15, Cape May Light-09) at 2043, Algoma Spirit at 2339 - Jun 1 - Harbour Fashion (Por) at 0050, tug Petite Forte & St Marys Cement at 1248, tug Everlast & Norman McLeod at 1357, Damia Desgagnes at 1455, Acadia Desgagnes at 1651, Pearl Mist (Mhl) at 1710 and Qikiqtaaluk W eta 2300

downbound - May 31 - Algoma Conveyor at 1911 - Jun 1 - tug Leonard M & Niagara Spirit at 1028, tug Leo A McArthur & John J Carrick at 1616, ALgoma Harvester at 1656 and Spruceglen at 2024 - Jun 2 - CCGS Biscayne Bay eta 0020 - delayed

Welland Canal docks:
docked - May 25 - CSL Tadoussac - stopped wharf 16 at 2230

Port Weller anchorge:
anchored - May 26 - Patras (Mlt) (ex GanSword-10) at 2350 from Hamilton - May 31 - Carolus Magnus (Bds) (ex SCT Breithorn-17, MCT Breithorn-16, HLL Celtic-07) at 1919 from Hamilton - departure - Jun 1 Carolus Magnus (Bds) eastbound - at 2300 approx.

Hamilton:
arrivals - Jun 1 - Algoma Niagara at 0142, Florence Spirit at 0517 and Algoma Conveyor at 1050 - anchored - May 31 - Brant (Cyp) at 1250 - docked - May 24 - Topaz I (Pan) at 2106 - (renamed Hinch Spirit on May 28th at Hamilton for McKeil Marine) - May 29 - Shoveler (Cyp) at 1550 - departures - May 31 - Federal Sakura (Mhl) at 1106 for Liverpool, U.K. and Carolus Magnus (Bds) (ex SCT Breithorn-17, MCT Breithorn-16, HLL Celtic-07) at 1715 for Port Weller anchorage

Bronte:
arrival - May 31 - Paul A Desgagnes at 0739

Clarkson:
arrival - Jun 1 - Robert S Pierson at 2039

Mississauga:
docked - May 26 - Adfines Sea (Mlt) (ex Osttank Norway-12) at 1109

Toronto:
arrivals - Jun 1 - NACC Argonaut at 0246, Algoma Sault at 1821 - docked - May 31 - Lubie (Bhs) at 0938, Redhead ii (Atg) (ex Bora-19, Hermann Schoening-15) at 0440 - departed May 31- Victory I (Bhs) passenger ship (ex Saint Laurent-16, Sea Voyager-15, Cape May Light-09) - 1844 for the canal

Oshawa:
arrival - Jun 1 - Juno (Bhs) at 0657 - departed - Jun 1 - Harbour Fountan (Por) at 0640 eastbound

Rochester, NY – Tom Brewer
McKeil Spirit was unloading at Lehigh Cement on Saturday.

 

Updates -  June 2

Saltie Gallery updated with pictures of the Adfines Sea, Alamosborg, Arneborg, Arsland, Brant, Carlos Magnus, Federal Biscay, Federal Caribou, Federal Danube, Federal Kivalina, Federal Mackinac, Federal Sakura, Federal Schelde, Federal Yukina, Finnborg, Furuholmen, Gagliarda, Greenwing, Happy River, Harbour Fountain, HC Melina, Hinch Spirit, Johanna G, Mamry, Narie, Patras, Pearl Mist, Redhead, Shoveler, Sloman Hera, Sunda, Topaz I, Tuvaq W and Vitosha.

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  June 2

June 2, 1958, the Liberian-flagged freighter MOUNT DELPHI sank enroute to Karachi, Pakistan. She was built by the British American Shipbuilding Company at Welland, Ontario, during the final years of World War I. She had 12 different owners during her career and had been seized by Vichy interests at Casablanca, Morocco, in 1940, and then by the Italian government in 1942.

On June 2 , 1893, CORSICAN (wooden schooner, 112 foot, 210 gross tons, built in 1862, at Olcott, New York) was carrying coal from Cleveland, Ohio to St. Ignace, Michigan, on a foggy night on Lake Huron. She collided with the iron steamer CORSICA and sank quickly off Thunder Bay Island. All six onboard went down with her. The wounded CORSICA was beached near Ossineke, Michigan, was later patched and proceeded to Ashtabula, Ohio.

In 1973, the SYLVANIA, downbound light in fog, collided with the FRANK PURNELL just north of the Detroit River Light at 05:23 hours. The SYLVANIA suffered minor bow damage and went to Toledo for repairs.

On 2 June 1855, J.W. BLAKE (wooden scow-schooner, 68 foot, 33 tons, built in 1853, at Dover, Ohio) was carrying lumber in a storm four miles off Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin, when she capsized. Her crew escaped in her yawl, but it was a very close call for one who was asleep below decks when she capsized. The vessel was later recovered and put back in service.

June 2, 1988 - The CITY OF MIDLAND 41 took on 17 truckloads of lake trout, which were planted off Beaver Island.

On 2 June 1882, INDUSTRY (wooden schooner, 63 foot, 30 tons, built in 1847, at Michigan City, Indiana) capsized and sank just a half-mile from South Haven, Michigan. The three crewmen clung to the wreck for a while as rescue attempts were made from shore, but they all perished. The wreck later drifted to the beach about five miles south of town and went to pieces.

1943: The W.W. HOLLOWAY and HARRY WM. HOSFORD collided in foggy lower Whitefish Bay and the latter steamer had to be beached at Point Iroquois to avoid sinking.

1958: WAR RACCOON was built at Welland in 1919. It was sailing under Liberian registry as l) MOUNT DELPHI when it hit a rock and was beached at Grand Island, near Mormugao, India, on a voyage from Mouimein, Burma, to Karachi, Pakistan. The ship was a total loss.

1968: CASTALIA, a Greek flag freighter, struck the north pier of the Mackinac Bridge, in dense fog and made a small gouge in the structure. The ship was holed and leaking but cleared to proceed to Chicago. It was on its first trip through the Seaway and was later scrapped as c) NEW ENGLANDER after arriving at Bilbao, Spain, on July 4, 1973.

1978: The bulk carrier ARCTIC was christened in a ceremony at Port Weller Dry Docks in St. Catharines.

1981: The sidewheel Toronto Island ferry TRILLIUM was unable to stop in time at the mainland dock. It struck the restaurant ship NORMAC and the latter sank two weeks later.

2000: ALGOWOOD buckled amidships while loading stone at Bruce Mines. The hull was patched, strengthened, refloated and towed to Port Weller Dry Docks to be lengthened and repaired.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Jody Aho, Max Hanley, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Historical Collections of the Great Lakes, Ahoy & Farewell II, The Marine Historical Society of Detroit and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Port Reports -  June 1

Port reports are compiled from reader observations and AIS transmissions. Please send information about vessel arrivals and departures from your port to news@boatnerd.net by 9 p.m. (Eastern) nightly for them to be included in the next day’s news. Please include name of vessel, arrival time, day and dock it went to (if known).

Duluth-Superior
Indiana Harbor departed Duluth at 06:31 Friday morning with a load of coal for St. Clair, and Alpena was inbound at 06:57 to discharge cement at Lafarge. During the evening, Michipicoten came in at 17:43 to load iron ore pellets at CN. She is expected to depart early Saturday. Also of note, the Arthur M. Anderson, which is in drydock at Fraser Shipyards undergoing a refit, is now transmitting an AIS signal for the first time in more than two years. She will re-enter service later this year when her work is complete. In Superior, American Integrity departed at 12:45 Friday with a load of iron ore from Burlington Northern, and Mesabi Miner arrived at 19:02 to load.

Two Harbors-Silver Bay – Gary A. Putney
Lee A. Tregurtha departed Two Harbors on May 31st at 08:17 for Indiana Harbor. Arriving Two Harbors on May 31st at 08:38 for South of #2 was the CSL Assiniboine. As of 19:30 on the 31st she was still loading, but was showing a Quebec City destination. Due Two Harbors around 20:00 on May 31st is the Presque Isle. Due Two Harbors on June 1st is the Roger Blough. Other potential arrivals on June 1st are the Algoma Enterprise and the Philip R. Clarke. The Enterprise is due the Twin Ports with salt and the Clarke with stone. June 2nd is probably when they will arrive Two Harbors. The Clyde S. VanEnkevort/Erie Trader departed Northshore Mining in Silver Bay on May 30th at 23:22 for Indiana Harbor. Northshore Mining had no traffic on May 31st and none scheduled for June 1st.

Thunder Bay, ON
Friday May 31st: 17:02 Federal Caribou arrived at Thunder Bay Terminals to load. 18:39 CCGS Samuel Risley arrived at the Coast Guard base. Expected for Saturday: tanker Algoscotia.

Owen Sound, ON – Paul Martin
The barge Medusa Challenger arrived in the early morning of May 30th and departed at 15:00 in the afternoon after delivering cement to the Miller Elevators of the east harbor wall in the port of Owen Sound. This was the first shipment of the new season for Miller Elevators.

Northern Lake Huron ports

Alpena:
Friday; 17:05 Samuel De Champlain departed for Milwaukee. Cuyahoga arrived to unload road salt from Goderich.

Stoneport:
Friday ; 1:07 Philip R Clarke departed for Duluth Superior.

Calcite: Friday;
1:56 Cason J Callaway departed for Buffington. 10:15 Victory and James L. Kuber arrived to load.

Meldrum Bay:
Friday; 8:40 Algoma Buffalo arrived to load limestone.

Thessalon:
Thursday, 20:11 Frontenac departed for Windsor.

Port Inland:
Friday; Joseph L Block arrived to load limestone.

Detroit-Rouge River – Raymond H
Friday Arrivals: American Spirit-arrived at the Waterfront Petroleum Terminal to fuel. Sam Laud-arrived at Zug Island to unload coal.

Northeast Ohio Ports – Bill Kloss
5/31 arrivals: Joyce L. VanEnkevort to Lorain, Hon. Paul J. Martin to Sandusky 5/31 departures: CSL St. Laurent from Ashtabula to Thunder Bay and John G. Munson to Calcite.

Cleveland, OH – Bill Kloss
5/30 arrivals: Herbert C. Jackson to Arcelor Mittal Steel, Finnborg to the Port dock 24E and State of Michigan to dock 26. 5/30 departures: American Spirit to Two Harbors

Rochester, NY – Tom Brewer
McKeil Spirit arrived at about 18:30 Friday for Lehigh Cement.

Oswego, NY – Ned Goebricher
Friday McKeil Spirit unloaded cement.

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  June 1

On 01 June 1903, ISAAC ELLWOOD (steel propeller freighter, 478 foot, 5,085 gross tons, built in 1900, at W. Bay City, Michigan) broke the record for ore when she carried a cargo of 8,579 tons out of Duluth harbor. This broke the record held by JOHN SMEATON (steel barge, 458 foot, 5,049 gross tons, built in 1899, at Superior, Wisconsin), which was 8,571 tons of ore.

ASA CHILDS (wooden scow schooner, 125 foot, 204 gross tons, built in 1866, at Mentor, Ohio) was carrying lumber in a storm on Lake Michigan when she was driven ashore at Highland Park just north of Chicago, Illinois on 01 June 1879, and was a total loss. The crew escaped in the lifeboat.

On 01 June 1914, the St. Joseph-Chicago Steamship Company bought the EASTLAND (steel propeller passenger steamer, 265 foot, 1,961 gross tons, built in 1903, at Port Huron, Michigan) from the Eastland Navigation Company for $150,000.

In 1943, IRVING S OLDS collided with the 524 foot steamer CHARLES O. JENKINS in heavy fog 28 miles northeast of Cleveland on Lake Erie and was holed eight feet above the water line. The OLDS was able to help the badly damaged JENKINS back to Cleveland by lashing the two vessels together. After a grueling seven hours the JENKINS was beached in the outer harbor to prevent her from sinking. The OLDS was repaired in time to carry a new record of 17,817 gross tons of iron ore on June 13, 1943. In 1952, the steamer J.L. MAUTHE (Hull#298) was launched at Great Lakes Engineering Works, River Rouge, Michigan, for the Interlake Steamship Co.

The WHITEFISH BAY, loaded with 950,000 bushels of spring wheat, was honored as she carried the billionth metric ton of cargo through the Eisenhower Lock in 1983.

On June 1, 1907, the Great Lakes Engineering Works launched the bulk steamer WILPEN (Hull#28) at Ecorse, Michigan, for the Shenango Steamship Co., a subsidiary of Shenango Furnace Co., Cleveland, Ohio. Renamed b.) DAVID P. THOMPSON in 1926, and converted to a self-unloader in 1957, at Superior, Wisconsin. She was renamed c.) JOSEPH S. YOUNG in 1969, and scrapped at La Spezia, Italy in 1979.

H. LEE WHITE departed Sturgeon Bay in ballast on her maiden voyage for the American Steamship Co., on June 1, 1974, to load iron ore at Escanaba, Michigan for Indiana Harbor.

June 1, 1902 - While northbound for Manistique, Michigan, the ANN ARBOR NO 1 went aground in a heavy fog about noon on South Manitou Island, but was able to free herself and to proceed undamaged.

June 1, 1938 - PERE MARQUETTE 21, under the command of Captain Arthur Altschwager, was released from a sand bar in the outer harbor at Manitowoc at 1:06 p.m. today after being aground for six hours. Her sister ship, the PERE MARQUETTE 22, commanded by J.F. Johnson, freed the ferry after taking a line and pulling the big ship back off the bar.

June, 1958, The ANN ARBOR NO 6 was taken out of service for extensive refitting. She was renamed b.) ARTHUR K. ATKINSON.

On 1 June 1887, LUCINDA VAN VALKENBURG (wooden schooner, 129 foot, 302 gross tons, built in 1862, at Tonawanda, New York) collided with the iron steamer LEHIGH in fog and sank near Thunder Bay Island on Lake Huron. The crew was safely taken aboard the LEHIGH and brought to Port Huron.

On 1 June 1892, the steel bulk freighter CHOCTAW was launched at the Cleveland Shipbuilding Company (Hull #17) in Cleveland, Ohio for the Lake Superior Iron Company. Her dimensions were 207 feet x 38 feet x 18 feet and she had a triple expansion steam engine 17 feet, 29 inches, 47 inches x 36 inch stroke. She was built as "monitor" type vessel based on whaleback design with all her cabins aft. She lasted until sunk in a collision in 1915.

1923: The barge BROOKDALE of Canada Steamship Lines was sunk near Montreal after a collision with MAPLEDAWN. The wooden hulled vessel, originally the schooner MORAVIA, was refloated and scrapped.

1943: A collision on foggy Lake Superior between BATTLEFORD and PRINDOC sank the latter off Passage Island. All on board were saved from the downbound, wheat-laden bulk carrier of the Paterson fleet.

1944: The first NEWBRUNDOC had been built at Toronto in 1921 and had previously sailed as CANADIAN ENGINEER and b) DONALD E.McKAY. The ship became f) SAVLATORE in 1934 and, with the outbreak of war, was now the enemy. It was bombed and sunk by British aircraft as part of a German convoy in the Aegean Sea and all hands were lost.

1966: RIO ALTO, a Liberty ship, came to the Great Lakes under Liberian registry in 1963. It developed leaks on the Pacific while enroute from Manati, Puerto Rico, to China as d) AKTOR and sank on this date 860 miles SSW of San Diego, CA in 1966.

1967: RENVOYLE struck the docked SYLVANIA while turning at Port Huron and the latter sank against the dock. The former, a C.S.L. package freighter, received bow damage and was laid up and then sold for scrap. SYLVANIA was refloated, repaired and returned to service.

1979: GEORGES HERBERT, a wooden goelette that occasionally came to the Great Lakes, sank in the Gulf of Mexico while carrying a cargo of corn.

2011: CANADIAN RANGER, under tow on the St. Lawrence, got spun around 180 degrees by a wind gust above the Iroquois Lock and had to be towed through the lock stern first before being realigned below the lock. It reached the scrap yard at Aliaga, Turkey, on July 13, 2011.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Historical Collections of the Great Lakes, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.


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